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date: 20 February 2020

(p. xiii) Contributors

(p. xiii) Contributors

Harold F. Abeles received his bachelor's and master's degrees in music education from the University of Connecticut and his Ph.D. from the University of Maryland. He is professor of music and music education and codirector of the Center for Arts Education Research at Teachers College, Columbia University. His scholarly interests include assessment in arts pedagogy, assessment of arts partnership programs, gender associations in instrumental music and the development and assessment of creativity. He has contributed more than 75 articles, chapters and books to the field of music education. He is the co-editor of Critical Issues in Music Education. His co-authored article on Learning in and through the arts won the Manuel Barkin Award from the National Art Education Association. He has been the program evaluator for numerous arts partnerships, including Carnegie Hall, The Cleveland Orchestra, The Baltimore Symphony, and the Lincoln Center Institute.



Carlos R. Abril holds a Ph.D. in music education from Ohio State University, an M.M. in performance from Cincinnati College Conservatory of Music, and a B.M. in music education from University of Miami. He is associate professor and director of music education at the Frost School of Music, University of Miami. Previously, he was associate professor and coordinator of music education at Northwestern University. His research interests include issues surrounding cultural diversity in music education, arts education policy, and music teacher education. He has published his work in research journals including the International Journal of Music Education, Journal of Research in Music Education, and Music Education Research. His latest project was co-editing Musical Experiences in Our Lives, a book that examines the nature and meaning of musical experience across the lifespan. He serves on various editorial boards including the Journal of Research in Music Education and Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education.



Mary S. Adamek received her B.M.E. at Virginia Commonwealth University, her M.A. at the University of Miami, and her Ph.D. at the University of Minnesota. She is currently the director of the music therapy program at the University of Iowa. She is co-author of the book Music in Special Education, published by the American Music Therapy Association (AMTA) and she has contributed chapters in three textbooks published by AMTA, Effectiveness of Music Therapy Procedures: Documentation of Research and Clinical Practice, An Introduction to Music Therapy: Theory and Practice and Models of Music Therapy Interventions in School Settings. She maintains an active leadership role in state, regional and national music therapy organizations and is a past-president of the American Music Therapy Association. (p. xiv)



Kenneth S. Aigen studied philosophy and psychology at the University of Wisconsin prior to completing master's and doctoral degrees in music therapy at New York University. He is currently an associate professor in the music therapy program at Temple University. His publications focus on Nordoff-Robbins music therapy, qualitative research methodology, music-centered music therapy, the use of popular groove music in music therapy, and critical examinations of the evolution of music therapy theory and research methods. He was the chairman of the scientific committee of the Ninth World Congress of Music Therapy and is a past-president of the American Association of Music Therapy. He is an associate editor of the Nordic Journal of Music Therapy and is on the editorial board of Qualitative Inquiries in Music Therapy. He is also president of the Nordoff-Robbins Music Therapy Foundation (USA) and is a member of the International Trust for Nordoff-Robbins Music Therapy.



Nick Beach studied at Dartington College of Arts, the National Centre for Orchestral Studies and Middlesex Polytechnic, UK. He worked for several years as a peripatetic/itinerant violin teacher, where he pioneered early approaches to whole class instrumental teaching in primary schools. He has held several management posts with UK music services, most recently as Head of Education with Berkshire Young Musicians Trust. He currently holds the post of Academic Director at Trinity College London. He was closely involved with the development of the national training programme for teachers engaged with whole class instrumental teaching in the UK. He was also instrumental in the development of the Arts Award qualifications and currently leads on the development of Trinity's qualifications and teacher development programmes worldwide. As a practicing musician he is a violinist and conductor.



Chelcy L. Bowles holds a bachelor's degree in music education and a master's degree in music theory, and a Ph.D. in music education from the University of Texas, Austin. She is professor and director of continuing education in music at University of Wisconsin, Madison, where she developed, directs, and teaches in a year-round program for adult music learners, and directs development opportunities for music professionals. She has taught at all educational levels, and has had a concurrent career as a classical, historical, and traditional Irish harpist. Although her research interests and publications have generally paralleled her teaching career, the primary thread and current focus is adult music teaching, learning, and continued engagement. She co-founded MENC's Adult and Community Music Education Special Research Interest Group, and currently serves on the steering committee of the North American Coalition for Community Music, and on the editorial board of the International Journal of Community Music.



Liora Bresler has a B.A. in piano performance and philosophy and M.A. in musicology from Tel-Aviv University, and a Ph.D. in Education from Stanford University. Bresler is a professor at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Her research and teaching focus on Arts and Aesthetic Education, Qualitative (p. xv) Research Methodology, and Educational/Artistic/Intellectual Entrepreneurship. Her research and teaching focus on Arts and Aesthetic Education, Qualitative Research Methodology, and Educational/Artistic/Intellectual Entrepreneurship. She is the co-founder and co-editor of the International Journal of Education and the Arts. Bresler has published 100+ papers, book chapters and books on the arts in education, including the International Handbook of Research in Arts Education (2007), and Knowing Bodies, Moving Minds (2004). Her work has been translated to German, French, Portuguese, Spanish, Hebrew and Chinese. She has given keynote speeches and presented invited talks, seminars and short courses in thirty-some countries and forty-some universities in Europe, Asia, Australia, Africa, and the Americas.



Andrew R. Brown is an active computer musician, computational artist, builder of software tools that support creativity, and educator. He currently holds the position of Professor of Digital Arts at the Queensland Conservatorium of Music, Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia, and has previously worked as the Research Manager for the Australasian Cooperative Research Centre for Interaction Design (ACID), the Coordinator of the Computational Arts Research Group at the Queensland University of Technology, and as a lecturer in music education at the University of Melbourne. His current interests include investigating how technologies support creativity and learning, novel process for computational music and art, and the philosophy of technology. He is the author of the book Computers In Music Education: Amplifying Musicality, published by Routlege.



Pamela Burnard studied music performance at the Melbourne Conservatorium of Music (Australia), before completing a master of music at Indiana University (USA), a master of education at the University of Queensland (Australia), and a doctorate of philosophy at the University of Reading (UK). She is a Reader in the Faculty of Education at the University of Cambridge, where she manages Higher Degree courses in Arts, Culture and Education and Educational Research. Her research interests include creativities in music, arts and education, creativity assessment, arts and educational partnerships, creative learning and teaching. She is co-editor of the British Journal of Music Education, associate editor of Psychology of Music and serves on numerous editorial boards. She is convenor of British Education Research Association Special-Interest-Group Creativity in Education and has served on the Board of the International Society of Music Education (2004–2008).



Mary L. Cohen completed her bachelor's, master's, and doctorate of philosophy in music education from the University of Kansas. She has a joint position with the teaching and learning department and the school of music at the University of Iowa. Her general research area is choral singing and wellbeing with particular emphasis on music programs in prison contexts. She founded the Oakdale Community Choir, a combined group of male prisoners and female and male community members. She has implemented both writing and songwriting components with this (p. xvi) choir and continues to explore the roles of such activities in people's lives who are incarcerated. She also researches and facilitates group improvisation, examines the roles of movement theories in learning and improvising, and investigates historical and philosophical research inquiries.



