Show Summary Details

Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD HANDBOOKS ONLINE (www.oxfordhandbooks.com). © Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a title in Oxford Handbooks Online for personal use (for details see Privacy Policy and Legal Notice).

date: 13 November 2019

(p. 627) Index

(p. 627) Index

academy, the, 112
aesthetic, the, 4, 184, 191, 194, 263
aesthetic philosophy, 5
“aestheticization,” 143
versus aisthetic, 144
aesthetics, 68, 102, 169, 183
as a free play of form, 188
affective labor, 54
African American Dance Ensemble, 30, 40
“Africanisms,” 12, 77–78, 90
agency, 5, 186, 530
agent, 82–83
AIDS, 303
Ailian, Dai, 351–52, 356
Althusser, Louis, 175–76
American Dance Festival, 355–56, 464
antagonisms, 171
Appadurai, Arjun, 294
as related to “flows” and “scapes,” 32–34
appropriation, 30–32, 41
as a form of cultural theft, 31
as racist, 290
archein, 117–18, 120
archetypes, 286
Arendt, Hannah, 117, 119, 245
Argentina, 375–78
and economic destabilization, 378
articulation, 170–71, 174, 176
articulatory space, 13
ArtsCross, 348–49, 358, 361–62, 367
Astaire, Fred, 57, 530–31
audience, 108–9
Ausdruckstanz, 120, 132, 396, 403–4, 406, 409, 423, 430, 561–62, 609
authenticity, 32
crisis in, 70
autonomy, artistic, 4, 187
BADco., 569–70
Balanchine, George, as associated with a black aesthetic, 78
ballet, 80, 183, 285, 291, 330
American, 561
to appropriate identities, 440
in China, 353–54
and lesbianism, 441, 447–48
Ballet Preljocaj, work of
Ballet Neige, 286
Banes, Sally, 249–52, 261, 608
Bausch, Pina, 13, 303–11, 319–21, 500, 562, 609
and her death, 304–5
and lack of a legacy plan, 306–7
and the Pina Bausch Foundation, 305–6
Bausch, Pina, works of
Café Müller, 188–89, 191–92, 307–10, 499
Tanztheater, 184
Walzer, 181–84, 186, 192, 194
World Cities, 311
Beijing Dance Academy, 16, 348, 352, 358
and its three types of training, 353
Bel, Jérôme, 13, 182–83, 200, 208
Bel, Jérôme, works of
Disabled Theater, 182, 184–85, 190, 192, 194
Berlin Wall, 18, 566, 605
binary, watching and moving, 224
black film industry, 525–26
Black Lives Matter movement, 232
Black Mountain College, 318–19
Black Swan (film), 439–41
and the Jewish body, 441, 443–45
and queerness, 448–50
“black will,” 19, 513, 528–29
black women’s bodies, 289–90
blackness, 446, 529
(p. 628) body, the, 107, 132, 203
as “broken-in,” 154
as collective, 140, 172
disciplining of, 151
female, 577, 580, 582, 594
as location, 268, 279
as politically responsive, 223–24
as privileged, unmarked, white, 65, 472
as pushing extremities, 59, 65
speaking and writing about, 245, 262
as “subject,” 7
as “transformative element,” 7
body image, and its malleability, 270
Body-Mind-Centering, 207, 223, 225
and contact improvisation, 228
Bollywood, 575
Boltanski, 70, 246–48
bondage, 1
borrowing, cultural, 12
Bourdieu, Pierre, 12, 53, 69–71
breaking (dance), 285
Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM), 312
brooks, mayfield, 232
Brown, Michael, 81, 223
Brown, Wendy, 54
Burrows, Jonathan, 211
Burt, Ramsay, 467
Butler, Judith, 275
Cage, John, 315
canon, Western, 287, 564, 567
capitalism, 200, 247, 290, 330, 342, 570, 608
affective, 161
neoliberal, 150, 160
Carmelich, Guido, work of
Monument for the Unknown Dancer, 502–3
Caron, Delphine, 333–39
Center for Contemporary Cultural Studies at University of Birmingham, 31
Chakravorty, Pallabi, 32
Chandramukhi, 576, 578–85
Charmatz, Boris, 212–13, 603–4
Charmatz, Boris, work of
20 Dancers of the XX Century, 607, 616–18
“chatter,” 79–80
Chiapello, Ève, 11, 70, 246
China, 347–67
