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date: 25 January 2020

(p. viii) (p. ix) About the Contributors

(p. viii) (p. ix) About the Contributors

Ananthi Al Ramiah is Assistant Professor of Social Science (Psychology) at Yale-NUS College, Singapore. She works in the area of intergroup social psychology and has written articles on the role of intergroup contact and social identity in reducing prejudice, the antecedents of intergroup contact, and the impact of diversity on intergroup relations.



Daniel Bar-Tal is Branco Weiss Professor of Research in Child Development and Education at the School of Education, Tel Aviv University, Israel. He has published 20 books and over 200 articles and chapters in major social and political psychological journals, books, and encyclopedias. He served as President of the International Society of Political Psychology and received various awards for his work, including the Lasswell Award of the International Society of Political Psychology for “distinguished scientific contribution in the field of political psychology.”



Michael Billig is Professor of Social Sciences at Loughborough University, UK. He has written books on a number of different subjects, including nationalism, psychoanalytic theory, rhetoric, ideology, and attitudes towards the British royal family. His latest book is Learn to Write Badly: How to Succeed in the Social Sciences” (published by Cambridge University Press, 2013).



Ted Brader is Professor of Political Science at the University of Michigan, USA, and Research Professor in the Center for Political Studies at the Institute for Social Research. He is the author of Campaigning for Hearts and Minds and currently serves as Associate Principal Investigator for the American National Election Studies and Associate Principal Investigator for Time-Sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences. His research focuses on the role of emotions in politics, political partisanship, media effects on public opinion, and other topics in political psychology. He serves on the Governing Council of the International Society of Political Psychology and has served on the editorial board for the journal Political Psychology.



Christia Brown is an Associate Professor of Psychology and Director of Children at Risk Research Cluster at University of Kentucky, USA. She has written numerous articles on children’s gender and ethnic stereotypes, understanding of politics, and perceptions of discrimination. She had been awarded a major grant from the Foundation for Child Development for her research with Mexican immigrants in elementary schools.



Gian Vittorio Caprara is Professor of Psychology at the “Sapienza” University of Rome, Italy. His primary research interests focus on personality development (p. x) and assessment, psychosocial adjustment, and personality and politics. He was President of the European Association of Personality Psychology from 1990 to 1992 and is a member of the Governing Council of the International Society of Political Psychology.



Dennis Chong is Professor and Chair of the Department of Political Science at the University of Southern California, USA. He studies American national politics and has published extensively on issues of decision-making, political psychology, social norms, rationality, tolerance, and collective action. He is the author of Rational Lives: Norms and Values in Politics and Society, a study of value formation and change, group identification, and conflict over social norms and values. He also wrote Collective Action and the Civil Rights Movement, a theoretical study of the dynamics of collective action as well as a substantial study of the American civil rights movement and the local and national politics that surrounded it. This book won the William H. Riker Prize, given by the Political Economy Section of the American Political Science Association. Professor Chong’s current research on the influence of information and framing in competitive electoral contexts has received several national awards, including the APSA’s Franklin L. Burdette / Pi Sigma Alpha Prize. An active member of the profession, Professor Chong has been elected to the Executive Council of the American Political Science Association, and he is coeditor of the book series Cambridge Studies in Public Opinion and Political Psychology, published by Cambridge University Press.



Susan Condor is Professor of Social Psychology in the School of Social Political and Geographical Sciences, at Loughborough University, UK. She has written numerous articles on vernacular political understanding. Her empirical work combines survey methodology with close textual analysis of the content and structure of political reasoning in formal political debate and unstructured everyday talk. She has held major research grants to study national framing in the British press, and identities, policy attitudes, and constructions of citizenship in the context of regional, English, UK, and European Union governance.



Stephen Benedict Dyson is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Connecticut, USA. He is the author of The Blair Identity: Leadership and Foreign Policy and numerous articles on political leaders, political psychology, and foreign policy. He serves on the editorial board of the journal Foreign Policy Analysis.



Stanley Feldman is Professor of Political Science at Stony Brook University, USA. He is the President of the International Society of Political Psychology from 2013 to 2014. He has published numerous papers on the structure and determinants of public opinion and ideology, values and politics, and the political effects of emotions.



