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Grafton, Richard. Chronicle at Large and Meere History of the Affayres of Englande (London: H. Denham for R. Tottle and H. Toye, 1569).Find this resource:

Green, Mary Anne Everett, ed. Diary of John Rous (London: Camden Society, 1856).Find this resource:

Greene, Robert. A Notable Discovery of Coosenage (London, 1591).Find this resource:

——– Greenes Groats-Worth of wit (London, 1592).Find this resource:

——– Mamillia, in The Life and Complete Works of Robert Greene, ed. Alexander B. Grosart (London: Huth Library, 1881–6).Find this resource:

——– Morando: The Tritameron of Love (London, 1584).Find this resource:

——– Pandosto: The Triumph of Time (London: John Wolfe, 1588).Find this resource:

——– Penelope's Web (London, 1587).Find this resource:

——– Philomela The Lady Fitzvvaters nightingale (London: R. B[ourne and E. Allde] for Edward White, 1592).Find this resource:

——– The Honorable Historie of Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay (London: Elizabeth Allde, 1630).Find this resource:

——– The Third and Last Part of Conny-Catching (London, 1592).Find this resource:

Greville, Fulke. A Dedication to Sir Philip Sidney, in The Prose Works of Fulke Greville, Lord Brooke, ed. John Gouws (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1986), 10–11.Find this resource:

——– The Life of the Renowned Sir Philip Sidney (London, 1651).Find this resource:

Grymeston, Elizabeth. Miscelanea. Meditations. Memoratives (London, 1604).Find this resource:

Guazzo, Stefano. La Civil Conversation (London: T. Dawson for Richard Watkins, 1581).Find this resource:

——– The civile conversation of M. Steeven Guazzo, trans. George Pettie (London: Richard Watkins, 1581).Find this resource:

——– The civile conversation of M. Stephen Guazzo, written first in Italian, diuided into foure bookes, the first three translated out of French by G[eorge] pettie (London, 1586).Find this resource:

Guevara, Antonio de. The golden boke of Marcus Aurelius emperour and eloquente orator (London: Thomas Berthelet, 1535).Find this resource:

Guicciardini, Lodovico. Hore di Ricreatione, trans. into English in James Sanford’, The Garden of Pleasure (London, 1573).Find this resource:

Gusmans Ephemeris: or, The Merry Rogues Calendar. Being an Almanack for 1662 (London, 1663).Find this resource:

(p. 694) Hakluyt, Richard. ‘Epistle Dedicatory to Sir Walter Ralegh’, in Original Writings and Correspondence of the Two Richard Hakluyts, ed. E. G. R. Taylor (London: Hakluyt Society, 1935).Find this resource:

——– The Principal Navigations, Voyages, and Discoveries of the English Nation (London, 1589).Find this resource:

Hall, Joseph. An Historicall Expostulation against the beastlye abusers, both of Chirurgie, and Physyke, in owre tyme (London, 1565).Find this resource:

——– Epistles, the first volume: conteining two decads (London: Eleazar Edgar & Samuel Macham, 1608).Find this resource:

——– Epistles. containing two decades … The third and last volume (London: E. Edgar, and A. Garbrand, 1611).Find this resource:

——– The Great Imposter, laid open in a sermon at Grayes Inne, Febr. 2. 1623 (London: J. Haviland for H. Fetherstone, 1623).Find this resource:

Harcourt, Edward H., ed. The Harcourt Papers (Oxford, 1880), Vol. 1. University of Nottingham MS Portland PwV 89; East Sussex Record Office DUN/52/10/3.Find this resource:

Harding, Thomas. A reiondre to M. Iewels relie against the sacrifice of the Masse (London: John Fowler, 1567).Find this resource:

Harman, Thomas. A Caveat or Warening for Common Cursetors vulgarely called Vagabones (1567).Find this resource:

Harpsfield, Nicholas. Dialogi sex contra summi pontificatus, monasticae vitae, sanctorum, sacrarum imaginum oppugnatores et pseudomartyres (Christopher Plantin, 1566).Find this resource:

Harrison, William. ‘The Description and Historie of England’, in The first and second volume of Chronicles, ed. Raphael Holinshed (London, 1587; 2nd edn.).Find this resource:

Harvey, Gabriel. A New Letter (London, 1593).Find this resource:

——– Fovre Letters, and Certaine Sonnets (London: John Wolfe, 1592).Find this resource:

——– Foure Letters and Certaine Sonnets, especially touching Robert Greene (London, 1592).Find this resource:

——– Letter-Book. British Library, Sloane MS 93.Find this resource:

——– Letter-Book of Gabriel Harvey, A.D. 1573–1580, ed. Edward John Long Scott, Camden Society, NS 33 (1884).Find this resource:

——– Pierces Supererogation or a new prayse of the old asse (London, 1593).Find this resource:

——– The Works of Gabriel Harvey, ed. Alexander Grosart (London: The Huth Library, 1884).Find this resource:

——– and Edmund Spenser. Three proper, and wittie, familiar letters: lately passed betvveene tvvo vniuersitie men: touching the earthquake in Aprill last, and our English refourmed versifying With the preface of a wellwiller to them both (London: H. Bynneman, 1580).Find this resource:

Harvey, John. A discoursive probleme concerning prophesies (London, 1588).Find this resource:

Harvey, Richard. An astrological discourse upon the conjunction of Saturne & Jupiter (London, 1583).Find this resource:

——– Lambe of God (London: J. Windet for W. P[onsonby], 1590).Find this resource:

——– Theologicall Discourse of the Lamb of God (London, 1590).Find this resource:

Hayward, John. Life and Raigne of King Henrie IIII, ed. John J. Manning, Camden Society, 4th series, 42 (London: Camden Society, 1991).Find this resource:

——– The First Part of the Life and Raigne of King Henrie IIII (London, 1599).Find this resource:

——– The Lives of the III. Normans, Kings of England (London, 1613).Find this resource:

Herbert, George. The Works of George Herbert, ed. F. E. Hitchinson (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1941).Find this resource:

Hereafter ensue the trewe encountre or batayle lately don betwene. Englande and: Scotland (London, 1513).Find this resource:

(p. 695) Heylyn, Peter. Theologiaveterum, or, The summe of Christian theologie (London, 1654).Find this resource:

Hill, Thomas. An almanack … in forme of a booke of memorie necessary for all such, as haue occasion daylie to note sundry affayres, eyther for receytes, payments, or such lyke (London, 1571).Find this resource:

Hobbes, Thomas, trans. Eight Bookes of The Peloponnesian Warre (London, 1629).Find this resource:

Hoby, Margaret. The Private Life of an Elizabethan Lady: The Diary of Lady Margaret Hoby 1599–1605, ed. Joanna Moody (Stroud: Sutton, 1998).Find this resource:

Holinshed, Raphael. Chronicles of England, Scotland and Ireland (London: Reginald Wolfe, 1577).Find this resource:

Holland, Guy. Grand Prerogative of Humane Nature (London, 1653).Find this resource:

Holland, Henry. A Treatise Against Witchcraft (London, 1590).Find this resource:

Hooker, Richard. Folger Library Edition of the Works of Richard Hooker, gen. ed. W. Speed Hill, 7 vols. (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1977–98).Find this resource:

——– Of the Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity, ed. Arthur Stephen McGrade (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989).Find this resource:

Hopton, Arthur. A new almanacke and prognostication for the yeare of our Lord God 1613 (1613), Bodleian Ash. 66.Find this resource:

Hoskyns, John. The Life, Letters, and Writings of John Hoskyns, 1566–1638, ed. Louise Brown Osborn (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1937).Find this resource:

Howard, Henry. A defensatiue against the poyson of supposed prophesaies (London, 1583).Find this resource:

Howell, James. Epistolae Ho-Elianae. Familiar letters domestic and forren; divided into six sections, partly historicall, politicall, philosophicall, upon emergent occasions (London: Humphrey Moseley, 1645).Find this resource:

Hubert, Conrad. A briefe treatise concerning the burning of Bucer and Phagius at Cambridge, trans. Arthur Golding (London: Thomas Marsh, 1562).Find this resource:

Hyde, Edward, Earl of Clarendon. History of the Rebellion and Civil Wars in England, ed. W. Dunn Macray (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1888).Find this resource:

James VI. The True Law of Free Monarchies, and ‘Speech to Parliament, 21 March 1610’, in Political Writings of James I and VI, ed. J. P. Somerville (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994).Find this resource:

Jocelyn, Robert, ed. The Private Diarie of Elizabeth, Viscountess Mordaunt (Duncairn: privately printed, 1856).Find this resource:

Jonson, Ben. ‘Conversations with Drummond’, in Works of Ben Jonson, ed. C. H. Herford and Percy and Evelyn Simpson (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1947).Find this resource:

——– ‘Masque of Queens’, in Ben Jonson: The Complete Masques, ed. Stephen Orgel (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1969).Find this resource:

——– The Fortunate Isles, in Ben Jonson: The Complete Masques, ed. Stephen Orgel (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1969).Find this resource:

——– The Works of Ben Jonson, ed. C. H. Herford, and Percy and Evelyn Simpson, 11 vols. (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1925–52).Find this resource:

——– Timber or Discoveries (London, 1641).Find this resource:

Kempe, William. The education of children in learning (London: John Potter and Thomas Gubbin, 1588).Find this resource:

Kinde Kit, of Kingstone. Westward for Smelts (London, 1620).Find this resource:

Knox, John. A Faithful Admonition to the Professors of God's Truth in England, in The Works of John Knox, ed. David Laing (Edinburgh: Wodrow Society, 1854).Find this resource:

——– History of the Reformation, in The Works of John Knox, ed. David Laing (Edinburgh: Wodrow Society, 1854).Find this resource:

(p. 696) Knox, John. On Rebellion, ed. Roger A. Mason (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994).Find this resource:

La segunda parte de Lazarillo de Tormes: y de sus fortunas y aduersidades (Antwerp: Martin Nucio, 1555).Find this resource:

Lambarde, William. Perambulation of Kent (London, 1576).Find this resource:

Langley, Thomas. Langley 1637 a new almanack and prognostication (London, 1637).Find this resource:

Les feits merveilleux, ensemble la vie du gentil Lazare de Tormes (Lyon, 1560)Find this resource:

Lever, Ralph. The Arte of Reason, rightly termed Witcraft (London: H. Bynneman, 1573).Find this resource:

Lindsay, Robert of Pitscottie. The Historie and Chronicles of Scotland, ed. A. J. G. Mackay (Edinburgh: Blackwood, 1911).Find this resource:

Lipsius, Justus. Politica: Six Books of Politics or Political Instruction, ed. and trans. Jan Waszink (Assen: Royal Van Gorcum, 2004).Find this resource:

Lowth, William. The Christian mans Closet (London, 1581).Find this resource:

Luna, Juna de. The Pursuit of the History of Lazarillo de Tormes (London, 1622).Find this resource:

Lupton, Thomas. Siuqila, Too Good To Be True (London, 1580).Find this resource:

Lyly, John. Euphues. The anatomy of wyt (London: [T. East] for Gabriel Cawood, 1578).Find this resource:

——– Euphues: The Anatomy of Wit and Euphues and His England by John Lyly, ed. Leah Scragg (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2003).Find this resource:

——– Papp with a Hatchet (London, 1589).Find this resource:

——– Sapho and Phao, in The Complete Works of John Lyly ed. R. Warwick Bond (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1902).Find this resource:

——– Sixe Court Comedies (London, 1632).Find this resource:

——– The Plays of John Lyly: Eros and Eliza, ed. Michael Pincombe (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1996).Find this resource:

Lynne, Walter. A Watch-word for wilfull women (London, 1581).Find this resource:

Magnus, Albertus. The Boke of secretes of Albertus Magnus, of the vertues of Herbes, stones and certaine beasts (London, 1525).Find this resource:

——– The Book of the secrets of Albertus Magnus (London, 1525).Find this resource:

Man, Judith. An Epitome of the History of Faire Argenis and Polyarchus (London, 1640).Find this resource:

Manningham, John. The Diary of John Manningham of the Middle Temple, 1602–1603, ed. Robert Parker (Hanover: University Press of New England, 1976).Find this resource:

Manuale, sententias aliquot diuinas & morales complectens (London: Peter Short, 1594).Find this resource:

Marcellinus, Ammianus. The Romane Historie, trans. Philemon Holland (London, 1609).Find this resource:

Massinger, John. The secretary in fashion (London: Godfrey Emerson, 1640).Find this resource:

Matthew, Tobie. A collection of letters, made by Sr Tobie Mathews Kt To which are added many letters of his own, to severall persons of honour, who were contemporary with him (London: Henry Herringman, 1659).Find this resource:

Medina, Juan de. De la orden que en algunos pueblos de España se ha puesto en la limosna: para remedio de los verdaderos pobres [Of the order that in certain Spanish towns has been imposed for alms for the remedy of the true poor] (Salamanca: Juan de Junta, 1545).Find this resource:

Mellis, John. A Briefe Instruction and Maner How to Keepe Bookes of Accompts After the Order of Debitor and Creditor (London, 1588).Find this resource:

Melvin, William. The Sonne of the Rogue, or, The Politicke Theefe (London, 1638).Find this resource:

Meres, Francis. Witt's Academy: A Treasurie of Goulden Sentences, Similes and Examples (London, 1636).Find this resource:

Milton, John. John Milton: Political Writings, ed. Martin Dzelzainis (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991).Find this resource:

(p. 697) Montaigne, Michel de. Les Essais, ed. J. Balsamo, M. Magnien, and C. Magnien-Simonet (Paris: Gallimard, 2007).Find this resource:

——– The Complete Essays, ed. and trans. M. A. Screech (Harmondsworth: Penguin Books, 1991).Find this resource:

——– The Complete Essays of Montaigne, trans. Donald M. Frame (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1958).Find this resource:

Montemayor, Jorge de. Diana of George of Montemayor: translated out of Spanish into English, trans. Bartholomew Yong (London: Edm. Bollifant for G[eorge] B[ishop], 1598).Find this resource:

More, Henry. An explanation of the grand mystery of godliness (London, 1660).Find this resource:

More, Sir Thomas. A dyaloge of syr Thomas More, knyght (London, 1529).Find this resource:

——– A fruteful, and pleasaunt worke of the beste state of a publyque weale, and of the newe yle called Utopia, trans. Ralph Robinson (London, 1551).Find this resource:

——– History of King Richard III (London, 1518).Find this resource:

——– Libellus vere aureus, nec minus salutaris quam festivus, de optimo reipublicae statu deque nova insula Utopia (London, 1516).Find this resource:

——– Richard III, in The Complete Works of St. Thomas More, ed. Richard S. Sylvester, 12 vols. (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1963).Find this resource:

——– Utopia, ed. Richard Marius (London: J. M. Dent, 1994).Find this resource:

Morgan, Matthew. ‘An Elegy on the Death of the Honorable Mr Robert Boyle’ (1692).Find this resource:

Morley, Thomas. A plaine and easie introduction to practicall musicke (1597).Find this resource:

Munday, Anthony. Amadis de Gaule, ed. Helen Moore (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2004).Find this resource:

Nabokov, Vladimir. Lolita (London: Penguin, 1995).Find this resource:

Nashe, Thomas. Have With You to Saffron-Walden (London: John Danter, 1596).Find this resource:

——– The Anatomie of Absurditie (London: Charles Whittingham, 1589).Find this resource:

——– The Return of the Renowned Caualiero Pasquill (London: John Charlewood, 1589).Find this resource:

——– The Unfortunate Traveller, in The Unfortunate Traveller and Other Works, ed. J. B. Steane (New York: Penguin Books, 1973).Find this resource:

——– The Works of Thomas Nashe, ed. R. B. McKerrow, rev. F. P. Wilson, 5 vols. ([1904] Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1958).Find this resource:

New epistles of Mounsieur de Balzac, trans. Sr. Richard Baker Knight, 3 vols. (London: Fra. Eglesfield, Iohn Crooke, and Rich. Serger, 1638).Find this resource:

Newes from the Low Countries, or a Courant out of Bohemia, Poland, Germanie, &c. (Amsterdam, 1621).Find this resource:

Newton, Isaac. Principia Mathematica (London, 1687).Find this resource:

Nichols, Thomas. A pleasant description of the fortunate ilandes, called the Ilands of Canaria with their straunge fruits and commodities (London, 1583).Find this resource:

——– trans. The Hystory Writtone by Thucidides (London, 1550).Find this resource:

Occasional Reflections upon Several Subjects, Whereto is Premis’d a Discourse upon such kind of Thoughts (London, 1665).Find this resource:

Oldcastle, Hugh. A Briefe Instruction and Maner How to Keepe Bookes of Accompts After the Order of Debitor and Creditor (now lost, but reissued by John Mellis in 1588).Find this resource:

Painter, William. The Palace of Pleasure, ed. Joseph Jacobs, 3 vols. (New York: Dover, 1966).Find this resource:

Palfreyman, Thomas. A Treatyce of Morall Philosophy (London, 1557).Find this resource:

——– Morall Phylosophie (London, 1610).Find this resource:

Papp with a Hatchet (London: T. Orwin, 1589).Find this resource:

Peacham, Henry. The Truth of Our Times (London, 1638).Find this resource:

Penry, John. A Treatise Containing the Aequity of an Humble Supplication (Oxford: Joseph Barnes, 1587).Find this resource:

(p. 698) Pepys, Samuel. The Diary of Samuel Pepys, ed. Robert Latham and William Matthews, 11 vols. (Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1970–83).Find this resource:

Perkins, William. Christian oeconomie: or, A short survey of the right manner of erecting and ordering a familie according to the scriptures, trans. Tho. Pickering Bachelar of Diuinitie (London, 1609).Find this resource:

Petition Directed to Her Most Excellent Majestie (Middelburg, 1592).Find this resource:

Pettie, George. A Petite Palace of Pettie His Pleasure (London, 1576).Find this resource:

——– A Petite Pallace of Pettie His Pleasure, ed. Herbert Hartman (London: Oxford University Press, 1938).Find this resource:

Petty, William. ‘A Dialogue concerning shipping’, BL Add MS 72893.Find this resource:

——– ‘Laudem Navis Geminae’, BL Sloane MS 360, fos. 73r–80r.Find this resource:

Philomusus, The academy of complements (London: H. Mostley, 1640).Find this resource:

Phiston, William, trans. The most pleasaunt and delectable historie of Lazarillo de Tormes, a Spanyard and of his maruellous fortunes and aduersities. The second part (London: Thomas Creede for John Oxenbridge, 1596).Find this resource:

Piccolomini, Aeneas Silvius. De Gestis Concilii Basiliensis Commentariorum, ed. and trans. Denys Hay and W. K. Smith (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1967).Find this resource:

——– The goodli history of the moste noble and beautyfull ladye Lucres of Scene in Tuskane (London: John Day, 1553).Find this resource:

Plat, Hugh. The Floures of Philosophie (London: Frauncis Coldocke and Henry Bynneman, 1581).Find this resource:

Plat, Neil. Sundrie New and Artificiall Remedies against Famine (London: Peter Short, 1596).Find this resource:

Plutarch. Plutarch's Lives Englished by Sir Thomas North, 10 vols. (London: J. M. Dent, 1910).Find this resource:

——– The Philosophie, commonlie called, the Morals, trans. Philemon Holland (London: Dent, 1911).Find this resource:

Positions Wherein Those Primitive Circvumstances be Examined, which are Necessarie for the Training vp of Children, either for skill in their booke, or health in their bodie (London, 1581).Find this resource:

Prayers and Thenkesgiving to be used by all the Kings Majesties loving servants for the Happy Deliverance of his Majestie … from the most traitorous and bloody intended Massacre by Gunpowder (London, 1605).Find this resource:

Proclamation against Certaine Seditious and Schismatical Bookes and Libels (London, 1589).Find this resource:

Purchas, Samuel. Hakluytus posthumous or Purchas his pilgrims (London, 1625).Find this resource:

——– Purchas His Pilgrimage (London, 1613).Find this resource:

Purfoote, Thomas. A blanke and perpetuall Almanacke (London, 1566).Find this resource:

Puttenham, George. The Arte of English Poesie (London, 1589).Find this resource:

Quevedo, Francisco de. Historia de la vida del buscón, llamado Don Pablos (London, 1626).Find this resource:

Quintilian. Institutio Oratoria, trans. Donald Russell, 4 vols. (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2001).Find this resource:

——– Pasquils Jests: With the Merriments of Mother Bunch (London, 1632).Find this resource:

Ralegh, Walter. Dialogue betweene a Counsellor of State and a Justice of the Peace (London, 1614).Find this resource:

——– The prerogative of parlaments in England (London, 1628).Find this resource:

Rastell, John. New boke of Purgatory (London, 1530).Find this resource:

Ratzel, Friedrich. The History of Mankind (London, 1896).Find this resource:

Rawley, Walter. Sylva Sylvarum (London, 1627).Find this resource:

Rider, Cardanus. British Merlin (1680), Folger A2254.5.Find this resource:

Ross, Alexander. Medicus Medicatus (London, 1645).Find this resource:

Rowland, David. The Pleasant History of Lazarillo de Tormes, ed. Gareth Alban Davies and Frank Martin (Newtown: Gwasg Gregynog, 1991).Find this resource:

(p. 699) ——– trans. The Pleasaunt Historie of Lazarillo de Tormes a Spaniarde, wherein is conteined his maruelous deedes and life (London: Abell Jeffes, 1586).Find this resource:

Roy, William. A proper dyaloge betwene a gentillman and an husbandman (London, 1529).Find this resource:

Salicetus, Nicolas. The Antidotarius (Robert Wyer: London, 1530).Find this resource:

Sallust. Here begynneth the famous cronycle of the warre, which the romayns had against Iugurth vsurper of the kyngdome of Numidy, trans. Alexander Barclay (London, 1522).Find this resource:

Samuel, William. The arte of angling (London, 1577).Find this resource:

Savile, Henry, trans. The Ende of Nero and Beginning of Galba (London, 1591).Find this resource:

Scot, Reginald. The Discoverie of Witchcraft (London: William Brome, 1584).Find this resource:

Scrinia Ceciliana, mysteries of state & government in letters of the late famous Lord Burghley, and other grand ministers of state, in the reigns of Queen Elizabeth, and King James, being a further additional supplement of the Cabala (London: G. Bedell and T. Collins, 1663).Find this resource:

Seneca. Epistulae Morales, trans. Richard M. Gunmere, 10 vols. (Cambridge, MA and London: Harvard University Press, 1917).Find this resource:

——– The Workes of Lucius Annaeus Seneca Newly Inlarged and Corrected, ed. Thomas Lodge (London, 1620).Find this resource:

Shakespeare, William. Much Ado about Nothing, ed. A. R. Humphreys, The Arden Shakespeare (New York: Routledge, 1994).Find this resource:

——– Othello, ed. E. A. J. Honigmann, The Arden Shakespeare (Walton-on-Thames: Nelson, 1997).Find this resource:

——– The Historie of Troylus and Cresseida (London: R. Bonian and H. Walley, 1609).Find this resource:

——– The Riverside Shakespeare, ed. G. Blakemore Evans (Chicago: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 1997).Find this resource:

——– The Winter's Tale, ed. J. H. P. Pafford, The Arden Shakespeare (London: Methuen, 1963).Find this resource:

Sherry, Richard. A Treatise of Schemes and Tropes (London, 1550).Find this resource:

Shyp of Folys of the Worlde, trans. John Barclay (London, 1509).Find this resource:

Sidney, Sir Philip. A Defence of Poetry (London: Printed for William Ponsonby, 1595).Find this resource:

——– A Defence of Poetry, ed. Jan van Dorsten (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1966).Find this resource:

——– A Defence of Poetry, in Brian Vickers, ed., English Renaissance Literary Criticism (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1999), 336–91.Find this resource:

——– An Apology for Poetry, ed. Geoffrey Shepherd, rev. and expanded by R. W. Maslen (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2002).Find this resource:

——– The Countesse of Pembrokes Arcadia … Now since the first edition augmented and ended (London: [John Windet] for William Ponsonbie, 1593).Find this resource:

——– The Defence of Poesy, in Sir Philip Sidney: The Major Works, ed. Katherine Duncan-Jones (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002).Find this resource:

——– The Major Works, ed. Katherine Duncan-Jones (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002).Find this resource:

Smith, A. H., and G. M. Barker, eds. The Papers of Nathaniel Bacon of Stiffkey (Norwich: Norfolk Record Society, 1983).Find this resource:

Smith, Henrie. A Preparative to Mariage (London: R. Field for Thomas Man, 1591).Find this resource:

Smith, John. The Generall Historie of Virginia, New-England, and the Summer Isles (London, 1624).Find this resource:

——– The mysterie of rhetorique unveil’d (London, 1665).Find this resource:

Smith, Thomas. A Discourse of the Commonweal (London, 1549).Find this resource:

——– A letter sent by I.B. Gentleman (London, 1572).Find this resource:

——– Communicacion, BL Add MS 4,149, BL Add MS 48,047.Find this resource:

——– Communicacon of the Quenes Highnes Mariage (London, 1561).Find this resource:

(p. 700) Smith, Thomas. De recta et emendata anglicae scriptione (London, 1568).Find this resource:

——– De Republica Anglorum, printed as The common-welth of England (London, 1589).Find this resource:

——– De Republica Anglorum: A Discourse on the Commonwealth of England, ed. L. Alston (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1906).Find this resource:

Soto, Domingo de. Deliberación en la causa de los pobres (Salamanca: Juan de Junta, 1545).Find this resource:

Spenser, Edmund. Complaints. Containing Sundrie Small Poems of the Worlds Vanitie, London 1591 (Amderstam: Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, facs. edn. 1970).Find this resource:

——– The Poetical Works of Edmund Spenser, ed. J. Smith and E. de Selincourt (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1912).Find this resource:

Sprat, Thomas. The History of the Royal-Society of London (London, 1667).Find this resource:

Stafford, William. A compendious or briefe examination of certayne ordinary complaints of divers of our country men in these our days (London, 1581).Find this resource:

Stanley, Thomas. History of Philosophy, 4 vols. (London, 1655–62).Find this resource:

Starkey, Thomas. A Dialogue between Pole and Lupset, ed. T. F. Mayer (London: Royal Historical Society, 1989).Find this resource:

Streater, J. A Further Continuance of the Grand Politick Informer (London, 1653).Find this resource:

T., W., trans. The letters of Mounsieur de Balzac. Translated into English, according to the last edition (London: Richard Clotterbuck, 1634).Find this resource:

Tales and quicke answeres, very mery and pleasant to rede (London, 1532).Find this resource:

Tarlton, Richard. Tarltons newes out of Purgatorie (London, 1590).Find this resource:

Taylor, Thomas. The Practice of Repentance (London, 1629).Find this resource:

Tertullian, De Carne Christi 5.4, in Ante-Nicene Fathers, ed. Alexander Roberts, vol. 3 (Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1885).Find this resource:

Travers, Walter. Defence of the Ecclesiastical Discipline (Middelburg: Richard Schilders, 1588).Find this resource:

Vaughan, Sir William. The Newlanders Cure (London: F. Constable, 1630).Find this resource:

——– The Spirit of Detraction (London: George Norton, 1611).Find this resource:

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