and “century of humiliation,” 350
dance and politics in, 349, 367
and the West, 349, 354–55, 357–59, 367
Chipaumire, Nora, 284
Chipaumire, Nora, works of
Dark Swan, 288
Rite/Riot, 284–85
choreographic explorations
of attention, 214–15
choreographic idea, 202, 217
choreographic order, 139
choreography, 13, 99, 137, 150, 165, 172, 201, 247, 542, 593
as an artistic form to ask questions, 14, 182, 210
as a choreopolitical event, 153
experimental, 149
minimalist, 256
as an operation of problems, 217
as recognized, 214
and the social, 138–39
urban, 133, 138, 140
“choreopolice,” 156–57
choreopolitics, 13, 150, 156–57, 160, 170
“circuits of culture,” 33–34
circulation, 30
the trope of, 33–38
Ciríaco, Gustavo, work of
Nada. Vamos ver/Nothing. We shall see, 150–52, 155, 159
Claid, Emilyn, 358–59, 361
classics, reimagined, 284–85
Cold War, the, 360, 376, 604
collaboration, 9
collectivity, 125
colonialism, 578
commodity, 12
communism, 347, 352, 365, 566, 569
community, 41, 108–9, 250, 371, 383–84
and alternative lifestyle, 252
competition, as replacement of personal, self-value, 61–62
concert dance, 29
connectivity, 378
constitutive indeterminacy, 171
consumerism, 248, 262
contact improvisation, 122–23, 226–27, 246, 259, 616
“breaking rules” of, 227
(p. 629)
and hetero-normative partnering, 228–29
and the “press,” 236
and “the small dance,” 247
as a “white” form of dance, 232
Contact Quarterly, 225, 232
contemporary dance, 106, 183, 200–1
in Buenos Aires, 373, 378
in the East, 563–64, 569
literature and writings on, 225
and the West, 560–61, 564, 569
where perception is situated separate from politics, 224
control, loss of, 191–92
Cooperation Cultural Center, 371–75, 378
and the Dance and Politics Program, 379–80, 389–90
corporeal representational politics, 267
counterculture, 246, 250, 258
“critical fetishism,” 33
critical race theory, 524
criticism, 109
cultural capital, 54
cultural diplomacy, 67, 422
“cultural minstrelsy,” 35
“cultural ownership,” 11, 29–30
Cunningham, Merce, 303, 313–21
and dissolution of the company, 317
and Mondays with Merce, 314–16
Cunningham, Merce, works of
MinEvent, 314
Nearly Ninety, 313–14, 317
Sounddance, 316
D-Day, 330–32, 335
and live dance performance, 331, 337
Dada movement, 4
dance, 100
as an ephemeral form, 303
as form of labor, 54
and “freedom,” 331, 336–37, 340, 343
as a lens for anti-racist work, 80
as not quantitative or quantifiable, 329–30
and same-sex relations, 468–69 (see also queer)
as theory, 8, 91
dance competitions, 57–58, 61
dance conventions. See dance competitions
dance instruction, 55
Dance Masters of America, 56
Dance Research Journal, 225, 607
dance studies, and women, 576
Dance Theatre Workshop, 276
dancer
as a repository of knowledge, 68
as sentient agent, 2
dancing body
and disability, 278
as doting on investment, 11
as marketable, 11
and political valence, 283
as transformative agent, 15
DANCING EARTH, 298–300, 536–37, 545–53
DANCING EARTH, works of
Of Bodies of Elements, 545
ORIGI-NATION: ROOTS AND SEEDS, 546–47, 549–52
Walking the Edge of Water, 546
Danscross. See ArtsCross
de Beauvoir, Simone, 267
death, 303–4
Deleuze, Gilles, 14, 151, 157, 199, 201, 204–5
democracy, 342
Denishawn, 56–57, 65–69
“derivative,” 9
Derrida, Jacques, 175, 582
devadasi, 578–86
DIN A 13, 269, 272
DIN A 13, work of
Colours of Longing, 273–74
disability, 267–68, 271–72, 275
disability studies, 267
discipline, 152
disjunctions, 212
divergent aesthetics, 12
documentation, 320
domestication, 442, 577
duality, 7
“East Indian hands,” 68
Eastern Bloc, 18
Eastern Europe, 18, 559, 563, 566, 573