Ronald J. Fisher is Professor of International Peace and Conflict Resolution in the School of International Service at American University, Washington, DC, USA. His primary interest is interactive conflict resolution, which involves informal third-party interventions in protracted and violent ethnopolitical conflict. His publications include (p. xi) a number of books at the interface of social psychology and conflict resolution as well as numerous articles in interdisciplinary journals including Political Psychology.



Carolyn L. Funk was an associate professor in the L. Douglas Wilder School of Government and Public Affairs at Virginia Commonwealth University, USA. She has written numerous articles using twin studies to examine the genetic and environmental influences on political behavior.



Eva G. T. Green is Senior Lecturer in Social Psychology at the University of Lausanne in Switzerland. Winner of several grants from the Swiss National Science Foundation, she has extensively published on prejudice and immigration attitudes, national identity, and social representations.



Eran Halperin is Senior Lecturer at the new school of psychology at the IDC, Herzliya, Israel. He got his PhD from the University of Haifa in 2007 (summa cum laude) and completed postdoctoral training (through a Fulbright Scholarship) at the Department of Psychology, Stanford University, in 2008. His work integrates psychological and political theories and methods in order to explain different aspects of intergroup (mostly intractable) conflicts. Dr. Halperin’s main line of research focuses on the role of emotions and emotion regulation in determining public opinion about peace and equality, on the one hand, and war and discrimination, on the other. In addition, he is interested in the psychological roots of some of the most destructive political ramifications of intergroup conflicts (e.g., intolerance, exclusion, and intergroup violence). The unique case of Israeli society in general, and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict in particular, motivates his work and inspires his thinking. Hence, most of his studies are conducted within the context of this “natural laboratory.”



Paul ‘t Hart is a Professor of Public Administration at the Utrecht School of Governance and Associate Dean at the Netherlands School of Government in The Hague, the Netherlands. His research interests include political and public sector leadership; elite behavior and group dynamics in government; policy evaluation and policy change; and the political psychology of crisis management. His recent books include Dispersed Democratic Leadership, Framing the Global Meltdown, The Real World of EU Accountability, How Power Changes Hands, Prime-Ministerial Performance, and the Oxford Handbook of Political Leadership. He is a coeditor of Political Psychology and recipient of the Erik Erikson Prize of the International Society for Political Psychology.



Matthew Hayes is an assistant professor at Indiana University, Bloomington, USA. Professor Hayes’s research and teaching interests primarily focus on political behavior and racial and ethnic politics, with a particular interest in issues of representation and how institutions can shape individual political behavior. His current research investigates how citizens evaluate representation and whether substantive and descriptive representation can maximize satisfaction both for minorities and for whites. In addition to his primary research in race and representation, Professor Hayes has also conducted collaborative research with Professors Jeff Mondak and Damarys Canache examining (p. xii) the role of personality in shaping political attitudes and behaviors using survey data from across Latin and North America. Professor Hayes received his AB from the University of Chicago in 2006 and his PhD from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2013.



Richard K. Herrmann is Professor and Chair of the Department of Political Science at the Ohio State University, USA. He has published numerous pieces on the role perceptions play in international relations and for five years coedited the International Studies Quarterly. He has served on the policy planning staff at the US Department of State and from 2002 to 2011 was Director of the Mershon Center for International Security Studies.



Miles Hewstone is Professor of Social Psychology at the University of Oxford and Fellow of New College, UK. He has published widely in the field of social psychology, focusing on prejudice and stereotyping, intergroup contact, the reduction of intergroup conflict, sectarianism in Northern Ireland, and segregation and integration. He is a co-founding editor of the European Review of Social Psychology. He has presented his work to various public policy bodies and reviews and was recipient of the 2012 Kurt Lewin Award from the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues.



Robert Huckfeldt is Distinguished Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Davis, USA. He has written several books and a series of articles on the roles of social contexts and social networks for diffusion, persuasion, and conflict in politics.



Leonie Huddy is Professor of Political Science and Director of the Center for Survey Research at Stony Brook University, USA. She has written numerous articles and book chapters on political psychology, with a focus on the politics of intergroup relations. Huddy’s research has been funded by the National Science Foundation. She is past editor of the journal Political Psychology, past president of the International Society for Political Psychology, and serves on the American National Election Studies (ANES) Board of Overseers and numerous editorial boards in political science.



