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date: 28 January 2020

(p. 633) Index

(p. 633) Index

8 1/2 (Fellini)
film within a film in, 563–565
Guido’s memories as “series of completely gratuitous episodes” in, 560–561
Guido’s redemption in, 566–567
photo stills from, 561–566
priming and, 571
suffering transfigured into aesthetic bliss in, 562–563
The 158-Pound Marriage (Irving), 186–187
The 400 Blows (film), 490
Abbott, Porter, 86, 144, 583
Abel, Elizabeth, 125
Ablow, Rachel, 96
Adaptation (Kaufman), 559
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (Twain), 189–190
Advice to a Young Investigator (Rámon y Cajal), 515
Aeschylus, 314
aesthetic experience
bidirectionally focused states and, 253–254, 257–259
brain’s default model network and, 252–259
memory and, 254–255
physical manifestations of, 252
sensory detail and, 246–247, 252
Wordsworth’s description of, 257–258
Affective Narratology (Hogan), 280
Against the Grain (Huysmans), 93
Ainslie, George, 371, 380–383
Alas, Leopoldo. See La Regenta (Alas)
Aldama, Frederick Luis
cross-cultural comparisons conducted by, 352
illusory liberation and, 330
materialist critique of mainstream postcolonial theory by, 330–333, 340
allegory
cartoons and, 159
definition of, 24
Spenser’s Faerie Queene as, 24–26
Allen, Woody, 572
American Beauty (film), 497
“American Debtor’s Prison” (Wahl), 164–166, 168, 170
Amnesty International, 340
Andreason, Nancy, 235–236
Anna Karenina (Tolstoy)
Anna’s argument with her husband in, 549
Anna’s railway car described in, 588–589
Kitty Shcherbatskya described in, 585–587
Levin’s animals in, 585
Levin’s mowing scene in, 584
Nabokov and, 588–589
Oblonsky awakening from a dream in, 588
Oblonsky’s affair with the governess in, 583
Oblonsky’s dining on oysters in, 581–582, 588–589
opera house scene in, 587–588
reality effect and, 581–589
Vronsky’s steeplechase scene and, 584–585, 587–588
Ansons, Tamara, 250–251, 255
Antony and Cleopatra (Shakespeare), 27
Appalachian Trail, 237
Aristotle
anagnorisis (recognition) and, 489
catharsis and, 315, 317, 319, 444, 449
On Generation and Corruption and, 21
On the Heavens and, 21
on imagination and command of metaphor, 228
Metaphysics and, 21
Meteorology and, 21
natural philosophy of, 20–24
Nicomachean Ethics and, 24
“occult” phenomena and, 21, 23
(p. 634) peripeteia (dramatic reversals), 489–490
Physics and, 21
Poetics and, 228, 313, 315–316, 489
on theater and emotion, 315–317, 319
on tragedy and sequencing, 378
on understanding of complex things through simple things, 397
Armstrong, Isobel, 600–602, 605
“Art as Technique” (Shklovsky), 615
Artaud, Antonin, 318–319
Aspects of the Novel (Forster), 203
Astington, Janet Wilde, 188–190, 193n52
Asturias, Miguel Angel, 549
As You Like It (Shakespeare), 19
At Swim Two Birds (O’Brien), 560
attribution theory, 137
Augustine
on “loving to love,” 374
on marriage, 166
on theater and emotion, 316, 318
Austen, Ben, 293
Austen, Jane
Catherine of the Bower and, 55
cognitive historicist readings of, 63
concentration represented by, 55–56
decision theory analysis of fiction by, 384–385
Emma and, 474, 476
game theory interpretations of, 373
hindsight bias and, 474, 476
literary neuroscience study of, 56–64, 66–67, 69–72
Mansfield Park and, 58–62, 66–67, 70–72, 183, 373
naive characters depicted by, 448
Northanger Abbey and, 65, 234, 384–385
Persuasion and, 55, 58–61, 63, 66–67, 69–70
pleasure reading represented by, 65
Pride and Prejudice and, 55, 97, 126
autism
disability studies and, 393–394, 397
empathy and, 396, 408–409
perceptual processing of speech and, 403–404
poetry and, 393–396, 398, 402–405, 409
switch from sensing to interpretation and, 395, 397, 401
synesthesia and, 396, 405–406, 408–409
visuospatial processing and, 398–400
Autism and Sensing: The Unlost Instinct (Donna Williams), 394, 401
The Autobiography of My Mother (Kincaid), 354
Auyoung, Elaine, 3, 572
Bachelard, Gaston, 19
back-to-front processing of time, 594, 596, 604, 606
Bacon, Francis, 48
Baggs, Amanda, 394, 403
Bakhtin, Mikhail, 93
Balázs, Béla, 297–298, 300, 306
The Balcony (Genet), 560
Baldanzi, Jessica, 426
The Band (music group), 149
Bare, Bobby, 141, 153
Barsalou, L.W., 402
Barthes, Roland, 581, 589
Batson, Daniel C., 441–442, 498n1
Bauerlein, Mark, 517
The Beach Boys, 149
Beckett, Samuel, 377–378, 560
Before Reading (Rabinowitz), 96
Bellamy, Ralph, 377
bent straw illusion, 567–568
Berlin, Brent, 16
Berman, Russell, 457n42
Bersani, Leo, 199
Bérubé, Michael, 5n10
Best Laid Schemes (Oatley), 283
Bhabha, Homi, 329, 334–335, 337
Big Brother and the Holding Company, 149
The Big Sleep (Chandler), 85
The Big Sleep (film directed by Howard Hawks), 373
“Big Two-Hearted River” (Hemingway), 107–109, 115, 116n11
Bilandzic, Helena, 527, 531
Binder, Jeffrey, 41–42, 46, 49
Bin Laden, Osama, 476
Bissonnette, Larry, 394
Black, Ira, 66
Black, Shameem, 352
Blackburn, Elizabeth, 510
“Black Girl” (song), 145. See also “Where Did You Sleep Last Night?” (Lead Belly)
Blade Runner (film), 299, 309n38
(p. 635) Blair, R.J.R., 408
Blajenkova, Olessia, 513
Bleak House (Dickens), 581
blending
in cartoons, 155–158, 160–170
as a cognitive resource, 160–161
definition of, 160
dynamic versus static forms of, 169
humor and, 164, 169
imagination and, 225–226, 228–230
incongruity and, 158, 164, 169
input spaces and, 161–162, 168, 603
metaphors and, 160–162, 168, 229
spatial poetics and, 603–605
Wordsworth and, 603–605
Blind Chance (Kieslowski), 492–497
Blood Meridian (McCarthy), 178
Bloom, Paul, 568
Boardwalk Empire (television program), 483–485
Bogart, Humphrey, 373–374
Bogdashina, Olga, 395, 398, 402
Booth, Wayne, 447
Bordwell, David, 294–295, 307n11, 493
Bortolussi, Marisa, 4, 71–72, 77n60, 111, 543, 550–553
Bostocke, Richard, 24
bottom-up processes of cognition, 486, 583, 594
Bourgois, Philippe, 422–423, 429
Bousset, Jacques-Bénigne, 320
Boyd, Brian, 2, 5n5, 5n10, 402. See also Literary Darwinists
Brann, Eva, 226–227
Brauckmann, Sabine, 516
Breath, Eyes, Memory (Danticat), 352–353
Brecht, Bertolt
alienation effects and, 318
The Caucasian Chalk Circle and, 323–324
epic theater and, 317–319, 354
readers’ engagement with, 528
Verfremdung and, 571
Brock, Timothy C., 528, 535–536
Bromwich, David, 626
Brooks, Christopher, 47
Brooks, David, 464
Brother, I’m Dying (Danticat), 353
Brown, Dan, 530
Brown, Joseph Emerson, 145
Bruhn, Mark, 3–4, 229–230, 238
Bruner, Jerome, 583
Bürger, Gottfried, 619, 626
Burke, Edmund, 159
Burke, Kenneth, 86, 93
Burns, Ed, 422–423
Burns, Robert, 620
Burris, Roy, 147–148
Busselle, Rick, 527, 531
Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (film), 111
Butler, Judith, 199, 334–336
Butler, Octavia, 340
Butte, George, 87
Bybee, Joan L., 111
The Byrds (music group), 149
Caleb Williams (Godwin), 234
Calvino, Italo, 559
Cameron, Euan, 47, 49
The Canterbury Tales (Chaucer), 477–478
Cantos (Pound), 597
“Captain Shigemoto’s Mother” (Tanizaki), 213–214
Carey, Susan, 20
Carpenter, Patricia A., 545
Carroll, David, 525
Carroll, Joseph, 329
Carroll, Noël, 294–295, 298, 303–304
Carruthers, Mary, 238
cartoons
allegory in, 159
allusion in, 165
blending in, 155–158, 160–170
caricatures compared to, 159–160
definition of, 159
drawings compared to, 159
as genre, 158–160
ideology in, 157–158
implied narratives in, 157–158, 168–170
metaphors and, 160, 162–165
narratology and, 158
semantic conjunction and, 161
signaling in, 156
Casablanca (film), “La Marseillaise” scene in, 86–87
(p. 636) “The Cask of Amontillado” (Poe), 532
Castel of Health (Elyot), 23
Catch-22 (Heller), 92
categorization theory, 17, 20, 27
