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date: 22 July 2019

(p. xiii) List of Contributors

(p. xiii) List of Contributors

Nick Adams is Director of Corporate Branding at Novo Nordisk A/S. Nick is a brand and marketing strategist with extensive experience in international brand development. Before joining Novo Nordisk, he spent eight years as a brand consultant working with health care, manufacturing, and FMCG brands. As Head of Corporate Branding Nick manages a team working with brand engagement, visibility, and identity, and is responsible for global brand strategy and reputation management. He is a graduate of the University of Humberside and has an Executive Master of Corporate Communications from Copenhagen Business School.



Michael L. Barnett is Professor of Strategy at the Said Business School and Fellow in Management at St. Anne's College, University of Oxford. Mike's research focuses on the firm-stakeholder interface. In particular, he studies how firms individually and collectively manage their relationships with stakeholders, and how their efforts at stakeholder management influence their reputations and financial performance. Mike's scholarship has won numerous honors, to include the 2008 Academy of Management Journal Best Paper Prize and the 2006 Best Article Award from the International Association for Business & Society. Mike serves on the editorial boards of Academy of Management Journal, Academy of Management Review, Academy of Management Perspectives, Business & Society, Long Range Planning, and Strategic Management Journal.



David N. Barron is Rhodes Trust Reader in Organizational Sociology at the Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a Fellow of Jesus College, Oxford. His research interests include organization theory, health care management, quantitative research methods, and corporate reputation. He has published widely in leading sociological and health care management journals and presented his work at numerous international conferences.



Stephen Brammer is Professor of Strategy at Warwick Business School. His research lies principally in the areas of business ethics and corporate social responsibility. Specifically, he explores firm–stakeholder relationships, the strategic management of these, and the impacts of these upon company performance and reputation. His research has been widely published in leading journals such as the Strategic Management Journal, Journal of Management Studies, and Organisation Studies.



Jay Inghwee Chok is Assistant Professor of Strategy and Entrepreneurship at the Keck Graduate Institute, Claremont Colleges. His research interests lie at the intersection of the sociology of professions, academic entrepreneurship, and network strategy.



(p. xiv) Cynthia E. Devers is Associate Professor and the Morton A. Aldrich Professor of Business in the A.B. Freeman School of Business, Tulane University. Her research draws on behavioral decision and social psychological perspectives to explore the effects of formal and informal governance mechanisms on individual and group risk perceptions, behaviors, and organizational outcomes. She is currently associate editor of Academy of Management Review and her work has been published in several strategy and management journals.



Grahame R. Dowling, after a 30-year career at the University of New South Wales, first at the Australian Graduate School of Management, and then after its dissolution at the Australian School of Business, was made an Emeritus Professor on his retirement in 2009. He currently has a part-time appointment in the Faculty of Business at the University of Technology, Sydney. Since his retirement Grahame has remained an active researcher.



Kimberly D. Elsbach is Professor of Management and Stephen G. Newberry Chair in Leadership at the Graduate School of Management, University of California, Davis. She received her Ph.D. in Industrial Engineering from Stanford University. Kim's research focuses on perception—specifically how people perceive each other and their organizations. She has studied these perceptual processes in a variety of contexts ranging from the California cattle industry, and the National Rifle Association, to Hollywood screenwriters. She is currently studying how crying at work affects images of professional women and why fans identify with NASCAR.



Charles J. Fombrun is Chairman of the Reputation Institute, a global research and consulting firm specializing in the development and management of reputational assets. Dr Fombrun is a former Professor of Management at the Wharton School (1979–84) and at New York University's Stern School of Business (1984–2004). He is the author of six books, including the pioneering Reputation: Realizing Value from the Corporate Image (1996) and Fame and Fortune: How Global Companies Create Value from Reputation (2004). Dr Fombrun has also written hundreds of articles and chapters in academic and practitioner publications and is the creator of reputation management systems used by many of the world's largest companies.



Peter O. Foreman is Associate Professor of Management at Illinois State University. His research interests are in organizational identity, image, and reputation, with a particular focus on multiple identity organizations and the management of identity complexity and conflict. His work has examined these topics in a range of organizational settings, including rural cooperatives, health care systems, sporting events, universities, and insurance companies. His most current research explores the temporally related issues of identity construction, maintenance, and change.