Herbert C. Kelman is the Richard Clarke Cabot Professor of Social Ethics, Emeritus, at Harvard University, USA. A pioneer in the development of interactive problem solving, he has been engaged for some 40 years in efforts to resolve the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. His publications include International Behavior: A Social-Psychological Analysis (editor and coauthor, 1965) and Crimes of Obedience: Toward a Social Psychology of Authority and Responsibility (with V. Lee Hamilton, 1989). He is past president of the International Studies Association, the International Society of Political Psychology, and several other professional organizations.



Donald R. Kinder is the Philip E. Converse Collegiate Professor of Political Science at the University of Michigan, USA. A Fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford, the Guggenheim Foundation, and the American (p. xiii) Academy of Arts and Sciences, Kinder is the author of News That Matters (1987), Divided by Color (1996), Us against Them (2009), and The End of Race? (2012), among other works.



Bert Klandermans is Professor in Applied Social Psychology at the VU University, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. He has published extensively on the social psychology of political protest and social movement participation. His Social Psychology of Protest appeared with Blackwell in 1997. He is the editor and coauthor (with Suzanne Staggenborg) of Methods of Social Movement Research (University of Minnesota Press, 2002) and (with Nonna Mayer) of Extreme Right Activists in Europe (Routledge, 2006). With Conny Roggeband he edited the Handbook of Social Movements across Disciplines (Springer, 2007). He is the editor of Social Movements, Protest, and Contention, the prestigious book series of the University of Minnesota Press and of Sociopedia.isa, a new online database of review articles published by Sage in collaboration with the International Sociological Association. He is coeditor of Blackwell/Wiley’s Encyclopedia of Social Movements.



Robert Kurzban is Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania, USA, and currently occupies the Rasmuson Chair of Economics at the University of Alaska, Anchorage, USA. His research primarily focuses on human social behavior from an evolutionary perspective. He serves as co-editor-in-chief of Evolution and Human Behavior, the flagship journal of the Human Behavior and Evolution Society.



Richard R. Lau is Professor of Political Science and Director of the Center for the Experimental Study of Politics and Psychology at Rutgers University, USA. His research focuses on information processing, political advertising, and voter decision-making. His research has been supported by the National Science Foundation, the National Institute of Health, the Carnegie Corporation, and the Ford Foundation. His most recent book (with David Redlawsk), How Voters Decide (Cambridge University Press, 2006), won the 2007 Alexander George Award from the International Society of Political Psychology for the best book in political psychology published in the previous calendar year.



Jack S. Levy is Board of Governors’ Professor of Political Science at Rutgers University, USA. He is past president of the International Studies Association and of the Peace Science Society. Levy studies the causes of interstate war and foreign policy decision-making, including prospect theory, misperception and war, intelligence failure, learning from history, and time horizons. His most recent books include Causes of War (2010) and The Arc of War: Origins, Escalation, and Transformation (2011), each coauthored with William R. Thompson.



George E. Marcus is Professor of Political Science at Williams College, USA. He, with his colleagues, have written a number of books, among them, Political Tolerance and American Democracy, With Malice toward Some: How People Make Civil Liberties Judgments, and Affective Intelligence and Political Judgment. He is also the author of The Sentimental Citizen and Political Psychology: Neuroscience, Genes, and Politics. He (p. xiv) has published in many political science journals and has received grants from the National Science Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Sloan Foundation, the Ford Foundation, and the Carnegie Corporation, and held a residency at the Rockefeller Foundation Center in Bellagio, Italy.



Tali Mendelberg is Professor of Politics at Princeton University, USA. She is the author of The Race Card: Campaign Strategy, Implicit Messages, and the Norm of Equality (Princeton University Press, 2001), winner of the American Political Science Association’s Woodrow Wilson Foundation Award for “the best book published in the United States during the prior year on government, politics or international affairs.” She received the APSA Paul Lazarsfeld Award for the best paper in Political Communication, the APSA Best Paper Award in Political Psychology, the Carrie Chapman Catt Prize for Research on Women and Politics (honorable mention), and the Erik H. Erikson Early Career Award for Excellence and Creativity in the Field of Political Psychology. She has published articles in the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics, Public Opinion Quarterly, Perspectives on Politics, Political Behavior, Political Psychology, and Political Communication. Her work has been supported by grants and fellowships from the National Science Foundation, the University of Pennsylvania, Harvard University, and the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. She holds a PhD from the University of Michigan. Her areas of specialization are political communication; gender; race; public opinion; political psychology; and experimental methods.



