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date: 20 February 2020

(p. xiii) List of Contributors

(p. xiii) List of Contributors

Kathleen Ahrens (安可思) is Head of Language Centre and Professor at Hong Kong Baptist University. Understanding lexical meaning has been the driving impetus behind much of her research. In addition to her research in cognitive linguistics and discourse analysis, she also explores stylistic issues in children's literature.



Yung-O Biq (毕永峨) is Professor in the Department of English at National Taiwan Normal University. Her research interests are in discourse and grammar, lexical semantics, cognitive linguistics, corpus linguistics, and pragmatics.



Guangshun Cao (曹广顺) is a Research Fellow at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. He is widely recognized for his research on the history of Chinese syntax, lexical studies of pre-modern Chinese, language contact, and its impact on the Chinese language.



Baoya Chen (陈保亚) is a Professor at the Department of Chinese Language and Literature, Peking University, specializing in language contact and etymology between Chinese and several minority languages. He has done extensive field research on the Tea-Horse Trail in southwestern China.



Ping Chen (陈平) is Professor and Chair in Chinese Studies in the School of Languages and Comparative Cultural Studies at the University of Queensland. His research interests include functional syntax, discourse analysis, pragmatics, sociolinguistics, and historical linguistics.



T. Richard Chi (齊德立) is Professor of Chinese Language and Linguistics at the University of Utah. His areas of expertise are in second language acquisition, Chinese linguistics, applied linguistics, curriculum and assessment design, and teaching Chinese as a second language.



George van Driem (無我) is a Linguist at the University of Berne, where he holds the chair of Historical Linguistics and directs the Linguistics Institute. He has conducted field research in the Himalayas since 1983. His interdisciplinary research in collaboration with geneticists has led to advances in the reconstruction of Asian ethnolinguistic prehistory.



Ik-sang Eom (严翼相) is Professor in the Department of Chinese Language and Literature at Hanyang University, Seoul. His research interests include Chinese phonology and comparative phonology between Chinese and Korean. He played an active role in changing the Chinese name of Seoul from Hancheng to Shou’er. (p. xiv)



Mitsuaki Endo (远藤光晓) is Professor at the College of Economics, Aoyama Gakuin University, Japan. His area of expertise is in Chinese linguistics, especially in Chinese dialectology and historical phonology.



Helena Hong Gao (高虹) is Assistant Professor at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. She received her PhD in general linguistics from Lund University, Sweden. Her research interests include cognitive linguistics, language acquisition, bilingualism, and computational linguistics.



Zev Handel (韓哲夫) is Associate Professor at the University of Washington, Seattle. His research interests include historical phonology, Chinese dialectology, Tibeto-Burman languages, Sino-Tibetan comparison, and Asian writing systems.



Agnes Weiyun He (何纬芸) is Professor of Applied Linguistics and Founding Director of the Center for Multilingual and Intercultural Communication at SUNY-Stony Brook University. Her honors include a Guggenheim Fellowship and a Spencer Postdoc Fellowship. Her research focuses on discourse and educational linguistics.



Yancheng He (何彦诚) is Associate Professor in the College of Foreign Studies and Director of the Institute of Foreign Languages and Literatures at Guangxi Normal University. His areas of scholarship are in linguistic typology, contact linguistics, and the documentation, history and typology of Tai-Kadai languages.



Dah-an Ho (何大安) is Academician at Academia Sinica, Taiwan and a research fellow at its Institute of Linguistics. His major fields of study is in the history of Chinese phonology, Chinese dialectology, and Austronesian linguistics.



Shu-Kai Hsieh (谢舒凯) is Assistant Professor in the Graduate Institute of Linguistics, National Taiwan University. He is interested in computational linguistics, lexical semantics, and linguistic philosophy. He now works on the construction of ontological lexical resources that would improve the performance of Natural Language Processing systems and facilitate e-Humanities researches.



Chu-Ren Huang (黃居仁) is Chair Professor and Dean of Faculty of Humanities at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University. His areas of scholarship are in computational and corpus linguistics, lexical semantics, and ontology. Language resources projects he led at Academia Sinica built the first lexica, corpora, treebanks, and wordnets for Chinese.



Jiangping Kong (孔江平) is Professor at the Department of Chinese Language and Literature, Peking University. His research interests include experimental phonetics, physiological and acoustical modeling of Mandarin, evolutionary studies of Tibetan tones, and digitalization of oral cultures.