Naomi A. Gardberg is a tenured Associate Professor in the Department of Management, Baruch College—City University of New York. She earned her Ph.D. from New York (p. xv) University. Dr Gardberg's research interest is in nonmarket competition and the creation, transfer, and dissipation of intangible assets, such as corporate reputation. Her work in these areas has been published in the field's major journals, such as Academy of Management Review, Business & Society and the Journal of International Business Studies. She also has several cases to her credit.



Sharon Gilad is a Senior Lecturer at the Department of Political Science and the Federman School of Public Policy at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Her research contributes a New Institutional perspective to the analysis of regulatory agencies’ interaction with their multiple audiences, and of firms’ responses to regulation.



Scott D. Graffin is Assistant Professor at the Terry College of Business at the University of Georgia. He received his Ph.D. in strategic management from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. His research interests include corporate governance, and the impact of reputation, status, and the financial press on organization outcomes. Scott's research has been published in the Strategic Management Journal, the Academy of Management Journal, Organization Science, Strategic Organization, and other outlets.



William S. Harvey is a Lecturer in Work and Organizational Studies at the University of Sydney Business School and an Associate Fellow at the Centre for Corporate Reputation, University of Oxford. His current work focuses on the multiple dimensions of reputation within professional service firms. His other research analyses the mobility and economic impact of highly skilled migrants as well as the methodological challenges of interviewing business elites. William's research has been published in journals such as Work and Occupations, global Networks, and Population, Space and Place.



Mary Jo Hatch works freelance as an organizational theorist, having formally retired from academia in 2007, but acts as visiting professor at Copenhagen Business School and Gothenburg University for some months of each year. She writes and lectures on branding (from an organizational point of view), organizational culture and identity, and on art and design in organizations, and does consulting. She spends the rest of her time writing and painting on Boston's North Shore. Check out her most recent book Organizations: A Very Short Introduction (2011) from Oxford University Press.



Michael W. Hill is a Ph.D. student at the Terry College of Business at the University of Georgia. He studies strategic management and his research interests include intangible assets, top management teams, and boards of directors.



Paul Ingram is the Kravis Professor of Business at the Columbia Business School, and Faculty Director of the Columbia Senior Executive Program. His Ph.D. is from Cornell University, and he was on the faculty of Carnegie Mellon University before coming to Columbia. He has served as a consulting editor for the American Journal of Sociology, a senior editor for Organization Science, an associate editor for Management Science, and on the editorial boards of Administrative Science Quarterly and Strategic Organization.



(p. xvi) Gregory Jackson is Professor of Management at the Freie Universität Berlin and chief editor of Socio-Economic Review. His research examines how corporate governance is influenced by diverse organizational and institutional contexts. His comparative studies have focused on Germany, Japan, the UK, and the US, and integrated disparate fields of scholarship, including institutional theory, international business, economic sociology, and comparative political economy. His current projects look at corporate responsibility in different countries, and apply qualitative comparative analysis (QCA) to understanding organizational configurations.



Michael Jensen is Associate Professor at the University of Michigan, Ross School of Business. His main research focuses on the role of social structures and dynamics in markets, and his current projects include work on identity and status.



Jonathan M. Karpoff is the Washington Mutual Endowed Chair in Innovation and Professor of Finance at the University of Washington. Jon's research seeks to understand how Adam Smith's Invisible Hand works, or does not work, to coordinate economic activities ranging from fisheries management to Arctic exploration to corporate governance. Jon teaches and seeks to inspire Executive, MBA, and Ph.D. finance students. He also serves as associate editor for several research journals, is past president of The Financial Management Association, and past director of the Univeristy of Washington's CFO Forum and Environmental Management Program.



Mark Thomas Kennedy is Assistant Professor of Strategy in the Department of Management and Organizations at University of Southern California's Marshall School of Business. His research focuses on the emergence of new organizational phenomena—categories, identities, forms, strategies, practices, reputation criteria, and so on—with particular attention to meaning construction processes.



Bo Kyung Kim is Assistant Professor at, Edwin L. Cox School of Business, Southern Methodist University. Her current research focuses on market identity and social structure, with emphasis on the interaction between them over time.



Heeyon Kim is a doctoral candidate at the University of Michigan, Ross School of Business. Her research interests are in the areas of organizational identity and status, with current projects focusing on the mobility of status and identity.



Tohyun Kim is Assistant Professor at the SKKU Business School, Sungkyunkwan University. His research interests include organizational learning, organizational identity, social networks, and institutional logics. His recent publication appeared in Strategic Organization. He received his Ph.D. from the Shidler College of Business at the University of Hawaii.