Jeffery J. Mondak is the James M. Benson Chair in Public Issues and Civic Leadership in the Department of Political Science at the University of Illinois, USA. His research has appeared in numerous journals, including the American Political Science Review, the American Journal of Political Science, the British Journal of Political Science, and the Journal of Politics. His most recent book is Personality and the Foundations of Political Behavior (Cambridge University Press).



C. Daniel Myers is a Robert Wood Johnson Scholar of Health Policy at the University of Michigan, USA. In the fall of 2013, he will start as Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Minnesota, USA. His research focuses on the political psychology of democratic deliberation and other forms of political communication. His dissertation, “Information use in Small Group Deliberation,” won the American Political Science Association’s Experimental Research Section 2011 Best Dissertation Award.



Susan Allen Nan is Associate Professor of Conflict Analysis and Resolution and Director of the Center for Peacemaking Practice at the School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution at George Mason University, USA. Her main focus is on reflective practice and research that emerges from practice contexts. She has substantial expertise in intermediary roles and coordination among intermediaries, evaluation of conflict resolution initiatives, and theories of change and indicators of change in conflict resolution practice. She has engaged long term in conflict resolution in the Caucasus, as well as contributing to a (p. xv) variety of conflict resolution initiatives in the United States, eastern Europe, Eurasia, the Caribbean, South America, and Africa.



Yioryos Nardis is a PhD candidate in Communication Studies at the University of Michigan, USA. His research focuses on political communication from a comparative perspective. He is currently examining citizen apathy toward European Union integration and the role of the media in fostering engagement in EU politics.



Matthew T. Pietryka is a lecturer and postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, Davis, USA. He studies political communication and the role of social networks in political behavior.



Jerrold M. Post, M. D., is Professor of Psychiatry, Political Psychology, and International Affairs, and Director of the Political Psychology Program at George Washington University, USA. He was the founding director of the CIA’s Center for the Analysis of Personality and Political Behavior, where he took the lead in preparing the Camp David profiles of Menachem Begin and Anwar Sadat. Dr. Post is author and/or editor of 11 books, including The Psychological Assessment of Political Leaders, and Leaders and Their Followers in a Dangerous World.



David P. Redlawsk is Professor of Political Science and Director of the Eagleton Center for Public Interest Polling at Rutgers University, USA. His most recent book with Caroline Tolbert and Todd Donovan is Why Iowa? How Caucuses and Sequential Elections Improve the Presidential Nominating Process (2011, University of Chicago Press). With Richard Lau he is the author of How Voters Decide: Information Processing in Election Campaigns (2006, Cambridge University Press) winner of the 2007 Alexander L. George Best Book Award from the International Society of Political Psychology. His research has been supported by multiple research grants from the National Science Foundation. He currently coedits the journal Political Psychology.



Jack Reilly is a PhD candidate in Political Science at the University of California, Davis, USA. He studies social networks and political discussion, with a focus on the political behavior and communication patterns of socially isolated individuals.



David O. Sears is Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Political Science at the University of California, Los Angeles, USA. He is a coauthor of Obama’s Race: The 2008 Election and the Dream of a Post-racial America (2010) and The Diversity Challenge(2008). He received his PhD in Psychology from Yale University and is a former president of the International Society for Political Psychology and a former Dean of Social Sciences at UCLA.



Jim Sidanius is Professor in the departments of Psychology and African and African American Studies at Harvard University, USA. He received his PhD at the University of Stockholm, Sweden, and has taught at several universities in the United States and Europe, including Carnegie Mellon University, the University of Texas at Austin, New York University, Princeton University, the University of Stockholm, Sweden, and (p. xvi) the University of California, Los Angeles. He has authored some 270 scientific papers. His primary research interests include the interface between political ideology and cognitive functioning, the political psychology of gender, institutional discrimination and the evolutionary psychology of intergroup conflict.