Oi Yee Kwong (邝蔼兒) is Assistant Professor at the Department of Linguistics and Translation, City University of Hong Kong. Her research interests span many bilingual and pan-Chinese language processing issues in computational linguistics and corpus (p. xv) linguistics, including lexical semantics, lexical resource development, name transliteration, and sentiment analysis.



Randy J. LaPolla FAHA (罗仁地) is Professor of Linguistics and Head of the Division of Linguistics and Multilingual Studies at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. His research focuses on the documentation of and the history and typology of Sino-Tibetan and Austronesian languages and issues related to the nature and development of communicative behavior.



David C. S. Li (李楚成) is Professor in the Department of Linguistics and Modern Language Studies at the Hong Kong Institute of Education. He has published in three main areas: World Englishes and perceptions of “Hong Kong English,” motivations of Chinese-English code-switching in Hong Kong and Taiwan, and EFL learners’ learning difficulties and error-correction strategies.



Mingxing Li (李明兴) is a Doctoral Student in linguistics at the University of Kansas. His research interests are in phonetics-phonology interface and Chinese phonology.



Paul Jen-kuei Li (李壬癸) is Distinguished Research Fellow at the Institute of Linguistics and Academician at Academia Sinica, Taiwan. He is a leading specialist on Formosan languages. He has made a lifelong study of all these languages, and has published 16 monographs, including dictionaries on the endangered Pazeh and Kavalan languages.



Ping Li (李平) is Professor of Psychology, Linguistics, and Information Sciences and Technology and Co-Chair of the Neuroscience Program, Pennsylvania State University. His research interests are in the cognitive neuroscience of language, psycholinguistics, bilingualism, computational, and neural mechanisms of language acquisition.



Li, Wei (李嵬) is Professor of Applied Linguistics at Birkbeck College, University of London, where he is Pro-Vice-Master and Director of the Birkbeck Graduate Research School. His main research interest is in the broad area of bilingualism and multilingualism, and his current work focuses on the creativity and criticality of multilingual and multimodal language users.



Zihe Li (李子鹤) got his PhD in linguistics at Peking University and is currently Assistant Professor at School of Literature, Capital Normal University. While pursuing his doctorate he conducted extensive fieldwork on minority languages.



Chinfa Lien (连金发) is a Professor at the Graduate Institute of Linguistics, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan. His research expertise is in semantics, morphology, dialectology, and historical linguistics. He has published extensively on diachronic and synchronic aspects of Southern Min.



Jingxia Lin (林静夏) is Assistant Professor at the Division of Chinese, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. Her research interests include lexical semantics, grammaticalization, syntax-semantics interface, and Chinese dialectology. (p. xvi)



Meichun Liu (刘美君) is Professor at the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures and at the Graduate Institute of Foreign Literatures and Linguistics, National Chiao Tung University, Taiwan. Her areas of expertise are in lexical semantics and functional syntax. She has done extensive research on the construction of Mandarin VerbNet.



Yi Liu (刘艺) is Assistant Professor at the Department of Chinese and Bilingual Studies, Hong Kong Polytechnic University. Her areas of scholarship are in dialectology, lexicology, experimental phonetics, and language teaching.



Catherine McBride is a Developmental Psychologist and has published on a variety of topics including parenting, creativity, child abuse, peer relations, and reading development and impairment. She is Professor in the Department of Psychology, Chinese University of Hong Kong. Her research interests include social and cognitive development and language and reading development.



Tsu-lin Mei (梅祖麟) is Hu Shih Professor Emeritus of Cornell University and Academician at Academia Sinica, Taiwan. His publications cover the historical development of syntax and morphology of the Chinese language and its various dialects. He has also published several papers on Sino-Tibetan comparison.



Jianhong Mo (莫剑宏) is a PhD Student in the Department of Psychology, Chinese University of Hong Kong. She is interested in language acquisition and developmental disorders, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and developmental dyslexia. She currently works in Chinese writing acquisition and visual-motor skills.



Jerome L. Packard (裴吉瑞) is Professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign, specializing in Chinese word structure, Chinese psycholinguistics, and Chinese language acquisition and pedagogy. His current research interests include sentence processing in native Mandarin speakers and learners of Mandarin as a second language, and reading acquisition by Chinese children.