economics, 330
efficacy, 1, 7
political, 478
(p. 630) ekphrasis, 149
Elswit, Kate, 311
emancipation, 1
embodied practices, as political weapon, 44
empathy. See feelings
episteme, 9–10
exchange, understandings of, 33
exile, 410, 419–20, 423, 427
as a critical category for a new dance historiography, 17
and German dance, 417–21
expression, 208–9
Fake it! (2007), 497, 500–3, 568–69
fascism, 173, 421
feeling, 234
feelings, 234
feminism, 229, 275, 289, 373, 483, 580
Western, 587
feminist theory, 267
“figuration,” 139
force, 193–95
Forsythe, William
and “choreographic objects,” 216
Foster, Susan Leigh, 239, 467, 471
Foucault, Michel, 9, 157, 270
frames, 11
framework, 85
as competitive, 58, 62
of respect, legacy, and acknowledgment, 41
France, 330–33
and its investment in dance, 330, 333, 339
Franko, Mark, 608
French Ministry of Defense, 16, 335
Fritzsche, Peter, 404
funding, 103–4, 377
gaze, the, 206–7, 310, 466, 484, 582
male, 591
gender, 183, 520, 608
and difference, 269–70
dynamics, 224
relationships, 185, 189
Germany, 347, 395, 423, 603, 619
Nazi (see Third Reich)
and Weimar, 404, 417
Gert, Valeska, 418, 425, 428–30
Ginot, Isabelle, 225–26
globalization, 19, 577, 587
globalized economy, 64, 69, 500
Goebbels, Joseph, 405–6
Gottschild, Brenda Dixon, 462
Goya, Francisco de, 159
Graham, Martha, 317
Groys, Boris, 567
Gurewitsch, Matthew, 79
halaus, 30
hand-dancing, 477, 486–87
Harrell, Trajal, 161–2
Harris, Rennie, work of
Heaven, 284–86
Hawaiian tourist shows, 39–40
Hay, Deborah, 245
Hay, Deborah, work of
Circle Dances, 248, 260
hedonism, 4
Hegel, Georg Wilhelm Fredrich, 2
hegemony, 171, 504, 560, 569, 571
conservative, 64
Hinduism, 294, 578
hip hop, 64, 479
French, 337–39
Holland, Fred, 227, 241
Holocaust, 395
Houston-Jones, Ishmael, 227, 241
humanism, 12
identity, 182, 193
cultural, 169, 460, 580
as established by effort, 63
formation of, 54
national, 53
political, 335, 490
racial, 334, 516
identity politics, 188, 512–14
imagination, 14, 149, 157
imperialism, 350
impersonal, the, 172–73
impression, 235
improvisation, 119, 141, 249
and gender, 224
and habits, 209–10
(p. 631) inclination, 251
India, 575, 579, 587
India’s Daughter, 576, 586
in-difference, 192–93
“Indigenous choreography,” 19, 298–301, 535–37
Indigenous dance, 61, 536–39, 545–47, 553
Ingvartsen, Mette, works of
69 Positions, 163–64
Speculations, 164–65
institutionalization, 573
interculturalism, 349, 354
international diplomacy, and dance, 340
interplay, 17
intersectionality, 289
intertextuality, 85
intervention, physical, 239
“invisibilization” methodology, 87–88
isolationism, China’s model of, 354, 357
J-setting, 477, 482–85, 487–88
Jewishness, 446
Joel, Billy, 36
Johnson, Emily, 536–40
Johnson, Emily, works of
Niicugni, 538–39
SHORE, 538, 541–44
The Thank-you Bar, 538, 544–45
Johnston, Jill, 248
Jones, Bill T., 8, 80, 89, 258, 318, 468
Jones, Brutus, 18, 459, 461, 463
Jooss, Kurt, 352, 417, 421, 423, 427–30
Jooss, Kurt, works of
Nachtzug (Night Train), 425–27
Weg im Nebel (Journey in the Fog), 425–27
jouissance, 192, 196
Jowitt, Deborah, 261, 464
Judson Dance Theater, 121–22, 200–1, 245, 262
and democratic nature of working process, 249
kinestheme, 9–10
kinesthesia, 233
and kinetic sensibility of moving together, 233
kinesthetic empathy, 233–34
“kinesthetic modernity,” 144
“kinesthetic politics,” 144
Kowal, Rebekah J., 465
Laban, Rudolf, 245, 406
labor, 172
Lambert-Beatty, Carrie, and spectatorship, 256
lateral space, 269
Lauclau, Ernesto, 4
Le Roy, Xavier, 204–5, 209, 410–11
Lefort, Claude, 173–74
