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date: 21 November 2019

(p. 623) Bibliography

(p. 623) Bibliography

Primary Sources

Manuscripts

Bodleian Library, Oxford

Part for Secundus Miles, Bodleian Library MS, Ashmole 750.

Second Northumberland Household Book, Bodleian Library MS Eng. hist. b. 208.

Christ Church, Oxford

MSS 439, 984–8.

Corporation of London Records Office, London

(Corporation of London MSS temporarily held at the London Metropolitan Archives, London)

Journals: 8 (1470–82), COL/CC/01/01/008; 15 (1543–8), COL/CC/01/01/015; 22 (1580–5), COL/ CC/01/01/022; 24 (1591–5), COL/CC/01/01/024; 26 (1602–5), COL/CC/01/01/027; 28 (1605–9), COL/CC/01/01/028.

Letter Books: H (1375–99), COL/AD/01/008; L (1461–97), COL/AD/01/011; N (1515–26), COL/ AD/01/013; P (1532–40), COL/AD/01/015.

Repertories: 1 (1495–1504), COL/CA/01/01/001; 10 (1537–43), COL/CA/01/01/010.

Drapers' Hall, London

Drapers' Company Wardens' Accounts 1475–1510, MS þ 403.

Dulwich College Library, London

Henslowe Papers, MS I, art. 106.

Dulwich, Mun. 58.

Goldsmiths' Hall, London

Goldsmiths' Company Wardens' Accounts and Minutes 1334–1443, MS 1518.

Houghton Library, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Book of parts belonging to Macklin, Harvard Theatre Collection MS, TS 1197 54.5.

Parts of Poore, Polypragmaticus, Amurath, Antoninus, Harvard Theatre Collection MS, Thr. 10.1.

Part for Trico, Houghton Library MS Eng. 1258 (5).

Huntington Library, San Marino, California

William Percy, Poems, MS HM 4.

London Metropolitan Archives, London

(See also Corporation of London Records Office)

(p. 624) J. Hancock and G. Archer (1635), Final Report of the Churchwardens and Constables of the Parish of St Saviour for the Commissioners for Buildings, P92/SAV/1327.

Mercers' Hall, London

Mercers' Company MSS Acts of Court 1 (1453–1528).

The National Archives, London

PROB 11/54/140, PROB 11/55/218, PROB 11/74/199, PROB 11/99/269, PROB 11/129/369.

Saffron Walden Town Hall

Chamberlains' Accounts.

Printed Texts

Texts of plays, poems, etc. are listed by author, not by editor. Collections of early documents, including Records of Early English Drama (REED) volumes, Malone Society Collections, Calendars of State Papers, maps, and corporation and institutional documents, are listed by editor and date. Co-authored or co-edited items are listed after items published individually by the first-named author or editor.

Anon. (1909), The Second Maiden's Tragedy, ed. W. W. Greg (Oxford: Malone Society).Find this resource:

——(1936), The Soddered Citizen (c.1630), ed. J. H. Pafford (Oxford: Malone Society).Find this resource:

——(1949), The Three Parnassus Plays, ed. J. B. Leishman (London: Ivor Nicholson and Watson).Find this resource:

——(1959 [1958]), The Lady Mother [by Henry Glapthorne?] (1635), ed. Arthur Brown (Oxford: Malone Society).Find this resource:

——(1960), The Telltale (1630s?), ed. R. A. Foakes and J. C. Gibson (Oxford: Malone Society).Find this resource:

——(1990), The Receyt of the Ladie Kateryne, ed. G. Kipling (Oxford: Early English Text Society).Find this resource:

——(1992), Tom a Lincoln, ed. G. R. Proudfoot (Oxford: Malone Society).Find this resource:

Baildon, W. P. (ed.) (1897–2001), Records of the Honorable Society of Lincoln's Inn: The Black Books, 6 vols (vols i-v ed. Baildon) (London: Lincoln's Inn).Find this resource:

Baldwin, Elizabeth, Lawrence M. Clopper, and David Mills (eds) (2007), Records of Early English Drama: Cheshire, 2 vols (Toronto: University of Toronto Press).Find this resource:

Bale, R. (1911), ‘Robert Bale's Chronicle’ (15th-century), in R. Flenley (ed.), Six Town Chronicles of England (Oxford: Clarendon Press), 114–53.Find this resource:

Bandello, Matteo (1890), The Novels of Matteo Bandello Englished by John Payne, 6 vols (London: Villon Society).Find this resource:

Barnes, Barnabe (1607), The Divils Charter (London).Find this resource:

——(1913), The Devil's Charter, ed. John S. Farmer (Amersham: Tudor Facsimile Texts).Find this resource:

Bawcutt, N. W. (ed.) (1993), Malone Society Collections, xv (Oxford: Malone Society).Find this resource:

Beard, Thomas (1597), The Theater of Gods Judgements (London).Find this resource:

Beaumont, Francis, John Fletcher (1905–12), The Works of Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher, ed. Arnold Glover and A. R. Waller, 10 vols (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).Find this resource:

——et al. (1647), Comedies and Tragedies Written by Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher Gentlemen (London).Find this resource:

Bevington, David (ed.) (2002), English Renaissance Drama: A Norton Anthology (New York: W. W. Norton).Find this resource:

Birck, Sixt (1938), Sapientia Solomonis, ed. and trans. Elizabeth Rogers Payne (New Haven: Yale University Press).Find this resource:

Blount, Thomas (1656), Glossographia (London).Find this resource:

Brathwait, Richard (1634), A Strange Metamorphosis of Man, Transformed into a Wildernesse (London).Find this resource:

(p. 625) Brewer, J. S., J. Gairdner, and R. H. Brodie (eds) (1862–1914), Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, of the Reign of Henry VIII, 1509–47, 21 vols in 33 (London); Addenda, ed. R. H. Brodie (1929–32), 1 vol. in 2 pts (London).Find this resource:

———(1965), Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, of the Reign of Henry VIII, and Addenda, 2nd edn, 21 vols in 37 (1920–32; London: HMSO).Find this resource:

Brinsley, Joseph (1612), Ludus Literarius, or, The Grammar School (London).Find this resource:

Brome, Richard (1632), The Northern Lasse (London).Find this resource:

——(1640), The Antipodes: A Comedy (London).Find this resource:

——(1653), Five New Playes (London).Find this resource:

——(1873), The Dramatic Works of Richard Brome, ed. R. H. Shepherd, 3 vols (London).Find this resource:

Brown, R., et al. (eds) (1864–1947), Calendar of State Papers and Manuscripts Relating to English Affairs, Existing in the Archives of Collections of Venice and in Other Libraries of North Italy, 38 vols (London: Historical Manuscripts Commission).Find this resource:

Callon, Gordon J. (ed.) (2002), William Lawes: Collected Vocal Music, pt 1: Solo Songs, pt 2: Dialogues, Partsongs, and Catches (Middleton, WI: A-R Editions).Find this resource:

Carew, T. (1949), The Poems of Thomas Carew with his Masque ‘Coelum Britannicum’, ed. R. Dunlap (Oxford: Clarendon Press).Find this resource:

Carleton, D. (1972), Dudley Carleton to John Chamberlain 1603–1624: Jacobean Letters, ed. M. Lee, Jr. (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press).Find this resource:

Cavendish, William (1999), The Country Captain, ed. Anthony Johnson (Oxford: Malone Society).Find this resource:

Centlivre, S. (1714), The Wonder (London).Find this resource:

Chamberlain, John. See McClure, Norman E.

Chambers, E. K. (1907), ‘The Elizabethan Lords Chamberlain’, in Malone Society Collections, i/1. 31–42.Find this resource:

——(ed.) (1911), ‘Commissions for the Chapel’, in Malone Society Collections, i/4–5. 357–63.Find this resource:

——(ed.) (1931), ‘Dramatic Records of the City of London: The Repertories, Journals, and Letter Books’, in Malone Society Collections, ii/3. 285–320.Find this resource:

——and W. W. Greg (1907), ‘Dramatic Records of the City of London: The Remembrancia’, in Malone Society Collections, i/1. 43–100.Find this resource:

———(1908), ‘Dramatic Records from the Lansdowne Manuscripts’, in Malone Society Collections, i/2. 143–215.Find this resource:

———(1909), ‘Dramatic Records from the Patent Rolls: Company Licences’, in Malone Society Collections, i/3. 260–84.Find this resource:

———(1911), ‘Dramatic Records from the Privy Council Register, 1603–1642’, in Malone Society Collections, i/4–5. 370–95.Find this resource:

Chapman, George (1611), May-Day (London).Find this resource:

——(1970), The Plays of George Chapman: The Comedies, ed. Allan Holaday et al. (Urbana: University of Illinois Press).Find this resource:

Cicero, Marcus Tullius (1948), De Oratore, trans. E. W. Sutton (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press).Find this resource:

Clavell, J. (1936), The Soddered Citizen (c.1630), ed. J. H. P. PaVord and W. W. Greg (Oxford: Oxford University Press).Find this resource:

C[leaver], R. [and J. Dod] (1598), A Godlie Forme of Householde Gouernment for the Ordering of Priuate Families, According to the Direction of Gods Word (London).Find this resource:

Colvin, H. M. (ed.) (1963–82), The History of the King's Works, 6 vols (London: HMSO).Find this resource:

Cook, David, and F. P. Wilson (eds) (1961), ‘Dramatic Records in the Declared Accounts of the Treasurer of the Chamber 1558–1642’, in Malone Society Collections, vi.Find this resource:

Cooke, J. (1614), Greenes Tu Quoque, or, The Cittie Gallant (London).Find this resource:

(p. 626) Cotgrave, Randle, and Adam Islip (1611), A Dictionarie of the French and English Tongues (London: Printed by Adam Islip).Find this resource:

Cox, J. E. (ed.) (1876), The Annals of St. Helen's, Bishopsgate (London: Tinsley Brothers).Find this resource:

Crashaw, William (1608), The Sermon Preached at the Crosse, Feb xiiii 1607 (H.L. for Edmond Weaver).Find this resource:

Dasent, John R., et al. (eds) (1890–1964), Acts of the Privy Council of England, New Series: 1542–1631, 46 vols (London: HMSO).Find this resource:

Davenant, William (1630), The Just Italian (London).Find this resource:

——(1673), The Works of Sir William Davenant (London).Find this resource:

Davies, John (of Hereford) (1611), The Scourge of Folly (London).Find this resource:

Davies, Sir John (1876), The Complete Poems of Sir John Davies, ed. A. B. Grosart (London).Find this resource:

Davis, Norman (1979), Non-Cycle Plays and the Winchester Dialogues (Oxford: Oxford University Press for the Early English Text Society).Find this resource:

Dekker, Thomas (1600), The Pleasant Comedie of Old Fortunatus (London).Find this resource:

——(1606), The Seven Deadlie Sinns of London (London).Find this resource:

——(1630), The Blacke Rod, and the White Rod (London).Find this resource:

——(1884–6), The Non-Dramatic Works, ed. A. B. Grosart, 5 vols (New York: Russell and Russell).Find this resource:

——(1953–61), The Dramatic Works of Thomas Dekker, ed. Fredson Bowers, 4 vols (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).Find this resource:

——(1963), The Non-Dramatic Works, ed. A. B. Grosart, 5 vols (1884–6; New York: Russell and Russell).Find this resource:

——and Thomas Middleton (1604), The Honest Whore (London).Find this resource:

——and John Webster (1607), Westward Hoe! (London).Find this resource:

———(1911), Westward Ho! (1607; London: Tudor Facsimile Texts).Find this resource:

Douglas, Audrey, and Peter Greenfield (eds) (1986), Records of Early English Drama: Cumber-land, Westmorland, Gloucestershire (Toronto: University of Toronto Press).Find this resource:

Dugdale, G. (1604), The Time Triumphant (London).Find this resource:

Earle, John (1628), Micro-cosmographie, or, A Peece of the World Discouered in Essayes and Characters (London).Find this resource:

Edwards, Richard (1980), Damon and Pythias, ed. D. Jerry White (New York: Garland).Find this resource:

Elliott, John R., and Alan H. Nelson (University); Alexandra F. Johnston and Diana Wyatt (City) (2004), Records of Early English Drama: Oxford, 2 vols (Toronto: University of Toronto Press).Find this resource:

Erler, Mary (2008), Records of Early English Drama: Ecclesiastical London (Toronto: University of Toronto Press).Find this resource:

Feuillerat, Albert (1908), Documents Relating to the Office of the Revels in the Time of Queen Elizabeth (Louvain: Ustpruyst).Find this resource:

——(1914), Documents Relating to the Office of the Revels at Court in the Time of King Edward VI and Queen Mary (The Loseley Manuscripts) (Louvain: Ustpruyst).Find this resource:

Field, Nathan (1950), The Plays of Nathan Field, ed. William Peery (Austin: University of Texas Press).Find this resource:

Finet, John (1987), Ceremonies of Charles I: The Notebooks of John Finet, 1628–1641, ed. Albert J. Loomie (New York: Fordham University Press).Find this resource:

Firth, C. H., and R. S. Rait (1911), Acts and Ordinances of the Interregnum, 1642–1660, 3 vols (London: HMSO).Find this resource:

Fisher, John (ed.) (1981), A Collection of Early Maps of London, 1553–1667 (Lympne Castle: Guildhall Library).Find this resource:

(p. 627) Flecknoe, Richard (1664), Love's Kingdom, with A Short Discourse of the English Stage (London).Find this resource:

——(1674), Short Discourse of the English Stage.Find this resource:

Fletcher, John (1966–96), The Dramatic Works in the Beaumont and Fletcher Canon, ed. Fredson Bowers et al., 10 vols (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).Find this resource:

Florio, John (1578), First Fruites (London).Find this resource:

Foakes, R. A. (1985), Illustrations of the English Stage 1580–1642 (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press).Find this resource:

——(ed.) (2002), Henslowe's Diary (1961; Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).Find this resource:

——and J. C. Gibson (eds) (1960), The Telltale (Oxford: Malone Society).Find this resource:

——and R. T. Rickert (eds) (1961), Henslowe's Diary (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).Find this resource:

Foster, Joseph (ed.) (1887), London Marriage Licenses, 1521–1869 (London: Bernard Quaritch).Find this resource:

Foxe, J. (1837–41), Acts and Monuments, ed. S. R. Cattley and G. Townsend (London: Seeley, Burnside, and Seeley)Find this resource:

Fraser, Russell A., and Norman C. Rabkin (eds) (1976), Drama of the English Renaissance, i: The Tudor Period (New York: Macmillan).Find this resource:

Fuller, Thomas (1642), The Holy State (Cambridge).Find this resource:

Furnivall, F. J. (ed.) (1868), Ballads from Manuscript, i/1 (London: Ballad Society).Find this resource:

Gainsford, Thomas (1616), The Rich Cabinet (London).Find this resource:

Galloway, David (ed.) (1984), Records of Early English Drama: Norwich 1540–1642 (Toronto: University of Toronto Press).Find this resource:

Gardiner, Samuel (1606), A Booke of Angling, or Fishing (London).Find this resource:

Gascoigne, George (1575), Glasse of Governement (London).Find this resource:

Gawdy, Philip (1906), The Letters of Philip Gawdy, ed. I. H. Jeayes (London).Find this resource:

Gayton, Edmund (1654), Pleasant Notes upon Don Quixot (London).Find this resource:

Gee, H., and W. J. Hardy (eds) (1896), Documents Illustrative of English Church History (New York: Macmillan).Find this resource:

George, David (ed.) (1991), Records of Early English Drama: Lancashire (Toronto: University of Toronto Press).Find this resource:

Gesta Grayorum (1688) (London).Find this resource:

Gibson, James M. (ed.) (2002), Records of Early English Drama: Kent, Diocese of Canterbury, 3 vols (Toronto: University of Toronto Press).Find this resource:

[Glapthorne, Henry?] (1959 [1958]), The Lady Mother (1635), ed. Arthur Brown (Oxford: Malone Society).Find this resource:

Gosson, Stephen (1579a), The Ephemerides of Phialo (London).Find this resource:

——(1579b), The Schoole of Abuse. Conteining a Plesaunt Inuectiue Against Poets, Pipers, Plaiers, Iesters and Such Like Caterpillers of a Commonwelth (London: [Thomas Dawson] for Thomas Woodcock.Find this resource:

——(1582), Playes Confuted in Five Actions (London).Find this resource:

Gower, Granville William Gresham Leveson (ed.) (1877), A Register of all the Christninges Burialles & Weddinges within the Parish of Saint Peeters vpon Cornhill (London).Find this resource:

Grafton, R. (1809), Grafton's Chronicle (1569), 2 vols (London: J. Johnson et al.).Find this resource:

Gray, William (1649), Chorographia (London).Find this resource:

Greene, Robert (1598a), Menaphon (London).Find this resource:

——(1598b), The Scottish Historie of James the Fourth (London).Find this resource:

——(1921), James IV, ed. A. E. H. Swaen (London: Malone Society Reprints).Find this resource:

——(1923), The Thirde and Last Part of ConnyCatching (1592) and A Disputation Betweene a Hee Conny-Catcher and a Shee Conny-Catcher (1592), ed. G. B. Harrison (London: Bodley Head Quartos).Find this resource:

(p. 628) Greene, Robert (1926), Alphonsus of Aragon (c.1587–8), ed. W. W. Greg (London: Malone Society Reprints).Find this resource:

Greg, W. W. (ed.) (1922), Two Elizabethan Stage Abridgements: ‘The Battle of Alcazar’ and ‘Orlando Furioso’ (Oxford: Malone Society).Find this resource:

——(1931), Dramatic Documents from the Elizabethan Playhouses, 2 vols (Oxford: Clarendon Press).Find this resource:

Grose, F. (ed.) (1809), ‘The Earl of Northumberland's Household Book’, in The Antiquarian Repertory, iv (London: E. Jeffery).Find this resource:

Guilpin, Everard (1598), Skialetheia, or, A Shadowe of Truth, in Certaine Epigrams and Satyres (London: J. R[oberts] for N. Ling).Find this resource:

Hall, Edward (1809), Hall's Chronicle: The Union of the Two Noble and Illustre Famelies of Lancastre and Yorke (1548; London: J. Johnson et al.).Find this resource:

Hallen, A. W. Cornelius (transcriber) (1889), The Registers of St. Botolph, Bishopsgate London, 3 vols (Edinburgh: T. and A. Constable).Find this resource:

Hamilton, W. (ed.) (1875, 1877), A Chronicle of England during the Reigns of the Tudors by Charles Wriothesley, Windsor Herald, Camden Society, new ser., 11, 20.Find this resource:

Harbage, Alfred (1964), Annals of English Drama 975–1700: An Analytical Record of All Plays, Extant or Lost, Chronologically Arranged and Indexed by Authors, Titles, Dramatic Companies, Etc., rev. S. Schoenbaum (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press).Find this resource:

Harvey, Gabriel (1884), Letter-Book of Gabriel Harvey, ed. Edward John Long Scott, Camden Society, new ser., 33.Find this resource:

Hayes, S., and W. Murdin (eds) (1740–59), A Collection of State Papers … left by William Cecil, Lord Burghley, 2 vols (London: HMSO).Find this resource:

Hays, Rosalind Conklin, and C. E. McGee/Sally L. Joyce and Evelyn S. Newlyn (eds) (1999), Records of Early English Drama: Dorset/Cornwall (Toronto: University of Toronto Press and Brepols).Find this resource:

Henslowe, Philip (1904–8), Henslowe's Diary, ed. W. W. Greg, 2 vols (London: A. H. Bullen).Find this resource:

——(1907), Henslowe Papers, ed. W. W. Greg (London: A. H. Bullen).Find this resource:

——(1961), Henslowe's Diary (c.1592–1604), ed. R. A. Foakes and R. T. Rickert (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).Find this resource:

——(2002), Henslowe's Diary, 2nd edn, ed. R. A. Foakes (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).Find this resource:

Herbert, Sir Henry (1917), The Dramatic Records of Sir Henry Herbert, ed. Joseph Quincy Adams (New Haven: Yale University Press).Find this resource:

——(1996), The Control and Censorship of Caroline Drama: The Records of Sir Henry Herbert, Master of the Revels 1623–73, ed. N. W. Bawcutt (Oxford: Oxford University Press).Find this resource:

Heywood, Thomas (1608), The Rape of Lucrece (London).Find this resource:

——(1609), The Rape of Lucrece (London).Find this resource:

——(1612), An Apology for Actors (London).Find this resource:

——(1613), The Brazen Age (London).Find this resource:

——(1631), Fair Maid of the West (London).Find this resource:

——(1632), The Iron Age (London).Find this resource:

——(1637), The Royall King, and the Loyall Subject (London).Find this resource:

——(1874), The Dramatic Works of Thomas Heywood, ed. R. H. Shepherd, 6 vols (London).Find this resource:

——(1978), The Escapes of Jupiter (1583), ed. Henry D. Janzen (London: Malone Society Reprints).Find this resource:

——(1986), Thomas Heywood's Pageants, ed. D. M. Bergeron (New York: Garland).Find this resource:

Hill, Aaron, and William Popple (1966), The Prompter: A Theatrical Paper (1734–6), ed. W. W. Appleton and K. A. Burnim (New York: Benjamin Blom).Find this resource:

Hill, Thomas (1581), The Contemplation of Mankinde (London).Find this resource:

(p. 629) Holinshed, R. (1807–8), Holinshed's Chronicles of England, Scotland, and Ireland, 6 vols (London: J. Johnson et al.).Find this resource:

Honigmann, E. A. J., and S. Brock (1993), Playhouse Wills 1558–1642: An Edition of Wills by Shakespeare and his Contemporaries in the London Theatre (Manchester: Manchester University Press).Find this resource:

Hovenden, R. (ed.) (1884–94), A True Register of all the Christeninges, Mariages, and Burialles in the Parishe of St. James, Clerkenwell, from the Yeare of Our Lord God 1551, 6 vols (London: Harleian Society).Find this resource:

Howes, Edmund (1631), Additions to John Stow's ‘Annales, or, A General Chronicle of England’ (London).Find this resource:

Hume, Martin Andrew Sharp (ed.) (1892–8), Calendar of State Papers relating to English Affairs preserved principally in the Archives of Simancas, 4 vols (London: HMSO).Find this resource:

Ingram, R. W. (ed.) (1981), Records of Early English Drama: Coventry (Toronto: University of Toronto Press).Find this resource:

J.C. (1620), The Two Merry Milkemaids, or, The Best Words Weare the Garland (London).Find this resource:

J.D. (1640), The Knave in Graine (London).Find this resource:

JeaVreson, John Cordy (ed.) (1972), Middlesex County Records (1886–92), old ser., 4 vols (London: Greater London Council).Find this resource:

Johnston, A. F., and M. Rogerson (eds) (1979), Records of Early English Drama: York, 2 vols (Toronto: University of Toronto Press).Find this resource:

Jonson, Ben (1601), The Fountaine of Self-Love, or, Cynthias Revels (London).Find this resource:

——(1607), Volpone (London).Find this resource:

——(1616), The Workes of Benjamin Jonson (London).Find this resource:

——(1925–52), Ben Jonson, ed. C. H. Herford and Percy and Evelyn Simpson, 11 vols (Oxford: Oxford University Press).Find this resource:

Justices of the Peace, Quarter Sessions (1925), Middlesex County Records: Calendar of Sessions Rolls (1610; London: [British Library Typescript]).Find this resource:

Kirk, R. E. G., and E. F. Kirk (eds) (1900), Returns of Aliens Dwelling in the City and Suburbs of London from the Reign of Henry VIII to that of James I, 1523–1571, Publications of the Huguenot Society of London, 10/1 (Aberdeen: Aberdeen University Press).Find this resource:

——(1907), Returns of Aliens Dwelling in the City and Suburbs of London from the Reign of Henry VIII to that of James I, 1598–1625 (Aberdeen: Huguenot Society of London).Find this resource:

Kirke, J. (1638), The Seven Champions of Christendome (London).Find this resource:

Kirkman, F. (1673), The Wits, or, Sport Upon Sport (London).Find this resource:

Klausner, David N. (1990), Records of Early English Drama: Herefordshire/Worcestershire (Toronto: University of Toronto Press).Find this resource:

——(2005), Records of Early English Drama: Wales (Toronto: University of Toronto Press).Find this resource:

Knolles, Richard (1603), The Generall Historie of the Turks (London).Find this resource:

Kyd, Thomas (1615), The Spanish Tragedie: or, Hieronimoe is mad againe (London).Find this resource:

Lambarde, William (1576), A Perambulation of Kent (London: [Henry Middleton] for Ralph Newbery).Find this resource:

le Hardy, William (ed.) (1935–41), County of Middlesex: Calendar to the Sessions Records 1612–1618, new ser., 4 vols (London: Guildhall).Find this resource:

Leishman, J. B. (ed.) (1949), The Three Parnassus Plays (London: Ivor Nicholson and Watson; repr. 1994).Find this resource:

Leland, J. (ed.) (1774), Antiquarii de Rebus Britannicis Collectanea, iv, ed. T. Hearne (London: Benjamin White).Find this resource:

Lemnius, Levinus (1576), The Touchstone of Complexions, trans. Thomas Newton (London).Find this resource:

Lemon, Robert, and Mary Anne Everett Green (eds) (1857), Calendar of State Papers: Domestic Series of the Reigns of Edward VI, Mary, Elizabeth I, James I, preserved in the State Paper (p. 630) Department of Her Majesty's Public Record Office, 48 vols (1856–97), viii: Reign of James I: 1603–1610 (London: HMSO).Find this resource:

Lenton, Francis (1629), The Young Gallants Whirligigg, or, Youths Reakes (London).Find this resource:

Lodge, Thomas (1596), Wits Miserie, and the Worlds Madnesse (London: Andrew Islip sold by Cuthbert Burby).Find this resource:

——(1910), The Wounds of Civil War (1594), ed. J. Dover Wilson (London: Malone Society Reprints).Find this resource:

Louis, C. (ed.) (2000), Records of Early English Drama: Sussex (Toronto: University of Toronto Press).Find this resource:

Lyly, John (1902), The Complete Works of John Lyly, ed. R. W. Bond, 3 vols (Oxford: Clarendon Press).Find this resource:

McClure, Norman E. (ed.) (1939), The Letters of John Chamberlain, 2 vols (Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society).Find this resource:

Machyn, H. (1848), The Diary of Henry Machyn, Citizen and Merchant-Taylor of London, from a.d. 1550 to a.d. 1563, ed. J. G. Nichols, Camden Society,42.Find this resource:

Madden, John (1998), Shakespeare in Love, motion picture (Bedford Falls, Miramax, Universal).Find this resource:

Madge, Sidney J. (ed.) (1901), Abstracts of Inquisitiones Post Mortem for the City of London, pt II: 1561–1577 (London: British Record Society).Find this resource:

Malone, Edmund (1790), The Plays and Poems of William Shakespeare, 10 vols (London).Find this resource:

Manningham, John (1976), The Diary of John Manningham of the Middle Temple 1602–1603, ed. Robert Parker Sorlien (Hanover, NH: University Press of New England).Find this resource:

Marlowe, Christopher (1590) Tamburlaine the Great. The Second Part of the bloody Conquests of mighty Tamburlaine (London).Find this resource:

——(1973), The Complete Works of Christopher Marlowe, ed. Fredson Bowers (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).Find this resource:

Marston, John (1601), Iacke Drums Entertainment, or, The Comedie of Pasquill and Katherine (London).Find this resource:

——(1602), The History of Antonio and Mellida (London).Find this resource:

——(1604), The Malcontent, 3rd edn (London).Find this resource:

——(1605), The Dutch Courtezan (London).Find this resource:

——(1934–9), The Plays, ed. H. Harvey Wood, 3 vols (Edinburgh: Oliver and Boyd).Find this resource:

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(p. 649) ——(1999), ‘Tragedy and the Spectacle of the Mind: Messenger Speeches, Actors, Narrative, and Audience Imagination in Fourth-Century bce Vase-Painting’, in Bettina Bergmann and Christine Kondoleon (eds), The Art of Ancient Spectacle (New Haven: Yale University Press), 37–63.Find this resource:

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——and Eric Handley (1995), Images of the Greek Theatre (Austin: University of Texas Press).Find this resource:

Greenblatt, Stephen (1980), Renaissance Self-Fashioning: From More to Shakespeare (Chicago: University of Chicago Press).Find this resource:

——(1985), ‘Invisible Bullets: Renaissance Authority and its Subversion, Henry IV and Henry V’, in Jonathan Dollimore and Alan SinWeld (eds), Political Shakespeare: New Essays in Cultural Materialism (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press), 18–47.Find this resource:

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GreenWeld, Peter H. (1983), ‘Entertainments of Henry, Lord Berkeley, 1593–4 and 1600–05’, Records of Early English Drama Newsletter, 8/1: 12–24.Find this resource:

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——(1970), A Bibliography of the English Printed Drama to the Restoration, 4 vols (London: Bibliographical Society).Find this resource:

GriYn, A. (1972), Pageantry on the Shakespearean Stage (New York: AMS).Find this resource:

GriYth, Eva (2001), ‘New Material for a Jacobean Playhouse: The Red Bull Theatre on the Seckford Estate’, Theatre Notebook, 55: 5–23.Find this resource:

——(2004), ‘Baskervile, Susan (bap. 1573, d. 1649)’, in H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison (eds), Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford: Oxford University Press).Find this resource:

GriYths, Paul (1993), ‘The Structure of Prostitution in Elizabethan England’, Continuity and Change, 8: 39–64.Find this resource:

——(2003), ‘Contesting London Bridewell, 1576–1580’, Journal of British Studies, 42/3: 283–315.Find this resource:

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(p. 650) Gurr, Andrew (1988), ‘Singing through the Chatter: Ford and Contemporary Theatrical Fashion’, in M. Neill (ed.), John Ford: Critical Revisions (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), 81–96.Find this resource:

——(1989), ‘The Shakespearian Stage, Forty Years On’, Shakespeare Survey, 41: 1–12.Find this resource:

——(1992a), ‘Cultural Property and “Sufficient Interest”: The Rose and the Globe Sites’, Journal of Cultural Property, 1: 9–25.Find this resource:

——(1992b), The Shakespearean Stage 1574–1642, 3rd edn (1970; Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).Find this resource:

——(1993a), ‘The Chimera of Amalgamation’, Theatre Research International, 18/2: 85–93.Find this resource:

——(1993b), ‘Three Reluctant Patrons and Early Shakespeare’, Shakespeare Quarterly, 44: 159–74.Find this resource:

——(1994a), ‘Playing in Ampitheatres and Playing in Hall Theatres’, in A. L. Magnusson and C. E. McGee (eds), Elizabethan Theatre XIII (Toronto: P. D. Meany), 47–62.Find this resource:

——(1994b), ‘The Loss of Records for the Travelling Companies in Stuart Times’, REED Newsletter, 19/2: 2–19.Find this resource:

——(1996a), ‘Entrances and Hierarchy in the Globe Auditorium’, Shakespeare Bulletin, 14/4: 11–13.Find this resource:

——(1996b), The Shakespearian Playing Companies (Oxford: Clarendon Press).Find this resource:

——(1996c), ‘Some Reasons to Focus on the Globe and on the Fortune: Stages and Stage Directions: Controls for the Evidence’, Theatre Survey, 37: 23–33.Find this resource:

——(1999), ‘Stage Doors at the Globe’, Theatre Studies, 53: 8–18.Find this resource:

——(2002), ‘Privy Councilors as Theatre Patrons’, in Paul WhitWeld White and Suzanne R. Westfall (eds), Shakespeare and Theatrical Patronage in Early Modern England (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), 221–45.Find this resource:

——(2004a), ‘A New Theatre Historicism’, in Peter Holland and Stephen Orgel (eds), From Script to Stage in Early Modern England (Basingstoke: Palgrave), 71–88.Find this resource:

——(2004b), Playgoing in Shakespeare's London, 3rd edn (1987; Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).Find this resource:

——(2004c), The Shakespeare Company 1594–1642 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).Find this resource:

——(2004d), ‘Beeston, Christopher’, in H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison (eds), Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford: Oxford University Press).Find this resource:

——(2005), ‘Henry Carey's Peculiar Letter’, Shakespeare Quarterly, 57: 51–73.Find this resource:

——and Mariko Ichikawa (2000), Staging in Shakespeare's Theatres (Oxford: Oxford University Press).Find this resource:

See also ISGC (1993).

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——(1997), The Tudor Monarchy (London: Arnold).Find this resource:

Haaker, A. (1968), ‘The Plague, the Theater, and the Poet’, Renaissance Drama, new ser., 1: 283–306.Find this resource:

Hafter, Daryl M. (ed.) (1995), European Women and Pre-industrial Craft (Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press).Find this resource:

Haigh, Christopher (1998), Elizabeth I, 2nd edn (1988; London: Longman).Find this resource:

Halasz, Alexandra (1997), The Marketplace of Print: Pamphlets and the Public Sphere in Early Modern England (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).Find this resource:

Hall, Edith (2006), The Theatrical Cast of Athens (Oxford: Oxford University Press).Find this resource:

Halpern, Richard (1991), The Poetics of Primitive Accumulation: English Renaissance Culture and the Genealogy of Capital (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press).Find this resource:

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(p. 651) Hammer, Paul E. J. (1995), ‘Patronage at Court, Faction and the Earl of Essex’, in John Guy (ed.), The Reign of Elizabeth I: Court and Culture in the Last Decade (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), 65–86.Find this resource:

——(1999), The Polarisation of Elizabethan Politics: The Political Career of Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex, 1585–1597 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).Find this resource:

——(2003), Elizabeth's Wars: War, Government and Society in Tudor England, 1544–1604 (Basingstoke: Palgrave).Find this resource:

Hanawalt, Barbara A. (1993), Growing Up in Medieval London (Oxford: Oxford University Press).Find this resource:

Harbage, Alfred (1941), Shakespeare's Audience (New York: Columbia University Press).Find this resource:

——(1952), Shakespeare and the Rival Traditions (New York: Macmillan).Find this resource:

——(1964), Annals of English Drama 975–1700: An Analytical Record of All Plays, Extant or Lost, Chronologically Arranged and Indexed by Authors, Titles, Dramatic Companies, &c., rev. S. Schoenbaum (London: Methuen).Find this resource:

Harris, John, and A. A. Tait (1979), Catalogue of the Drawings by Inigo Jones, John Webb, and Isaac de Caus at Worcester College Oxford (Oxford: Clarendon Press).Find this resource:

Harris, Jonathan Gil (2001), ‘Shakespeare's Hair: Staging the Object of Material Culture’, Shakespeare Quarterly, 52: 479–91.Find this resource:

——and Natasha Korda (2002), ‘Introduction: Towards a Materialist Account of Stage Properties’, in J. G. Harris and Natasha Korda (eds), Staged Properties in Early Modern English Drama (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), 1–31.Find this resource:

Hart, Alfred (1934), Shakespeare and the Homilies (Melbourne: Melbourne University Press).Find this resource:

Haskell, Francis (1993), History and its Images: Art and the Interpretation of the Past (New Haven: Yale University Press).Find this resource:

Hasler, P. W. (ed.) (1981), The History of Parliament: The House of Commons, 1558–1603, 3 vols (London: HMSO).Find this resource:

Hattaway, Michael (1982), Elizabethan Popular Theatre: Plays in Performance (London: Routledge and Kegan Paul).Find this resource:

Hays, Rosalind Conklin (1992), ‘Dorset Church Houses and the Drama’, Research Opportunities in Renaissance Drama, 31: 12–23.Find this resource:

Heal, Felicity (1990), Hospitality in Early Modern England (Oxford: Clarendon Press).Find this resource:

Heinemann, Margot (1980), Puritanism and Theatre: Thomas Middleton and Opposition Drama under the Early Stuarts (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).Find this resource:

——(1991), ‘ “God Help the Poor: The Rich Can Shift”: The World Upside-Down and the Popular Tradition in the Theatre’, in G. McMullan and J. Hope (eds), The Politics of Tragicomedy: Shakespeare and After (New York: Routledge).Find this resource:

Henry, Stuart (1987), ‘The Political Economy of Informal Economies’, Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 493: 137–53.Find this resource:

Herlihy, David (1990), Opera Muliebria: Women and Work in Medieval Europe (New York: McGraw-Hill).Find this resource:

Hermerén, Göran (1969), Representation and Meaning in the Visual Arts: A Study in the Methodology of Iconography and Iconology (Stockholm: Norstedt).Find this resource:

Hickman, D. (1999), ‘Religious Belief and Pious Practice among London's Elizabethan Elite’, Historical Journal, 42/4: 941–60.Find this resource:

Higgott, Gordon (2006), ‘Two Theatre Designs by John Webb in 1660’, for the session ‘Stages for Shakespeare's Theatre’, 32nd International Shakespeare Conference, Shakespeare Institute, Stratford upon Avon, 6–11 Aug. 2006.Find this resource:

Hildy, Franklin (1993), ‘If You Build it They Will Come’, in The Design of the Globe, app. 3 (London: International Shakespeare Globe Centre), 89–106.Find this resource:

Hill, Christopher (ed.) (1977), History and Culture (London: Mitchell Beazley).Find this resource:

Hill, Tracey (2004), Anthony Munday and Civic Culture: Theatre, History, and Power in Early Modern London, 1580–1633 (Manchester: Manchester University Press).Find this resource:

(p. 652) Hillebrand, Harold Newcomb (1964), The Child Actors (1926; New York: Russell and Russell).Find this resource:

Hirschfeld, Heather (2004), Joint Enterprises: Collaborative Drama and the Institutionalization of the English Renaissance Theater (Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press).Find this resource:

Hodges, C. Walter (1953), The Globe Restored (rev. 1968; London: Oxford University Press).Find this resource:

Holderness, B. A. (1984), ‘Widows in Pre-industrial Society: An Essay upon their Economic Functions’, in R. M. Smith (ed.), Land, Kinship, and Life Cycle (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), 423–42.Find this resource:

Holland, Peter (2003), ‘Series Introduction: RedeWning British Theater History’, in W. B. Worthen, with Peter Holland, Theorizing Practice: RedeWning Theatre History (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan)Find this resource:

——(2004a), ‘RedeWning British Theatre History’, in Peter Holland and Stephen Orgel (eds), From Script to Stage in Early Modern England (Basingstoke: Palgrave), pp. xi-xiii.Find this resource:

——(2004b), ‘Theatre without Drama: Reading REED’, in Peter Holland and Stephen Orgel (eds), From Script to Stage in Early Modern England (Basingstoke: Palgrave), 43–67.Find this resource:

——and Stephen Orgel (eds) (2004), From Script to Stage in Early Modern England (Basingstoke: Palgrave).Find this resource:

Hollindale, Peter (1985),‘Review’, Review of English Studies, 36: 80–1.Find this resource:

Holly, Michael Ann (1984), Panofsky and the Foundations of Art History (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press).Find this resource:

——(1996), Past Looking: Historical Imagination and the Rhetoric of the Image (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press).Find this resource:

——and Keith Moxey (eds) (2002), Art History, Aesthetics, Visual Studies (Williamstown, MA: Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute).Find this resource:

Holman, Peter (1992), ‘Music for the Stage I: Before the Civil War’, in Ian Spink (ed.), Music in Britain: The Seventeenth Century (Oxford: Blackwell), 282–305.Find this resource:

——(1993), Four and Twenty Fiddlers: The Violin at the English Court, 1540–1690 (Oxford: Oxford University Press).Find this resource:

——(2000), Review of Bruce R. Smith, The Acoustic World of Early Modern England: Attending to the O-Factor (Chicago: University of Chicago Press), Journal of the Royal Musical Association, 125: 115–18.Find this resource:

Holmes, Martin (1950–1), ‘An Unrecorded Portrait of Edward Alleyn’, Theatre Notebook, 5:11–13.Find this resource:

——(1978), Shakespeare and Burbage (London: Phillimore).Find this resource:

Honigmann, E. A. J. (1998), Shakespeare: The ‘Lost Years’ (1985; Manchester: Manchester University Press).Find this resource:

——(1998), Myriad-Minded Shakespeare, 2nd edn (London: Macmillan).Find this resource:

Hope, Jonathan (1994), The Authorship of Shakespeare's Plays: A Sociolinguistic Study (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).Find this resource:

Horne, D. H. (1952), ‘The Life’, in Horne (ed.), The Life and Minor Works of George Peele (New Haven: Yale University Press), 3–146.Find this resource:

Hosley, Richard (1957), ‘The Gallery over the Stage in the Public Playhouse of Shakespeare's Time’, Shakespeare Quarterly, 8: 15–31.Find this resource:

——(1975), ‘The Playhouses’, in C. Leech and T. W. Craik (gen. eds), The Revels History of Drama in English, 8 vols (London: Methuen), iii. 119–235.Find this resource:

——(1979), ‘The Theatre and the Tradition of Playhouse Design’, in Herbert Berry (ed.), The First Public Playhouse: The Theatre in Shoreditch 1576–1598 (Montreal: McGill-Queen's University Press), 47–79.Find this resource:

Hotson, Leslie (1928), The Commonwealth and Restoration Stage (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press).Find this resource:

(p. 653) ——(1954), ‘Shakespeare's Wooden O’, The Times, 26 Mar., 7, 14.Find this resource:

——(1962), The Commonwealth and Restoration Stage (1928; repr. New York: Russell and Russell).Find this resource:

Howard, Jean E. (1994), The Stage and Social Struggle in Early Modern England (London: Routledge).Find this resource:

——(2007), Theater of a City: The Places of London Comedy, 1598–1642 (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press).Find this resource:

Howard, S. (1998), ‘In Praise of Margaret Brayne’, paper presented at the Shakespeare Association of America conference, Cleveland, Ohio.Find this resource:

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