catharsis, 315, 317, 319, 444, 449
Catherine of the Bower (Austen), 55
The Caucasian Chalk Circle (Brecht), 323–324
Cavanagh, Patrick, 583
Cela-Conde, Camilio, 256
Cervantes, Miguel de, 234, 448
Chakrabarty, Dipesh, 352
Chancery Court, 47–48
Chandler, Raymond. See The Long Goodbye (Chandler)
Chaplin, Charlie, 299
Chappatte, Patrick, 155–158, 162, 170
character narration, 121–122, 124, 127
Charon, Rita, 506
Chaucer, Geoffrey, 477–478
Chekhov, Anton, 92, 97–98, 283, 369, 582
“Children of the Sea” (Danticat), 353
children’s acquisition of metacognitive concepts, 188–189, 193n52
Chouard, Tanguy, 41
A Christmas Carol (Dickens), 545
Cid (Corneille), 323
City Lights (Chaplin), 299, 309n38
Clarín. See La Regenta (Alas)
Clarissa, or The History of a Young Lady (Richardson), 123–124, 445, 454
Cloze tests, 594, 607n1
Cobain, Kurt, 145
Coetzee, J.M., 572
cognitive hermeneutics, 18
cognitive historicism
Aristotelian natural philosophy and, 20–22, 24
“book of nature” trope and, 22
categorization theory and, 17, 20, 27
cognitive hermeneutics and, 18
cognitive linguistic theory and, 17–18
early modern medicine and, 23–24
epistemological shifts and, 19–20, 22–27
polysemic words and, 17, 19
reciprocity between literary history and neuroscience and, 63, 69, 72–73
symptomatic reading and, 18
on “Temperance” concept in Spenser’s Faerie Queene, 23–26
cognitive linguistic theory, 17–18
cognitive literary studies
cognitive disability studies and, 3
“computer” model of the brain and, 16
consilience with science and, 2
early modern literature and, 15
Literary Darwinists and, 2, 5n5, 5n10, 16
resistance to, 16
resistance to unified theory in, 1–2, 4–5n3, 4n3
Richardson’s definition of, 1
cognitive model of learning, 35–36, 46, 49–50
Cohen, Jonathan, 533
Cohn, Dorrit, 203, 208, 210
Coleridge, Samuel Taylor
blending theory and, 229
circle of fire illustration of, 599
on consciousness and its conceptualization, 604
conversation poems of, 233, 237–238
“Frost at Midnight” and, 233–234
on imagination as a “synthetic and magical power,” 228
Lyrical Ballads and, 595, 600, 614, 616, 618–627
“The Nightingale” and, 233, 619
Notebooks and, 597
“Reflections on Having Left a Place of Retirement” and, 233
spatial poetics and, 597–600, 605–606
“This Lime Tree Bower My Prison” and, 237–238
on the “transmutation of the succession of Time into the juxtaposition of Space,” 598–599
Wordsworth and, 597–598, 603, 626
Collins, Jackie, 283
concentration
Austen’s representation of, 55–56, 63
Enlightenment notions of, 64–66, 68
fMRI readings and, 56–57, 70
Samuel Johnson on, 56, 66
conceptual integration theory. See blending
Confessions (Augustine), 316
Confessions of a Mask (Mishima), 209
Conrad, Joseph, 97, 140
Constantine, Mary-Ann, 146
contempt, anger, and disgust (CAD) hypothesis, 428–429, 432
(p. 637) Corneille, Pierre, 323
The Corner: A Year in the Life of an Inner-City Neighborhood (Burns), 422–423
Costa, Pedro, 490
The Counterfeiters (Gide), 559, 572
country-and-western music. See also specific songs
cheating songs and, 140, 151
cognitive narratology and, 150–152
fictional minds approach to, 137–138
Naipaul on, 150
Charlie Parker on, 136, 153
segmentation and, 136–137
social mind approach to, 146, 152
Coviello, Peter, 200–201
The Crack-Up (Fitzgerald), 374
Crawford, Richard, 152–153
Create Dangerously (Danticat), 352, 358
“Credulity, Superstition, and Fanaticism” (Hogarth), 159
Cruelty and Laughter (Dickie), 349
Cuklanz, Lisa M., 423–425, 429
Culler, Jonathan, 515–517, 542, 553
curiosity, Enlightenment notions of, 64
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime (Haddon), 393
Damasio, Antonio, 17, 41, 114–115, 617
Danby, John, 625
Dancygier, Barbara, 155, 160
Danger and Purity (Douglas), 303
Danielewski, Mark Z., 107
Danticat, Edwidge
Breath, Eyes, Memory and, 352–353
Brother, I’m Dying and, 353
“Children of the Sea” and, 353
Create Dangerously and, 352, 358
The Dew Breaker and, 353
Eight Days: A Story of Haiti, 353, 357–358
Haitian characters and subjects of, 352–353, 355, 357–358
Krik? Krak! and, 352
narrative empathy and, 347, 350, 353–355, 357–358
“Night Women” and, 353, 355
Darley, John M., 498n1
Darwin, Charles, 293, 297, 386n2
Daston, Lorraine, 64
Davidson, Donald, 372
The Da Vinci Code (Brown), 530
Davis, Mark, 355
Dawson, Michelle, 397
Deacon, Terence, 160
Dead Snow (film), 431
Dean, James. See James Dean Effect
Deathtrap (Levin), 321–322
De bono coniugali (Augustine), 166
Debussy, Claude, 93
decision theory
appetite satisfaction and, 379, 381–385
game theory and, 371–374, 386–387n13
hyperbolic discounting and, 372, 380, 382
intertemporal bargaining and, 3, 370–371, 380, 382–383, 385
literary emotions and, 370–371
Newcomb’s paradox and, 371
No Country for Old Men and, 369–370
preference ordering and, 376–385, 387n23
recursive nature of, 372, 375
relative probabilities and, 374–376
subjective probability and, 371, 386n6
de Graaf, Anneke, 71, 527, 532, 534
de Grouchy John Walter, 211, 218n45
Dehaene, Stanislas, 63, 66
Deleuze, Gilles, 376
DeMaria, Robert, 56
Demme, Jonathan. See Silence of the Lambs
The Demons (Dostoyevsky), 91
Denis, Michel, 509
Dennett, Daniel, 122
Derrida, Jacques, 17, 509
Der Schrei der Natur (Munch), 497
Desai, Rutvik, 41–42, 46, 49
DeWall, Nathan, 471
The Dew Breaker (Danticat), 353
Dexter (television program)
murder and, 421, 425, 430–431, 434
rape and, 422, 430–431
revenge in, 430–431, 434
Diary of a Bad Year (Coetzee), 572
Dickens, Charles, 545, 581
Dickie, Simon, 349
Diderot, Denis
on distraction, 68
(p. 638) on the emotional state of actors, 320
engagement with reader in Jacques the Fatalist of, 559, 572
“Didn’t You Get My Email?” (cartoon), 168–170
Die Hard (film), 491
Diener, Ed, 492–493, 495–497
Digital Humanities and Literary Cognition (DHLC) lab, 72
The Distinction of Fiction (Cohn), 203
Distraction (Phillips), 56
“The Divide” (Tagore), 337, 342
Dixon, Peter, 4, 71–72, 77n60, 111, 543, 550–553
Doctor and Student (Saint German), 48
Doctor Zhivago (film), 490
Doležel, Lubomír, 104, 106, 108
Dombey and Son (Dickens), 383
Don Quixote (Cervantes), 234, 448, 476
Doppo, Kunikida, 205–206
Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 512, 532
Dougherty, Bob, 57
Douglas, Mary, 303
Doyle, Arthur Conan, 97
drama. See theater
Dreaming by the Book (Scarry), 227, 507–508
Dream of the Red Chamber (Cao Xueqin). See The Story of the Stone (Cao Xueqin)
Duck, Stephen, 620
duck/rabbit figure, 123, 133n11
Dudai, Yadin, 238
The Dunciad (Pope), 66
Dunker, A. Keith, 40
duration neglect, 487–488, 490, 492, 496–497
Durocher, Leo, 374
Duvalier, François “Papa Doc,” 353
Dylan, Bob, 149
dynamic equilibria, 42–43
Eagleman, David, 469, 472–473
early modern medicine, 23–24
Easterlin, Nancy, 2–3, 237, 381, 384
Edelman, Gerald, 35
Edelman, Lee, 199, 202
Effi Briest (Fontane)
advocative exploitative empathy and, 454
empathic sadism and, 451–455, 457n42
Fassbender’s film adaptation of, 453
implicated reader and, 448, 453–454
Eight Days: A Story of Haiti (Danticat), 353, 357–358
Ekman, Paul, 302
Elective Affinities (Goethe), 446, 454
Eliot, T.S., 112–113, 597
Elizabeth I (queen of England), 48
Ellesmere, Lord, 48
Elyot, Thomas, 23
embodied abstraction, 41–42
Émile (Rousseau), 444
Emma (Austen), 474, 476
emotion
aversive simulation and, 279–280
cognitive science and, 273–274
critical period particularizations and, 280–281
diary records of, 275
emotionally effective errors in literature and, 275
emotional memories and, 280–281
film close-ups and, 292–294, 296–297
functional preferences and, 277
group divisions in literature and, 276–277
