Show Summary Details

Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD HANDBOOKS ONLINE (www.oxfordhandbooks.com). © Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a title in Oxford Handbooks Online for personal use (for details see Privacy Policy and Legal Notice).

date: 26 June 2019

(p. xiii) Notes on Contributors

(p. xiii) Notes on Contributors

Sharon Achinstein is Reader in Renaissance Literature, Oxford University, and a Fellow of St Edmund Hall, Oxford. She is the author of Milton and the Revolutionary Reader (1994) and Literature and Dissent in Milton's England (2003), and the co-editor of Milton and Toleration (Oxford University Press, 2007). She is editing the divorce tracts for Volume 5 of the Oxford Complete Works of John Milton.



Gordon Campbell is Professor of Renaissance Studies, University of Leicester. His publications include A Milton Chronology (1997), Milton and the Manuscript of De Doctrina Christiana (with Thomas N. Corns, John K. Hale, and Fiona Tweedie; Oxford University Press, 2007), and, with Thomas N. Corns, John Milton: Life, Work, and Thought (Oxford University Press, 2008). With Thomas N. Corns, he is general editor of the Oxford Complete Works of John Milton.



Ann Baynes Coiro is Associate Professor of English, Rutgers University. She is the author of Robert Herrick's “Hesperides” and the Epigram Book Tradition (1988) and is currently writing a book on Milton and drama. She won the Milton Society of America's James Holly Hanford Award for her article ‘Fable and Old Song: Samson Agonistes and the Idea of a Poetic Career’ in Milton Studies (1998).



Thomas N. Corns is Professor of English, University of Wales, Bangor. His books include The Development of Milton's Prose Style (Clarendon Press, 1982), Milton's Language (1990), Regaining Paradise Lost (1994), and, with Gordon Campbell, John Milton: Life, Work, and Thought (Oxford University Press, 2008). His edited work includes A Companion to Milton (2001). He is, with Gordon Campbell, general editor of the Oxford Complete Works of John Milton.



John Creaser is Emeritus Professor, Royal Holloway, University of London (where he was formerly Hildred Carlile Professor of English Literature) and Emeritus Fellow, Mansfield College, Oxford (where he was formerly English Fellow and Vice-Principal). He has edited plays by Jonson and Middleton, and written extensively on Milton, Jonson, and other seventeenth-century poets.



Stuart Curran is Vartan Gregorian Professor of English, University of Pennsylvania. He is the author of Poetic Form and British Romanticism (Oxford University Press, 1990) and the editor of The Cambridge Companion to British Romanticism (1993) and The Poems of Charlotte Smith (Oxford University Press, 1993). He is editing four volumes of the Johns Hopkins University Press edition of Shelley, in progress.



(p. xiv) Stephen B. Dobranski is Associate Professor of Early Modern Literature and Textual Studies, Georgia State University. He is the author of Milton, Authorship, and the Book Trade (1999) and co-edited, with John Rumrich, Milton and Heresy (1998). Most recently, he has completed A Variorum Commentary on the Poems of John Milton: ‘Samson Agonistes’ (2009) and is editing Milton in Context (2009).



Martin Dzelzainis is Professor of Early Modern Literature and Thought, Royal Holloway, University of London. His publications include editions of Milton's Political Writings (1991) and of Marvell's The Rehearsall Transpros'd for Volume 1 of The Prose Works of Andrew Marvell (2003). He is a General Editor of the forthcoming Oxford edition of The Works of Edward Hyde, Earl of Clarendon, and is editing the History of Britain for Volume 10 of the Oxford Complete Works of John Milton.



Karen L. Edwards is Senior Lecturer in English, University of Exeter. She is the author of Milton and the Natural World: Poetry and Science in ‘Paradise Lost’ (1999) and Milton's Reformed Animals: An Early Modern Bestiary (published as a series of special issues of Milton Quarterly, 2005–9).



Stephen M. Fallon is Cavanaugh Professor in the Humanities, University of Notre Dame. He is the author of Milton among the Philosophers: Poetry and Materialism in ‘Paradise Lost’ (1991) and Milton's Peculiar Grace: Self-Representation and Authority (2007). He has edited, with William Kerrigan and John Rumrich, The Complete Poetry and Essential Prose of John Milton (2007).



Estelle Haan (Sheehan) is Professor of English and Neo-Latin studies, Queen's University, Belfast. She is the author of From Academia to Amicitia: Milton's Latin Writings and the Italian Academies (1998) and Andrew Marvell's Latin Poetry: From Text to Context (2003). She is editing Milton's Latin poetry for Volume 3 of the Oxford Complete Works of John Milton.



