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date: 09 July 2020

(p. x) (p. xi) List of Tables

(p. x) (p. xi) List of Tables

  1. 5.1 Comparing the productivity of -ity and -ness 74

  2. 5.2 P* value comparison 75

  3. 5.3 Derived forms for -ment and -ity 78

  4. 5.4 Sample Google ETM counts for high-frequency doublets 82

  5. 5.5 Sample Google ETM counts for high-frequency singletons 82

  6. 5.6 -ical is productive in stems ending in olog 82

  7. 9.1 Semantics of derivational infixes: from intangible to lexical 144

  8. 10.1 Different types of conversion and different types of languages. These results classify doubtful evidence as Uncertain 165

  9. 10.2 Word classes and different types of conversion. Only the types where a sufficient representation are shown. These results classify doubtful evidence as Uncertain 167

  10. 14.1 Formation of argument nouns in Saisiyat 241

  11. 17.1 Descriptive vs. qualitative perspective in evaluation 304

  12. 18.1 Categories of function words 318

  13. 18.2 Eight logically possible types of derivational relation involving function words 322

  14. 18.3 Deictic adverbs in Shughni 325

  15. 18.4 Demonstrative pronouns and deictic adverbs as derivational bases in Georgian 326

  16. 18.5 Interrogative, reflexive, indefinite, and personal pronouns as derivational bases in Georgian 326

  17. 18.6 Sanskrit derivative proforms in -rhi and -ti 327

  18. 18.7 Differences between the perfect auxiliary and the verb have ‘own’ 328

  19. 18.8 Some derived adverbs in Sanskrit 329

  20. 18.9 Some derived adjectives in Sanskrit 330

  21. 18.10 The distinction between ordinary nouns and pronouns in the a-stem and ā-stem declensions 331

  22. 18.11 Derived pronouns with comparative and superlative morphology in Sanskrit 332

  23. (p. xii) 18.12 Ordinal derivatives of compound cardinal numerals in five languages 334

  24. 18.13 Content words derived from numerals, mostly by conversion (American English) 336

  25. 24.1 Some innovative denominal verbs 429

  26. 24.2 Some innovative agent and instrument nouns 432

  27. 24.3 Using un- as a verbal prefix to talk about reversal 435

  28. 24.4 Innovative reversal verbs in French and German 435

  29. 25.1 Indo-European language family 445

  30. 25.2 Indo-Aryan—number of speakers 446

  31. 29.1 Core references on Mon-Khmer morphology 522

  32. 29.2 Common derivational processes in Mon-Khmer 523

  33. 29.3 Types of affixation in Mon-Khmer languages 525

  34. 29.4 Causative affixes in Mon-Khmer 526

  35. 29.5 Nominalizing affixes in Mon-Khmer 527

  36. 29.6 Demonstratives in Vietnamese 527

  37. 29.7 Specialized semantico-syntactic functions of affixation in Mon-Khmer 528

  38. 29.8 Number of days/years in Pacoh (Katuic) 534

  39. 29.9 Types of alternating reduplication with monosyllabic bases 536

  40. 29.10 Specialized semantico-syntactic functions of reduplication in Mon-Khmer 538

  41. 29.11 Types of lexical compounds in Mon-Khmer 541

  42. 30.1 Derivation by subtraction in the vocative forms of kinship terms 550

  43. 30.2 The reduplication-transitivity correlation in Tok Pisin 554

  44. 31.1 Valency change types and valency change markers in Wolof 563

  45. 34.1 Ideophone alternation patterns 647

  46. 35.1 Words for “boot” or “shoe” in some Pama-Nyungan languages 654

  47. 35.2 Words for “pig” in some Pama-Nyungan languages 657

  48. 35.3 Terms formed with “having” suffixes in some Pama-Nyungan languages 665

  49. 38.1 Valence stem allomorphy 734

  50. 38.2 Change of state predicates and thematic alternations 737

  51. 39.1 Derivational instrumental suffixes 753

  52. 39.2 Evaluative morphology suffixes 757