innate triggers and, 280–281
laboratory experiments measuring, 275
literary tragedies and, 279
literature’s ability to increase knowledge of, 280
literature’s explicit statements about, 275
literature’s representations of, 274–277
narrative universals and, 280
sharing of, 279–280
theater and, 313–324
empathy. See also narrative empathy
advocative exploitative empathy and, 445–446, 454
autism and, 396, 408–409
definition of, 441–442
Effi Briest and, 451–455
empathic sadism and, 441–455, 457n42
“empathy for empathy’s sake” and, 441–442, 445
failed empathy and, 340, 349, 355–356, 358
fMRI studies of, 456n9
implicated reader and, 441, 453–454
La Regenta and, 446, 448–451, 453
manipulative predictive empathy and, 443
(p. 639) postcolonial theory and, 339–343, 347–349, 352–355, 358–359
predictive (self-empowering) empathy and, 442–444, 446, 454
retributive pain empathy and, 443
“sadistic benefactor” and, 444–446
self-focused vicarious empathy, 442, 446
theater and, 324
victims’ families viewing of executions and, 440–441
Empson, William, 249
Encyclopédie (Diderot), 68
Endgame (Beckett), 560
Engelsing, Rolf, 65
English Matrimonial Causes Act of 1973, 166
The Enlightenment
concentration and, 64–66, 68
curiosity and, 64
distraction and, 66, 68
moral theories and, 431–432
neuroscience and, 56
“reading revolution” in, 65
scientific revolution and, 19–20
entropy, 34, 48–49
enzyme catalysis, 39–41, 46
The Epistemology of the Closet (Sedgwick), 201–202
equity court. See Chancery Court
Espaces mentaux (Fauconnier), 603
Esrock, Ellen, 227, 506–507
“Evolution of Imagination” (Mithen), 236
exceptionality thesis, 203–204, 208
Exit the King (Ionesco), 560
Exton, Andrew, 165–168, 170
facial feedback hypothesis, 296
The Faerie Queene (Spenser), 15, 23–27
failed empathy, 340, 349, 355–356, 358
Fanny (Feydeau), 619
Fanon, Frantz, 329, 351
Farhadi, Asghar, 110
Fassbinder, Rainer Werner, 453
Fauconnier, Gilles
blending theory and, 155, 161–162, 228–229, 603–605
mental spaces and, 603
on time as space, 604–605
Faulkner, William, 91–92, 97, 236
The Feeling of What Happens (Wordsworth), 606
Fellini, Federico. See 8 1/2 (Fellini)
Female Quixote (Lennox), 234
Feydeau, Ernest-Aimé, 619
Fictional Minds (Palmer), 137, 153
Fielding, Sarah, 444
film theory
cognitive cultural approach to, 293–295, 306
facial expressions and, 293–302, 305
filmmakers as folk psychologists and, 484–487
forking-path narratives and, 493–495
James Dean effect and, 492–493, 496–497
mind-reading and, 293, 296, 298, 306
monsters and, 303–304
peak-end rule and, 488–493, 497–498
peripeteia (dramatic reversals) and, 489–490
point-of-view structures and, 298–299
“scenes of empathy” and, 299
twofoldedness and, 300–301
“The Final Problem” (Doyle), 97
Fischbein, Efraim, 20
Fischer, Emile, 40
Fischhoff, Baruch, 474–475
Fish, Stanley, 248
Fisher, R. A., 373
“Fish Wedding” (cartoon), 162–163
Fiske, Susan, 356
Fitzgerald, F. Scott, 143, 374
Flanagan, Matthew, 490
Flaubert, Gustav
free indirect discourse in the work of, 570
Madame Bovary and, 446, 450–451, 454, 581, 619
narrative perspective of, 621
Flesch, William, 3, 572
Fletcher, C.R., 544
“Florida effect,” 464
Fludernik, Monika, 4, 354
fMRI (functional Magnetic Resolution Imagery)
blood flow to the brain detected by, 58–59, 61–62, 67, 70–71
cognitive historicism and, 64–65
concentration and, 56–57, 70
empathy and trauma narratives and, 72
eye tracking and, 57, 59, 69–71, 77n60
functional connectivity studies and, 69–70
(p. 640) literary neuroscience and, 56–59, 61–62, 64–65, 67–72, 77n60
neuropsychology of emotion and, 68
folk psychology, 297, 307n5, 484–498
Fontane, Theodor. See Effi Briest (Fontane)
Forceville, Charles, 158
Forster, E.M.
Bloomsbury Group and, 211
internalist view of sexuality and, 209
on the minds of fictional characters, 203, 206
on understanding others, 208
Fortier, Mark, 48
Foster, Jerry, 153
Foster, Jodie, 291–292
Foucault, Michel
discourses and, 452
on epistemological shifts of early modern era, 19–20
on sexuality as a historical construction, 200–201
on “visible signatures” in nature, 22
The Four Pennies (music group), 145
Foy, Betty, 626
Frank, Arthur, 394
Frank, Joseph, 597–598, 605
Frank, Robert, 380, 382
French Revolution, 159
Freud, Sigmund
confirmation bias and, 467
on heteronomativity and civilization, 199
hierarchy of psychic systems and, 468
literary theory and, 190
pleasure principle and, 379
the repressed and, 212, 468
unconscious mind and, 465, 467–468
Fried, Michael, 64
Frost, Robert, 409
“Frost at Midnight” (Coleridge), 233–234
fundamental attribution error, 483–484, 498n1
Fuss, Diana, 202–203, 209
Futabatei Shimei, 206
Galen, 21, 23
Galison, Peter, 72
Galton, Francis, 508
Gamer, Michael, 620
game theory, 371–374, 386–387n13. See also decision theory
Gandharva Veda, 313
gaps in storytelling. See narrative gaps
García Márquez, Gabriel, 529
Gatten, Aileen, 213
Gay, John, 66
Genet, Jean, 560
Genette, Gérard, 87–88, 94, 98, 106
Gerrig, Richard, 108, 111, 525
gesaku (printed woodblock fiction of Japan’s Edo period), 205
Gibbs, Raymond W., 506
Gide, André, 559, 563, 572
Gigerenzer, Gerd, 517, 519
Gilbert, Daniel, 275
Gilray, James, 159
Gilroy, Paul, 394
“Gin Lane” (Hogarth), 159
Girl with the Pearl Earring (Vermeer), 273
GLAAD (The Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation), 303
Gladwell, Malcolm, 464
Glanzman, Dennis L., 617
The Godfather (film), 488–489
Godwin, William, 234
Goethe, Johann Wolfgang, 446, 454
Goffman, Erving, 356
The Goldfinch (Tartt), 253
Goldsmith, Oliver, 620
Goldstein, Rebecca Newberger, 514, 518
Gone with the Wind (film), 490
Gone with the Wind (Mitchell), 187
Gonzalez, Rigoberto A., 513
Good Bye, Dragon Inn (Tsai), 490
“Good Ole Boys Like Me” (Don Williams)
aspectual story world in, 151
Bildungsroman quality of, 142–143
full lyrics of, 141
identity construction in, 144, 149
narrator’s mental state in, 143–144, 151
nonrepeated and monosyllabic words in, 139
social cognitive networks in, 152
summary of cultural references in, 142
temporal progression in, 142–143
Gopnik, Alison, 469
Gora (Tagore), 337
(p. 641) Goren, Harriet, 514
Grandin, Temple
cattle industry and, 399
memoirs of, 394, 398
Sacks on, 511–512
visualization of mental imagery and, 398, 506, 511–512, 522n34, 522n48
Grant, Cary, 377
The Grapes of Wrath (Steinbeck), 147
The Grateful Dead, 149
Great Expectations (Dickens), 385
The Great Gatsby (Fitzgerald), 143
Green, Melanie
on cognitive and emotional features of transport, 529
on effects of transport, 532
factor analytic approach of, 536
on feeling of being lost in a book, 57
on multidimensional nature of transport, 528
“Murder in the Mall” case study and, 533
on transport and critical thinking, 530–531
on transport and readers’ adoption of beliefs, 533–535
on transport and surface structures, 529
on transport and visual imagery, 71
transport defined by, 527
transport experiments of, 526, 528, 533–536
Greenblatt, Stephen, 49
The Grey (film), 111
Grodal, Torben, 429
grotesques
definition of, 36–37
in early modern Italy, 37
in revenge plays, 37–39, 43–49
in Shakespeare’s plays, 43–44
Groundhog Day (film), 494
Guillory, John, 58
Guthrie, Woody, 147
Haidt, Jonathan, 428–429, 431–433
Haiti earthquake (2010), 352, 358
Hallwell, Stephen, 489
Halperin, David, 202, 216n12, 530
Hamilton, William, 372–373
Hamlet (Shakespeare), 38, 43–44
Hammett, Dashiell, 91, 94, 373
Harpham, Geoffrey Galt, 36
Harris, Lasana, 356
Harry Potter series (Rowling), 178, 383
Hart, F. Elizabeth, 230
Hartman, Geoffrey, 600, 602, 605
Hastings, Warren, 159
Hauer, Rutger, 299
Hawkes, David, 190