Elizabeth D. Harvey is Professor of English, University of Toronto. She is the author of Ventriloquized Voices: Feminist Theory and Renaissance Texts (1992), editor of Soliciting Interpretation: Literary Theory and Seventeenth-Century English Poetry (1990) and Sensible Flesh: On Touch in Early Modern Culture (2002), and co-editor of Luce Irigaray and Premodern Culture (2004).



Blair Hoxby is Associate Professor of English, Stanford University. He is the author of Mammon's Music: Literature and Economics in the Age of Milton (2001) and Spectacles of the Gods: Tragedy and Tragic Opera, 1550–1780 (forthcoming). His essay ‘Milton's Steps in Time’ (1998) won the Monroe Kirk Spears award for the best publication in Studies in English Literature, 1500–1900.



Ann Hughes is Professor of Early Modern History, University of Keele. Her publications include Gangraena and the Struggle for the English Revolution (Oxford University Press, 2004), a study of the Presbyterian Thomas Edwards, ‘shallow Edwards’ in Milton's sonnet on the ‘New Forcers of Conscience under the Long Parliament’. She is a co-editor of the forthcoming Oxford edition of the Works of Gerrard Winstanley.



(p. xv) Edward Jones is Associate Professor of English, Oklahoma State University. His publications include Milton's Sonnets: An Annotated Bibliography, 1900–1992 (1994) and he has been editor of Milton Quarterly since 2005. He is co-editor of Volume 11 of the Oxford Complete Works of John Milton, for which he is editing the letters of State.



N. H. Keeble is Professor of English Studies and Senior Deputy Principal, University of Stirling. His publications include Richard Baxter: Puritan Man of Letters (Oxford University Press, 1982), The Literary Culture of Nonconformity in Later Seventeenth-Century England (1987), and The Restoration: England in the 1660s (1992). He is the editor of The Cambridge Companion to Writing of the English Revolution (2001) and is editing Milton's later vernacular republican tracts for Volume 6 of the Oxford Complete Works of John Milton.



Laura Lunger Knoppers is Professor of English, Pennsylvania State University. She is the author of Historicizing Milton: Spectacle, Power, and Poetry in Restoration England (1994) and Constructing Cromwell: Ceremony, Portrait, and Print, 1645–1661 (2000). She is the editor of Puritanism and its Discontents (2003) and co-editor of Milton in Popular Culture (2006). She has edited Paradise Regained and Samson Agonistes for Volume 2 of the Oxford Complete Works of John Milton (2008).



John Leonard is Professor of English, University of Western Ontario. He is the author of Naming in Paradise: Milton and the Language of Adam and Eve (Oxford University Press, 1990) and has edited the Penguin editions of Milton's Complete Poems (1998) and Paradise Lost (2000). He is writing the introduction to Paradise Lost for the Milton Variorum Commentary.



Nicholas McDowell is Associate Professor of English, University of Exeter. He is the author of The English Radical Imagination: Culture, Religion, and Revolution, 1630–1660 (Oxford University Press, 2003) and Poetry and Allegiance in the English Civil Wars: Marvell and the Cause of Wit (Oxford University Press, 2008). He is editing the 1649 prose for Volume 6 of the Oxford Complete Works of John Milton.



Charles Martindale is Professor of Latin, University of Bristol. He is the author of John Milton and the Transformation of Ancient Epic (1986), Redeeming the Text: Latin Poetry and the Hermeneutics of Reception (1993), and Latin Poetry and the Judgement of Taste: An Essay in Aesthetics (Oxford University Press, 2005). Among his edited work is, with A. B. Taylor, Shakespeare and the Classics (2004).



William Poole is Fellow and Tutor in English, New College, Oxford. He is the author of Milton and the Idea of the Fall (2005) and has edited Francis Lodwick's A Description of a Country not Named (2007). His The World-Makers: Changing Conceptions of the Earth in the Scientific Revolution is forthcoming and he is editing the Commonplace Book for Volume 9 of the Oxford Complete Works of John Milton.



Diane Purkiss is Fellow and Tutor in English, Keble College, Oxford. Her publications include Literature, Gender and Politics during the English Civil War (2005) and (p. xvi) The English Civil War: A People's History (2006), and, as co-editor with Clare Brant, Women, Texts and Histories 1575–1760 (1992).



