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date: 19 June 2019

(p. xix) Carl Schmitt’s Life: A Chronology

(p. xix) Carl Schmitt’s Life: A Chronology

1888

Carl Schmitt is born in Plettenberg, Germany (July 11)

1900–1907

Schmitt completes his secondary education at the Humanistisches Gymnasium, Attendorn

1907

Schmitt studies law at the University of Berlin

1907–1908

Schmitt studies law at the University of Munich

1908–1909

Schmitt studies law at the University of Strasbourg

Schmitt befriends Fritz Eisler

1910

Schmitt passes the first stage of his juridical training (Erstes juristisches Staatsexamen) at the University of Strasbourg

Schmitt completes his doctoral degree in law at the University of Strasbourg with a dissertation supervised by Fritz van Calker, entitled “Über Schuld und Schuldarten: Eine terminologische Untersuchung”

Schmitt begins the second stage of his juridical training at the Oberlandesgericht Düsseldorf (August)

1912

Schmitt publishes Gesetz und Urteil: Eine Untersuchung zum Problem der Rechtspraxis

Schmitt befriends the poet Theodor Däubler

1913

Schmitt publishes, with Fritz Eisler and under a pseudonym, Schattenrisse, a collection of parodies

Schmitt develops a close friendship with Hugo am Zehnhoff, subsequently minister of justice in Prussia, whom he credits with having taught him what it means to be a lawyer

1914

The death of Fritz Eisler leads to Schmitt’s friendship with Georg Eisler, the brother of his close friend

World War I begins (July 28)

1915

Schmitt passes the second stage of his juridical training (Assessorexamen) (January)

Schmitt marries Pawla Carita Dorotić (February 20)

Schmitt begins military service at the Stellvertretendes Generalkommando, Munich (February 26)

Schmitt drafts Bericht über das Belagerungszustands-Gesetz for his superiors

1916

On leave from military service, Schmitt commences his Habilitation and a temporary lectureship in law as Privatdozent at the University of Strasbourg with a Probevorlesung titled “Die Einwirkung des Kriegszustandes auf das ordentliche strafprozessuale Verfahren” (February 16)

Schmitt completes the Habilitation in law at the University of Strasbourg with a dissertation entitled “Der Wert des Staates und die Bedeutung des Einzelnen”

Schmitt publishes Theodor Däublers “Nordlicht”: Drei Studien über die Elemente, den Geist und die Aktualität des Werkes

Schmitt publishes “Diktatur und Belagerungszustand: Eine staatsrechtliche Studie”

Schmitt begins a close friendship (which will end in 1933) with the author and editor Franz Blei

1917

Schmitt is promoted to Assessor in the Stellvertretendes Generalkommando, where he is now in charge of his own department (October 1)

Schmitt attends Max Weber’s lecture “Wissenschaft als Beruf” (“Science as Vocation”) at the University of Munich (November 7)

Schmitt begins a close friendship with the poet Konrad Weiss

1918

Schmitt befriends Ludwig Feuchtwanger, editor and executive director of the publishing house Dunker & Humblot

Schmitt publishes “Die Buribunken: Ein geschichtsphilosophischer Versuch”

Proclamation of the Weimar Republic (November 9)

World War I ends (November 11)

The University of Strasbourg is dissolved, and Schmitt loses his position (November 11)

1919

The German government relocates to the city of Weimar due to violent unrest in Berlin (January)

The first parliamentary elections in Weimar Germany are held. The democratic political parties gain a large absolute majority, and a center-left majority government (SPD, Zentrum, DDP) is formed under Reich chancellor Philipp Scheidemann (SPD) (Weimarer Koalition) (January 19)

Schmitt attends Max Weber’s lecture “Politik als Beruf” (“Politics as Vocation”) at the University of Munich (January 28)

The Weimar parliament convenes as a constituent assembly and unicameral parliament (February 6)

Friedrich Ebert (SPD) is appointed Reich president (February 13)