Hawks, Howard, 373, 377
Hawthorne, Nathaniel, 454
Hayles, Katherine, 510, 517, 519
Haywood, Eliza, 66
Hazlitt, William, 235, 238
Heald, Anthony, 301
Heart of Darkness (Conrad), 97, 140
Hedda Gabler (Ibsen), 530
Hegel, G.W.F., 385
Heidegger, Martin, 466, 517
Hemingway, Ernest, 107–109, 115
Hendrix, Jimi, 125
Hentoff, Nat, 153
Herman, David
on classical narratology, 122, 133n9, 203
exceptionality thesis and, 203–204
hypothetical focalization and, 101n26
on intentional systems of stories, 121
Rabinowitz and, 87
on transition from source state to target state, 93
on Woolf, Joyce and interiority, 207
A Hero of Our Time (Lermontov), 92
Herranz, Miguel, 163
hindsight bias, 474–477
His Girl Friday (film), 377
The History of Pendennis (Thackeray), 551–552
Hobbes, Thomas, 48, 233–234, 238
Hogan, Patrick Colm, 87, 278–281, 284–285, 350–352
Hogarth, William, 66, 159
Hogg, James, 620
Holmes, Dennis, 162
Holquist, Michael, 510–512
homeostasis, 34, 49
Homer, 159, 227, 237, 383, 529
homologies, 36, 39, 49, 338
Hopkins, Anthony, 291–292
(p. 642) Hosler, Jay, 514
House of Leaves (Danielewski), 107
Huettel, Scott, 59
Huffer, Lynne, 200
Hühn, Peter, 115
Human Rights and Narrated Lives (Schaffer and Smith), 349
human rights discourse
as a doctrine of universals, 350–351, 358
false empathy and, 356
literary cognitivism and, 347–348
narrative empathy and, 3, 347–350, 355–356, 358–359
postcolonial theory and, 348–349
Hume, David, 469–470
Hunt, Lynn, 349
Hunter, Kathryn Montgomery, 506
Huston, John, 373
Hutchins, Pat, 188–189
Huxley, Aldous, 559–560
Huysmans, Joris-Karl, 93
hyperbolic discounting, 372, 380, 382
Iacoboni, Marco, 351
Ibsen, Henrik, 530
The Idiot (Dostoyevsky), 99
“The Idiot Boy” (Wordsworth), 618, 622, 625–627
“I Don’t Believe in Sex after Marriage” (Exton), 165–168, 170
If on a winter’s night a traveler (Calvino), 559
“I Hate Goodbyes” (song), 153
The Iliad (Homer), 159, 383
“I’ll Change Your Flat Tire, Merle” (song), 149
imagery. See also aesthetic experience
brain’s default model network and, 252–253, 255–258
“bridge test” and, 510–512, 522n34
coherent principles of, 247–249
fMRI studies of responses to, 251–252, 520n1
individuals’ varying visualizations of, 505–520, 520n1
intense aesthetic response to, 251–257
memory and, 251, 255
mere exposure effect and, 261n19
motion and, 248–249
multisensory nature of, 248–249, 255
neuroscience of processing, 508
neuroscience of reading and, 249
object imagery from literary texts and, 513–515
pleasure and, 249–251, 256–258
poets’ and novelists’ experiences with, 517–519
text-driven spatial imagery and, 515–517
visual responses to read words and, 512–513
visual responses to spoken language and, 509–512
imagination
blending and, 225–226, 228–230
brain’s default mode network and, 226, 230–239
daydreaming and, 235–236
definition of, 225
deterrent effect of, 279
episodic future thinking and, 234–235
literary theory on, 226–227
memory and, 232–234, 236–238
mental imaging and, 225–228, 230
navigation and, 236–238
neuroscience studies of brain anatomy and, 226, 231, 234–236, 239
Romanticism and, 225, 232–235, 237–238, 332
synthetic imagination and, 228–230
Imagination and the Meaningful Brain (Modell), 228
Immortality (Kundera), 560
“Immortality Ode” (Wordsworth), 594
induced fit model, 40
Industrial Revolution, 613
Ingarden, Roman, 278, 586
In My Language (Baggs), 403
In Search of Lost Time (Proust)
access to the mind represented by, 85, 87–92, 96, 98–99
cognitive flavor and, 87, 94, 99
discussions on knowing others in, 208–209
internalist view of sexuality and, 209
Judaism and, 89
on knowing others, 208
linkage between memory and aesthetics in, 256
Lolita and, 98
narratology of the moment and, 85–92, 94, 98–99
Nussbaum on, 282
reference to fictiousness of events in, 559
(p. 643) synesthesia and, 93
voyeurism represented in, 90
In Search of Respect: Selling Crack in El Barrio (Bourgois), 422–423, 429
Inside/out: Lesbian Theories, Gay Theories, 202–203, 209
“Interlude of the Four Elements” (Rastell), 22
intertemporal bargaining. See under decision theory
Interview with the Vampire (Rice), 552
Intruder in the Dust (Faulkner), 97
intuition, 20–21, 27
Inventing Human Rights (Hunt), 349
Ion (Plato), 319–320
Ionesco, Eugène, 560
Irving, John, 186–187
Iser, Wolfgang, 447, 542–543, 553
“I would like my love to die” (Beckett), 377–378
Jackson, Stonewall, 141–142
Jacques the Fatalist (Diderot), 559, 572
Jakobson, Roman, 585, 598–599, 605
James, Henry, 104, 106–107, 214
James, William, 386n2, 569, 575–576n24
James Dean effect, 492–493, 496–497
James I (king of England), 48
Jameson, Fredric, 18, 63, 350–351
Janin, Joël, 40
Jauss, Hans Robert, 615–619, 627
Jaynes, Julian, 398, 411n40
Jensen, Deborah, 351
Johnson, Barbara, 58
Johnson, Blind Willie, 136
Johnson, Dan R., 354, 535
Johnson, Mark
cognitive linguistic theory and, 228
cognitive metaphor theory and, 160, 229, 338
on image schemas, 20
Johnson, Samuel
on anticipation, 231–232
on concentration in reading, 56, 66
imagination and, 234, 238
Johnson-Laird, Philip, 338
Joyce, James
Molly Bloom character of, 560
stream of consciousness writing of, 236
Woolf on, 207
Jung, Carl, 468
Just, Marcel Adam, 545
Kagan, Jerome, 350
Kahneman, Daniel
cognitive resources allocation and, 544
on “experiencing self” and “remembering self,” 488
groupthink and, 476
hindsight bias and, 475–476
James Dean Effect and, 492
on “our blindness to our blindness,” 464
peak-end rule and, 487–489, 498
on System 1 and System 2 thinking, 473–474, 487
Kalahari Bushmen, 613–614
Kane, Julie, 396, 399–402
Kant, Immanuel, 253, 432
Kaplan, Stephen, 613, 625
Karatani Kōjin, 204–207
Kashmir, 339
Kaufman, Charlie, 559
Kay, Paul, 16
Kazan, Elia, 296
Keating, Patrick, 489
Keen, Suzanne, 3, 5n10, 340–341
Kesebir, Selin, 431–432
Kieran, Matthew, 431
Kieslowski, Krzysztof. See Blind Chance (Kieslowski)
Kihlstrom, John, 464–465
The Killer (Woo), 300
Kincaid, Jamaica, 354
King Lear (Shakespeare), 27, 380
Kintsch, W., 544
“Klopstock moments,” 90, 96–97
Koshland, Daniel, 40
Kosslyn, Stephen, 249, 507
Kozhevnikov, Maria, 508–509, 513–514, 520
Krakauer, David, 510, 512
Krammick, Jonathan, 5n5, 56
Krik? Krak! (Danticat), 352
Kuhn, Thomas, 19, 525
(p. 644) Kuiken, Don, 619
Kuleshov effect, 296
Kundera, Milan, 560, 572
Kurosawa, Akira, 300, 532
Kyd, Thomas, 37–38, 45–47
LaBerge, D., 543
Lacan, Jacques, 466–467
“Lady with a Dog” (Chekhov), 97–98
Lakoff, George
cognitive linguistics and, 228
cognitive metaphor theory and, 160–161, 229, 338
on image schemas, 17, 20
Landy, Joshua, 3
Lane, Anthony, 107
“Laocoön and His Sons” (sculpture), 158–159
Laokoön (Lessing), 597
La Regenta (Alas)
catharsis and, 449
competition of suitors depicted in, 446–449
Don Alvaro character in, 446–450
Don Fermín character in, 446–448, 450
Donna Ana Ozores character in, 446, 448–451, 454
empathic sadism and, 446, 448–451, 453
implied reader and, 447–449, 453
predictive (self-empowering) empathy and, 454
Larsen, Nella, 122
Latin America, 330, 332, 529–530
Laud, Archbishop William, 48
Laws (Plato), 314
Leach, Edmond, 37
Leboe, Jason, 250–251, 255
Le Carré, John, 549
Le Chiendent (Queneau), 560, 571
L’eclisse (film), 490
Ledbetter, Huddie. See Lead Belly
Lederer, Charles, 377
Lehrer, Jonah, 464
Lemnius, Levinus, 23, 25
Lennox, Charlotte, 234
Lermontov, Mikhail, 92
Les damnés de la terre (Fanon), 329
Lessing, Gotthold, 597–598
Letter to M. D’Alembert on the Theatre (Rousseau), 316–317
Levine, Ted, 302
Levy, Dore J., 187
Lewes, George Henry, 582
Libet, Benjamin, 470
“Lining Track” (song), 114
Lipps, Theodor, 441
Literary Darwinists, 2, 5n5, 5n10, 16.