Timothy Raylor is Professor of English, Carleton College, Minnesota. He is the author of Cavaliers, Clubs, and Literary Culture (1994) and a co-editor of Culture and Cultivation in Early Modern England (1992) and Samuel Hartlib and Universal Reformation (1994). He is editing Of Education for Volume 9 of the Oxford Complete Works of John Milton.



Joad Raymond is Professor of English, University of East Anglia. He is the author of The Invention of the Newspaper: English Newsbooks, 1641–49 (Oxford University Press, 1996), Pamphlets and Pamphleteering in Early Modern Britain (2003), and Milton's Angels (Oxford University Press, forthcoming). He is editing the ‘Defences’ for Volume 7 of the Oxford Complete Works of John Milton.



John Rogers is Professor of English, Yale University. He is the author of The Matter of Revolution: Poetry, Science, and Politics in the Age of Milton (1996), for which he won the Modern Language Association Prize for a First Book, and of the forthcoming Milton's Passion.



Elizabeth Sauer is Professor of English, Brock University. She is the author of ‘Paper Contestations’ and Textual Communities in England, 1640–1675 (2005) and Barbarous Dissonance and Images of Voice in Milton's Epics (1996). Her edited and co-edited books include Milton and the Imperial Vision (1999), Milton and the Climates of Reading (2006), and Milton and Toleration (Oxford University Press, 2007).



Regina M. Schwartz is Professor of English, Northwestern University. She is the author of Remembering and Repeating: Biblical Creation in Paradise Lost (1988), The Curse of Cain: The Violent Legacy of Monotheism (1997), and Sacramentality at the Dawn of Secularism: When God Left the World (2007). She is the editor of The Book and the Text: The Bible and Literary Theory (1990).



R. W. Serjeantson is a Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge. His publications include Generall Learning: A Seventeenth-Century Treatise on the Formation of the General Scholar, by Meric Casaubon (Cambridge, 1999) and a range of essays in early modern intellectual history. He is currently editing Volume 3 of the Oxford Francis Bacon for the Clarendon Press.



Nigel Smith is Professor of English, Princeton University. He is the author of Perfection Proclaimed: Language and Literature in English Radical Religion, 1640–1660 (Oxford University Press, 1989), Literature and Revolution in England, 1640–1660 (1994), and Is Milton Better than Shakespeare? (2008), and has edited the Ranter tracts (1983), George Fox's Journal (1998), and the Poems of Andrew Marvell (2003) for the Longman Annotated English Poets series. He is volume editor of Volume 9 of the Oxford Complete Works of John Milton.



Paul Stevens is Professor and Canada Research Chair in English Literature, the University of Toronto. He is the author of Imagination and the Presence of (p. xvii) Shakespeare in ‘Paradise Lost’ (1985). His most recent publications include Early Modern Nationalism and Milton's England (co-edited with David Loewenstein, 2008) and Milton in America (co-edited special issue of University of Toronto Quarterly, 2008).



Gordon Teskey is Professor of English, Harvard University. He is the author of Allegory and Violence (1996) and Delirious Milton: the Fate of the Poet in Modernity (2006), and the editor of the Norton Critical Edition of Paradise Lost (2004).



Nicholas von Maltzahn is Professor of English, University of Ottawa. He is the author of Milton's ‘History of Britain’: Republican Historiography in the English Revolution (Oxford University Press, 1991) and An Andrew Marvell Chronology (2005), and editor of Andrew Marvell's An Account of the Growth of Popery for Volume 2 of the Prose Works of Andrew Marvell (2003). He is editing the tracts on church government and toleration for Volume 4 of the Oxford Complete Works of John Milton.



Susan Wiseman is Professsor of Seventeenth-Century Literature, Birkbeck College, University of London. She is the author of Drama and Politics in the English Civil War (1998) and Conspiracy and Virtue: Women, Writing, and Politics in Seventeenth-Century England (Oxford University Press, 2006), and a co-editor of Women, Writing, History: 1640–1740 (1992).



Joseph Wittreich is Distinguished Professor, the Graduate School of the City University of New York. His books on Milton include Angel of Apocalypse: Blake's Idea of Milton (1975), Visionary Poetics: Milton's Tradition and his Legacy (1979), Interpreting “Samson Agonistes” (1986), Feminist Milton (1987), Shifting Contexts: Reinterpreting “Samson Agonistes” (2003), and Why Milton Matters (2006).



Anne-Julia Zwierlein is Professor of English Literary and Cultural Studies, the University of Regensburg. She is the author of Majestick Milton: British Imperial Expansion and Transformations of Paradise Lost, 1667–1837 (2001) and co-editor of Plotting Early Modern London: New Essays on Jacobean City Comedy (2004).