Schmitt’s health suffers due to the revolutionary situation and ongoing state of emergency in Bavaria (May)

The Treaty of Versailles is signed (June 28)

Schmitt declines a civil service position in the Volkswohlfahrtsministerium (Ministry of People’s Welfare)

Schmitt begins a professional relationship with the macroeconomist Moritz Julius Bonn, the director of the Handelshochschule, who becomes a strong supporter

Schmitt is appointed lecturer of law at the Handelshochschule, Munich (September 1)

Schmitt publishes Politische Romantik

1920

The Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei (NSDAP) is founded (February 24)

The “Kapp Putsch,” a failed attempt by right-wing forces to overthrow the Weimar Republic, takes place (March 13–17)

The “Ruhraufstand,” a revolutionary workers’ revolt against the “Kapp Putsch” and attempt by left-wing forces to establish a dictatorship of the proletariat, fails (March 13–April 12)

In the second parliamentary elections, the Weimarer Koalition loses the absolute majority, and a center-right minority government (Zentrum, DVP, DDP) is formed under Reich chancellor Constantin Fehrenbach (Zentrum) (June 6)

Schmitt loses his position at the Handelshochschule, Munich (October 1)

1921

Schmitt begins a professional friendship with Rudolf Smend, the constitutional lawyer, who becomes a mentor

Schmitt is appointed professor of law at the University of Greifswald (fall)

Schmitt publishes Die Diktatur: Von den Anfängen des modernen Souveränitätsgedankens bis zum proletarischen Klassenkampf

1922

Schmitt is appointed professor of law at the University of Bonn (spring)

Schmitt completes draft of Der treue Zigeuner (The Loyal Gipsy), a novella (February)

Schmitt publishes Politische Theologie: Vier Kapitel zur Lehre von der Souveränität

Schmitt republishes the first three chapters of Politische Theologie in a Festschrift for Max Weber

Walter Rathenau is assassinated by right-wing forces, which preoccupies Schmitt (June 22)

Hyperinflation destabilizes Germany (summer)

Schmitt begins a brief friendship (which will end in 1925) with the writer and poet Hugo Ball, cofounder of the Dada movement in European art

Schmitt befriends Erik Peterson, Karl Eschweiler, and other theologians; Blei serves as his most important interlocutor about Catholicism

1923

Schmitt publishes Die geistesgeschichtliche Lage des heutigen Parlamentarismus

Schmitt publishes Römischer Katholizismus und politische Form

1924

Schmitt publishes “Die Diktatur des Reichspräsidenten nach Art. 48 der Reichsverfassung”

In the third parliamentary elections, the left-wing and right-wing political parties gain significant support, and a center-right minority government (Zentrum, DVP, DDP) is formed under Reich chancellor Wilhelm Marx (Zentrum) (May 4)

In the fourth parliamentary elections, the democratic political parties gain, the left-wing and-right wing political parties lose some support, and a center-right majority government (DNVP, Zentrum, DVP, DDP, BVP) is formed under Reich chancellor Hans Luther (unaffiliated) (December 7)

1925

Schmitt publishes Verfassungslehre

The NSDAP is refounded with Adolf Hitler as party leader (February 26)

Reich president Ebert dies (February 28)

In the first presidential elections in Weimar Germany, General Paul von Hindenburg is elected Reich president (April 26)

The Treaty of Locarno is signed (October 16)

The NSDAP creates the Schutzstaffel (SS) as a subsidiary organization of the Sturmabteilung (SA) (November 9)

1927

Schmitt publishes “Der Begriff des Politischen”

1928

Schmitt is appointed professor of law at the Handelshochschule, Berlin

In the fifth parliamentary elections, the democratic political parties gain support, and a left-center-right majority government (SPD, Zentrum, DVP, DDP) is formed under Reich chancellor Hermann Müller (SPD) (May 20)

1929

Schmitt publishes Der Hüter der Verfassung

Schmitt publishes “Das Reichsgericht als Hüter der Verfassung”

