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date: 16 September 2019

Index

Index

acting troupes 415–18, 467
actors, Greek and Hellenistic 51–2, 65–7
(illusionism, virtuoso acting), 359–77 See also Artists of Dionysus
Roman 420–2
adespota K-A fr. 71 533
adespota K-A fr. 1027 528–9
adespota K-A fr. 1147 526
Aeschylus 127, 194, 266–8, 272
aischron 38
Alcaeus (Comicus) 162, 192, 194, 264
Alciphron 743–9
Alexander the Great 360–2
Alexandrianism 542–5, 553
Ameipsias 186, 191–2, 279
Anaxandrides 167, 169, 173, 185, 187, 192–5, 200, 201, 203, 205, 212, 264. See also virtuoso speeches
ancient grammarians 450–60, 549, 550, 700–1, 711, 754–5
Anderson, W.S. 426–7
Anechomenos 760
Apollodorus of Carystus 205, 207–8, 541. See also Terence
aprosdoketon 140, 155
Apuleius 755–64
Archedicus 189–90, 203, 301
Aristophanes (Comicus)
audience address 141, 143, 144, 233–4
comic themes 149–56
dramatis personae 145–9
fragmentary plays: Aeolosicon 146, 162, 270, 298
Babylonians 302–3
Cocalus 162, 194, 271, 298
Dramas or The Centaur 165
influence on the comic canon 113–15
critique of other poets 96, 99, 104, 117
language 64, 135–7
neologisms 149
life 132–3, 194
linguistic characterization 136–7
parabasis and constituent elements (kommation, parabasis proper, epirrhematic syzygy [ode, antode, epirrhema], pnigos, sphragis) 141–3, 263
papyri 804–7
poetics 156–7
as school author, 657
structure 51, 141–5, 150–1
surviving plays: Acharnians 146, 148–9, 151–4, 156, 265, 292, 342–3
Assembly women 151, 186, 286, 292, 299
Birds 154–5, 163, 261
Frogs 148, 155–7, 163, 168, 266, 344
Knights 96, 116, 146, 154–5, 305
Lysistrata 150
Peace 150, 343
Wasps 145
Wealth 299
Women at the Thesmophoria 153, 155, 163–4, 265
textual tradition, 655–66
works, 133–4
Aristophanes of Byzantium 542, 549, 552, 674
Aristophon 188, 288
Aristotle
Metaphysics, on the word holos (1023b12–37) 503
Nicomachean Ethics 155, 184, 291–2
Poetics, on the relationships among Comedy, Tragedy, and Epic (1448a16–19, b35–1149a6, 1449a2–6, a9–14, 1453a35–39) 34–5
actions follow from character (1454a33–b2) 293
comedy distinctive (1448a31–38, 1449a32–b27, 1449a32–b27, 1449b2–8, 1451b12, 1449b5–9) 36–8
on prologues (1452b19f.) 503
themes not discussed about comedy (1449b21–22, 1449a37–b6) 36, 72–3
Politics 184, 286–8, 314
Rhetoric 291
on prologues (1414b19–21, 1415a11–19) 501–2, (1415a7–25) 502
Arnott, G. 4, 5, 6n12, 16, 19
Artists of Dionysus 362–4, 368, 373, 530, 533
asides 473–4
Atellan farce, 404–7, 424–5, 430–40, 534
influenced by Rhinthon, 404 (see also masks)
Athenaeus of Naucratis 34, 166, 259, 279–81, 283–4, 287–9, 669–72, 676–9
Attic demes 74 and n1, 76 and n2, 80, 81–7. See also festivals, Greek, Rural Dionysia
Atticization 163, 165–8, 169
audience, Greek
internal 229, 232, 233
international, at the Dionysia 53
activity of 55
size of 54, 200
audience address 209 (see also under Aristophanes)
audience, Roman 410–18
effect on, of asides 473–44
internal 468
participation of 469–70
perceptions and expectations of 464–6, 473
reading audience also presumed 544
audience response theory 429
Austin, C. 6n12, 13, 15, 17, 18, 803
Axionicus 271