literary neuroscience
Austen and, 56–64, 66–67, 69–72
brain physiology and, 64, 66
close reading versus pleasure reading and, 57–63, 66–67, 70–72
cognitive historicism and, 63–69
“cognitive load” processing and, 65, 67
concentration and, 56–58, 61, 64, 68, 70–71
fMRI readings and, 56–59, 61–62, 64–65, 67–72, 77n60
neuroplasticicty and, 66, 68–69
Stroop test of directed attention and, 65
Living Theater, 319
Locke, John, 233
Lolita (Nabokov), 86, 98, 123–124
“The Longest Train I Ever Saw” (song), 113, 145–146. See also “Where Did You Sleep Last Night?” (Lead Belly)
The Long Goodbye (Chandler)
narratology of cognitive flavor and, 85
representations of mind-reading in, 88–90, 94–95, 97
tiger trap scene in, 94–95, 101–102n37
Lorre, Peter, 300
lucid dreaming, 570
Lukács, Georg, 332
Luria, Alexander, 401
Lynch, David, 214
Lyrical Ballads (Wordsworth and Coleridge)
preface of, 616, 626
re-presenting the past in, 595
“The Thorn” included in, 600
Madame Bovary (Flaubert)
adultery depicted in, 446
cotton stockings in, 581
Effi Briest and, 451
(p. 645) ironic treatment in, 454
La Regenta and, 450
staying power of, 619
“The Mad Mother” (Wordsworth), 622–627
The Making of Americans (Stein), 549
Mallarmé, Stéphane, 572, 577n39
The Maltese Falcon (film directed by John Huston), 373
The Maltese Falcon (Hammett), 91, 94, 387n20
The Manchurian Candidate (film), 465
Mandler, Jean, 17
“Ma Negresse” (song), 145
Mannoni, Octave, 329
Mansfield Park (Austen)
class politics in, 70–71
Fanny Price as sympathetic character in, 183, 373
literary neuroscience study of, 58–62, 66–67, 70–72
opening chapter of, 59
second chapter of, 59–60, 70–72
Margulis, Lynn, 511, 514
Mark, Gospel of, 113
Markandaya, Kamala, 342–343
Marks, David, 508–509
Martindale, Colin, 613, 615, 619–621
Matsumoto, D., 306
Matthew, Gospel of, 113
McCarthy, Cormac, 178, 369–370
McEwan, Ian, 97
McFarland, Sam, 355–356
McHale, Brian, 136–137
McNeill, Daniel, 297, 305
McRaney, David, 485
McTiernan, John, 491
Measure for Measure (Shakespeare), 97–98
Melville, Herman, 396–397, 406–407, 548
Memento (film), 465
Memmi, Albert, 329
memory formation physiology, 41–42
metabolism. See enzyme catalysis
metaphors
Aristotle on, 228
blending and, 160–162, 168, 229
cartoons and, 160, 162–165
category extension and, 17
cognitive metaphor theory and, 160–161, 229–230, 338
communication of complex phenomena and, 525
of transport, 525–537
Metaphysics (Aristotle), 21
Meteorology (Aristotle), 21
metrarepresentation, 120–121, 123–124
Miall, David, 618–619
Michelangelo, 278
Michigan State University Digital Humanities and Literary Cognition lab, 72
Midnight’s Children (Rushdie), 342
Mill, John Stuart, 432
Milton, John
on desire and satisfaction, 383
equity law and, 48
flash lag effect and, 472–473
Satan depicted by, 258, 375, 469, 473, 478
sensory quality of descriptions by, 246–248
similes and, 473
on tragedy and purging of emotion, 378
The Mind and Its Stories (Hogan), 280
mind-reading. See also theory of mind
film theory and, 293, 296, 298, 306
narratology of the moment and, 88–92, 94–99
representations of in The Long Goodbye, 94–95, 97
In Search of Lost Time in, 5–17
“Recitatif” in, 128
psychological altruism and, 349
Zunshine on, 87–89, 92
The Mind Tree (Mukhopadhyay), 400, 411n24
Mīrābāī, 284–287
mirror boxes, 569
Mishima Yukio, 209
Mist (Unamuno), 560, 571
Mitchell, Margaret, 187
Mitchell, W.J.T., 509
Mithen, Steven, 236
Mittell, Jason, 422, 428, 430
Miyoshi, Masao, 205
Moby-Dick (Melville), 396, 406–407, 414n114, 548
Modell, Arnold, 228
Modern Language Association, 1, 4n2
Molière, 322
Molton, Samuel, 249
Monroe, Bill, 145
(p. 646) Monroe, Vaughn, 491
Monsoon Wedding (Nair), 300
Montaigne, Michel de, 22
Moon, Michael, 214
Moore, Henry, 113–114, 146
The Moral Imagination (Mark Johnson), 229
Moretti, Franco, 65
Morgan, Monique, 598
Mori Ōgai, 209
Morrison, Toni
racial difference represented by, 120, 122–130, 133n11
social minds represented by, 127–132
“triple source” reading and, 124–125, 128–129
unreliable representation by narrators of, 125
Mosjoukine, Ivan, 296
Motes, Michael, 513
Mother Courage and Her Children (Brecht), 528
Mottron, Laurent, 397, 399
Moulin Rouge (film), 490
Movshon, Tony, 510, 513
Mr. Potter (Brecht), 354
Mrs. Dalloway (Woolf), 89, 95, 572
Much Ado about Nothing (Shakespeare), 321
Mukhopadhyay, Tito
coalmining disaster recounted by, 408–409
conversion of verse into prose by, 401–404
Moby-Dick and, 406–407
poetry by, 405
Savarese’s interaction with, 396–397, 402, 407
synesthetic perception and, 405–406, 408–409
visualization of language by, 400, 406–408, 414n113
Mullis, Kary, 152
Munch, Edward, 497
Munsterberg, Hugo, 295–297
Murasaki Shikibu. See The Tale of the Genji (Murasaki)
“Murder in the Mall” (Green case study), 533
Nabokov, Vladimir
Anna Karenina and, 588–589
on Lolita and moments of “aesthetic bliss,” 86
Proust and, 98
similarity to Pale Fire narrator of, 560
sociocognitive complexity in the work of, 178
unreliable narrator in Lolita and, 123–124
Naipaul, V.S., 141, 150
Nair, Mira, 300
The Naïve and the Sentimental Novelist (Pamuk), 589
Nandy, Ashis, 338
Narayan, Venkat, 510, 513
Narrative as Virtual Reality (Ryan), 354
Narrative Discourse (Genette), 87–88
narrative empathy
altruism and, 354–355, 358–359
bounded strategic empathy and, 357
bridge characters and, 353
broadcast strategic empathy and, 357
definition of, 356
human rights discourse and, 3, 347–350, 355–356, 358–359
literary neuroscience and, 356
strategic narrative empathy and, 357
narrative gaps
binding of, 107–108
colliding narratives and, 112–114
Doležel on, 104, 106, 108
ellipsis and, 106
Henry James on, 104, 106
jamming of, 109–112
narrative compression and, 105–106, 111
quantum narrativity and, 104
shadow stories and, 104–108, 110, 114–115, 115n6
stills at the end of films and, 109–111
trauma and, 107–108
narratology of the moment
aftertaste situations and, 94–96
angle and, 89–90, 95
cognitive flavor and, 87–88, 92–98, 216n15
consistency and, 91–92
counterpoint and, 93
depth and, 89
emotional valence and, 89
extensions and, 94, 96
fusion texts and, 96–98
“Klopstock moments” and, 90, 96–97
mode and, 91
multiplicity and, 89
occlusion and, 90–91
“OMG” moments and, 86
patterns and, 96–99
(p. 647) polyphony and, 93
reciprocity and, 89, 92, 96
representations of mind-reading and, 88–92, 94–99
sequence and, 86, 93
“We’ll Always Have Paris” moments and, 86
Nash Equilibrium, 373
Native Son (Wright), 341
Natsume Sōseki, 209
Natya Shastra, 313
Nectar in a Sieve (Markandaya), 342–343
nested mental states
in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, 189–190
computers’ attempts to detect, 186–188
in Romeo and Juliet, 189–190
sociocognitive complexity and, 178
in The Story of the Stone, 177, 179–188, 190
summary description of, 176–177
The Neural Sublime (Alan Richardson), 67
neurobiological materialism, 330–331
neurocosmopolitan approach to poetry, 3, 394–397, 407, 409
Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o, 333, 342
“Nick Adams stories” (Hemingway). See “Big Two-Hearted River” (Hemingway)
Nicomachean Ethics (Aristotle), 24
Nietzsche, Friedrich, 319, 566–567, 574n10
“The Nightingale” (Coleridge), 233, 619
Nightmare on Elm Street (film), 303
“Night Women” (Danticat), 353, 355
Nirvana (music group), 145
Nisbett, Richard, 470
Njogu, Kĩmani, 343n3
Nobody, Nowhere (Donna Williams), 394
No Country for Old Men (McCarthy), 369–370
Nolan, Christopher, 465
Northanger Abbey (Austen), 65, 234, 384–385
Norway, 421
Notebooks (Coleridge), 597
Notes from the Underground (Dostoyevsky), 532
novelty
cognitive conception of, 615–618
defamiliarization and, 615, 617, 620–621, 627
disruption of cognitive propensity for narrative and, 621–622
formalism and, 615–616
habituation and, 617–622
“horizontal change” and, 616–617
literary work’s offering of, 614
Marxist perspective on, 613, 616
meaningfulness and, 619, 621
new environments’ impact on, 614
Pound’s call for, 613
reader response theory and, 615
Nussbaum, Martha
on disgust, 282
on emotions as “intelligent responses to perceptions of value,” 281
on emotions’ role in reasoning, 281, 287
on “good world citizens,” 358
on literature and emotion, 274, 282–283
on love and resentment, 282
Mīrābāī and, 284