Hitler appoints Heinrich Himmler Reichsführer (Reich leader) of the SS (January 6)

Schmitt begins a close professional friendship with the economist Johannes Popitz, a fellow academic-turned-practitioner who initially served and subsequently resisted the Nazi regime

1930

Reich chancellor Müller’s left-center-right majority government resigns due to internal disagreements; there is a de facto constitutional transition from parliamentarianism to presidentialism (March 27)

Heinrich Brüning (Zentrum) is appointed Reich chancellor, and a presidential government (Z, DVP, DDP, BVP, WP, DNVP, KVP) is formed (March 30)

Brüning persuades von Hindenburg to dissolve parliament by invoking Article 48 of the Weimar Constitution, inaugurating a steady rise in the use of presidential Notverordnungen (emergency decrees) to govern (July 18)

In the sixth parliamentary elections, the democratic political parties incur heavy losses, the left-wing and right-wing political parties (especially NSDAP) gain significant support, and a presidential government is formed under reappointed Reich chancellor Brüning (September 14)

Schmitt begins a friendship with the writer Ernst Jünger (fall)

Schmitt receives an admiring letter from author and cultural critic Walter Benjamin, who acknowledges an intellectual debt to Schmitt’s reflections on the state (December 9)

1931

Schmitt publishes Der Hüter der Verfassung

Schmitt publishes “Die Wendung zum totalen Staat”

Schmitt publishes “Die staatsrechtliche Bedeutung der Notverordnung, insbesondere ihre Rechtsgültigkeit”

Schmitt receives, and declines, an offer to succeed Hans Kelsen (who took up a chair at the University of Cologne) as professor of law at the University of Vienna

1932

Schmitt publishes Der Begriff des Politischen: Mit einer Rede über das Zeitalter der Neutralisierungen und Entpolitisierungen

Schmitt publishes Legalität und Legitimität

Schmitt publishes “Die Verfassungsmäßigkeit der Bestellung eines Reichskommissars für das Land Preußen”

In the second presidential elections, von Hindenburg defeats Hitler (NSDAP) and is elected to a second term as Reich president (April 10)

Brüning resigns as Reich chancellor (May 30), and a presidential government (DNVP, unaffiliated) is formed under Reich chancellor Franz von Papen (unaffiliated) (June 1)

In the so-called Preußenschlag (Prussia coup), von Papen persuades Reich president von Hindenburg to dissolve the government of Prussia and seizes power in the state (July 20)

In the seventh parliamentary elections, the democratic political parties incur further losses, the NSDAP emerges as the strongest political party (July 31), and the presidential government continues under von Papen

Schmitt serves as counsel for the German Reich in the case Preußen contra Reich at the Staatsgerichtshof

Schmitt is appointed professor of law at the University of Cologne (September 19)

The Reichsgericht (Constitutional Court) declares the Preußenschlag to have been partially unconstitutional (October 25)

In the eighth parliamentary elections, the democratic political parties incur further losses, the NSDAP remains the strongest political party (November 6), and a presidential government is formed under Reich chancellor Kurt von Schleicher (unaffiliated) (December 3)

1933

Schmitt publishes Staat, Bewegung, Volk: Die Dreigliederung der politischen Einheit

Schmitt publishes “Das Gesetz zur Behebung der Not von Volk und Reich vom 24. März 1933”

Schmitt publishes “Führertum als Grundbegriff des nationalsozialistischen Rechts”

Schmitt publishes “Die deutschen Intellektuellen”

Schleicher resigns as Reich chancellor (January 28), and a presidential government (NSDAP, DNVP, Stahlhelm) is formed under Reich chancellor Hitler (NSDAP) (January 30)

Reich president von Hindenburg dissolves parliament (February 1)

An arson attack on parliament results in the Reichstagsbrand (Reichstag fire) (February 27)

Reich president von Hindenburg bestows extraordinary emergency powers on the Hitler government in the “Reichstag Fire Decree” (February 28)