Bernadette D. Colley holds bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees from Syracuse, McGill, and Harvard universities, respectively. She is founder and principal of Colley Consulting, a research consultancy specializing in arts education policy design since 1989.  She taught at Harvard, McGill, and Boston universities, Massachusetts College of Art and Design, and K-12 schools in the US. Her research on interdisciplinarity in music education and arts education policy development is published in the Journal of Research in Music Education, Journal of Music Teacher Education, Arts Education Policy Review, Update, Chamber Music, and is presented internationally. She is author of Minds Alive: Teachers as Scholars-cases reflecting the importance of teachers’ intellectual rejuvenation. She was music evaluator for the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, received the Reston Prize from the National Associations of Schools of Dance, Music, Theatre, Art and Design, an was an Arts Education Fellow at the National Endowment for the Arts in Washington DC.



Richard Colwell holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts and Master of Music from the University of South Dakota and Ed.D. from the University of Illinois. He was the founder and editor of the Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education and the Quarterly. He was chair of music education at the University of Illinois, Boston University, and the New England Conservatory of Music. He is a recipient of the MENC-National Association of Music Education hall of fame award, was recognized for his life-time contribution to music education by the largest music association—the Federated Music Clubs, received an honorary doctorate of humane letters, was the recipient of a John Simon Guggenheim fellowship, the Horace Porter Award for distinguished scholarship and was the first honorary member of the Chopin Academy's Institute for Research. He is the editor of the Handbook of Research in Music Education and co-editor, with Carol Richardson of the New Handbook of Research in Music Education.



Ian Cross holds a Licentiate of Royal Academy of Music and an Associate of the Royal College of Music—he took a B.Sc. in music at City University, London, before completing a doctorate at the same institution. Since 1986 he has taught in the Faculty of Music at Cambridge University, where he is now Professor of Music and Science. He is director of the Centre for Music and Science in the Faculty of Music at the University of Cambridge, where he is also a fellow of Wolfson College. The interdisciplinary nature of his research interests is reflected in the range of his published work, in which the fields of music cognition, music theory, ethnomusicology, archaeological acoustics, psychoacoustics and, most recently, music and language evolution are represented. His research is guided by the aim of developing an integrated understanding of music as grounded in both biology and culture. (p. xvii)



Robert A. Cutietta received his doctorate in music education from Pennsylvania State University after completing a master and bachelor of music education at Cleveland State University. He is currently the dean of the Thornton School of Music at the University of Southern California after completing professorships at the University of Arizona, Kent State University, and Montana State University. His research interests revolve around the cognitive processing in music that leads to musical memory especially in the adolescent mind. He has published research and professional articles in a wide variety of publications in music education and is the author, co-author, or editor of five books. Most importantly he thanks you, the reader, for caring about the importance of educating future generations of youngster in our art form.



William M. Dabback holds an undergraduate degree in music education from West Chester University and received his master of music and doctor of philosophy degrees in music education from the University of Rochester's Eastman School of Music. He is an associate professor in the James Madison University School of Music, where he teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in music education and formed the Harrisonburg New Horizons Band in partnership with the university Lifelong Learning Institute.  The primary threads of his scholarship comprise work in adult music learning, sociological issues of music participation, community music, and instrumental music pedagogy. He has presented papers and workshops at international symposia and conferences in the United States, Canada, and Europe, and is a member of the steering committee of the North American Coalition for Community Music.



Alice-Ann Darrow received her B.M., B.M.E., M.M., and Ph.D. degrees at Florida State University. Her teaching and research interests are teaching music to special populations, nonverbal communication in the classroom, and the role of music in deaf culture. Related to these topics, she has been the recipient of over twenty federal, university, or corporate grants, and published numerous monographs, research articles, and book chapters. She is editor of the text, Introduction to Approaches in Music Therapy, and co-author of Music in Special Education. She presently serves on the editorial boards of the Bulletin for the Council on Research in Music Education, Music Therapy Perspectives, Update: Applications of Research in Music Education, and the Florida Music Director. She has been the recipient of the Ella Scoble Opperman Faculty Citation and Guardian of the Flame awards from the FSU College of Music, and research and clinical practice awards from the American Music Therapy Association.



Rokus de Groot obtained a master's degree of musicology at the University of Amsterdam, and a doctorate of humanities at the University of Utrecht. He is professor of musicology at the University of Amsterdam, after occupying a personal chair, Music in the Netherlands since 1600,” at the University of Utrecht. He conducts research on music of the 20th and 21st centuries, especially about the systematics and aesthetics of composition; about the interaction between different (p. xviii) cultural traditions; about (re)conceptualizations in music practices, of past and present religious and spiritual ideas; and about the metaphorical use of musical concepts in various disciplines, in particular polyphony. In 2009 he was invited to deliver the Edward Said Memorial Lecture at the American University of Cairo. He also works as a composer, creating danced music theatre in which artists and scholars of different traditions cooperate in processes of mutual learning.



Steve C. Dillon studied music education at the University of South Australia, before completing a master of music education and a doctorate of philosophy at La Trobe University in Melbourne. He has combined a career as a professional singer-songwriter with school music teaching. He is a senior lecturer in Music and Sound at Queensland University of Technology, director of save to DISC Research Network and project Leader of the Network Jamming Research Group. Steve is series editor of the meaningful music making for life book series and reviewer for international journals. He is current president of the Musicological Society of Australia Queensland branch and is an active affiliate of ISME and ASME. His research interests focus on meaningful engagement with music making and designing digital media technologies and relational pedagogies to provide access to cognitive growth, health and well being through music making.



John Drummond, B.A., B.Mus., Ph.D., is Blair Professor of Music at the University of Otago in New Zealand. He trained in the UK as a musicologist and composer specializing in opera. In the late 1980s he became involved in music education, joining the ISME Commission on Community Music Activity, which he chaired 1990–1992. He joined the ISME Board in 1995 and was elected President from 2000 to 2002. From 2002 to 2004 he was on the Steering Group for the International Music Council's project on Musical Diversity, and has been a member of the Cultural Diversity in Music Education Network for many years. He is currently working on a project on the Future of Opera within the Sustainable Futures for Musical Cultures international research project.



Randi Margrethe Eidsaa holds bachelor in music from Agder Music Conservatory and a master in music education from the University of Oslo. Prior to her work at Agder University she taught music for 10 years in primary and secondary schools in Norway. Her research interest is on composition, creativity and music education. She is composer and producer of school musicals and co-author of Sanger, Septimer og Triangler, Spektro Musikal and Allmenn Musikkundervisning - cases presenting pedagogy, didactics, methods and repertoire for music teachers and students. She was a member of the National Committee who revised the music teacher education in 1997 and the Norwegian National Music curriculum in 2006. She has organized a wide range of performances in collaboration with The Cultural Rucksack, a national programme for art and culture provided by professionals in Norwegian schools.



Cochavit Elefant, Ph.D., is associate professor of music therapy at the Grieg Academy of the University of Bergen and a researcher at the Grieg Academy Music (p. xix) Therapy Research Centre, Bergen, Norway. She has worked for almost 30 years as music therapist with children in educational and private settings in the United States and Israel. She is the co-founder of the Israeli National Rett Syndrome Assessment and Evaluation team. Her research interest is in music therapy inclusion and intergroup relations in the community in children with and without special needs. She has also researched communication through songs in population groups with neurological disorders such as children with Rett Syndrome and speech in adults with Parkinsons Disease. She has published several articles, book chapters and a book Where Music Helps (with Stige, Ansdell, and Pavlicevic) in 2010. She serves as an associate editor for the Nordic Journal of Music Therapy.