legacy, 304, 317, 319, 512
LeGon, Jeni, 511–30
Lei, Guo, 362, 365
Lei, Guo, work of
Mask, 362–65
liberal consensus, 64–65
LIGNA, 133, 136, 396
as creating “artistic interventions,” 134
LIGNA, works of
Dance of All, 132, 134, 138, 141
Radioballet, 131–33, 136, 138, 141
Limón, José, 459–60, 466
and staging race, 459–60, 463–67
Limón, José, work of
Emperor Jones, 459–61, 463–65, 468–73
looseness, 12, 125
Magic Garden Company, 333–34, 337
Mahabharata, 589–92
mainstream, 488–89
Manning, Susan, 460–61, 467, 608
marketability, 11
Martin, John, 202, 233, 465
Martin, Randy, 7, 64, 196, 239, 375
“mass dance,” 174
mechanisms of control, 13
media, the, 329–32
memory, 186
Merleau-Ponty, Maurice, 233, 268, 270, 274
metakinesis, 465
micro-politics
of cultural exchange, 421–22
of technique, 15, 284, 292
Middlesex University’s ResCen Research Center, 348
minimalism, 255–56
(p. 632) mobilization, 5, 195
as collective, 7
political, 390
modern dance, 202–3, 226, 356, 459
and minstrelsy, 461–62
modernism, 604, 607, 609–11, 613
Western, 356
money, 107, 330
Morrison, Toni, 82, 93
Mouffe, Chantal, 4, 171, 245
movement
pedestrian, 259
as performed vs. as perceived, 214
as to question movement itself, 210
Movement Research, 224
Müller, Hedwig, 395–96, 402, 408
Murry, Arthur, 57
Nancy, Jean-Luc, 250, 262, 342
narratives, unhinging of popular, 285
National Socialism, 400, 407, 424
and modern dance, 398–99
and “volkish thought,” 400
Native American, 535
“Native dances,” 66–67, 543
negotiation, 187
neoliberalism, 64, 133, 357, 373, 376–77, 575–76, 589
choreographies of, 576–94
Nijinsky, Vaslav, 284
Nijinsky, Vaslav, works of
Sacre du Printemps, 284–85
92nd Street YW/YMHA, 256
Novak, Cynthia, 55
Obama, Barack, 334
Obama, Michelle, 477, 490–91
objectivation, 203
Occidentalism, 18, 67, 356–57
Orientalism, 18, 67, 356–57, 577–78
Other, 108, 276, 286–87, 289, 301
otherness, 284, 289, 427, 430–31, 483
“overreading,” 8
Paris is Burning (1990), 478–79
patriarchy, 575–77, 583
Paxton, Steve, 122, 236, 245–46, 360, 500
Paxton, Steve, works of
Flat, 247
Magnesium, 248, 257–60
Satisfyin’ Lover, 247
State, 258
pedagogy, 58. See also dance instruction
with focus on a physical “re-patterning,” 225
perception, 223, 236, 242
issues of, 231
performance, cinematic techniques in, 215–16
performance art, 137
contemporary European, 133
performative repetition, 182, 189, 195
performativity, 184, 275
Perron, Wendy, 79
personality, as related to ranking, 63
Phelan, Peggy, 246, 262
phenomenology, 267, 275
and communicability of difference, 269
political, the, 189
according to Chantal Mouffe, 245
according to Hannah Arendt, 245
and distinctions from politics, 171
and the physical, 231
political action, and artistic performance, 119–20
“political dance,” 3–4
political economy of dance, 29, 44
political theory, 170
of collectivity, 124
political will, 512–15
politics, 188
destabilization of, 190
and distinctions from the political, 171
international, 190
“politics of dance,” 3–4
politics of “precarity,” 10
polyrhythm, 41
poner el cuerpo, 375–77, 390
postcolonialism, 580
power, 152, 585
economic, 334, 585
embodied, 173
of erasure, 587
power relations, 258, 283
as between dancers, choreographers, and audiences, 3, 186–87
(p. 633) practice, 117, 122
collective, 124–25
cultural, 32
prattein, 117–18, 120–21
praxis, 117–19, 186
as political, 118
Preljocaj, Anjelin. See Ballet Preljocaj
problem-posing, 200–1, 212
problems, 199, 203–4, 207
product, cultural, 32
project, 200
professionalism, 565, 571, 573
publications, as mediums of choreography, 216
queer, 469–70