Bakhtin, M. 283, 429
Baton 188, 283, 285, 289–90
Bierl, A. 46
Blanchard, A. 15
Bowie, A. M. 45
Caecilius of Calacte 522
Caecilius Statius 448–52, 455–7, 540, 541, 546, 550, 557–9
in Gellius 758–9
Callias 101, 107, 165
Callimedon 309–10
Callistratus 308, 310
Callopian recension. See under Terence
canon, of comic poets 113–14
of school authors 777–80
of Roman authors 533, 540
of Homer and Menander 549
Carthage 609–10
Cato the Elder 428
as Roman Demosthenes 551
chance. See Tyche
Chariton, Callirhoe 735–42
Chionides 95
choregos (pl.: choregoi) 70
appointed by archon, later nominated by tribe for City Dionysia 73–5, 300
appointed by basileus for Lenaea 75
metic choregoi and chorus members at the Lenaea 76
choregia (“agonistic liturgy”) 70
beginning of the institution 73
its end 86–9
choregic monuments (dedications) 79–87
chorus (comic)
Aristotle’s view of 38–9
characterization of 147–8
description of 51
in fourth century 201, 203, 271
interaction with actors and audience 141–5, 262–3
Christian reception of Greek comedy 677–9
Chrysoloras, Manuel 662
City Dionysia. See festivals, Greek, City Dionysia
Clement of Alexandria 290, 677–679
Cleonymus 303, 305
Cleophon 305–6
Comedy, Greek. See also names of Greek Comic poets under “Comic poets, Greek”
origins 33–47 passim
treatment by Aristotle (see Aristotle)
ancient tripartition of (“Old,” “Middle,” “New”) 181, 207, 298–301
Old Comedy, demagogues in 98–9, 125, 304–6, 310–12
political humor 98–107, 182–3
personal jokes (to onomasti komoidein) 96–108, 114, 304 (see also humor, personal)
mythological burlesque 100–3
(Cratinus), 106
(Hermippus), 109–10
(Pherecrates), 160–77 passim
domestic comedy 109–10 (Pherecrates) (see also Magnes, Cratinus, Crates, Hermippus, Callias, Teleclides, Pherecrates, Aristophanes)
“Middle Comedy,” domestic comedy 190–5
hetaira comedy 183–4, 186–8, 190–5
myth comedy and mythological burlesque 193–5
political comedy 182–90, 300, 310
reception of in later antiquity, 667–79
“New Comedy” settings 298
visual record 717–27 (see also papyri)
continuity in 181
post-Menandrian 871–5
names of poets 875–83
productions, in Athens 50–6
productions outside Athens 219, 362–5
non-Dionysiac, in eastern Mediterranean 365–70
outside Greece 52, 201, 362–5
in western 372–4 (see also festivals, Greek, Rural Dionysia)
Comedy, Roman
acting troupes 415–18, 467
actors 420–2
Artists of Dionysus, relation to 370–3, 530, 533
Atellan farce, relation to, 404–7, 424–40, 534 (see also Atellan farce)
audience (see under audience, Roman)
canon of 533, 540
exposition 501–13
interpolation (see Plautus, interpolation)
intertextuality (see intertextuality in Roman comedy)
linguistic characterization in 569–72
literary language of 568–9
piety 605–12
prologues 413–20, 498–513
prologue speakers 413–20, 501–13
production 462–6
production notices (didascaliae) 422, 471
visual record 727–31 (see also gesture)
See also festivals, Roman
metrics, Roman
reception
Roman law, Roman religion
comic fragments 13, 16, 17–19, 115–29 passim, 162
Roman 449–60
Comic poets, Rome. See under individual names: Afranius, Caecilius Statius, Ennius, Livius Andronicus, Naevius, Plautus, Terence, Titinius