David J. Elliott is professor of music and director of music education at New York University. From 1977 to 2002 he was professor of music education at the University of Toronto. He has held visiting professorships at Indiana University, the University of North Texas, Northwestern University, the University of Limerick, and the Puerto Rico Conservatory of Music. His research interests include the philosophy of music and music education, music and emotion, community music, jazz, music composition, and multicultural music education. He is the author of Music Matters: A New Philosophy of Music Education, editor of Praxial Music Education: Reflections and Dialogues, editor of Action, Criticism, and Theory for Music Education, and founder and editor emeritus of the International Journal of Community Music. Publications are in English, Spanish, Swedish, Finnish, Greek, German, and Chinese, and he is an award-winning composer/arranger with many works published by Boosey & Hawkes.



Sam Evans studied traditional tabla drumming for a decade in India with Pandit Anindo Chatterjee and later with Ustad Zakir Hussian in the United States. He completed a bachelor of music with honors and a master's in music performance in tabla drumming at Monash University in Melbourne. He is the founder of the Melbourne Tabla School and teaches Indian and world music at Monash University. As a regular international performer he has toured throughout India performing on television, radio, and in concert. He is renowned for his world music ensembles and his music has been featured on CD alongside Ravi Shankar and Nitin Sawheny. His research interests have focused on the broadening awareness of tabla in the western world, specifically the development and implementation of a syllabus for the instrument at secondary and tertiary levels in Australia, with the creation of a hybridized notation system for the instrument.



Helena Gaunt has a B.A. Hons. (Cantab.) in English, an M.A. in sociology of literature, and a Ph.D. in student and teacher perceptions of one-to-one instrumental and vocal tuition in a conservatoire. She is the Assistant Principal (research and academic development) at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama in London, and a national teaching fellow (2009). Her current research focuses on one-to-one and small group tuition in conservatoires, orchestral musicians in the twenty first century, and the role of improvisation (verbal and musical) in developing profes (p. xx) sional expertise. Alongside research, she is a professional oboist, and has been a member of the Britten Sinfonia. She is a member of the editorial board of the British Journal of Music Education, and chairs the research group of the Polifonia project for the Association of European Conservatoires (AEC), and the Forum for Instrumental Teaching for the International Society of Music Education. Helena lives in London and has five children, including two sets of twins.



Lucy Green is professor of music education at the Institute of Education, London University, UK. Her research interests are in the sociology of music education, specializing in meaning, ideology, gender, popular music, informal learning, and new pedagogies. She is the author of Music on Deaf Ears: Musical Meaning, Ideology and Education (1988/2008), Music, Gender, Education (1997), How Popular Musicians Learn: A Way Ahead For Music Education (2001/02), and Music, Informal Learning and the School: A New Classroom Pedagogy (2008). She led the research and development project Informal Learning in the Music Classroom within the British venture Musical Futures, and her current research is taking this work forward into instrumental tuition. She has lectured in many countries around the world, and serves on the Editorial Boards of eleven journals, including Music Education Research, Radical Musicology, Popular Music, the British Journal of Music Education, and Research Studies in Music Education.



Wilfried Gruhn is a professor emeritus of music education at the University of Music, Freiburg, Germany. His research interests are in music education, musicology, psychology, and German literature. He has taught at high schools and became a professor of music education at the Universities of Music in Essen and Freiburg, Germany. His research areas encompass historical and systematic musicology as well as music education with a special focus on learning theory and the neurobiology of music learning. He has served as president of the Research Alliance of Institutes for Music Education (RAIME) and as a Board Member of the International Society for Music Education (ISME). He is a member of several international research societies and was a visiting professor at Eastman, Rochester NY and at UiTM, Kuala Lumpur. He has founded the Freiburg Institute for Early Childhood Music Learning, and currently is the president of the International Leo Kestenberg Society.



David G. Hebert has recently accepted a permanent position as Professor of Music Education with the Grieg Academy, Bergen University College, Norway. He previously worked for universities in the United States, Japan, Finland, Russia, and New Zealand. He serves in editorial roles for several scholarly journals and is Chair of the Historical Ethnomusicology special interest group of the Society for Ethnomusicology. His research applies an international-comparative perspective to issues of pluralism, identity, and cultural relevance in music education, as well as processes by which music traditions emerge and change - both sonically and socially - as they are adopted into institutions. His writings appear in 20 professional journals and such books as Music Education for Changing Times, Music of (p. xxi) Japan Today, Sociology and Music Education, De-Canonizing Music History, and Multicultural Perspectives in Music Education.



Sarah Hennessy is a graduate of the Guildhall School of Music and Drama and holds a P.G.C.E. in music teaching from the Institute of Education, London University. She is a senior lecturer in the Graduate School of Education at the University of Exeter in the United Kingdom. She is president of the European Association for Music in Schools, a past chair of the National Association of Music Educators and chair of the Orff Society (UK). She is a teacher educator, training and working with generalist and specialist primary music teachers and also teaches on masters and doctoral programs. Her teaching and research investigates the factors and implements strategies that support effective teacher education for primary music education, the role of professional musicians in education, and the creative development of young people. She is editor in chief of the international refereed journal, Music Education Research and director of the international biennial research conference, RIME.



Liane Hentschke holds a master's and Ph.D. in music education from the University of London. She is Professor of Music Education at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil, and a Past President of the International Society of Music Education, and currently Vice-President of International Music Council and Head of the International Affairs Office at University of Rio Grande do Sul. Her research interests include the areas of teacher education, formal and informal music education and motivation to learn and to teach music. At the UFRGS she teaches at the undergraduate and graduate level, supervising MA and PhD students. Her publications include books, book chapters, prefaces and refereed articles published in Brazil, England, Australia, Argentina, Hong Kong, Germany, and Spain. She has been a member of the Arts and Music Higher Education Committee at the Brazilian Ministry of Education for five years.



Lee Higgins received a Ph.D. from the Irish Academy of Music and Dance at the University of Limerick in Ireland. Currently he is associate professor of music education at the Boston University School of Music. As a community musician he has worked across the education sector as well as within health settings, prison and probation service, youth and community, and orchestra outreach. As a musician he plays guitar, mainly electric popular styles and Brazilian hand-held percussion. His professional practice embraces a gamut of music genres, most notably samba drumming, improvisation, pop/rock, and music technology. He has published articles in English, Portuguese, and Chinese and has a forthcoming book entitled Community Music: In Practice and Theory, published by Oxford University Press. He is the senior editor of the International Journal of Community Music and a past chair of the International Society for Music Education Commission on Community Music Activity. As a community musician he has worked across the education sector as well as within health settings, prison and probation service, youth and community, and orchestra outreach. As (p. xxii) a musician he plays guitar, mainly electric popular styles and Brazilian hand-held percussion.



Evangelos Himonides holds the University of London's first ever “lecturer in music technology education” position. He teaches music education, music technology, and information technology at postgraduate level at the Institute of Education, University of London, and leads the postgraduate course “Music Technology in Education.” He holds a Music Diploma from the Macedonian Conservatoire of Thessaloniki, Greece, a Bachelors of Science in Information Technology (Multimedia) with Star First Class Honours from Middlesex University, UK, a Masters in Education with distinction from the University of Surrey, UK and a PhD in Psychoacoustics and Information Technology from the University of London. He is Chartered I.T. professional with the British Computer Society. As a musician, technologist and educator, Evangelos has had an ongoing career in experimental research in the fields of Psychoacoustics, Music Perception, Music Cognition, Information Technology, Human-Computer Interaction, Special Needs, the Singing Voice and Singing Development.