In the first parliamentary elections in Nazi Germany, the NSDAP secures a substantial (but not absolute) majority, and a presidential dictatorship (March 5) is formed

Hitler government abolishes state governments and installs Reich commissars in their stead (March 5–10)

The SS establishes Dachau concentration camp (March 22)

The Nazi parliament adopts Gesetz zur Behebung der Not von Volk und Reich (Law for Rectification of the Distress of Nation and Reich), the so-called Enabling Act, formally establishing the Nazi dictatorship (March 23)

Prompted by Popitz, Schmitt begins to contribute to the drafting of the Reichsstatthaltergesetz and to the law of criminal procedure (March 31)

The NSDAP and affiliated organizations mobilize for a nationwide anti-Jewish boycott (April 1)

The Nazi parliament adopts Gesetz zur Wiederherstellung des Berufsbeamtentums (Law for the Restoration of the Professional Civil Service), excluding most Jews and political opponents from the civil service (April 7)

Schmitt refuses to support a petition seeking to prevent Hans Kelsen’s removal from the law faculty at the University of Cologne, the sole faculty member to do so (April 18)

Heinrich Göring establishes the Geheime Staatspolizei (Gestapo) (April 26)

Schmitt joins the NSDAP (May 1)

German student associations organize burnings of books by Jews and other presumed enemies of the state (May 10)

Schmitt receives, and declines, an offer to succeed Gerhard Anschütz as professor of law at the University of Heidelberg (May)

Schmitt is appointed Preußischer Staatsrat by Hermann Göring (July 11)

The Nazi parliament adopts Gesetz gegen die Neubildung von Parteien (Law against the Founding of New Political Parties), establishing a one-party state (July 14)

The Nazi parliament adopts Gesetz zur Verhütung erbkranken Nachwuchses (Law for the Prevention of Offspring with Hereditary Diseases), mandating the forced sterilization of disabled persons (July 14)

Schmitt receives, and declines, an offer to become professor of law at the University of Munich (August)

Schmitt is appointed professor of law at the University of Berlin (October)

Nazi Germany leaves the League of Nations (October 14)

Schmitt becomes Reichsgruppenleiter, or chair, of the section “University Professors” of the Bund Nationalsozialistischer Deutscher Juristen (Association of National Socialist German Legal Professionals) (November)

1934

Schmitt publishes Über die drei Arten des rechtswissenschaftlichen Denkens

Schmitt publishes Nationalsozialismus und Völkerrecht

Schmitt publishes “Ein Jahr nationalsozialistischer Verfassungsstaat”

Schmitt publishes “Nationalsozialismus und Rechtsstaat”

Schmitt publishes “Nationalsozialistisches Rechtsdenken”

Schmitt publishes “Der Führer schützt das Recht: Zur Reichstagsrede Adolf Hitlers vom 13. Juli 1934”

Himmler is appointed head of Gestapo and of all police forces outside of Prussia (April 20)

Hans Frank appoints Schmitt editor of the Deutsche Juristen-Zeitung, Germany’s most influential and respected law journal (June 1)

The “Röhm Putsch,” a violent purge by the SS of the leadership of the SA, the Nazi paramilitary organization, takes place, and select politicians are assassinated (June 30–July 2)

Von Hindenburg dies, and Hitler becomes Reich president (August 2)

Hitler abolishes the office of Reich president and declares himself Führer des deutschen Reiches und Volkes (Leader of the German Reich and People) (August 19)

Himmler establishes the Inspektion der Konzentrationslager (Inspectorate of Concentration Camps), the central SS administrative and managerial authority for all Nazi concentration camps (December 10)

1935

Schmitt publishes “Die Verfassung der Freiheit”

Schmitt publishes “Der Rechtsstaat”

The Nazi government adopts the Reichsstatthaltergesetz (Reich Governors Law) (January 30)

The Nazi government reintroduces military service, thereby violating the Treaty of Versailles (March 16)