comic patter 208–14
comic reversal 175–6
commentaries, ancient, on Plautus and Terence 755
comoedia palliata 409–10, 425, 427, 432, 447–9
masks of 433–40
Comparison of Aristophanes and Menander 674
contaminatio 526–9
criticized by Horace 777–8
See also Plautus
Cornford, F. M., on the origin of Comedy in ritual 45
costume, Greek Comedy 57–9
Cratinus 96–105, 116–18, 120–1, 128, 157, 164, 182–3, 194
All-Seers 279
Dionysalexander, 100–2, 125, 182
Odysseus and Company, 102–3, 164–5, 299
source of fragments 669n3
Wealths 287
Wine-Flask 104–5, 116, 191, 307–8
cult 341–5
Damoxenus 188, 194, 281
de Robertis, Teresa 684–94 passim
Demetrius of Phalerum 184, 188, 189, 218, 219
Demetrius Poliorcetes 185, 190, 218, 219
Demetrius On Style 673–4
Demetrius Triclinius 660–1, 663
democracy, Athenian 300–7
Democritus 282–3
didaskalos 50
didascaliae 422, 471
Dinolochus 264
Diodorus 311
Dionysiac Festivals. See festivals, Greek
Diphilus, 184, 191, 194–5, 200, 205, 207, 208, 210–13 (Zographos K-A fr. 42, Emporos K-A fr. 31 vv.2–11), 310–11, 672–3, 676–8, 874–5
Divus, Andreas 663
Donatus, Aelius 711–15, 782–97
dramatic illusion 65–7, 104
nature of, in Plautine comedy 529–34
Ecphantides 97
ekkyklema 55, 222
Ennius 545–9, 588–91 passim, 648
Ephippus 170–2, 185, 188, 191, 195
epic 120, 127, 160, 546
Epicharmus 280
Epicrates 188, 191–2, 280
Epicurus 281–3, 285
epistolography 743–9
ethos (character type) 713–14
Euanthius. See Evanthius
Eugraphius 794–7
Eupolis 113–21, 128, 186–7, 192, 279
Demes 118–20
Dyers 115, 117, 299
Maricas 113, 125, 183, 305–6, 309
source of fragments 669n3
“euripidaristophanize” 121, 157
“euripidize” 208, 214
Evanthius 253, 582, 779, 783
fabula Atellana. See Atellan farce
fabula palliata 409–10, 425, 427, 432, 447–9
masks of 433–40
fabula togata 447–9, 459–60
Terence familiar with 768n2 (see also Titinius)
Fasti (IG II2 2318) 73
Fescennine verses 404, 405
festivals, Greek
in Athens 341–5, 875–6
City (“Great”) Dionysia 260–1, 268, 270, 302–3
beginning in 487/486 BCE 33, 72, 74–5
Lenaea 70, 72, 76–77, 98, 260–1, 268
outside Greece 52, 362–5, 876–7 (e.g. Dionysia-Antiocheia, Dionysia-Attaleia)
non-Dionysiac, in eastern Mediterranean 365–70
in western 372–4
Rural Dionysia (celebrated in the demes of Attica) 70, 80, 81–4
festivals, Roman 409–14, 634–5
ludi Megalenses 465, 466 (of 191 BCE)
five-act rule 252–3
Fraenkel, E. 5, 7, 425–7, 433, 456, 519, 527, 529
Fragmentum Grenfellianum 382–3, 490
Fredershausen, O. 616, 620
freedom of speech (parrhesia) 302–7
Freiburg School 431–3, 441
Fronto 755–7, 779
Gaza, Theodore 662
Gellius, Aulus 755–60, 771, 775, 779
genre/s 46–47, 121, 258–73 passim
gesture, in Roman comedy 784–97
gods, in Old Comedy 345–9
in New Comedy 349–53
Goldberg, S. 545
Green, J. R. 10–12, 21
Groningen edition 12, 14
Halliwell, S., and aischrology 46
Handley, E. 6n12, 8n15, 12, 14n25, 15, 17 and n32, 220, 222, 426, 519, 520n5, 529, 809, 813
hedonism 286–7
Hegesippus 188, 191, 283
Heniochus 185, 191, 195
Henderson, J. 4, 13–14, 19, 20, 21
Hermippus 105–8, 113, 182–3, 194, 305–6, 308
hero, comic 142–5, 145–9
Herodas 379, 381–2, 385–93. See also mime