Valentina Iadeluca graduated in ancient (Greek and Latin) literature at “La Sapienza” University of Rome in 1993. In 2000 she completed a master's in Cultural Management and Communication at LUISS Management University of Rome. Since 1996 she has taught in many different nursery and primary schools of Rome. She is a music teacher at CDM – Centro Didattico Musicale of Rome, specializing in singing, girls’ choir, creative movement and singing for 6 to 8 years old children, children groups from 3 to 6 years old. Since 1996 she has taught in many different nursery and primary schools of Rome. She is a music teacher at CDM – Centro Didattico Musicale of Rome, specializing in singing, girls’ choir, creative movement and singing for 6 to 8 years old children, children groups from 3 to 6 years old. All the activities are based on Orff-Schulwerk principles and integrate Edwin Gordon's Music Learning Theory. Iadeluca defines herself as an interpreter of modern music and a jazz singer and has studied singing with different teachers, performing several kinds and styles of music.



Neryl Jeanneret studied undergraduate music at the University of Sydney, followed by a diploma of education, a master of education, and a doctor of philosophy. She is the head of music education at the Melbourne Graduate School of Education and has served as national president of the Australian Society of Music Education, the chair of the International Society for Music Education's policy commission, and chief examiner of music for the Board of Studies, NSW. Her current research focuses on the impact of arts partnerships in schools and other settings, effective teaching models for the preparation of preservice primary generalists and Musical Futures in an Australian context. She has been involved in curriculum writing and assessment K – 12 as well as development of teacher support materials for organizations such as the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development (Victoria), Opera Australia, the Department of Education (NSW), Musica Viva, and the Sydney Symphony Orchestra. (p. xxiii)



Judith A. Jellison is the Mary D. Bold Regents Professor in Music and Human Learning and University Distinguished Teaching Professor in the Sarah and Ernest Butler School of Music at the University of Texas, Austin. Her experiences working with diverse populations in schools and hospitals have shaped her philosophy and her research in music therapy and music education, which focuses on the musical development of children with disabilities and inclusive educational practices. She has served on editorial boards of major journals in music education and music therapy and is the recipient of the Senior Researcher Award from MENC: The National Association for Music Education, and the Publications Award from the American Music Therapy Association. She is a member of The University of Texas's Academy of Distinguished Teachers and is a recent recipient of the Outstanding Teaching Award from The University of Texas System Board of Regents.



Janet L. Jensen holds degrees in music education, string development and flute performance from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and a doctorate of philosophy in music education from the University of Texas, Austin. She is associate director of the UW-Madison School of Music, where she holds the faculty position in string pedagogy. Her research interests are in curriculum development, lifelong learning, and learning communities linking higher education with other populations, music and arts education policy, and the iconographic history of early bowed instruments. Her outreach activities focus on professional development for teachers, support of school and youth programs, and arts and music education advocacy; and she is active as a conductor and clinician of school and amateur orchestras.



Christopher M. Johnson earned the B.M.E., M.M.E., and Ph.D. degrees from Florida State University and came to the University of Kansas in 1992. He is a professor of music education and music therapy, and director of the Music Research Institute at the University of Kansas. His research interests include applied research in music education, and basic research in the psychology of music. His most noteworthy project has been the study of rubato in musical performance, and how that element enhances musical expression. Also significant is his work considering music engagement/education and general academic success. One of his key professional interests is the ambassadorial possibilities of music education research and how new knowledge can unite people from differing cultures. He is the immediate past chair of the MENC Executive Committee of the Society for Research in Music Education, chair of the International Society of Music Education Research Commission, and since 2001, editor of the International Journal of Music Education: Research.



Patrick M. Jones received the bachelor of science in music education at West Chester University, a master of arts in conducting at George Mason University, a diploma of fine arts in conducting from the University of Calgary, and doctor of philosophy in music education at the Pennsylvania State University. He is director of the Setnor School of Music at Syracuse University. His scholarly interests (p. xxiv) include music education theory, history and policy. He is national chair of the MENC History Special Research Interest Group, a member of the ISME Policy Commission, and serves on the editorial boards of the International Journal of Community Music and Visions of Research in Music Education. In addition to his academic career, he is chief of Air National Guard Bands, responsible for policy and budgeting for all eleven ANG bands.



Estelle R. Jorgensen is professor of music at Indiana University Jacobs School of Music, where she teaches graduate courses in the foundations of music education. She serves as editor for Philosophy of Music Education Review, general editor for Counterpoints: Music and Education series at Indiana University Press, is the founding chair of the Philosophy Special Research Interest Group of MENC—the National Association for Music Education, and is the founding cochair of the International Society for the Philosophy of Music Education. She is the author of In Search of Music Education (University of Illinois Press, 1997), Transforming Music Education (Indiana University Press, 2003), The Art of Teaching Music (Indiana University Press, 2008), the Pictures of Music Education (Indiana University Press, 2011), and is a frequent contributor to leading research journals in music education internationally.



Ailbhe Kenny holds a bachelor of education degree and master's degree in music education from St. Patrick's College, Dublin, and is currently pursuing a Ph.D. at the University of Cambridge. She currently holds the position of lecturer and coordinator of music education at Mary Immaculate College, University of Limerick. Research interests span examining communities of musical practice, local government and music, national music policy, children's representations of music and musicians in the classroom. Previous roles include working as a primary teacher in a mainstream, learning support and specialist music teacher capacity; arts education officer at ‘The Ark - A Cultural Centre For Children’ in Dublin; research fellow at St Patrick's College, Dublin; and leader of numerous professional development Ailbhe is also the co-founder of Irish Music Education (www.irishmusiceducation.ie).



Jody L. Kerchner received an undergraduate degree in music education and a master's degree in vocal performance from West Chester University and a doctorate of philosophy in music education at Northwestern University. She is professor and director of music education at the Oberlin Conservatory of Music, where she is the secondary school music and choral music education specialist. She is the founder and co-teacher of the Oberlin-North Ridgeville Middle School Partnership and the Langston Middle School Music Workshop. Her primary research interests, including numerous books and articles published in these areas, focus on children's responses during music listening, choral music education, empathetic leadership, assessment, reflective thinking, and teacher identity. She is chair of the Music in the Schools and Teacher Education Commission of ISME and serves on the editorial board of several professional journals. (p. xxv)



Andrew King studied music at the University of Huddersfield, received a doctorate of philosophy at the University of Northumbria, and is a member of the Audio Engineering Society and the Institute of Engineering and Technology. He is the Deputy Dean (Learning and Teaching) at the University of Hull, a senior lecturer, and a University Teaching Fellow. He is also editor of the Journal of Music, Technology & Education. His research interests examine the use of technology in the music curriculum. He is particularly interested in the recording studio environment with an emphasis on the types of technology available, how learners interact in the environment and the roles undertaken in-group work. He has worked as a professional recording engineer for the BBC.



