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date: 23 September 2020

(p. xi) Contributors

(p. xi) Contributors

Eric Gary Anderson is Associate Professor of English at George Mason University. His publications include American Indian Literature and the Southwest: Contexts and Dispositions (University of Texas Press, 1999) and the coedited volume Undead Souths: The Gothic and Beyond in Southern Literature and Culture (Louisiana State University Press, 2015).



Michael P. Bibler is Associate Professor of Southern Studies at Louisiana State University and author of Cotton’s Queer Relations: Same-Sex Intimacy and the Literature of the Southern Plantation, 1936–1968 (University of Virginia Press, 2009).



Martyn Bone is Associate Professor of American literature at the University of Copenhagen, where he also coordinates the Center for Transnational American Studies. He is the author of The Postsouthern Sense of Place in Contemporary Fiction (Louisiana State University Press, 2005) and, most recently, coeditor of Creating and Consuming the American South (University Press of Florida, 2015).



Leslie Bow is Mark and Elisabeth Eccles Professor of English and Asian American Studies at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. She is the author of the award-winning “Partly Colored”: Asian Americans and Racial Anomaly in the Segregated South (New York University Press, 2010) and editor of the four-volume Asian American Feminisms (Routledge, 2012).



Will Brantley is Professor of English at Middle Tennessee State University, where he teaches southern literature, modern American literature, and film studies. His published work has focused on women writers of the American South and includes Feminine Sense in Southern Memoir: Smith, Glasgow, Welty, Hellman, Porter, and Hurston (University Press of Mississippi, 1993), which received the Eudora Welty Prize for an interpretive work in modern letters.



Robert H. Brinkmeyer, Jr., is Director of the Institute for Southern Studies and Emily Brown Jefferies Professor of English at the University of South Carolina. His most recent book is the award-winning The Fourth Ghost: White Southern Writers and European Fascism, 1930–1950 (Louisiana State University Press, 2009).



W. Fitzhugh Brundage is the William B. Umstead Professor of History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He has written on lynching, utopian socialism, and African Americans and popular culture. His most recent book is The Southern Past: A (p. xii) Clash of Race and Memory (Harvard University Press, 2005). He is currently completing a history of torture in the United States from De Soto to George W. Bush.



Keith Cartwright is Professor of English at the University of North Florida. He is the author of Sacral Grooves, Limbo Gateways: Travels in Deep Southern Time, Circum-Caribbean Space, Afro-creole Authority (University of Georgia Press, 2013).



James W. Coleman is Professor of English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His most recent book is Writing Blackness: John Edgar Wideman’s Art and Experimentation (Louisiana State University Press, 2010).



María DeGuzmán is Professor of English & Comparative Literature and founding director of Latina/o Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is the author of Spain’s Long Shadow: The Black Legend, Off-Whiteness, and Anglo-American Empire (Minnesota, 2005) and Buenas Noches, American Culture: Latina/o Aesthetics of Night (Indiana University Press, 2012).



Leigh Anne Duck is Associate Professor at the University of Mississippi, where she edits the journal The Global South. Her book The Nation’s Region: Southern Modernism, Segregation, and U.S. Nationalism was published by the University of Georgia Press in 2006.



Minrose Gwin is Kenan Eminent Professor of English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is the author of four scholarly books, a novel, and a memoir; editor of two books; coeditor of Literature of the American South, a Norton anthology; and former coeditor of the Southern Literary Journal.



Katherine Henninger is Associate Professor of American Literature at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, where she specializes in southern literature, visual culture, and gender and sexuality studies. She is the author of Ordering the Façade: Photography and Contemporary Southern Women’s Writing (University of North Carolina Press, 2007).



Ruth Hill is Professor of Spanish and Andrew W. Mellon Chair in the Humanities at Vanderbilt University, where she teaches courses in critical race studies from the early modern period to the present. She is the author of Hierarchy, Commerce, and Fraud in Bourbon Spanish America (Vanderbilt University Press, 2006).



Fred Hobson is Lineberger Professor of Humanities Emeritus at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is author of a number of works in American literary studies, including Mencken: A Life (Random House, 1994), But Now I See: The White Southern Racial Conversion Narrative (Louisiana State University Press, 1999), and The Silencing of Emily Mullen and Other Essays (Louisiana State University Press, 2005).



Suzanne W. Jones is Professor of English and Tucker-Boatwright Professor of Humanities at the University of Richmond. The author of Race Mixing: Southern Fiction since the Sixties (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2004), she has published numerous articles and edited several collections about southern literature. (p. xiii)



Stephen Knadler is Professor of English at Spelman College. He is the author of The Fugitive Race: Minority Writers Resisting Whiteness (University Press of Mississippi, 2002) and Remapping Citizenship and the Nation in African American Literature (Routledge, 2009).



Michael Kreyling is Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Professor of English at Vanderbilt. His most recent book is A Late Encounter with the Civil War (The Lamar Lectures at Mercer University, 2012), published by University of Georgia Press.



Barbara Ladd is Professor of English at Emory University. Her latest book is Resisting History: Gender, Modernity, and Authorship in William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, and Eudora Welty (Louisiana State University Press, 2007).



John Lang is Professor of English Emeritus at Emory & Henry College, Emory, Virginia. He is the author of Understanding Ron Rash (University of South Carolina Press, 2014).



John W. Lowe is Barbara Methvin Professor of English and Latin American and Caribbean Studies at the University of Georgia. A specialist in southern, African American, Caribbean, and multiethnic literature, he is the author or editor of seven books, including Louisiana Culture from the Colonial Era to Katrina (Louisiana State University Press, 2008).



Lloyd Pratt is University Lecturer in American Literature and Associate Professor of English at the University of Oxford. He is the author of Archives of American Time: Literature and Modernity in the Nineteenth Century (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2010).



Gary Richards is Associate Professor of English and Chair of the Department of English, Linguistics, and Communication at the University of Mary Washington. He is the author of Lovers and Beloveds: Sexual Otherness in Southern Fiction, 1936–1961 (Louisiana State University Press, 2005).



Owen Robinson is Senior Lecturer in U.S. Literature at the University of Essex, specializing in the literature of the South, New Orleans, and William Faulkner. His most recent book is the coedited collection Surveying the American Tropics: A Literary Geography from New York to Rio (Liverpool University Press, 2013).



Scott Romine is Professor of English and Department Head at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. He is the author of The Real South: Southern Narrative in the Age of Cultural Reproduction (Louisiana State University Press, 2008).



Thomas Ruys Smith is Senior Lecturer in American Literature and Culture at the University of East Anglia in the U.K. Most recently, he is the author of Southern Queen: New Orleans in the Nineteenth Century (Continuum, 2011), and the coeditor of Must Read: Rediscovering American Bestsellers (Bloomsbury, 2012).



Harilaos Stecopoulos is Associate Professor of English at the University of Iowa, and the editor of The Iowa Review. He has published Reconstructing the World: Southern Fictions and U.S. Imperialisms, 1898–1976 (Cornell University Press, 2008). (p. xiv)



Daniel Cross Turner is Associate Professor of English at Coastal Carolina University. He is the author of Southern Crossings: Poetry, Memory, and the Transcultural South (University of Tennessee Press, 2012) and coeditor of Undead Souths: The Gothic and Beyond in Southern Literature and Culture (Louisiana State University Press, 2015).



Anthony Wilson is Associate Professor of English at LaGrange College. He is the author of Shadow and Shelter: The Swamp in Southern Culture, published in 2005 by the University Press of Mississippi.