humor, personal 96–108, 114, 115–18, 136, 151
political, 98, 101–2, 106, 115–21
verbal 40
Hyperbolus 303–6, 309
hypocrisy 284
iconography 717–28
illustrated manuscripts 701–8, 727–31, 789–94. See also Terence
impersonation 471–2
improvisation 428–33
infrared photography 684, 688, 693
intertextuality in Greek comedy 115n2, 119, 121, 272
in Roman comedy 543–4, 588–9 (see also paratragedy)
indirect tradition of Terence 710–14 (see also Menander)
interpolation. See Plautus, interpolation
irony 151, 154–5, 714
Kassel, R. 18
Konstan, D. 426
Laberius, Decimus 385–90. See also mime
Latin language
archaizing language 754–9, 778–9 (see also Second Sophistic)
early Latin (EL) 563–5
colloquial spoken Latin 568–9
law, Athenian
and Aristophanes, legal terminology in 322–6
as a source for law 324–5
effect of Aristophanes’ critique of the courts on the audience 326–33 passim
excessive litigiousness 312, 332–3
parody of law-making protocols 328–9
parody of laws (“legal intertextuality”) 326–8
using laws out of context (“transcontextulization”) 329–31
and Aristophanes’ rivals 333–4
and Menander, private law, family relationships, arbitration and the law 334–6
law, Roman
and comedy, earlier scholarship 616–17
and the fragments of comoediae palliatae, comoediae togatae, and literary farces 628–30
and Plautus, adapting legal scenarios from Attic Comedy 617–21
comic effect of legal language in Plautus 624–5
methods of translating legal texts 621–4
Plautine law and the audience 625–6
satire of lawyers in Plautus 780
sumptuary laws 546, 548n8, 611
and Terence 626–8
Leigh, M. 427
Lefèvre, E. 431. See also Freiburg School
Lenaea. See festivals, Greek
Leo, F. 426, 526
letters, fictional. See epistolography
lexicography 779–80
linguistic characterization, in Roman comedy 569–72. See also Aristophanes, Menander, Plautus, Terence
linguistic correctness, Latin 772, 779
liturgies, military and festival (= “agonistic liturgy”, i.e. choregia) 70
Livius Andronicus 544, 548, 580, 534
love plots 160, 173–4
ludi. See festivals, Roman
ludi scaenici 19
MacDowell, D. M. 332n2, 324–5, 326, 335 and n11, 337
Magnes (comic victor at City Dionysia in 473/2) 73, 96–7, 157
Mai, Cardinal 682, 693
Marshall, C.W. 428, 430–3, 436–8
“marvelous motifs” 169–70
masks
generally 201 and n4, 206 and n9
in New Comedy 60–4
in Old Comedy 58
in Roman Comedy, 425, 433–41
Manutius, Aldus 662–3
Matius, Cnaeus 386–90. See also mime
Mazon, P., theory of the origin of Old Comedy’s structure 44–5
McCarthy, K. 427, 429
Menander
Anechomenos 760
Aspis 293
Dis Exapaton (as model of Plautus’ Bacchides) 426–7, 519–26
Dyskolos 227–8 (vv.104–15), 228–9 (vv.487–99), 224–5 (play’s conclusion), 252–3, 350, 811
Epitrepontes 193, 229 and n11, 230, 271–2, 809–11
Misoumenos 230, 809
Perikeiromene 272
Sikyonios/oi 231, 272, 313–14
Synaristosai 269
ancient biography 551–3 (see also as character in fictitious letters)
as character in fictitious letters 205, 748–9
as preeminent author of New Comedy 674–5
audience address 232–4
author of model of Plautus’ Pseudolus 526–9
chorus 221–2
linguistic characterization 225–9, 234
maxims 717, 725