Thomas W. Langston studied teaching at St. John's College, York (UK), and received an Associate, Licentiate, and Fellowship in vocal performance through London College of Music, and a Licentiate in singing teaching through the Royal Academy of Music, London, before completing a bachelor of arts through the Open University (UK), a master of letters at the University of New England (Australia) and a doctorate of education at the University of Tasmania (Australia). He is affiliated with the University of Queensland and currently teaches at the Tasmanian Polytechnic, Burnie, Tasmania. His research interests are varied. His most important research examines the manifestation of social capital in community music. His earlier research interests were in musicology and in particular the vocal music of the Italian and English Renaissance. He has published in the area of narrative in music education. He is active in community music conducting a number of choirs.



Eleni Lapidaki studied piano at the State Conservatory of Thessaloniki and the Hochschule für Musik, Freiburg (Germany), received a graduate law diploma from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, a master of music education from the School of Music, Ohio State University, and a doctorate of philosophy in music education from the School of Music, Northwestern University. She is associate professor of music education at Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. Her dissertation was awarded with the “Outstanding Dissertation Award” by the Council for Research in Music Education (USA). Her research concerns an examination of interactions between artistic, scientific, and educational aspects of musical time and creativity. She is member of the editorial boards of Music Education Research and the International Journal of Music Education. She is the founder of the interdisciplinary research project C.A.L.M. (Community Action in Learning Music) and the principal coordinator for music education interventions of the EU-funded program Active Inclusion of Roma Children in the Greek Educational System. In 2011 she received the “Excellence in Research and Innovation Award” by the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki.



Felicity Laurence holds a licentiate in piano performance from the Royal Schools of Music, studied psychology and education at the University of Otago, subsequently took Musikkhovedfag (M.A. in music) at Bergen University College, and completed her doctorate of philosophy at the University of Birmingham. She currently directs the master's program in music and education at Newcastle (p. xxvi) University. Her international work as teacher, composer (both commissioned and with assignments as composer-in-residence), and children's singing specialist is underpinned by the principles of children's inherent musicality, and their likewise innate senses of quality and of empathy. Her research explores conceptual resonances between musicking and empathy, both within children's school music education, and within intercultural contexts, and includes attention to children's voice and agency. Her published work includes musical compositions, and texts about children's singing, music and empathy, and musicking in the context of peace building.



Andreas C. Lehmann holds a master's degree in music education and a Ph.D. in musicology from the Hochschule für Musik und Theater Hannover (Germany). He conducted postdoctoral research in psychology at the Florida State University, Tallahassee. He is currently professor of Systematic Musicology at the Hochschule für Musik Würzburg (Germany). He teaches in the area of music psychology and related topics, and is associate editor of Musicae Scientiae as well as president of the German society for music psychology. His research interests concern the structure and acquisition of high levels of instrumental music performance skill (sight-reading, practice, generative processes), they include historical studies on the development of expertise, and they cover a broad range of topics in music education (e.g., competency modelling, amateur music making and participation).



Samuel Leong (Ph. D) is Associate Dean (Quality Assurance and Enhancement) of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, and professor and head of the Cultural and Creative Arts Department at the Hong Kong Institute of Education. He is also Director of the UNESCO Observatory for Research in Local Cultures & Creativity in Education. He was Director of Music Education at the University of Western Australia and codirected the Australian National Review for School Music Education (2004–5) prior to moving to Hong Kong. He has been awarded competitive research grants from the Australian Research Council, Hong Kong Research Grants Council and Arts Development Council of Hong Kong. Leong is Director of Research of the International Drama and Theatre Education Association and serves on the boards of nine refereed journals. His professional and research interests are in the areas of creativity and arts assessment, performance wellness, metacognition, cultural policy, and cross-cultural learning.



Richard Letts, AB., Ph.D. (University of California at Berkeley), is Executive Director, Music Council of Australia. After leaving university, he was Director of the East Bay Center for the Performing Arts, San Francisco East Bay, and of the University of Minnesota's MacPhail Center for the Arts, Minneapolis. In 1982, he returned to Australia as the Director of the Music Board of the Australia Council, then was Director of the Australian Music Centre, and in 1994, founded the national Music Council of Australia. From 2005 to 2009, he was President of the International Music Council. He is a journal editor, and author of books, (p. xxvii) hundreds of articles, and research reports including The Protection and Promotion of Cultural Diversity for UNESCO. Current activity is focused on policy formation and advocacy in a broad range of music issues, including music education at all levels. He is a Member of the Order of Australia.



Bo Wah Leung received his Ph.D. from the University of New South Wales, Australia. He is associate professor in the Cultural and Creative Arts Department at the Hong Kong Institute of Education. His areas of research interests include creativity in music teaching and learning, motivation in composing and learning ethnic music, and teaching Cantonese opera in partnership. His areas of research interests include creativity in music teaching and learning, motivation in composing and learning ethnic music, and teaching Cantonese opera in partnership. He was the founding president of the Hong Kong Association for Music Educators. Currently he is a founding co-editor of the Asia-Pacific Journal for Arts Education and on the editorial board of three international refereed journals. He is an elected board member of the International Society for Music Education (ISME), a commissioner of the Research Commission of ISME, a Subject Consultant (Education and Performing Arts) of the Hong Kong Council for Academic Accreditation and Vocational Qualifications, and an adjunct professor of the School of Music at the Northeast Normal University, China.



Håkan Lundström has a long teaching experience at the Malmö Academy of Music, Sweden, particularly folk music, world music, and popular music in the music teacher program. As head of the institution and presently as a dean of the Malmö Faculty of Fine and Performing, arts he has played an active role in starting research in music education and more recently artistic research. He has also served as president of the International Society for Music Education. Specializing in ethnomusicology his thesis was on the music of the ethnic minority Kammu in Laos. On-going research projects also include Japanese festival and popular music and native music in Alaska. He has co-edited school song books and led a project on intercultural music education including field studies abroad (Gambia) and work with immigrant musicians. Another long-term project concerns conservatory education and revitalization of minority music in Vietnam.



Clifford K. Madsen, Ph.D., is the Robert O. Lawton Distinguished Professor in the Center for Music Research in the College of Music at the Florida State University, where he completed his doctorate and served as a faculty member since 1961. His expertise is in experimental research in music and systematic observation and analysis concerning teacher effectiveness. His research interests are in perception and cognition having done a good deal of research in intonation and teacher effectiveness. Additionally he pioneered the use of the Continuous Response Digital Interface (CRDI) to investigate aesthetic and emotional response to music. He is widely published in many scholarly journals and has authored and/or co-authored 13 books. (p. xviii)



Andrew J. Martin is Professorial Research Fellow, Australian Research Council Research Fellow, and President-elect of the International Association of Applied Psychology – Division 5 Educational, Instructional, and School Psychology. He is a registered psychologist recognized for psychological and educational research in motivation and for the quantitative methods he brings to the study of applied phenomena. Although the bulk of his research focuses on motivation, engagement, and achievement, he is also published in cognate areas such as academic resilience and academic buoyancy, personal bests, and pedagogy. His research also bridges other disciplines through assessing motivation and engagement in sport, music, and work. He is an associate editor of the British Journal of Educational Psychology and is on the editorial boards of three international journals (American Educational Research Journal, and Contemporary Educational Psychology).



