Show Summary Details

Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD HANDBOOKS ONLINE (www.oxfordhandbooks.com). © Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a title in Oxford Handbooks Online for personal use (for details see Privacy Policy and Legal Notice).

date: 19 July 2019

(p. viii) List of Figures

(p. viii) List of Figures

  1. 1.1. Sales Strategy and Management Processes 3

  2. 2.1. The Evolving Strategic Customer Management Domain 30

  3. 2.2. Sales Relationships Across the Customer Portfolio 31

  4. 2.3. The Strategic Evolution of the Sales Organization 35

  5. 4.1. Determinants of Sales Organization Effectiveness 82

  6. 4.2. Antecedents of Sales Organization Effectiveness 84

  7. 5.1. Interactions within the Sales Environment 104

  8. 5.2. Levels of Analysis and Sales Research 116

  9. 6.1. Two Alternative Reporting Structures for a Sales Force of Product Specialists 133

  10. 6.2. Reporting Structure for a Microprocessor Manufacturer with Multiple Sales Specialist Roles 134

  11. 6.3. A Framework for Understanding the Impact of Sales Force Structure Decisions 135

  12. 6.4. A Framework for Understanding the Influences on Sales Force Structure Decisions 136

  13. 6.5. The Influence of Sales Force Structure on Sales Force Systems, Programs, and Processes 136

  14. 6.6. A Framework that Guides the Specialization Decision138

  15. 6.7. A Comparison of Efficiency for a Generalist versus a Specialized Sales Organization 139

  16. 6.8. Sales Bandwidth Required for IBM in 2009 140

  17. 6.9. Questions for Assessing the Need for Product, Market, or Activity Specialization 144

  18. 6.10. Alternative Sales Force Specialization Plans for a Wine and Spirits Distributor 145

  19. 6.11. Solutions for Enhancing Effectiveness and Ensuring the Right Allocation of Sales Effort with Generalists 148

  20. (p. ix)
  21. 6.12. Solutions for Achieving Customer Focus and Enhancing Efficiency with Product and Activity Specialists 152

  22. 6.13. Matching the Sales Force Structure to Local Needs at a Pharmaceutical Company Example of One Sales District in Texas 154

  23. 6.14. Geographic Reporting Structure for a Bottled Water Company 157

  24. 6.15. Example of Product Specialists in a Product-based Reporting Structure 159

  25. 6.16. Organization Chart for a Medical Device Sales Force of Activity Specialists 160

  26. 6.17. Example of Product Specialists in a Geographically-based Reporting Structure 162

  27. 6.18. Organization Chart for a Maintenance, Repair, and Operational Supply (MRO) Company 163

  28. 6.19. Questions for Understanding the Detailed Impact of Sales Force Structure Change 170

  29. 7.1. An Overview of Sales Force-Generated Marketing Intelligence 177

  30. 8.1. Idiosyncratic Investment Model of the Manufacturer?Rep Relationship 210

  31. 9.1. Sales Training Objectives, Topics, Methods, and Measurement 226

  32. 9.2. Rewards 237

  33. 10.1. A Model of Salesperson Job Stress 256

  34. 11.1. The Relationship between Sales Force Size and Several sales Force Performance metrics 281

  35. 11.2. The Customer Test of Sales Force Size 284

  36. 11.3. The Sales Force Morak Test of Sales Force Size 284

  37. 11.4. The Selling Activities Test of Sales Force Size 285

  38. 11.5. A Competetive Benchmarking Analysis for One Market 286

  39. 11.6. Implications of the Incremental Sales per Additional salesperson/Breakeven Sales Ratio and carryover for Sales Force Size 288

  40. 11.7. Finacial Test Calculation example 288

  41. 11.8. Example of Activity-based Analysis for sizing a Consumer Products merchandising Sales Force 290

  42. (p. x)
  43. 11.9. Example of Pipeline Analysis for sizing a medical Device Sales Force 291

  44. 11.10. Example of Target-Return-per-Call Analysis for sizing a Not-for-Profit Sales Force 293

  45. 11.11. Example of Sales Response Analysis for sizing a Pharmaceutical Sales Force 294

  46. 11.12. Sales Force Size and Income per Salesperson, Salesperson Turnover, Sales, and Contribution in a Commission-only Sales Force 296

  47. 11.13. Sales Force Team Sizes Before and After ?Project Genesis? at Pharmacia 306

  48. 12.1. Common Metrics for Customer Relationship Acquisition and Management 317

  49. 12.2. Measures for Online Customer Advocacy 322

  50. 12.3. Burke, Inc?s Secure Customer Index 323

  51. 12.4. Two CLV Formulations 326

  52. 12.5. Prioritizing Current Customers for Retention Efforts 329

  53. 12.6. Customer Portfolio Analysis 339

  54. 13.1. Enterprise Customer Relationship Strategy 347

  55. 13.2. Assessing Financial Payback on CRM in Sales Force Terms 350

  56. 13.3. Organization-Level CRM Model and Processes 352

  57. 13.4. Customers Vary in Their Buying Sophistication and Relational Preferences 356

  58. 13.5. CRM Customers Learning Typology in Sales-Intense Contexts 358

  59. 14.1. The Curvilinear Climate Level-Climate Strength Relationship 386

  60. 14.2. Antecedents and Consequences of an Organizational Sales Climate 387

  61. 14.3. The Ambidextrous Organization 390

  62. 14.4. The Three Dimensions of Sales Climate 393

  63. 15.1. The Contrast between Economic and Psychological Well-Being … from Meyer (2000).407

  64. 15.2. An Example of the Commitment and Consistency Principle … from Cialdini (1993) 412

  65. (p. xi)
  66. 16.1. The relationships among sales technology (ST), CRM, εt SFA domains 429

  67. 17.1. Trends in Sales Force Management 459

  68. 17.2. Marketing as a Dynamic Process of Value Creation and Realization 461

  69. 17.3. The Development of Marketing?s Contribution to the Value Propositions of the Firm. Continued on next page. 463

  70. 17.4. Process of Organizational Learning in a Network taken from Johnston, Peters, and Gassenheimer (2006) 477

  71. 18.1. Strategic Selling Function Framework (SSFF) 497

  72. 19.1. A Domain for Examining Sales Force Agility 520

  73. 19.2. Why Salespeople Must Be Agile 522

  74. 19.3. The Salesperson as a Value Creator 524

  75. 19.4. The Strategy-Agility Challenge 530

  76. 21.1. The Fundamental Business Model 574

  77. 21.2. Six Marketing Imperatives and Four Marketing Principles 576

  78. 21.3. Elements of the Market Segment Strategy 581

  79. 21.4. Strategic Focus: Developing Alternatives 584

  80. 21.5. Positioning in the Market Segment 586

  81. 21.6. Example of Competitive Framing 588

  82. 21.7. Positioning Statement: Cemex Example 590

  83. 21.8. Developing Implementation Programs: Marketing and Other Functional Areas 591

  84. 21.9. Marketing Mix for Steubenware 592

  85. 21.10. Managing Multi-segment Strategy: Possible Issues 593