meters 202n5, 222, 224–5
monologues 221, 223, 226, 229–31, 232–4
mosaics. See visual record
personal address 226–9
and philosophy 292
politics 189, 301, 312–13
prologues 223–4
reception in ancient novels 736–42
in epistolary collections 743–9
in later antiquity 670, 672–9 (see also relationship to Homer and visual record)
relationship to Homer 549–53, 736–7
to tragedy 271–3
“speech within speech” (“quoted speech”) 227, 230–1
text of 239–55 passim
fragments 242–3
indirect tradition 242–7, 249–50, 254–5
titles 243–7
“three-actor convention” 222–3
visual record 717–27
metatheater, 5, 65, 67, 116, 124, 127, 128, 265, 428–31, 440
metrics, Greek
music, of a piper 64
in Aristophanes (see under Aristophanes)
in Menander (see under Menander)
metrics, Roman 477–93
accompanied verses 477–80, 484, 491
alphabetic notation 483, 484
cantica, polymetric 487–91
change of meter 491
of Early Latin (EL) 565
iambic senarius 482–4
laws 478n1, 480–4
long verses 480, 484–8
Plautus vs. Terence 491–2
song (see cantica, polymetric and music)
trochaic septenarius 484–7
unaccompanied verses 477–82
Middle Comedy. See comedy, Greek
monuments of New Comedy. See comedy, Greek, New Comedy, visual record
Moore, T. 428, 518
mos maiorum 428, 603–4
MS Ravenna 658
Musurus, Marcus 663
mythological burlesque. See under Comedy, Old
Naevius 448, 452–5, 556–7, 531
neologism 135–6, 149, 156–7, 530
New Comedy. See comedy, Greek
non-Athenians 184–5
novel, Greek 735–42
Old Comedy. See comedy, Greek
P. Freiburg 12 527–9
papyri 664, 670–9 passim, 803–16, 818–65. See also Menander and P. Freiburg 12
parabasis. See under Aristophanes
paratragedy 119, 121–4, 194, 264–6, 273
Roman comedy 546, 580–98
parody
in Aristophanes 135, 138, 140, 153–4, 157
of philosophy 279
of prayer 636, 642–6
paterfamilias 612–13
Pellio 414–17
performance, of Eunuchus vv.46–206 470–3
Hecyra vv.623–726 473–4
Menaechmi vv.1050–1152 468–70
Pseudolus vv.129–229 466–8
discussed by ancient commentators 783, 789, 792–7
performance grammar 260–3
performance studies 6–8
Petrone, G., 429
Pherecrates 108–10, 125, 186, 190–2, 287, 345
Philemon 185–6, 188, 192, 200, 202, 203, 204–5, 207, 208–9 and n11 (Adelphoi K-A fr. 3), 211, 214, 280, 290, 309–10, 352, 668, 673–4, 676–8, 874–6
in Roman comedy 530, 551, 673
Philippides 188–90, 203, 205, 219, 283, 301
Philo of Alexandria 677
philosophy 278–93 passim
Philyllius 173, 185, 187, 192
Phrynichus 113–14, 191
piety 605–12
Plato Comicus 124–8, 167, 174, 183–4, 186, 191, 194, 305–6, 308–9
Plato Philosophus 184, 188, 259, 268, 279–81, 283, 285–7, 290, 293, 305
“plautinisches” in Plautus 424–8
Plautus
Amphitruo 264, 413, 583–5, 596n1, 605, 606, 610–11, 637n2
vv.282–3 as model for Turpilius 770
Asinaria 415, 436, 611
vv.307–8 as model for Turpilius 770
Aulularia vv.508–13 772
Captivi 438, 585–7, 605–7
Casina 417–18, 590, 605, 606
prologue 767–8, 780
Cistellaria 269, 527n10, 637n2, 645, 682–97, 769
Curculio 416, 419, 434–6, 533, 589, 611
Epidicus 414, 435
Menaechmi 416, 531, 590
model for Terence 773
vv.1050–1152 468–470
Mercator 506–8, 590, 516n1, 611, 638–49
v.396 as model for Lucilius 775
Miles Gloriosus 420, 527, 602, 607, 635