Alagi Mbye is a jali, born to be musician, in the casted system of the Mandinka culture in Gambia. He has been involved in the development of the course “Studies in the Music of a Foreign Culture—Gambia” at the Malmö Academy of Music, since it began in 1991, and has a deep experience of cultural exchange through a wide range of projects. In 1998 he opened Maalis Music School in Nema Kunku, a little village in Gambia. This school is unique, since it is open to all children, not only those belonging to a Jali family. He is an excellent kora player, who blends his traditional knowledge with a strong vision to change and thereby make his heritage sustainable in a modern world. He regularly tours in Sweden and Norway and has made CD recordings with some of the leading folk musicians in Scandinavia.



Katrina McFerran is a music therapist who attained her bachelor's and Ph.D. qualifications at the University of Melbourne in Australia. She is now senior lecturer in music therapy at the Melbourne Conservatorium of Music (University of Melbourne), where she focuses on training of registered music therapists and research into music therapy with young people. Her research interests span a range of challenges faced by young people, from disabilities to mental illness. She is also interested in preventative uses of music for health by young people and investigations of how musical engagement can lead to flourishing. She has recently released her first book: Adolescents, Music and Music Therapy.



Gary E. McPherson studied music education at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music, before completing a master of music education at Indiana University, a doctorate of philosophy at the University of Sydney, and a Licentiate and Fellowship in trumpet performance through Trinity College, London. He is the Ormond Professor and Director of the Melbourne Conservatorium of Music at the University of Melbourne, and has served as National President of the Australian Society for Music Education and President of the International Society for Music Education. His research interests are broad and his approach interdisciplinary. His most important research examines the acquisition and development of musical competence, and motivation to engage and participate in music from novice to (p. xxix) expert levels. With a particular interest in the acquisition of visual, aural and creative performance skills he has attempted to understand more precisely how music students become sufficiently motivated and self-regulated to achieve at the highest level.



Bradley Merrick completed a master of education at the University of Western Sydney, followed by a doctorate of philosophy in music education at the University of New South Wales, after completing his undergraduate study. He is an experienced musician and educator, having taught in state, Catholic, and independent schools in New South Wales, while also having performed professionally for many years. He is Director of Research in Learning at Barker College, where he teaches secondary music and oversees research projects. He has written several music textbooks for secondary students and specialises in the use of new technology in music education, having presented nationally and internationally in this field. His research interests include classroom teaching practice and emerging pedagogies, combined with the investigation of new technologies and their use amongst students. He has a particular interest in student motivation and self-regulation, combined with different learning styles and their influence upon understanding.



David E. Myers holds a bachelor's degree in music education from Lebanon Valley College, master's degree from the Eastman School of Music, and Ph.D. in music education from the University of Michigan. He is professor and director of the School of Music, University of Minnesota. He previously taught at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the University of Sydney (AUS), and Georgia State University. He is a founding member MENC's Special Research Interest Group in Adult and Community Music and was an author-editor for The New Handbook of Research on Music Teaching and Learning (Oxford, 2002). He conducted a U.S. study of orchestra-community partnerships in 1996 and has been a national evaluation research consultant with the League of American Orchestras. He has written widely and keynoted national and international meetings on the topic of lifespan considerations in music education.



Adam Ockelford studied at the Royal Academy of Music in London, before embarking on a career that has embraced performing, composing, teaching, researching, writing, consultancy, and management. His Ph.D. drew together thinking from music theory and music psychology, in investigating how music intuitively makes sense to us all. Today, his research interests are in music psychology, education, theory and aesthetics – particularly special educational needs and the development of exceptional abilities; learning, memory and creativity; the cognition of musical structure and the construction of musical meaning. He has over 100 publications to his name, including 20 books. He is Secretary of the Society for Education, Music and Psychology Research (‘SEMPRE’), Chair of Soundabout, an Oxfordshire-based charity in the UK that supports music provision for children and young people with complex needs, and founder of The AMBER Trust, a charity that supports visually impaired children in their pursuit of music. (p. xxx)



Bengt Olsson holds a master's in music education and history and a Ph.D. in musicology. He is the chair of research on music education at the Academy of Music and Drama, University of Gothenburg. He is a former dean of the Faculty of Fine, Applied and Performing Arts and the Faculty of Teacher Education. He has been involved in research projects on musical knowledge and aesthetic discourses, the social psychology and the sociology of music education, Scandinavian research on music teaching and learning, which appear in international journals and books. He is presently involved in national and international research projects on the connection between digital knowledge and musical teaching and learning. He is a member of the editorial board of the International Journal of Community music, the International Advisory Board of British Journal of Music Education and the External Advisory Board of London Review of Education.



Helen Phelan studied music and German at University College Cork. Her teaching diploma and master's in music education were awarded by the National University of Ireland, Galway, and her doctorate in philosophy is from the University of Limerick. She is associate director of the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance at the University of Limerick and also director of the arts practice Ph.D. program. She was course director of the masters program in chant and ritual song for ten years and also served as assistant dean to the college of humanities. Her research interests include cross-cultural ritual chant, rituals of new migrant communities in Ireland, music of the Irish Catholic church and music education philosophy. She is director of the Anáil Dé: Breath of God festival of world sacred music and of Sanctuary, a higher education funded initiative, which facilitates cultural projects with new migrant communities in Ireland.



Ross Purves studied music at City University, London, before completing a master of music education at the Institute of Education, University of London, and a P.G.C.E. in postcompulsory education at the University of Greenwich. He is Joint Course Manager for Music and Music Technology at Luton Sixth Form College and a part-time research officer in the Institute of Education, University of London. He has worked on a series of research projects funded by the UK Economic and Social Research Council, the Department for Education and Skills and the charity Youth Music. He is currently working on the European Union-funded ‘Use of Music for Social Inclusion’ project. His doctoral research is focused on geographical and social variables that impact on the music learning biographies of young people. Publications embrace musicians’ and teachers’ professional development, music technology education, and aspects of human computer interaction. He is an experienced performing musician and arranger.



Tal-Chen Rabinowitch studied psychology and musicology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, as well as performing arts at the Jerusalem Academy of Music and Dance (specializing in the flute). She has a master's degree in cognitive sciences from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, which focused on theoretical aspects of emotional perception of music and on the links between music and (p. xxxi) empathy. She is currently completing her Ph.D. at the Centre for Music and Science, in the Faculty of Music, at the University of Cambridge. This work explores experimentally the effects of musical group interaction on children's every day capacity for empathy, and in particular, the emotional impact of synchronisation during musical interaction. She is interested in uncovering the cognitive mechanisms and processes that underlie musical group interaction and their relevance to empathy.



Bennett Reimer is the John W. Beattie Professor of Music Emeritus at Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois. Founder and Director of the Center for the Study of Education and the Musical Experience, he is author and editor of two dozen books, the latest Seeking the Significance of Music Education (2009). He has published over 150 essays on philosophy of music education, curriculum theory, research theory, multicultural issues, musical intelligences, interdisciplinary arts principles, teacher education, international music education issues, and applications of cognitive psychology to music learning. He received the rare “Legends of Teaching” award from the Northwestern University School of Music and an honorary doctorate from DePaul University, Chicago. A special double issue of The Journal of Aesthetic Education, “Musings: Essays in Honor of Bennett Reimer,” was published in Winter, 1999. He is a recipient of the MENC Senior Researcher Award and an inductee into the Music Educators Hall of Fame.