Wuyun Pan (潘悟云) is Professor in Shanghai Normal University and has done extensive research on Chinese phonology. His monograph on Chinese historical phonology has gained worldwide recognition and is considered a mainstream work of the field.



Gang Peng (彭刚) is Research Associate Professor at the Department of Linguistics and Modern Languages and Deputy Director of the Joint Research Centre for Language and Human Complexity at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. His primary research interests are in language evolution and variation, engineering aspects of language, psycholinguistics and neurolinguistics, with a specific focus on lexical tones.



Feng Shi (石锋) is Professor at the Institute of Linguistics, Nankai University and the Institute of Language Pathology and Brain Science, Beijing Language and Culture University. His major areas of research are in experimental linguistics, language evolution, and language acquisition.



Xiangdong Shi (施向东) is Professor at the College of Chinese Language and Culture, Nankai University, China. His major fields of research are in phonology, comparative (p. xvii) studies between Chinese and Tibetan and between Sanskrit and Chinese, and teaching Chinese as a second language.



Zhongwei Shen (沈钟伟) is Professor at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. He is interested in the mechanism of sound change, Chinese historical phonology, early history of Mandarin seen from ancient Altaic scripts, and Chinese dialectology.



Chaofen Sun (孙朝奋) is Professor at Stanford University and was Yangtze Scholar at Beijing Language and Culture University. His areas of scholarship are in morphosyntactic changes in the history of Chinese, sociolinguistics and Chinese syntax. He has done extensive research on Chinese historical linguistics and grammaticalization.



Hongkai Sun (孙宏开) is Emeritus Academy Member and Professor at the Institute of Ethnology and Anthropology, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. He is best known for his investigation of Chinese minority languages. He has published over two hundred papers and twenty-five books on descriptive, comparative, and social linguistics, especially Sino-Tibetan languages.



James H.-Y. Tai (戴浩一) is Chair Professor at the Graduate Institute of Linguistics and Director of the Research Center for Humanities and Social Sciences, National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan. His fields of specialization are in Chinese linguistics (syntax, semantics, and pragmatics), cognitive linguistics, and sign linguistics.



Gladys Tang (邓慧兰) is Professor at the Department of Linguistics and Modern Languages, Chinese University of Hong Kong. She has three major strands of research: linguistic structure of Hong Kong Sign Language, acquisition of signed language and spoken language by deaf children, and effect of sign bilingualism and co-enrollment on educating deaf and hearing students.



Hongyin Tao (陶红印) is Professor in the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of California, Los Angeles. His research areas include Chinese discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, applied linguistics, and socio-cultural linguistics.



Twila Tardif (谭霞灵) is Professor in the Department of Psychology and Center for Human Growth and Development, University of Michigan. Her research interests are in exploring the relationships between language, cognition, and culture, with a primary focus on Mandarin and Cantonese.



Shiao Wei Tham (谭晓薇) is Associate Professor in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures at Wellesley College. Her research interests lie mainly in lexical semantics, and extend to information structure and discourse.



Xiuhong Tong (佟秀红) is Postdoctoral Fellow at the Department of Psychology, Chinese University of Hong Kong. Her area of scholarship is in language acquisition and development. She is interested in Chinese reading processing and developmental dyslexia. (p. xviii)



Yaching Tsai (蔡雅菁) has an MA in Italian linguistics from Ca’ Foscari University of Venice and an MPhil in linguistics from the Chinese University of Hong Kong. She is now a freelance translator, working primarily with English and Italian to Chinese translation.



Jane S. Tsay (蔡素娟) is Professor at the Graduate Institute of Linguistics and Dean of College of Humanities, National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan. Her primary research areas are theoretical phonology, experimental phonology and phonetics, child language acquisition, corpus linguistics, Chinese dialectology, and Taiwan Sign Language.



Benjamin K. Tsou (邹嘉彥) is Emeritus Professor of the City University of Hong Kong, and Foreign Member of the Royal Academy of Overseas Science of Belgium. He launched LIVAC, the gigantic synchronous corpus of Chinese in 1995. Besides natural language processing, he has worked on language variation in space and time and was a general editor of the Language Atlas of China.