“painful self-examination” and, 281–283, 286
on “the ascent of love,” 283
Oatley, Keith, 274, 282–283, 287
object imagery from literary texts, 513–515
O’Brien, Flann, 560
Ochs, Phil, 149
Odd Tablet (commentator on The Story of the Stone), 178–179
The Odyssey (Homer), 237, 529
Oedipus, 321, 323–324
“Okie from Muskogee” (Haggard)
five stages of cultural reception to, 148–149, 152
full lyrics to, 147–148
good ole’ boy attitudes in, 142
group identity and, 150
identity construction in, 144, 149
“implied composer” of, 149–150
nonrepeated and monosyllabic words in, 139
summary of cultural references in, 147
Vietnam War and, 148–149
The Old Man and the Sea (Hemingway), 108
On Chesil Beach (McEwan), 97
One Hundred Years of Solitude (García Márquez), 529
Ong, Walter, 400–401, 404
On Generation and Corruption (Aristotle), 21
online-prominence model
cognitive resources in reading and, 542–545, 547, 553
conscious introspection and, 549–550
(p. 648) diagnostic signals and, 548, 552–553
discourse processing and, 545–546, 549, 552–553
fluctuations in mental capacity over time and, 541–544
“ideal reader” model contrasted with, 542, 553
measuring online prominence and, 550–553
personal reactions and, 545–546
prominence of processing components and, 546–547
reallocation signals and, 548–549, 552
signals determining prominence and, 546–549, 552
story processing and, 545–546, 552–553
On the Heavens (Aristotle), 21
optical illusions, 567–568
“Orange” (Mukhopadhyay), 405
The Order of Things (Foucault), 19–20
Østby, Ylva, 255
Otis, Laura, 2, 228, 505, 520, 528
Paivio, Allan, 508
Pale Fire (Nabokov), 560
palimpsests, 606
Palliser novels (Trollope), 375–377
Palmer, Alan
on crossing narrative fragments in Lead Belly, 113–114
on fictional narrative and mental functioning, 87
intermental units and, 96, 126, 137–138, 210
on internalist and externalist views of consciousness, 121, 126
relationship between fictional and real minds and, 203
on social minds in fiction, 126–127, 134n16, 137
Pamela; or Virtue Rewarded (Richardson), 444–445
Pamuk, Orhan, 589
Parable of the Sower ( Octavia Butler), 340
Paracelsus, 22–24, 26
Paradise Lost (Milton)
flash lag effect and, 472–473
Pandemonium described in, 246–248
Satan depicted in, 258, 375, 469, 473, 478
Park, Katherine, 64
Parker, Charlie, 136, 153
Parsons, Gram, 149
Pascal, Blaise, 369, 381
Passing (Larsen), 122
“Paterson” (William Carlos Williams), 398
peak-end rule
film theory and, 488–493, 497–498
Kahneman on, 487–489, 498
unconscious mind and, 487–493, 497–498
Peau noire, masques blancs (Fanon), 329
Peckham, Morse
on adaptive value of chaos in art, 35–36, 39, 46, 49
on disorder’s incubation against new understanding, 35–36, 43
on the human drive for order, 35–36
Peel, David, 149
Percy, Thomas, 619
Persson, Per, 298–299
Persuasion (Austen)
concentration represented in, 55
literary neuroscience study of, 58, 60–61, 63, 66–67, 70
opening scene in, 55, 69
Peskin, Joan, 188–190, 193n52
Pessoa, Ferdinand, 470
Petals of Blood (Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o), 333
Phelan, James, 86, 136, 447
Philadelphia (Demme), 303
Phillips, Natalie, 15, 548
The Photoplay (Munsterberg), 295–297
Physics (Aristotle), 21
Pierce, Charles Sanders, 467
“Pine Grove Blues” (song), 145
Pinturiccio, 37
Pirandello, Luigi, 560, 572
Plantinga, Carl, 485–486
Plato
on desire and satisfaction, 383
imagination and, 225
Ion and, 319–320
Laws and, 314
mimesis and, 314
on the Muse, 319–320
Republic and, 314–315
Shelley on, 228
on theater and emotion, 313–316, 318–320
(p. 649) Playing by Ear and the Tip of the Tongue (Tsur), 405
Poe, Edgar Allan, 532
Poetics (Aristotle), 228, 313, 315–316, 489
poetry. See also specific works
concrete diction in, 396–397
neurocosmopolitan approach to, 3, 394–397, 407, 409
as “paradoxical language of illiteracy,” 397–402
patterning techniques and, 403–405
Point Counter Point (Huxley), 559–560
The Political Unconscious (Jameson), 18
Pope, Alexander, 66, 620
Porter, Dahlia, 620
Porter, Gerald, 146
Portrait (Don Williams), 143
Portrait du colonisé, précédé par portrait du colonisateur (Memmi), 329
The Portrait of a Lady (James), 104, 106–107
Posner, Jonathan, 68
Postcolonial Melancholia (Gilroy), 394
postcolonial theory
cognitive literary studies and, 3, 329–331, 333, 337–338, 343, 350–352, 358
cognitivist Marxism and, 331
critique of mainstream version of, 330–333
derivative colonialism and, 339
hybridity and, 334–337
identity and, 334–337, 343
in-group and out-group dynamics and, 335–336, 338–339, 341–342
Latin America and, 330, 332
Literary Darwinists and, 5n10
performance and, 334–337
postcolonial neurology and, 394
poststructuralism, post-poststructuralism and, 332–333
psychology and, 329, 333–334, 337
race and, 329, 334, 337–339, 343
resistance to universals and, 350–351
“turn toward the human” and, 352
poststructuralism, 17–18, 27
Pound, Ezra, 112, 597, 613, 615
prefronal cortex, 64, 68
The Prelude (Wordsworth)
creative process discussed in, 603
historically prospective nature of, 598
preface of, 600
science and history of feeling and, 606
spatial form and, 598
spots of time in, 594, 596–597, 601–603
The President (Asturias), 549
“President’s Daily Briefing” (August 6, 2001), 476
Price, George R., 372–373
Pride and Prejudice (Austen), 55, 97, 126
Prince, Dawn, 394
Prinz, Jesse, 428–429
Prior, Matthew, 620
“Prison” (Heranz), 163–164
Prometheus (Scriabin), 93
Propp, Vladimir, 98
psychoanalysis, 18, 27, 199–200
psychoanalytic unconscious, 463–468
Psychologie de la colonisation (Mannoni), 329
“Psychology and Form” (Burke), 86
“Psychology’s Missing Contexts” (Kagan), 350
Ptolemy, 21
Pure Prairie League, 149
Pynchon, Thomas, 376
quantum narrativity, 86, 104
Quarles, Philip, 559
queer theory
AIDS epidemic and, 199, 202
“Axiom #1” (Sedgwick) and, 202, 206, 208
cognitive queer theory and, 3, 199–200, 202, 208–210, 213, 215
on desire as the copying of the desires of others, 214
homophobia and, 202, 303
inside/out question and, 200–204, 208–209, 213–215
interiority in Japanese literature and, 204–207, 209–210
psychoanalysis and, 199–200
Queneau, Raymond, 560, 571
Rabinowitz, Peter J., 121–122, 132, 212, 216n15
Radway, Janice, 96
(p. 650) Ramazani, Jahan, 394
The Rambler (Samuel Johnson), 231–232
Ramón y Cajal, Santiago, 514–515
Raney, Arthur A., 427–428, 430, 433
rape. See also under specific works
Bourgois on the normalcy of rape in street culture and, 422–423
contempt, anger, and disgust (CAD) hypothesis and, 428–429
in detective and cop fiction, 423–425
masculine gender role socialization and, 423, 425
moral disgust and, 421, 427–431
narrative function of in antihero dramas and, 422–427, 430–431, 434
real life versus fiction and, 421, 428, 431, 434
repulsive rapist figure and, 421, 427–428, 434, 435n9
revenge and, 426–428
Rashomon (Kurosawa), 532
Rasselas (Samuel Johnson), 231
Rastell, John, 22
The Reader’s Eye (Esrock), 507
Reading in the Brain (Deheane), 63
reality effect
in Anna Karenina, 581–589
Barthes on, 581, 589
discourse comprehension and, 586–587, 590n7
epistemological tension and, 586–588
fragmentary clues and, 582–588
ontological tension and, 588–589
Pamuk on, 589
shadow stories and, 583
structuralist perspective on, 581
visual object perception and, 583–584
Rebel without a Cause (film), 490
“Recitatif” (Morrison)
character narration and, 121–122, 124, 127
“glitch” in, 130–131
mothers represented in, 127–128, 131–132
narrative progression in, 127–132, 134n17
racial difference represented in, 120, 122–130, 133n11
social minds represented in, 127–132
“triple source” reading of, 124–125, 128–129
unreliable representation in, 125
Recorde, Robert, 23
Redelmeier, Don, 487–488
Redgauntlet (Scott), 153
Red Inkstone (commentator on The Story of the Stone), 178
“Reflections on Having Left a Place of Retirement” (Coleridge), 233
Reichle, Erik D., 530, 544
Reineberg, Andrew E., 544
Reliques of Ancient English Poetry (Percy), 619
“Re-minding Modernism” (Herman), 207
The Renaissance, 19–20, 159
Republic (Plato), 314–315
Rethinking Intuition, 27
Revelation, Book of, 113
revenge plays
early modern English court system and, 35, 46–48
failure of dying revenger in, 44–45
grotesques in, 36–39, 43–49
rhetorical narrative theory