S. Alex Ruthmann studied performing arts technology at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, before completing M.M. and Ph.D. degrees at Oakland University in music education. He is Assistant Professor of Music Education at the University of Massachusetts, Lowell, where he teaches graduate and undergraduate courses at the intersection of music education, arts computing, and research. He currently serves as Chair of the Creativity special research interest group of the Society for Research in Music Education, as managing editor of the International Journal of Education & the Arts, and serves on the editorial/advisory boards of the British Journal of Music Education and Journal of Music, Technology, and Education. His current research explores social/digital media musicianship and creativity, as well as the development of technologies for music learning, teaching and engagement for use in schools and community-based interdisciplinary arts+computing programs.



Eva Saether studied musicology and social anthropology at the University of Oslo, before she completed her Ph.D. in music education at Lund University. She is a Reader in Music Education Research and postdoctoral research fellow at Malmö Academy of Music, where she was employed partly because of her background in Swedish folk music, a genre that needed to be included in academia. Alongside with her research activities, her work has included course development and projects at the Malmö Academy of Music, with the aim to develop a music teacher education that meets the needs of a multicultural society. In 2003 she defended her thesis The Oral University: Attitudes to music teaching and learning in the Gambia. Her research interests cover intercultural perspectives on music education, (p. xxxii) creativity, identity and collaborative learning in on-line contexts. Besides her research projects she is co-ordinating GLOMAS, an innovative Nordic joint master program in world music.



Andrea Sangiorgio concluded his piano studies in Italy and graduated in music and movement education at the Orff-Institute, university “Mozarteum,” Salzburg, Austria. Later he gained a master's degree in ethnomusicology at the university “Tor Vergata” in Rome. Since 1999 he has been co-director of CDM Centro Didattico Musicale where he is responsible for teacher education courses. In 2002 with Valentina Iadeluca he conceived a one-year course on Orff-Schulwerk - elemental music and dance education, which since 2007 has been run in collaboration with the University of Rome “Tor Vergata”. The author of various articles, he has been active as a teacher educator, both in Italy and abroad, mainly on the themes: elemental music and dance education (Orff-Schulwerk approach), voice training for children, ensemble music for percussion instruments, group improvisation, and cognitive aspects of music learning.



Jonathan Savage is a Reader in Education at the Institute of Education, Manchester Metropolitan University. He has a Ph.D. in Musicology from the University of East Anglia. He is currently working on the Innovative Technologies for an Engaging Classroom (iTEC) project, the largest pan-European test of learning and teaching scenarios using ICT in more than 1,000 classrooms in 12 countries. His research interests include implementing new technologies in education, cross-curricular approaches to teaching and learning, creativity and assessment. He is also Managing Director of Ucan.tv (www.ucan.tv), a not-for-profit company that produces educational software and hardware including Sound2Picture, Sound2Game and Hand2Hand. Free moodle courses are available at www.ucan.me.uk. Jonathan runs an active blog at www.jsavage.org.uk and can be followed on Twitter @jpjsavage.



Reza Shayesteh was born in Teheran in 1961 and has lived in exile since 1984. During the last 15 years he has been teaching Persian music in Malmö, after having studied in the traditional way from Persian masters. He teaches a wide range of different instruments: tar, setar, taf, tanboor, santour, tonbak, kamanche and song. He started and leads the music school at the Iranian-Swedish association, but his expertise is also being used at the Malmö Academy of Music, where he contributes as a guest teacher at the folk music department and in intercultural projects. Reza Shayesteh plays an important role in the multicultural music life of Malmö. He is an active musician in Orient Flames ensemble, World Mix Orchestra, Malmö Symfoniorkester, the Middle Eastern ensemble and Gol Riz ensemble.



Laya H. Silber studied music theory and conducting at the Rubin Academy of Music in Jerusalem, Israel, before completing a master of music at the New England Conservatory of Music and a doctorate of music education at Columbia University Teachers’ College. She is the assistant chair, director of undergraduate (p. xxxiii) studies, and choral director in the Department of Music of Bar-Ilan University in Ramat Gan, Israel. Her research interests include Yiddish art song, the music of George Gershwin and the American Yiddish theater, performance practice of choral music, and choral singing and well-being. A significant aspect of her research is in the area of choral singing in prisons, with special emphasis on multi-part singing and its effects on social skills.



Marissa Silverman completed a bachelor's degree in English literature at New York University before graduating with a master of fine arts in music at the State University of New York (Purchase), a master of teaching at Pace University, and a doctorate of music performance at New York University. She taught secondary school band, general music, and English literature in New York City before her appointment as Assistant Professor and Coordinator of Undergraduate Music Education at the John J. Cali School of Music, Montclair State University, Montclair, New Jersey. A Fulbright scholar, her research interests include urban music education, interdisciplinary methods of education, music education and identity, general music, curriculum, and various dimensions of music and music education philosophy. Her research is published in The International Journal of Music Education, Music Education Research, Research Studies in Music Education, International Journal of Community Music, and The Oxford Handbook of Music Education Philosophy.



Wendy L. Sims completed bachelor's and master's degrees at Kent State University and the doctor of philosophy degree in music education at Florida State University. She taught elementary music in public schools in Ohio, and since 1985 has been on the faculty of the University of Missouri, Columbia. An expert on early childhood music education and research, she regularly presents research and workshop sessions at national and international conferences. Her publications include articles in national and international journals and two edited books about music in prekindergarten. She served as a member and chair of the Music Education Research Council of MENC-The National Association for Music Education, on the Board of Directors of the International Society for Music Education (ISME), and as the ISME Publications Standing Committee chair. In 2006 she was appointed to a six-year term as editor of the Journal of Research in Music Education.



Rineke Smilde graduated from the Groningen Conservatory with principal study flute. She holds a master's degree in musicology (contemporary music) from Amsterdam University and a Ph.D. in education from the Georg August University in Goettingen, Germany. She is professor of Lifelong Learning in Music and the Arts at the Prince Claus Conservatory in Groningen and the Royal Conservatory in The Hague, leading an international research group that examines questions about what engaging with new audiences means for the different roles of musicians and artists. Her particular research interests are the different learning styles of musicians and the role of biographical learning in the context of lifelong and lifewide learning. She has served as vice president of the European Association of Conservatories (AEC) and as a board member of the European Association of (p. xxxiv) Music in Schools. She has led various research groups on lifelong learning in music for the AEC.



David S. Smith holds a bachelor of music education degree from Greenville College, a master of music education degree from Michigan State University, and a doctor of philosophy in music education and music therapy from Florida State University. Currently he is professor of music education at Western Michigan University, where he teaches classes in music education methodology, psychology of music, and research at the undergraduate and graduate levels, and supervises short- and long-term practicum experiences in music education and music therapy. His areas of expertise and research interests include diverse learners in inclusive environments, and musical involvement across the age and ability spectrum, particularly adult and older adult individuals. He is a past president of the American Music Therapy Association, charter member of MENC's Adult and Community Music Special Research Interest Group, and founding member of the North American Coalition for Community Music.



Petros Stagkos holds a graduate diploma from the School of Law, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, a postgraduate diploma (Diplôme d’¹tudes Supérieures) in public law, and a doctorate (Doctorat d’¹tat) in law from the Faculty of Law, Dijon University (France). He is Professor of European Law (Jean Monnet Chair of Human Rights), Faculty of Law, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, and member of the European Committee of Social Rights, Council of Europe, Strasbourg (France). His publications focus on the thematic areas of the European and Greek law of fundamental rights and European and national anti-discrimination law. He is senior expert of the Greek branch of legal experts network in the EU Fundamental Rights Agency, Vienna. He is a member of the interdisciplinary team of the research project C.A.L.M. (Community Action in Learning Music) that aims to democratize music education through an ongoing process of communal engagement between the university and “high-risk” schools.