Jingfang Liu is a Ph.D. candidate at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism at the University of Southern California. Her research lies at the intersection of information technology innovation, sustainability, as well as organizational change (p. xvii) and communication. She has complementary interests in corporate social responsibility, environmental communication, new media and technology for social change, international business and global communication, and critical theory.



Alison Mackey is Assistant Professor of Management at the Orfalea College of Business at California Polytechnic State University. Her research is related to executive labor markets, executive compensation, and corporate social responsibility. Her research has been published in Academy of Management Review, the Strategic Management Journal, and Business & Society. She received the Wiley Blackwell Outstanding Dissertation award from the Academy of Management. She serves on the editorial boards at the Strategic Management Journal and Journal of Management. She earned her Ph.D. from the Ohio State University.



Luis L. Martins is Associate Professor of Management at the McCombs School of Business, the University of Texas at Austin. He received a Ph.D. in Management and Organizational Behavior from the Stern School of Business, New York University. His research interests include identity processes in organizations, managerial cognition, and organizational change.



Christopher McKenna is University Reader in Business History and Strategy at the Saïd Business School, a Fellow of Brasenose College, and an Academic Programme Director in the Centre for Corporate Reputation, all within the University of Oxford. His research focuses on the historical development and evolving strategies of professional firms and their role in the global transformation of business, nonprofits, and the state. He is currently researching the international history of white-collar crime.



Yuri Mishina is Assistant Professor of Organisational Behaviour/Strategy at Imperial College London. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His work has been published in the Academy of Management Journal, Organization Science, and the Strategic Management Journal, and his research examines how top management team and stakeholder belief systems, including reputations, stigma, expectations, and cognitive biases, influence a firm's strategic choices and outcomes.



Timothy Morris is Professor of Management Studies at the University of Oxford and a Programme Director in the Centre for Corporate Reputation. His current work on reputation focuses on the processes of reputation production and maintenance in consulting firms and links to his interests in innovation, change, and decision-making in professional service firms. Timothy's research has been published in journals such as the Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Management Studies, and Organization Studies.



William Newburry is Associate Professor and SunTrust Bank Professor at Florida International University in the Department of Management and International Business. He received his Ph.D. from the University of New York in 2000. His current research (p. xviii) examines how foreign subsidiaries, their current and potential employees, and other local stakeholders perceive issues related to firm globalization, such as firm reputation. He has published over 25 papers in top-tier, peer-reviewed journals, such as the Journal of International Business Studies, Strategic Management Journal, and Journal of Management Studies, among others.



Thomas Noe is the Ernest Butten Professor of Management Studies at the Saïd Business School and a Professorial Fellow at Balliol College, University of Oxford. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin. Professor Noe's research has focused on developing and experimentally validating rational choice models of financing, investment, governance, and management compensation. His current research focuses on the role of learning in executive compensation determination, the inherent limitations of shareholder democracy, and the role of intra-family altruism in family firm governance. He has served or is serving on numerous panels, program committees, and editorial boards, including for the Review of Financial Studies and the Review of Corporate Finance Studies.



Rowena Olegario is the author of A Culture of Credit: Embedding Trust and Transparency in American Business (2006). She is co-author (with Davis Dyer and Frederick Dalzell) of Rising Tide: Lessons from 165 Years of Brand Building at Procter & Gamble (2004). She is currently writing a history of business and household credit in the United States. Olegario is a Senior Research Fellow and Case Writing Editor at the Centre for Corporate Reputation, Saïd Business School, University of Oxford.



Antoaneta P. Petkova is Associate Professor of Management and Organization at San Francisco State University, California. She earned her doctorate in strategic management from the University of Maryland—College Park in 2006. Her current research focuses on the processes of reputation accumulation by young organizations and the role of reputation for increasing organizational innovation and entrepreneurship.



Michael D. Pfarrer is Assistant Professor at the Terry College of Business at the University of Georgia. He received his Ph.D. in strategic management from the University of Maryland. His research focuses on external perceptions of firm behaviors and how firms manage these interpretations to create value. His specific interests include positive and negative social evaluations (e.g., firm celebrity, legitimacy, reputation, and stigma), impression and crisis management, media accounts, and the role of business in society.



Timothy G. Pollock is a Professor of Management in the Smeal College of Business at Penn State University. His research focuses on the social construction of value in uncertain and ambiguous circumstances, particularly the contexts of corporate governance, executive compensation, and entrepreneurial market environments. He has published articles in all the major management journals and his research has won numerous awards, most recently receiving the Oxford University Centre for Corporate (p. xix) Reputation's Award for Best Published Article in 2010. Tim is currently an Associate Editor for the Academy of Management Journal, has served on numerous editorial boards and the executive committees of the Organization Science Division of INFORMS and the OMT Division of the Academy of Management, and is an International Research Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Corporate Reputation.