cognitive narrative theory and, 120–122, 132
narrative progression and, 126
“Recitatif” (Morrison) and, 122–132
unreliable narration and, 124
Rice, Ann, 552
Rice, Bill, 153
Richard III (Shakespeare), 322
Richardson, Alan
cognitive literary studies defined by, 1
on embodiment of the brain, 67
on human rights discourse, 352
on visualization of mental imagery, 508–509
Richardson, Brian, 357
Richardson, Linda, 514
Richardson, Samuel
Clarissa and unreliable narrator in, 123–124
Pamela and Clarissa as trial narratives and, 444–445, 448, 454
Richmond, Diana, 510, 513, 518
Ricoeur, Paul, 598
Rimé, Bernard, 279
The Rise of the Novel (Watt), 64–65
Robinson, John Elder, 394
Robinson Crusoe (Defoe), 72
Rob Roy (film), 427–428
“Rock Island Line” (song), 114
Rohrer, Jason, 516
(p. 651) Roja (film), 339
Romanticism. See under imagination
Romeo and Juliet (Shakespeare), 189, 316, 321
Ronen, Ruth, 590n7
Rosch, Eleanor, 16–17
“A Rose for Emily” (Faulkner), 528
Rosencrantz and Gildenstern Are Dead (Stoppard), 369
Rosie’s Walk (Hutchins), 188–189
Rousseau, Jean-Jacques, 316–318, 444
Rowling, J.K., 178, 383
Rozin, Paul, 428
Rubin, Nava, 251–253, 256, 506
Rubin, Sue, 394
Rumbaut, Rubén, 352
Run, Lola, Run (film), 494
Rushdie, Salman, 342, 506, 510, 518–519
Russell, Rosalind, 377
Ryan, Marie-Laure, 354, 586–588
Sacks, Oliver
on the art of savants, 407
on classical autism, 394
on Grandin, 511–512
on Mukhopadhyay, 411n24
on Wiltshire, 414n118
Sade, Marquis de, 455
Saint Aethelthryth, 167
Saint Catherine of Sweden, 167
Saint Cecilia, 167
Saint German, Christopher, 48
Samuels, S.J., 543
Sartre, Jean-Paul, 561, 569
Saussure, Ferdinand de, 16–17, 20
Saussy, Haun, 177, 185, 190
Savarese, DJ, 404, 413n99
Savarese, Ralph James, 3, 471
The Scarlet Letter (Hawthorne), 454
Scarry, Elaine
on artists’ uses of transparent surfaces, 586
imagining under instruction and, 251
on mental imaging and imagination, 227–228
on the rewards of imagery, 250
on spatial visualization and fiction reading, 511
on visualization of mental imagery, 506–508, 513, 519–520
on vivacity and literary aesthetics, 248
Schacter, Daniel, 232–233
Schaeffer, Jean-Marie, 577n40
Schelling, Thomas, 372
Schlegel, Friedrich, 571
Schoenfeldt, Michael, 24
Schooler, Jonathan, 530–531, 544, 550
Schrödinger, Erwin, 34, 49
Schwarzenegger, Arnold, 375
Scott, Walter, 153, 227, 234, 238
Scriabin, Alexander, 93
Searle, John, 137, 581
Sedgwick, Eve Kosofsky
affect theory and, 200
Axiom #1 and, 202, 206, 208
homosocial continuum and, 209, 212
on knowledge and desire, 201–202, 216n15
male homosocial desire and, 213
on Proust and sexual possession of another person, 100n8
Seidensticker, Edward, 213
Selden, John, 48
Selemon, L. D., 64
self-reflexive fiction
characters complaining about authors and, 560
characters who admit to being creatures of fantasy and, 560
cultivation of divided state of mind by, 571–572
Fellini’s 8 1/2 as example of, 560–567, 571–572
fictional characters becoming part of reality and, 565, 568–569
lucid dreaming and, 570
narrators’ engagement with readers in, 559
priming and, 570–571
semiotics, 16
sensory imbalance physiology, 42–43, 46
A Separation (film), 109–112
September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, 476–477
Serres, Michel, 395, 397
The Sessions (film), 497
The Seven Samurai (Kurosawa), 300
shadow stories. See under narrative gaps
Shakespeare, William
Antony and Cleopatra and, 27
cognitive historicist readings of, 19, 27
equity law and, 48
grotesques in the plays of, 43–45
Hamlet and, 38, 43–44
(p. 652) King Lear and, 27, 380
Measure for Measure and, 97–98
Much Ado about Nothing and, 321
nested mental states depicted by, 189–190
Richard III and, 322
Romeo and Juliet and, 189, 316, 321
Titus Andronicus and, 39, 43–45
Venus and Adonis and, 599
As You Like It and, 19
Shakespeare’s Brain (Crane), 19
Shalimar the Clown (Rushdie), 519
Shapin, Steven, 20
Shapiro, James, 47, 49
Sharpe, Kevin, 47
Shaughnessy, Nicola, 3
Sheldon, Sidney, 283
Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 228
Sherlock Holmes stories, 89, 97
The Shield (television show), 425–426
Shin, Michael, 205
Shklovsky, Viktor, 615–619
Showalter, Elaine, 57–58, 62
Shur, Barry, 511, 514–515
Shweder, Richard, 428
Sidney, Philip, 48
The Silence of the Lambs (Demme)
Buffalo Bill character in, 291, 298, 301–304, 306
Clarice Starling character in, 291–292, 298–306
close-ups in, 292–293, 298, 302–305
Dr. Chilton character in, 301–302
Hannibal Lecter character in, 291–292, 300–306, 449
homphobia and, 303
Jack Crawford character in, 301
photo stills from, 292, 301–303, 305
shot-reverse shot sequences in, 291–293, 298, 305–306
Simon, David, 422–423
“Simon Lee” (Wordsworth), 618, 622, 625–627
Six Characters in Search of an Author (Pirandello), 560
Skolnick, Deena, 568
Smallwood, Jonathan, 531, 550
Smetacek, Victor, 42, 46, 49
Smiley’s People (Le Carré), 549
Smith, Adam, 626
Smith, Murray, 300
Smith, Sidonie, 349, 355
social anxiety, 176–177
social intuitionism, 433–434
social minds
Morrison’s representation of, 127–132
Palmer on, 126–127, 134n16, 137, 210
Social Minds in the Novel (Palmer), 137, 210
The Society for Cognitive Studies of the Moving Image, 4
sociocognitive complexity
definition of, 178
different from one reader to another as, 179
correlated with characters’ age, gender, and class as, 183
literary interpretations and, 184
popular fiction and, 186
Socrates, 319
Somebody, Somewhere (Donna Williams), 394
Soni, Vivasvan, 444
Sons of Anarchy (television program), 425–426, 428
Sophie’s Choice (film), 498
The Sopranos (television program)
murder in, 425, 430
rape of Dr. Melfi character in, 426–427
Tony Soprano character in, 421, 426–428, 430, 434
“Soul of a Man” (Blind Willie Johnson), 136
The Sound and the Fury (Faulkner), 91–92
The Sound of Music (film), 490
Source Code (film), 494
The Spanish Tragedy (Kyd), 37–38, 45–47
spatial form
blending theory and, 603–605
in effect, 599–602
palimpsest structuring and, 606
temporal distance and, 598
in theory, 596–599
ut pictura poesis poetry tradition and, 597
Speak, Memory (Nabokov), 178
Spellbound (film), 465
Spenser, Edmund, 15, 23–27, 48
Sperber, Dan, 49
Spolsky, Ellen, 2, 4, 67, 75n25
Stanwyck, Barbara, 299
(p. 653) Starr, G. Gabrielle
on authors’ use of multiple senses, 228
on cognitive responses to visual art, 70
on visualization of mental imagery, 506, 519–520, 520n1
on visual responses to aesthetic art, 251–253, 256
Star Trek: The Next Generation (television program), 303–304
Stein, Gertrude, 549
Steinbeck, John, 147
Stella Dallas (film), 299, 309n38
Stern, Daniel, 402, 405
Sternberg, Meir, 106
Stinchecum, Amanda Meyer, 206–207, 211
Stone, Lawrence, 166
Stoppard, Tom, 369
Story Line (Marshall), 237
The Story of the Stone (Cao Xueqin)
author’s revisions to, 178
computer analysis of mental states depicted in, 179, 186–188
explicit mental states in, 179–181
Freudian reading of, 190
gaps between explicit and implied mental states in, 184
implied mental states in, 182–183
mind-reading attempts in, 182
nested mental states in, 177, 179–188, 190
Odd Tablet commentary on, 178–179
position within Chinese culture of, 178, 192n14
Red Inkstone commentary on, 178
Saussy on, 185, 190
sociocognitive complexity in, 179, 183–187, 192n14
Zhang Xinzhi commentary on, 179
Storytelling in the New Hollywood (Kristin Thompson), 489
Strachey, Lytton, 211
strategic narrative empathy. See under narrative empathy
Stravinsky, Igor, 85
Stroop test of directed attention, 65
Structuralist Poetics (Culler), 542
Sufferings of Young Werther (Goethe), 90
Sugase, Kenji, 40
Swift, Jonathan, 66
Tagore, Rabindranath, 337, 342
The Tale of Genji (Murasaki)
interiority depicted in, 206–208, 210
queer grammar of desire in, 210–213, 218n45
translation idiosyncrasies and, 210–211, 213
Tal-Or, Nurit, 530, 533
Tanizaki Jun’ichirō, 213–214
Tarr, Bela, 490
Tartt, Donna, 253
Tartuffe (Molière), 322
Taylor, John R., 17
Taylor, Marjorie, 568, 575n20
Taylor, Shelley, 569
“Tell Me My Lying Eyes are Wrong” (George Jones)
aspectual story world in, 151
epistemology of pain and, 140–141
full lyrics of, 139
narrative gaps in, 140
narrator’s inner cognitive functioning and, 150–151
nonrepeated and monosyllabic words in, 139