Christian Staerklé is Associate Professor of Social Psychology at the University of Lausanne in Switzerland. He has widely published on intergroup attitudes, cultural beliefs, and political legitimacy and has obtained many research grants from national and international research organizations. Staerklé is codirector of the social psychology graduate school of the universities of Geneva and Lausanne.



Janice Gross Stein is the Belzberg Professor of Conflict Management and the Director of the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto, Canada. Her recent research focuses on the psychological dimensions of security and the changing meanings of humanitarianism.



Charles S. Taber is Professor of Political Science and Dean of the Graduate School at Stony Brook University, USA. He has written several books and many articles on political psychology and computational modeling in the social sciences. Winner of nine research grants from the National Science Foundation, Taber is a past editor of the journal Political Psychology and serves on numerous editorial boards in political science.



Cristian Tileagă is Lecturer in Social Psychology and member of the Discourse and Rhetoric Group at Loughborough University, UK. His research focuses on developing critical approaches for researching social and political life. He has written extensively on political discourse, the critical psychology of racism, collective memory, and social representations of national history. He is the author of Political Psychology: Critical Perspectives (forthcoming, Cambridge University Press) and Discourse Analysis and Reconciliation with the Recent Past (Romanian). He is coediting Psychology and History: Interdisciplinary Explorations (with Jovan Byford, Open University) and serves on editorial and advisory boards of international journals in Romania, Brazil, and Germany.



Tom R. Tyler is the Macklin Fleming Professor of Law and Professor of Psychology at Yale University, USA. His research explores the dynamics of authority in groups, organizations, and societies. In particular, he examines the role of judgments about the justice or injustice of group procedures in shaping legitimacy, compliance, and cooperation. He is the author of several books, including The Social Psychology of Procedural Justice (1988); Social Justice in a Diverse Society (1997); Cooperation in Groups (2000); Trust in the Law (2002); Why People Obey the Law (2006); and Why People Cooperate (2011).



Nicholas A. Valentino is Professor of Political Science and Research Professor in the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan, USA. He specializes in political psychological approaches to understanding public opinion formation, political (p. xvii) socialization, information seeking, attitude change, and electoral behavior. His work employs experimental methods, online and laboratory surveys, and content analyses of political communication. His previous work has focused on the intersecting roles of racial attitudes and emotion in support for public policies related to race. He is currently exploring the causes of public opinion on issues related to globalization including immigration, terrorism, and job transfers in the United States and around the world.



Jojanneke van der Toorn is Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology at Leiden University, the Netherlands. She holds MA degrees in Organizational Psychology and Cultural Anthropology from the Free University of Amsterdam and a PhD in Social Psychology from New York University. Her research focuses on processes of legitimation and the social psychological mechanisms implicated in social change and resistance to it. Her work has appeared in the American Sociological Review, the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, Political Psychology, and Social Justice Research.



Jacquelien van Stekelenburg (PhD, VU University Amsterdam, 2006) is Associate Professor of Sociology at the VU University, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. She researches the social psychological dynamics of protest, with a special interest in identification, emotions, and ideologies as motivators for collective action.



Michele Vecchione is a researcher in psychology at the “Sapienza” University of Rome, Italy. His research interests focus on political psychology, multivariate statistics in the field of personality and social psychology, personality assessment, socially desirable responding and response biases, the role of individual differences in predicting individuals’ preferences and performance, the issue of measurement invariance across cultural contexts and administration modes, and the longitudinal investigation of stability and change in personality.



David G. Winter is Professor of Psychology at the University of Michigan, USA. Within the field of personality and social psychology, his research focuses on power and power motivation, the motivational bases of leadership, and the psychological aspects of conflict escalation and war. He is the author of Personality: Analysis and Interpretation of Lives, as well as numerous articles in professional journals. He has been President and Councilor of the International Society of Political Psychology, and has received the society’s Lasswell Award for scientific contributions.



Everett Young received his PhD in political science from Stony Brook University, USA, in 2009. He has taught courses in political psychology, American politics, and methodology at Florida State University and Washington University in St. Louis. He resides in Tallahassee, FL.



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