queer communities of color, 18, 477–78, 489
queer dance, 478, 484
race, 124, 225, 519
“raced,” 12
“racing,” 77
racism, 83–84, 89, 230, 232, 521–24, 527
cultural, 78, 90–91
dismantling of, 81, 90
systemic, 78, 90–91
Rainer, Yvonne, 121, 245–46
and the No Manifesto, 255
Rainer, Yvonne, works of
Convalescent Dance, 254
The Flag Show version of Trio A, 252–57
The Mind Is a Muscle, Part One, Trio A, 246–48
Ranciére, Jacques, 4, 155, 188, 195
realism, 612
re-commoning, 502
re-enactment, 499
rehearsal process, 184, 188
Reiner, Silas, 313–14
“relational aesthetics,” 4
relative distance, 125
relativism, cultural, 290, 293–94
release technique, as regarding tension as problematic, 224–25
representation, 17, 187, 203
politics of, 288
representationalism, 208
reputation, 104–5
resiliency, 238
resistance, 386
and responsiveness, 230
“revising the canon,” era of, 79
rewriting, choreographic, 284, 288, 290, 300
Reynolds, Nancy, 79
Rice, Tamir, 223, 230, 241
Russo, Lucía, 371–72
Russo, Lucía, works of
El borde silencioso de las cosas, 372–87
Schilling, Tom, work of
La Mer, 608, 611, 614–15, 618
sentience, 14
sexuality, 225, 272, 445
reclaiming of, 289
Shannon, Bill, 269, 276
Shannon, Bill, work of
AOW: Remix, 276–78
Shapiro, Laura, 276
Shawn, Ted. See Denishawn
signification, 9
Simas, Rosy, 296–300
and contemporary Native performance/art, 296–98
Smith, Nancy Stark, 240–41, 246
and Underscore, 240
So You Think You Can Dance, 53–54, 58, 63–65
“social choreography,” 139
social dance, black, 477, 482, 485–90
social kinesthetic, 9, 17
socialism, 342, 561, 566, 569, 608, 615
socialist realism, 354, 604, 608–9, 612–16
“soft primitivism,” 39
somatics, 122–23, 225, 540
sovereignty, 172–73
spatial relationships, 173
spectator, 206–7, 213–14, 466, 501
speculation, 149
speculative imagination, 13, 158, 162–63
St. Denis, Ruth. See Denishawn
Stöckemann, Patricia, 396–97, 402
Stowe, Harriet Beecher, 8
“stutterances,” 211–12
subjectivation, 203
Swan Lake, 439–40, 450
(p. 634) Taipei National University of the Arts, 16, 348
Tangen, Rulan. See DANCING EARTH
tap dance, 520
temporality, 121, 169–70, 176, 303, 321
tension, as productive, 224
Tharp, Twyla, 30
Tharp, Twyla, work of
Movin’ Out, 36–40
theatre
political, 186
questioning key aspects of, 132, 136
theory vs. practice, 112–13
Third Reich, 16, 396, 405, 428
and modern dance, 397, 402, 407, 410
Thirdspace, 16, 374, 384–85, 389
tourism, cultural, 40
trace, the, 175
training, 100–1, 122, 154, 224
transcendence, 268
transformation
as a crossing of racial lines, 31
cultural, 30–33, 35
transition, 560, 565–66, 568, 572–73
translation, 295
transmission, 304
as appropriation, 31
cultural, 30, 35
United States of America, 340–41
and freedom, 342
and popular culture, 338
Urban Bush Women, 288
urban spaces, 133–36, 140, 586
choreographic order of, 137
villa, the, 16, 372, 375, 381, 384–86
Village Voice, 248, 261
violence, 576, 584, 586–87, 590–94
domestic, 579–80, 589
“voguing,” 30, 477–82, 487–88
and performative attributes, 481
waikiki, Hula practices in, 38
West African dance practices, 41–43
whiteness, 226, 294, 524
Whitman Sisters, 511–12
Wigman, Mary, 401–2, 405, 408, 430, 562
Williams, Raymond, 9, 248
woman problem, 20
World War I, 398–99, 402
World War II, 4, 604, 612
and ballet, 561
and D-Day 2014 choreography, 332, 336, 342
and German modern dance, 402, 427
and post war modern dance culture, 460
and Wuppertal, 308–9
Wuppertal Dance Theatre. See Bausch, Pina
Xiaoband, Wu, 351–52
yoga, 291–94, 578
balleticization of, 292
Young, Iris Marion, 229, 267–71
Zedong, Mao, 347, 349–55