social cognitive networks in, 152
The Ten Commandments (film), 490
Terms of Endearment (film), 490
text-driven spatial imagery, 515–517
Thackeray, William, 107, 551–552
theater. See also specific works
alienation effects and, 318
catharsis and, 315, 317, 319
coincident emotional states and, 321–322
criterial prefocusing and, 322–323
emotions and, 313–324
empathy and, 324
identification and, 314, 318, 320–321, 323–324
method acting and, 320
mimesis and, 314
pity and, 315–316, 321, 323–324
theater of cruelty (Artaud), 318–319
Thelma and Louise (film), 111
theory of mind. See also folk psychology
The Story of the Stone and, 179–181
cognitive function as, 19
revenge plays and, 42
cartoons in, 168
queer theory and, 202–207
imagination and, 226, 231
(p. 654) literary imagination and, 235, 258
nested mental states and, 176–179
“This Lime Tree Bower My Prison” in, 237–238
the default mode network and, 254
close-ups of the human face and, 296
not presuming a similar neurology, form of, 407
novels and, 585, 586
“These Things Called Empathy: Eight Related but Distinct Phenomena” (Batson), 441–442
“The Straight Mind” (Wittig), 199
Thinking, Fast and Slow (Kahneman), 487
“This Lime Tree Bower My Prison” (Coleridge), 237–238
Thompson, Kristin, 489
Thompson, Richard F., 617
Thomson, James, 227
“The Thorn” (Wordsworth)
novelty of, 618, 625–627
repetition in, 599–600
spatial poetics and, 599–600
Thorpe, Kate, 511–512, 516–519
Three Sisters (Chekhov), 582
The Thresher’s Labour (Duck), 620
“Tintern Abbey” (Wordsworth), 229–230, 233, 594
Titanic (film), 490
Titus Andronicus (Shakespeare), 39, 43–45
Tolstoy, Leo
Anna Karenina and, 548–549, 582–589
consciousness depicted by, 472
reality effect and, 582–589
War and Peace and, 472
Tooby, John, 469
top-down processes of cognition, 486, 583, 588, 594–596
Total Recall (Verheoven), 375–376
To the Lighthouse (Woolf), 206, 215
Towards a “Natural” Narratology (Fludernik), 354
transport
attention and, 527, 529
cognitive processing and, 530–531, 533
correlational nature of evidence of, 535
definition of, 526–528
discourse style features and, 528–529
effects of, 532–534
empathizing with characters and, 532–533
imageability and affect features of, 528
introspective reports and, 536
involvement and, 530
literary processing and, 534–536
meaning features and, 528–529
metaphor of, 525–537
narrative understanding and, 531
nonfiction and, 534
novelty and, 531–532
prosocial behavior and, 535
readers’ adoption of beliefs, 533
surface structure and, 529–530
unnecessary features of, 527–528
weak nature of some evidence of, 535–536
Trethewey, Natasha, 506, 518
Tristram Shandy (Sterne), 72
Trivia (Gay), 66
Trollope, Anthony, 375–377
Tsai Ming-lai, 490
Tsur, Reuven, 396, 403, 405, 413n96
Turgenev, Ivan, 92
Turner, Mark
blending theory and, 155–158, 161–162, 228–229, 603–605
cognitive metaphor theory and, 160, 229
on time as space, 604–605
“World Food Crisis” cartoon and, 155–158
Tversky, Amos, 474
Twain, Mark, 189–190
Tyler, Royall, 213
Ukigumo (Futabatei Shimei), 206
Ulysses (Joyce), 187, 237, 273, 560
Unamuno, Miguel de, 560, 571
Uncle Remus character, 141–142
unconscious mind
automaticity and, 477–478
change blindness and, 464
confirmation bias and, 467
duration neglect, 487–488, 490, 492, 496–497
filmmakers’ exploitation of, 483–498
flash lag effect and, 472
fundamental attribution error and, 483–484, 498n1
groupthink and, 476
heuristics and biases in, 464, 473–475
(p. 655) hindsight bias and, 474–477
neuroscience and, 468–472
overoptimism bias, mental health and, 569
peak-end rule and, 487–493, 497–498
phenomenology and, 471
popular guides to, 463–464
priming effect and, 464–465
psychoanalytic unconscious and, 463–468
reason and, 469–470
System 1 and System 2 thinking and, 470, 473–474
Understanding Cinema (Persson), 298–299
Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 358
Upheavals of Thought (Nussbaum), 282–283
Urinal of Physicke (Recorde), 23
ut pictura poesis poetry tradition, 597
Vaage, Margrethe Bruun, 3
Valéry, Paul, 572
van den Broek, P., 544
Van Dijk, T. A., 544
Vanity Fair (Thackeray), 107
Van Patten, Timothy, 484
van Peer, Willi, 613
Venus and Adonis (Shakespeare), 599
Verhoeven, Paul, 375
Vermeer, Johannes, 273
Vermeule, Blakey, 235, 375, 442
Vertigo (film), 490
Vessel, Edward, 251–253, 256, 506
Vietnam War, 148–149
Villiers de l’Isle-Adam, Auguste, 572
Vineland (Pynchon), 376
visual responses to read words, 512–513
visual responses to spoken language, 509–512
von Seggern, Jane, 511
Wahl, Andrew, 164–166, 168, 170
Waley, Arthur, 211, 218n45
Wallace, David Foster, 465–466
Walton, Kendall, 572
War and Peace (Tolstoy), 472
The Waste Land (Eliot), 112–113, 597
Watt, Ian, 64–65
Watts, Isaac, 65
Waverly (Scott), 234
The Way We Think (Fauconnier and Turner), 228
We (Zamyatin), 178
Weerathesakul, Apichatpong, 490
“We’ll Always Have Paris” moments, 86
Welty, Mary, 511, 514, 516
“Where Did You Sleep Last Night?” (Lead Belly)
focalized story world in, 151
full lyrics of, 113, 144–145
identity construction in, 146–147
“implied composer” of, 146
narrative gaps and, 113–114, 147, 151
nonrepeated and monosyllabic words in, 139
“The Longest Train I Ever Saw” and, 113, 145–146
Whitefield, George, 159
Why We Read Fiction (Zunshine), 63, 89
Williams, Don, 141–143, 151–152
Williams, Donna, 394–395, 401, 403–405
Williams, Hank, 141–142
Williams, Tennessee, 141–144
Williams, William Carlos, 398, 400
Wilshire, Bruce, 320
Wilson, Hugh, 511–512, 519
Wilson, John, 626
Wilson, Timothy, 470
The Wire (television program)
D’Angelo Barksdale character in, 421, 424–425
rape and, 422–425
Wee-Bey character in, 424
Wittgenstein, Ludwig, 16
Wittig, Monique, 199
Wolf, Maryanne, 404
Wolfe, Thomas, 141–144
Wolfe, Tom, 470
Wolfman Jack, 141–142
Wollstonecraft, Mary, 238
Woloch, Alex, 55
Woo, John, 300
Woodbridge, Linda, 47, 49
Woolf, Virginia
ego boundaries in the fiction of, 570
embedded intentionality represented by, 89, 95
on Joyce, 207
To the Lighthouse and, 206, 215
Mrs. Dalloway and, 89, 95, 572
multilayered consciousness represented by, 207–208
narrators in the fiction of, 203, 206–208
(p. 656) on The Tale of the Genji, 211
Waley and, 211
Wordsworth, William
bidirectionally focused state described by, 257–258
blending theory and, 603–605
cognitive metaphor theory and, 229–230
Coleridge and, 597–598, 603, 626
conversation poems of, 233, 238
The Feeling of What Happens and, 606
“The Idiot Boy” and, 618, 622, 625–627
on the imaginative process, 603
“Immortality Ode” and, 594
Lyrical Ballads and, 595, 600, 614, 616, 618–627
“The Mad Mother” and, 618, 622–627
narrators with no stable identity in work of, 622–623
novelty in the poetry of, 616–617, 620–627
“palimpsestically layered” experience and, 600–601
on poetry as “the history and science of feeling,” 606
The Prelude and, 594, 596–598, 600–603, 606
re-presentation of the past by, 594–597, 600–602
“Simon Lee” and, 618, 622, 625–627
spatial poetics of, 598–603, 605
stylistic redundancies of, 600, 602–604
“The Thorn” and, 599–600, 618, 625–627
“Tintern Abbey” and, 229–230, 233, 594
“World Food Crisis” (Chappatte), 155–158, 162, 170
Wright, Richard, 341
Wuthering Heights (Emily Brontë), 107
Yearsley, Ann, 620
Yi Kwang-su, 205–206
Yoda, Tomiko, 210–211
“You are Not So Smart” (blog), 485
Young, Allen, 349
Young, Kay, 87
Yu, Anthony C., 188
Zahavi, Amotz and Avishag, 373–374
Zamyatin, Yevgeny, 178
Zazie in the Metro (Queneau), 560
Zeki, Semir
ambiguity in art and, 278, 284
on art and neurobiology, 273–274
on biology and the will, 331
brain’s search for constancy and, 277
incompleteness in art, 278, 284
innate versus acquired concepts and, 277–278
on literature and emotion, 277
Mīrābāī and, 284
unity-in-love and, 278, 284
Zettel, Barbara, 513
Zhang Xinzhi, 179
Zunshine, Lisa
on cognitive perspectives and cultural explanations, 613
on embedded consciousness and its limits, 258
on embodied transparency, 131, 309n38
on historicization, 63
on metarepresentation, 120–121, 123–124
on nested mental states and mind-reading in fiction, 87–89, 92
on the “sadistic benefactor,” 444
on the source behind a narrative, 121
on source monitoring in the detective story, 122
on theory of mind and literature, 235
on unreliable narrators, 123–124