Hitler’s government decrees the Reichsbürgergesetz (Reich Citizenship Law) and Gesetz zum Schutze des deutschen Blutes und der deutschen Ehre (Reich Citizenship Law for the Protection of German Blood and German Honor), the so-called Nuremberg Race Laws (September 15)

1936

Schmitt convenes the conference “Das Judentum in der Rechtswissenschaft” (October 3–4)

Schmitt publishes “Faschistische und nationalsozialistische Rechtswissenschaft”

Schmitt publishes “Die deutsche Rechtswissenschaft im Kampf gegen den jüdischen Geist”

The Winter Olympic Games take place at Garmisch-Partenkirchen (February 6–16)

Nazi Germany occupies the demilitarized Rhineland, thereby violating the Treaty of Versailles (March 7)

Hitler appoints Himmler Chief of German Police (June 17)

The SS establishes Sachsenhausen concentration camp (July 12)

Nazi Germany intervenes in the Spanish Civil War (July 25)

The Summer Olympic Games take place in Berlin (August 1–18)

The SD-Hauptamt des Sicherheitsdienstes der Reichsführung SS (Security Service Main Office of the SS High Command) begins investigation of “Prof. Dr. Karl Schmitt” (October 4)

Das Schwarze Korps, the official, weekly newspaper of the SS, publishes the first of two articles calling into question Schmitt’s Nazi credentials (December 3)

Das Schwarze Korps publishes the second of two articles calling into question Schmitt’s Nazi credentials (December 10)

1937

Schmitt publishes “Totaler Feind, totaler Krieg, totaler Staat”

Schmitt publishes “Der Staat als Mechanismus bei Hobbes und Descartes”

The Nazi parliament extends the Enabling Law by four years (January 30)

The SS establishes Buchenwald concentration camp (July 19)

The Nazi propaganda exhibition “Entartete Kunst” (“Degenerate Art”) opens in Munich (July 19–November 30)

Hitler decides on a violent solution of the “Lebensraumfrage” (“The Question of Living Space”) by 1943/1945 (November 5)

The Nazi propaganda exhibition “Der ewige Jude” (“The Eternal Jew”) opens in Munich (November 8)

1938

Schmitt publishes Der Leviathan in der Staatslehre des Thomas Hobbes: Sinn und Fehlschlag eines politischen Symbols

Schmitt publishes Die Wendung zum diskriminierenden Kriegsbegriff

Schmitt publishes “Völkerrechtliche Neutralität und völkische Totalität”

Nazi Germany annexes Austria (March 11–13)

The SS establishes Flossenbürg concentration camp (May 3)

The SS establishes Mauthausen concentration camp (August 8)

Nazi Germany, Italy, Great Britain, and France sign the so-called Munich Agreement, forcing Czechoslovakia to surrender its border regions to Nazi Germany (September 29–30)

The NSDAP and affiliated organizations organize a nationwide pogrom against Jews (November 9–10)

The Nazi government issues Verordnung zur Ausschaltung der Juden aus dem deutschen Wirtschaftsleben (Decree on the Elimination of the Jews from Economic Life), barring Jews from all economic activities (November 12)

The Nazi government issues Verordnung über den Einsatz des jüdischen Vermögens (Decree on the Utilization of Jewish property), forcing Jews to sell any and all of their possessions (December 3)

1939

Schmitt publishes Völkerrechtliche Großraumordnung mit Interventionsverbot für raumfremde Mächte: Ein Beitrag zum Reichsbegriff im Völkerrecht

Schmitt publishes “Der Reichsbegriff im Völkerrecht”

Nazi Germany invades the remaining territory of Czechoslovakia and establishes the “Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia” (March 15)

The SS establishes Ravensbrück concentration camp (May 15)

Nazi Germany invades Poland; World War II begins (September 1)

The SS establishes the civilian prisoner camp (later concentration camp) Stutthof (September 2)

Himmler establishes the Reichssicherheitshauptamt (RSHA) (Reich Security Main Office), led by Reinhard Heydrich and subsequently charged with coordinating the destruction of the European Jews (September 27)