David J. Teachout completed a bachelor of music education from West Virginia University, a master of music education at the University of Oklahoma, and a doctorate of philosophy at Kent State University. He is Chair of the Music Education Department at the University of North Carolina, Greensboro, and his research interest is in pre-service music teacher development. His work has been presented at national and international conferences and published in numerous journals. He is co-principle investigator for a $374,000 US National Science Foundation grant funded to develop interdisciplinary teaching modules for grades 2–5 that explore natural intersections between science and music. He is a past Chair of the Society for Music Teacher Education (SMTE), and has served as Symposium Chair for SMTE's Symposium on Music Teacher Education since its inception in 2005.



Matthew D. Thibeault studied music education and psychology at Florida State University before completing M.A. and Ph.D. degrees at Stanford University in (p. xxxv) Curriculum Studies in Arts Education. He is Assistant Professor of Education and Music Education at the University of Illinois. Thibeault has consulted for Apple Computer, the California Arts Council, California State University System, and Interlochen Arts Academy. He is widely published in the areas general music and technology. He is co-managing editor of the International Journal of Education & the Arts, and serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Music, Technology, and Education. Working on a multiyear National Science Foundation grant, he co-authored the book Designing Everyday Assessment in the Science Classroom (Teachers College Press). He taught in public schools as K-3 music specialist for the Portola Valley School District, and later at the School of the Arts in San Francisco.



Evan S. Tobias studied music education at the Crane School of Music at State University of New York, Potsdam, before completing M.M. and Ph.D. degrees in music education at Northwestern University. He is Assistant Professor of Music Education at Arizona State University, where he teaches both undergraduate and graduate courses and heads the Consortium for Digital, Popular, and Participatory Culture in Music Education, which he founded in 2009. He also serves as a faculty member of the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts Digital Culture Initiative. Prior to his appointment at ASU, he taught a technology in music education course at DePaul University and middle school instrumental and general music in New York. His research focuses on creative uses of technology, issues of social justice, expanding beyond traditional music curricula, and approaches to integrating popular culture and music in music classrooms.



Rena B. Upitis studied piano performance with the Royal Conservatory of Music, before completing a bachelor of laws, bachelor of arts, and master of education at Queen's University, a doctorate of education at Harvard University, and a second performance degree in voice at the Royal Conservatory. She worked as a music teacher in inner-city schools in Canada and the United States and has been a studio teacher of piano and music theory for over 35 years, and currently is professor of arts education at Queen's University. Her various research projects have explored teacher, artist, and student transformation through the arts and the use of electronic games in mathematics and science education. Her current interest is on how school architecture both constrains and opens up possibilities for learning. She has served as national president of the Arts Researchers and Teachers Society of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies.



Kari K. Veblen is Associate Dean of Graduate Studies and Research and Associate Professor of music education at the Don Wright Faculty of Music at the University of Western Ontario, where she teaches foundations, elementary methods, cultural perspectives, and graduate research courses. She also served as a research associate at the Irish World Music Centre (University of Limerick), a visiting scholar at the Center for Research in Music Education (University of Toronto), and a curriculum consultant to orchestras, schools, and community groups. Her (p. xxxvi) interests bridge music, education, ethnomusicology, and the arts. She is currently investigating community music networks, structures, and individuals worldwide. Another strand of her research follows a twenty-five-year fascination with teaching and learning of traditional Irish/Celtic/diasporic musics. Research and lectures have taken her worldwide. Co-author and co-editor of three books and numerous peer-reviewed chapters, articles, and conference papers, she is associate editor of the International Journal of Community Music.



Janice L. Waldron studied music education at the University of Houston prior to receiving a master of music in wind band conducting from the University of Toronto and a doctorate in philosophy at Michigan State University. Currently she is assistant professor of music education at the University of Windsor. Her research interests include online music communities, cyber ethnographic methods, informal music learning, lifelong learning, adult music education, and Irish traditional and Old Time musics. Her most recent work employs cyber ethnographic method in examination of online music communities as communities of practice and epistemological implications of music learning and teaching in contextually linked on and offline music communities. She has had articles published in The Bulletin for the Council of Research in Music Education, The Philosophy of Music Education Review, Music, Education, and Technology, The International Journal of Community Music, Music Education Research International and Gender, Education, Music, Society.



Carole Waugh is currently completing her doctorate study at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how teachers see student consultation strategies to inform the development of their classroom assessment practices.  Prior to this she completed an MPhil in Educational Research. Her research interests lie in exploring students’ and teachers’ use of classroom assessment, with particular emphasis on their use of assessment of learning strategies when preparing for high stakes summative testing in the 14–19 sector. She is also involved in finding innovative ways of assessing new qualifications in Critical Thinking and Thinking Skills. She has worked as a classroom teacher for seventeen years and was a Chief Examiner for a leading UK Awarding Body for seven years.



Peter R. Webster holds master-s and doctoral degrees in music education from the Eastman School of Music. His teaching as a professor at Northwestern University includes responsibilities for courses in philosophy of music education, graduate research, music technology, assessment, and creative thinking in music. He supervises the doctoral program in music education. He has presented at many state, national, and international meetings and is a frequent keynote speaker. His published work includes over 70 articles and book chapters on technology, music cognition, and creative thinking in music which have appeared in journals and handbooks in and outside of music. He is an editorial board member for several prestigious journals and has severed as an editor for several projects. Webster (p. xxxvii) is co-author of Experiencing Music Technology, 3rd edition Update (Cengage/Schirmer, 2008). He is the author of Measures of Creative Thinking in Music, an exploratory tool for assessing music thinking using quasi-improvisational tasks.



Graham F. Welch holds the Institute of Education, University of London Established Chair of Music Education. He is elected chair of the internationally based Society for Education, Music and Psychology Research, president of the International Society for Music Education (ISME), and past co-chair of the Research Commission of ISME. Current Visiting Professorships include the Universities of Queensland (Australia), Limerick (Eire) and Roehampton (UK). He is also a member of the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council's (AHRC) Review College for music and has been a specialist consultant for Government departments and agencies in the UK, Italy, Sweden, USA, Ukraine, UAE, South Africa and Argentina. Publications number over two hundred and sixty and embrace musical development and music education, teacher education, the psychology of music, singing and voice science, and music in special education and disability. Publications are in English, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Swedish, Greek, Japanese and Chinese.



Paul Woodford holds degrees from the University of Toronto, the University of Western Ontario, and Northwestern University (Ph.D.) and is professor and former chair of the Department of Music Education at the Don Wright Faculty of Music, University of Western Ontario. His interests in philosophical, historical, sociological, and political issues affecting the profession have led to many publications, including a fifth book, Democracy and Music Education: Liberalism, Ethics, and the Politics of Practice (Indiana University Press, 2005), a chapter in The New Handbook of Research on Music Teaching and Learning, and articles in leading professional journals. He is past chair of the executive committee of the International Society for the Philosophy of Music Education (2005–7) and is a member of the advisory boards of the Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, the British Journal of Music Education, and the Philosophy of Music Education Review. (p. xxxviii) (p. xxxix) (p. xl)