vv.1–4 760–1
as model for Terence’s Eunuchus 773–4
Mostellaria 516n1
vv.138–143 adapted by Gellius 757
vv.157–312 as model for Pomponius 770
v.261 as model for Afranius 771
Persa 416, 533, 591, 602–5, 611
vv.419–420 as model for Titinius 771
Poenulus 413, 526, 588–9, 605–10 passim
ancient commentary on 755
interpolations in 769
Pseudolus 409, 413–21 passim, 436–8, 589, 634, 638n3
vv.23–4 imitated by Jerome 780
vv.129–229 466–8
model of 526–9
Stichus 412
Trinummus 530–2
quoted by Cicero 776
Truculentus, quoted by Donatus 778
fragmentary plays 516, 756–60 (see also Varronian canon)
ancient biography 533–4
audience (see audience, Roman)
contaminatio 526–9
Hellenistic paradigm 529–34
imperialism 603
interpolation 768
intertextual allusions 516n1
language 448–52, 556–62, 645n8
law 604, 611 (see also law, Roman)
linguistic characterization 556–62
metrics (see metrics, Roman)
models, possible, adespota K-A fr. 1027 528–9
adespota K-A fr. 1147 526
Menandrian 241–2, 519–29, 540, 813
P. Freiburg 12 527–9
of Pseudolus 526–59
mos maiorum 603–4
palimpsest 680–98
“plautinisches” in Plautus 424–8
politics 413, 427, 453, 601–5, 610–11, 650
relation to Old Comedy 125–8
relation to tragedy 124, 413, 415, 580–92, 646 (see also paratragedy)
religion 412–13, 634–50 (see also religion, Rome)
Saturnalian paradigm 412, 428–9, 529–34, 634n1
Second sophistic, reception in (see Second sophistic and reception of Plautus)
“speech within speech” 521
Textual tradition 418, 526, 680–98, 699
plot construction. See Aristophanes; Menander; Plautus; Terence
Plutarch, as source of fragments 670, 674, 676, 677
Comparison of Aristophanes and Menander 674
Pollux, On Masks 60, 62, 64, 66, 201n4, 435–8
Onomasticon: 669–71, 675
“popular” theater 424–33, 439, 440
populism 182–3
Posidippus 284–5
prizes
for tragic actors at the Dionysia and Lenaea 52
for comic actors at the Dionysia and Lenaea 52
producers, Roman 414–18
production. See under comedy, Greek and comedy, Roman
prologue. See under Menander and comedy, Roman
Publilius Syrus 385. See also mime
Pythagoras 283, 288–9
Querolus 780
Questa, C. 16–17, 434
rationalization 169
reception
of Caecilius Statius 758–60
of Diphilus 672–3, 676–8
of Greek comedy by Christian and Jewish authors 677–9
of Menander, by Apuleius 760
in ancient novels 736–42
in epistolary collections 743–9
by Ovid and Manilius 754 (see also Menander, visual record)
of Middle Comedy in antiquity 667–79
of New Comedy by authors of the palliata 672–3 (see also Comedy, Roman)
of Philemon 668, 673–4, 676–8
of Plautus, in the Second Sophistic 753–65
in late antiquity 779–80
in late republic 774–8
by other comic authors 543–4, 769–74
of Terence 756–7, 760
by ancient scholars 754–5
religion, Greece 340–53 passim. See also cult, gods, religious attitudes, ritual, sacrifice
religion, Rome 604–9, 634–50
curse 639, 647
instauratio 635
interrupted rituals 635, 637, 644–6
performance theory 637–8
religious festivals 634–5 (see also festivals, Roman)
speech act 644–5
staged rituals 637–8
religious attitudes 343–9, 350–1
revivals 200–1, 205, 207 and n10
of Plautus and Terence, immediate 767–9
in 2nd c. AD 778–9
