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date: 17 July 2019

Abstract and Keywords

This chapter summarizes developments within Canadian cultural studies from roughly the 1950s to the present. Though it denies anything like an unproblematic line of filiation connecting the field’s earliest theorists to those working in the present, it situates recent developments in the context of Marshall McLuhan, George Grant, and Harold Innis with the intention of discriminating zones of distinction and overlap that continue to resonate and enrich contemporary thought. If Canadian cultural studies is not, properly speaking, distinct from the methodology being practiced across the Anglophone world, its own specific postcolonial location and its proximity to the cultural and political influence of the United States has layered into its investigations themes and objects that can be seen to be uniquely Canadian. Canadian cultural studies has proven particularly effective in addressing multiculturalism, questions pertaining to Aboriginal culture and rights, and the possibility and risks of Canada’s indefinite and contested national identity.

Keywords: Canada, cultural studies, Canadian cultural studies, national identity, Aboriginal culture, multiculturalism, George Grant, Harold Innis, Marshall McLuhan

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