Nazi Germany annexes former Polish regions and establishes the Generalgouvernement (General Government) to administer these occupied territories (October 26)

1940

Schmitt publishes Positionen und Begriffe im Kampf mit Weimar—Genf—Versailles, 1923–1939

Schmitt publishes “Reich und Raum: Elemente eines neuen Völkerrechts”

Schmitt publishes “Die Auflösung der europäischen Ordnung im ‘International Law’ (1890–1939)”

Schmitt publishes “Raum und Großraum im Völkerrecht”

Nazi Germany invades Norway and Denmark (April 9)

Nazi authorities seal the Jewish ghetto in Lodz (April 30)

Nazi Germany invades the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg, and France (May 10)

The SS establishes Auschwitz concentration camp (Auschwitz I) (May 20)

The SS establishes Neuengamme concentration camp (June 4)

Italy enters World War II as an ally of Nazi Germany (June 10)

Nazi authorities seal the Jewish ghetto in Warsaw (November 15)

Hungary, Romania, and Slovakia become allies of Nazi Germany (November 20–24)

1941

Schmitt publishes “Staatliche Souveränität und freies Meer: Über den Gegensatz von Land und See im Völkerrecht der Neuzeit”

Bulgaria becomes an ally of Nazi Germany (March 1)

Nazi authorities establish and seal the Jewish ghetto in Krakow (March 3–20)

Nazi Germany and its allies invade Yugoslavia and Greece (April 6)

The SS establishes Gross-Rosen concentration camp (May 1)

The SS establishes Natzweiler-Struthof concentration camp (May 21)

Croatia becomes an ally of Nazi Germany (June 15)

Nazi Germany invades the Soviet Union, and mobile killing units (Einsatzgruppen) embark on the coordinated mass killing of Jews and other presumed enemies on Soviet territory (June 22)

Heydrich and RSHA are charged with developing plans for the implementation of the “Final Solution” of the “Jewish Question” (July 31)

Nazi authorities establish the Jewish ghetto in Bialystok (August 1)

Nazi authorities seal the Jewish ghetto in Kovno (August 15)

Himmler tasks SS General Odilo Globocnik with implementing Aktion Reinhardt, the plan for the destruction of Jews in the General Government (October 15)

Nazi authorities seal the Jewish ghetto in Riga (October 25)

Nazi authorities in the General Government establish extermination camps in Bełżec, Sobibór, and Treblinka (November)

Nazi authorities establish Theresienstadt concentration camp (November 24)

Japan attacks the United States at Pearl Harbor (December 7)

Nazi authorities establish Chelmno extermination camp and begin mass killing of Jews (December)

1942

Schmitt publishes Land und Meer: Eine weltgeschichtliche Betrachtung

Heydrich and RSHA convene the so-called Wannsee Conference in Berlin to coordinate the administration of the Holocaust (January 20)

Nazi authorities establish Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration and extermination camp (Auschwitz II) (March 1)

The large-scale deportation and systematic destruction of the European Jews begins (March)

1943

Joseph Goebbels announces “den totalen Krieg” in a propaganda speech at the Sportpalast, Berlin (February 18)

1944

British and U.S. troops invade Nazi-occupied France (June 6)

1945

SS authorities begin forced evacuations of many concentration camps, so-called death marches, notably in Auschwitz (January 17)

Soviet troops liberate Auschwitz concentration camp complex (January 27)

U.S. troops liberate Ohrdruf concentration camp, a subcamp of Buchenwald (April 4)

British troops liberate Bergen-Belsen concentration camp (April 15)

Hitler commits suicide (April 30)

Schmitt is arrested at his home in Berlin-Schlachtensee by Soviet troops in (April)

Nazi Germany surrenders unconditionally (May 7–9)