Rhinthon 403–4
ritual 349
role division 468–70
romances, Greek 735–42
Römer, C. 809–10
sacrifice 341–5, 350–1
Saturnalia 530, 634n1. See also Plautus, Saturnalian paradigm
satyr play 259–61, 268–9
Satyrus 262
Scafuro, A. 336n12, 337, 616, 620
scholia
Aristophanic 12–14, 658, 660–1 (see also Groningen edition)
school syllabus. See canon of school authors
Second Sophistic 735–52 passim, 753–66, 779
Seeberg, A. 10–11
Segal, E. 427–9, 529
semiotics, theater 639
Slater, N. 427–32
Socrates 279–81, 284, 292. See also Plato Philosophus
Sommerstein, A. 4, 13–14, 19
Sophron 379n2, 385–6, 393. See also mime
“speech within speech.” See under Plautus, Terence, and Menander
stage properties 464–5
Stärk, E. 431. See also Freiburg School
stock characters 171–2, 386, 753–4, 759, 761, 764
Strattis 121–4, 192, 194
Studemund, W. 682–94
sublime 118–21
Susarion 95
Su?ss, W., prototypic figures of comic plots 44
Syrus, Publilius, 385. See also mime
Teleclides 106–8, 287, 312
Terence
Adelphoe 414, 509–12, 542
modeled on Miles Gloriosus 773–4
Andria, alternate ending 709
Eunuchus 411n2, 413, 414, 542–52 passim, 559–62, 589–90
vv.46–206 470–3
Plautine quality of 772–3
Hecyra 410, 540–5 passim, 551, 612–13
vv.623–726: 473–4
Alexandrianism 542–5, 553
ancient biography 549–53, 709
Apollodorus of Carystus, relation to 541
Aristophanes of Byzantium, influence of 542, 549, 552
Callopian recension 708–10
commentaries. See Donatus
Eugraphius
scholia, Latin
Ennius, relation to 545–9
illustrated manuscripts 701–8, 727–31, 789–94
intertextual allusions 543–4, 589–90
Lex Fannia, allusion to 546, 548n8
language 555–63
law. See Lex Fannia and law, Roman
linguistic characterization 569–72
manuscripts 699–715
metrics. See metrics, Roman
neotericism 539, 544
politics 413, 612–13
religion 412–13, 636, 638, 642, 649
as Roman Menander 539–41, 549–51, 814
as school author 539–40, 700, 754, 779
“speech within speech” 472
textual tradition. See Terence, manuscripts
theater buildings, Greek 53–6
Roman 463–4
theater semiotics 639
theater spaces, Roman 418–21
Theocritus 379n2
Theognetus 289
Theophilus 192–3, 309
Theophrastus 155, 292, 313, 351
Theopompus 185–6, 188, 191–2, 280, 308
Thomas Magister 660–1
Timocles 184–5, 187–8, 192–5, 202, 259, 301, 308, 310
Dionysiazousai (Women at the Dionysia, K-A fr. 6) 185, 213–14, 258, 270
Titinius 448, 457–60, 771
tragedy 194, 258–73 passim, 297
Roman 546
See also festivals
paratragedy
tragicomedy
Aeschylus
Euripides
tragicomedy 583–5
Turpilius 558–9, 770
Turpio 414–17, 422
Tyche 293, 350–2
utopia 286–8
Varro, creative imitator of Plautus 775–6
Varronian plays 754–8, 771–2
vase paintings, South Italian and Sicily (“West Greek”) 56, 162, 169–71, 174–5, 370
virtuoso speeches 201
(Anaxandrides Protesilaus K-A fr. 42), 203
(Mnesimachus Hippotrophos K-A fr. 4), 211
(Straton Phoinikides K-A fr. 1), 521
Vogt-Spira, G. 428, 430–2
wealth 182, 185–6
Webster, T.B.L. 7–12, 21, 23
Wiles, D. 428, 434–9
Witt, P. 616, 620, 621–2
Xenarchus 184, 186, 311
Xenocleides (victorious choregos at City Dionysia in 473/2) 73
Zieliński, T., theory of the origin of Old Comedy’s structure 41–3
folk-tale comedy 44