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date: 25 August 2019

(p. 793) Bibliography and Further Reading

(p. 793) Bibliography and Further Reading

Each of the contributions in this volume contains a bibliography of the works and sources cited by the particular contributor. Readers may refer to these as a basis for further reading or sources. For those who are coming to Hume’s thought with little background and are looking for a general introduction, any of the works cited below may be a good place to start. The works cited with an asterisk contain useful bibliographies that the reader may also refer to:

Ballie, James. 2000. Hume on Morality. London & New York: RoutledgeFind this resource:

Blackburn, Simon. 2008. How to Read Hume. London: Granta.Find this resource:

Coventry, Angela. 2007. Hume: A Guide for the Perplexed. New York: Continuum.Find this resource:

Dicker, Georges. 1998. Hume’s Epistemology and Metaphysics. London: Routledge.Find this resource:

*Garrett, Don. 2015. Hume. London: Routledge.Find this resource:

Noonan, Harold W. 1999. Hume on Knowledge. London: Routledge.Find this resource:

O’Connor, David. 2001. Hume on Religion. London: Routledge.Find this resource:

The following are useful collections relating to Hume’s philosophy and thought:

Ainslie, Donald & Annemarie Butler, eds. 2015. The Cambridge Companion to Hume’s Treatise. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Find this resource:

*Bailey, Alan & Dan O’Brien, eds. 2012. The Continuum Companion to Hume. London: Continuum.Find this resource:

Millican, Peter, ed. 2002. Reading Hume on Human Understanding. Oxford: Clarendon Press.Find this resource:

Norton, David & Jackie Taylor, eds. The Cambridge Companion to Hume. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Find this resource:

*Radcliffe, Elizabeth S., ed. 2011. A Companion to Hume. Chichester: Blackwell.Find this resource:

Traiger, Saul. 2006. The Blackwell Guide to Hume’s Treatise. Oxford: Blackwell.Find this resource:

There are a variety of internet sources on Hume’s philosophy, thought, and life but the best place to start is with the Stanford Philosophy of Philosophy. See, in particular, the following:

*Morris, William Edward and Brown, Charlotte R., “David Hume,” The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Summer 2014 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.), URL = <http://plato.stanford.edu/archives/sum2014/entries/hume/>.

Cohon, Rachel, “Hume’s Moral Philosophy,” The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Fall 2010 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.), URL = <http://plato.stanford.edu/archives/fall2010/entries/hume-moral/>.

Russell, Paul, “Hume on Free Will,” The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Winter 2014 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.), forthcoming URL = <http://plato.stanford.edu/archives/win2014/entries/hume-freewill/>. (p. 794)

Russell, Paul, “Hume on Religion,” The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Winter 2014 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.), forthcoming URL = <http://plato.stanford.edu/archives/win2014/entries/hume-religion/>.