Caiyu Wang (王彩豫) is Assistant Professor of the School of Foreign Languages at Zhongnan University of Economics and Law and currently also a PhD student at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. She works in the areas of experimental phonetics and evolutionary phonology, especially in the aspect of tonal studies.



Feng Wang (汪锋) is Associate Professor at the Department of Chinese Language and Literature, Peking University. His research interests include historical phonology, Sino-Tibetan comparison, Chinese dialects and literacy, language contact, and Tibetan-Burman languages, especially the Bai language.



William S-Y. Wang (王士元) is Professor Emeritus of the University of California at Berkeley and Director of the Joint Research Center for Language and Human Complexity at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. The Center is formed in partnership with Peking University and the University System of Taiwan. His research interests include biological and evolutionary bases of language, and historical development of the Chinese language.



Lian-Hee Wee (黄良喜) is Associate Professor in the Department of English Language and Literature, Hong Kong Baptist University. His areas of specialization are in the phonology of Chinese, Hong Kong English and Singapore English.



Fuxiang Wu (吴福祥) is a Research Fellow at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. He specializes in historical linguistics, linguistic typology, and contact linguistics. His current areas of research are in grammaticalization, Chinese historical syntax, and syntactic change of minority languages in South China.



Daming Xu (徐大明) is Professor at the Department of Chinese, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, University of Macao. His research interests include language variation and change, speech community theory, urban language survey, and multilingual societies. (p. xix)



Liejiong Xu (徐烈炯) was Professor (Chair) of Linguistics at City University of Hong Kong and a professor at Fudan University. He is now affiliated to University of Toronto. He specializes in syntax and semantics and has published several influential papers in renowned journals such as Language, Linguistic Inquiry, Lingua, and Journal of Chinese Linguistics.



Yi Xu (许毅) is Professor of Speech Sciences at University College London. His research is primarily concerned with the basic mechanisms of speech in connected discourse. In particular, he is interested in the dynamic aspect of articulation, and the production, perception, typology, and computational modeling of speech prosody.



Nianwen Xue (薛念文) is based in the Computer Science Department and the Language and Linguistics Program, Brandeis University. His research interests include syntactic, semantic, temporal and discourse annotation, semantic-role labeling, and machine translation. He has published work on Chinese word segmentation and semantic parsing using statistical machine-learning techniques.



Hsiao-jung Yu (遇笑容) is Professor at the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultural Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara. Her research in Chinese linguistics focuses primarily on two areas: historical linguistics and applied linguistics. Her current research interest concentrates primarily on exploring external influences on the changes of the Chinese language.



Anne O. Yue (余霭芹) is Professor at the Department of Asian Languages and Literature, University of Washington. She has done field work on over thirty Chinese dialects from five different dialect groups and on several non-Sinitic languages. Her research interests include synchronic and diachronic aspects of dialectology, grammar, phonology, typology, and areal linguistics.



Caicai Zhang (张偲偲) is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Department of Linguistics and Modern Languages and the Joint Research Centre for Language and Human Complexity at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. Her primary research interests are in language evolution and variation, psycholinguistics and neurolinguistics, with a specific focus on lexical tones.



Hongming Zhang (张洪明) is a Professor at the Department of East Asian Languages and Literature, University of Wisconsin-Madison. His fields of study are interface between syntax and phonology, prosodic phonology, tonology, history of Chinese language, and teaching Chinese as a second language.



Wei Zheng (郑伟) is a Professor at Shanghai Normal University. His area of research is in historical linguistics. He won the Hashimoto Award for Chinese Historical Phonology at the Annual Conference of the International Association of Chinese Linguistics in 2010.



Shangfang Zhengzhang (郑张尚芳) specializes in Chinese historical phonology, Chinese dialectololgy and Sino-Tibetan comparative linguistics. He is a research fellow (p. xx) at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. His monograph on Old Chinese phonology makes him a leading authority in the field.



Hua Zhu (祝华) is Professor and Head of the Department of Applied Linguistics and Communication in Birkbeck College, University of London. Her main research interests are phonological development by monolingual and bilingual children, intercultural pragmatics, and language and intercultural communication. She has published extensively on child phonology, intercultural pragmatics and communication.



Xiaonong Zhu (朱晓农) is Associate Professor in linguistics at the Division of Humanities, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. His research interests include historical phonology, field and experimental phonetics and evolutionary phonology.