Mooweon Rhee is Shidler College Distinguished Associate Professor, Associate Professor of Management, and Cooperating Graduate Faculty of Sociology at the University of Hawaii. His research interests revolve around organization learning, corporate reputation, and social networks. He is also interested in constructing Asia-based theories of organizations. In 2009 he was selected as an Ascendant Scholar by the Western Academy of Management. He obtained his Ph.D. from the Stanford Graduate School of Business.



Violina P. Rindova is the Ralph B. Thomas Professor of Business at the McCombs School of Business, University of Texas at Austin and a Fellow of the IC2 Institute of the University of Texas at Austin. She received a JD from Sofia University, Bulgaria, an MBA from Madrid Business School—University of Houston, Spain, and a Ph.D. from The Stern School of Business, New York University. Her research focuses on value creation, intangible assets, and the dynamics of competitive advantage in a variety of industries.



Meredith Rolfe held a Nuffield College Postdoctoral Prize Research Fellowship before joining Saïd Business School (University of Oxford) as Senior Research Fellow. Her Ph.D. was earned at the University of Chicago. She was an invited contributor to the Oxford Handbook of Analytical Sociology, and has been awarded grants by the National Science Foundation, British Academy, Oxford University Press John Fell Fund, the EU-sponsored EQUALSOC Framework, and the Oxford University Centre for Corporation Reputation. Her dissertation received the Mancur Olson Award from the APSA Political Economy section.



Majken Schultz is Professor at Copenhagen Business School, senior advisor at The Reputation Institute, and International Research Fellow at Oxford University Centre for Corporate Reputation. Her research interests are located at the interfaces between organizational culture, organizational identity and image, corporate branding, and reputation. Majken has published more than 50 articles in international journals and written multiple books on these topics. She serves on several company boards, the Board of Governors for the Academy of Management, and is a regular columnist in the local newspapers.



David A. Whetten is the Jack Wheatley Professor of Organizational Studies and Director of the Faculty Development Center at Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, US. He received his Ph.D. from Cornell. His recent scholarship has focused on organizational identity and identification, theory development, and management (p. xx) education. He has served as president of the Academy of Management and as editor of the Foundations for Organizational Science, an academic book series, and the Academy of Management Review.



Richard Whittington is Professor of Strategic Management at the Saïd Business School and Millman Fellow at New College, University of Oxford. His main research interest is in strategy-as-practice, with projects on strategy communications and the history of strategic planning. He has authored or co-authored nine books, including Exploring Strategy (9th edition, 2010), Strategy as Practice: Research Directions and Resources (2007), and The European Corporation (2000). He has published articles in leading journals such as the Journal of Management Studies, Organization Science, Organization Studies, and the Strategic Management Journal. He has held visiting or full positions at the Harvard Business School, Imperial College, the University of Toulouse, and the University of Warwick.



Basak Yakis-Douglas is Lecturer of Management at New College and Research Fellow at the Centre for Corporate Reputation at Said Business School, University of Oxford. Her main research interests are in corporate reputation and building a “practice” perspective on strategy. Her ongoing projects on corporate reputation focus on how corporations build, manage, or destroy their reputations through the external formal communication of their strategies. Regarding strategy as practice, her main project from within this perspective is on the evolution of strategy practice. She is a regular contributor to main strategy textbooks including Exploring Strategy: Text and Cases.



Tamar Yogev is a Research Fellow at the Centre for Corporate Reputation at the Said Business School and an Associate Member at Nuffield College, University of Oxford. Tamar's research interests include economic sociology, organization studies, social networks, and sociology of culture and art. Tamar's research focuses on the role of exchange relations in markets and their effects on reputation. Her work provides insight into reputation in markets that are characterized by a high degree of uncertainty, primarily the art market.



Lori Qingyuan Yue is Assistant Professor at the USC Marshall School of Business. She received her Ph.D. in business administration from Columbia University. She studies evolutions of market institutions and market structures. Her recent research topics include the endogenous institutional failure in generating market dynamics, the incomplete information model in private politics, and the asymmetric effects of fashions on the formation and dissolution of interorganizational networks. Her research has been published in journals such as American Journal of Sociology, American Sociological Review, and Organization Science.