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date: 08 July 2020

Abstract and Keywords

For the first two decades of its existence, most scholarly work on Science Fiction tended to take three forms: theoretical efforts at definition that established the historical compass of the genre and elicited a canon of major works, formalist studies that traced important iconic or ideational features of the field, and critical investigations that purported to show the alignment of science fiction with specific trends in literary-cultural theory. Darko Suvin’s Metamorphoses of Science Fiction defined SF as “a literary genre whose necessary and sufficient conditions are the presence and interaction of estrangement and cognition.” The consequence was a general neglect of science fiction in other media. Since then, technoculture studies has made possible significant new ways of understanding the history of Science Fiction. Accordingly, this volume examines SF’s many lines of cross-pollination with technocultural realities since its inception in the nineteenth century, showing how SF’s unique history and subcultural identity has been constructed in ongoing dialogue with popular discourses of science and technology.For the first two decades of its existence, most scholarly work on Science Fiction tended to take three forms: theoretical efforts at definition that established the historical compass of the genre and elicited a canon of major works, formalist studies that traced important iconic or ideational features of the field, and critical investigations that purported to show the alignment of science fiction with specific trends in literary-cultural theory. Darko Suvin’s Metamorphoses of Science Fiction defined SF as “a literary genre whose necessary and sufficient conditions are the presence and interaction of estrangement and cognition.” The consequence was a general neglect of science fiction in other media. Since then, technoculture studies has made possible significant new ways of understanding the history of Science Fiction. Accordingly, this volume examines SF’s many lines of cross-pollination with technocultural realities since its inception in the nineteenth century, showing how SF’s unique history and subcultural identity has been constructed in ongoing dialogue with popular discourses of science and technology.

Keywords: science fiction, Everett F. Bleiler, Edward James, Darko Suvin, technoculture

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