Schmitt prepares Das internationalrechtliche Verbrechen des Angriffskrieges und der Grundsatz “Nullum crimen, nulla poena sine lege,” a legal opinion in support of the defense of Friedrich Flick, a German industrialist, at the International Military Tribunal (IMT) (August)

Schmitt is arrested and interrogated by U.S. authorities in Berlin and spends almost twelve months in detention there (September 25)

The trial of the major war criminals before the IMT at Nuremberg begins (November 20)

Control Council Law No. 10 is adopted (December 20)

1946

Schmitt is released from his first U.S. detention (October 10)

The IMT delivers its judgment (October 1)

1947

The U.S. military government establishes Military Tribunal III to try United States v. Josef Altstoetter, et al., the so-called Justice Case, under Control Council Law No. 10 (February 13)

Schmitt is rearrested and interrogated by U.S. authorities; he spends two months in detention in Nuremberg (March 19)

Schmitt is released from his second U.S. detention (May 6) and retreats to Plettenberg

Schmitt begins work on the Glossarium (August)

Military Tribunal III delivers its judgment (December 3–4)

1949

Schmitt publishes “Amnestie—Urform des Rechts”

The resurrected Vereinigung der deutschen Staatsrechtslehrer opposes Carl Schmitt’s membership

Otto Kirchheimer visits Schmitt in Plettenberg (December)

1950

Schmitt publishes Ex Captivitate Salus: Erfahrungen der Zeit 1945/47

Schmitt publishes Donoso Cortés in gesamteuropäischer Interpretation: Vier Aufsätze

Schmitt publishes Der Nomos der Erde im Völkerrecht des Jus Publicum Europaeum

1952

Academia Moralis, a support network for Schmitt, is formally established

1953

Schmitt’s isolation lessens and his intellectual contacts and travel increase

On the occasion of Schmitt’s sixty-fifth birthday, friends and supporters publish a bibliography in his honor (July)

Schmitt assists Johannes Winckelmann with the corrections for the new edition of Max Weber’s Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft

1954

Schmitt republishes Verfassungslehre (May)

Schmitt publishes “Im Vorraum der Macht”

1955

Schmitt delivers a rare public lecture, on Hamlet, at the Volkshochschule, an institution of adult education, in Düsseldorf

1956

Schmitt publishes Hamlet oder Hekuba: Der Einbruch der Zeit in das Spiel

1958

Schmitt publishes Verfassungsrechtliche Aufsätze aus den Jahren 1924–1954: Materialien zu einer Verfassungslehre

1959

Schmitt publishes “Nomos—Nahme—Name”

On the occasion of Schmitt’s seventieth birthday, friends and supporters publish the first of two Festschrifts, this one edited by Hans Barion, Ernst Forsthoff, and Werner Weber

1960

Schmitt publishes Die Tyrannei der Werte: Überlegungen eines Juristen zur Wert-Philosophie

1962

As founding editors, Ernst-Wolfgang Böckenförde and Roman Schnur establish the journal Der Staat, a counterpoint to the influential Archiv des öffentlichen Rechts

1963

Schmitt publishes Theorie des Partisanen: Zwischenbemerkung zum Begriff des Politischen

1968

On the occasion of Schmitt’s eightieth birthday, friends and supporters publish the edited collection Epirrhosis, the second of two Festschrifts, this one edited by Hans Barion, Ernst-Wolfgang Böckenförde, Ernst Forsthoff, and Werner Weber

1970

Schmitt publishes Politische Theologie II: Die Legende von der Erledigung jeder Politischen Theologie

1971

Schmitt ends discussions with Propyläen-Verlag, Berlin, about a possible edition of his political writings

1978

Schmitt publishes “Die legale Weltrevolution: Politischer Mehrwert als Prämie auf juristische Legalität und Superlegalität,” his final article

1985

Schmitt dies in Plettenberg (April 7)

(p. xx) (p. xxi) (p. xxii) (p. xxiii) (p. xxiv) (p. xxv) (p. xxvi) (p. xxvii) (p. xxviii) (p. xxix) (p. xxx)