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date: 21 September 2019

(p. 672) (p. 673) Index

(p. 672) (p. 673) Index

Activismsee Consumer activism
Advertising
children's consumption590
luxury as common parlance173
modern colonialism472, 476
modern Japan491
Nazi Germany436–437, 439
seventeenth-century Britain66
urban consumption192
Africa
impact of pre-colonial Africa on globalization
accommodation of consumer demand in East Africa102–106
consumer trends before 19th century89–91
importance of pre-colonial consumption106–107
introduction7
marketing consumer objects in East Africa91–96
social relations of consumption in East Africa96–102
value of pre-colonial study86–89
Indian cotton trade153
man and animal power310
supermarkets275
Asiasee China; India; Japan
Athens
abundance of goods26–28
clothes37–38
constraints on consumption39–41
effect of power struggles25
food as a status symbol34
household spending37
lack of previous study of consumption23–24
need for provisional assumptions25
organization of market-place28–30
place of special interest42–45
public consumption35
sexual services36–37
social activity in the marketplace32–34
source of modern inspiration24–25
Barter
early modern Europe245
early reliance634
possibilities for future study124
pre-colonial East Africa92
transatlantic goods118–119
waste334, 339
Bodysee Self and body
Boycotts
American Revolution505
Chinese shops283
consumer activism400, 404–406
economic and political weapon424
emergence of consumer-oriented national history2
ethical consumer behaviour515
link between nationalism and consumerism419–422
mixed motives509
modern popularity514–517
slave-grown sugar545
State actions410, 416
Branding
ancient Athens30–32
luxury as common parlance173
nationalist China
impact of global exchange426–429
national obsession431–432
(p. 674) Britain
consumer movements512
everyday life540
history of retail trade
co-operative stores271–272
self-service and supermarkets274
impact of India on food129
impact on East Africa105
Indian cotton consumption164
material culture in seventeenth-century Britain
attitudes to preservation and durability78–83
dangers of seeking point of take-off83
focus on materialism67–70
impact of technological change71–73
need for re-working of values64–65
new cultural practices73–76
re-statement of consumption as an active force66–67
supply of necessities76–78
saving habits368–372
transatlantic consumption
changing profiles of consumers119–121
commodification113–114
growth in importance of economic history112–113
importance111–112
possibilities for future study124–125
relationship between consumption and production122–124
slave trade115–119
‘staples theory’114–115
therapeutic and recreational drugs140–142
youth's golden age615
Budgeting
eating habits385
everyday life538–539
gender and family573
indication of values355–356
limitation of waste127
modern Japan490, 494
prioritization of food and clothing356–357
rural consumption195
source of social life13
standards of living211, 214–215
use of cotton148
working-class households354–355
youth consumption602
Children's consumptionsee also Youth consumption
children defined586–587
differing frames of reference588–589
early drinking habits207
everyday life540, 545
future avenues of research597–599
importance585–586
market recognition592–595
material culture596–597
modern Japan496
nationalist China427
parents as primary consumers589–592
place of children in family587–588
saving and spending356
China
consumption in a nationalist society
link between consumerism and commodity spectacles422–423
link with consumerism via boycotts419–422
obsession with branding431–432
period 1949–76423–431
useful basis for comparison418–419
debates over luxury goods180
everyday life540
hunger for scrap327
impact of growth on waste342–343
market reform342
MSW343
overview341–342
recycling343–346
impact on food129–130
imports of luxuries183
Indian cotton trade150–153
Ming China
association of consumption with morality51–52
clothes and fashion53
continuously developing literature60–63
cultural abundance50
(p. 675) distaste of ostentation53–54
elite values54–56
impact of Marxism59
intertwining of trade, commodities and social status49
luxuries and necessities distinguished56–58
negative side of consumption52–53
profusion of goods in marketplace50–51
relevance to modern study47–48
need for critical attention17
pre-modern waste330
small shops269
standards of living216
therapeutic and recreational drugs140–142
Choice
‘addict identities’650
assumed autonomous consumption664
comfort and convenience303, 310–311
consumer politics519
democratic societies577
department stores278
dominant ethic668
early modern Europe193–194, 200, 203, 205, 206
East African trade94, 101, 104, 107
eating out385
energy consumption308–309
everyday habit535, 539, 544
global trends622
individual stylization643
luxury goods175–176
measure of welfare666
measurement of well-being665–666
Nazi Germany444–447
needs for further legitimation649
rise of mass consumption532
self-responsibility644
seventeenth-century Britain73
standardization and homogeneity616
standards of living220, 222
symbolic power3–5
Citiessee Urban consumption
Class
consumer activism406
consumer movements509
consumption as an instrument of social power9
distinctiveness and social change560–562
eating habits381, 388
importance of middle class in modern colonialism473–478
intertwining of trade, commodities and social status in Ming China49
modern Japan
emergence of modern consumer489–490
wartime modernity497
sociable elites253–255
youth consumption608–609
Clothes
ancient Athens
constraints on consumption41
status symbols37–38
convenience300–301
everyday life540, 545
fashion
form of modern social change631–632
impact of globalization619–620
link with urban life622–628
male fashionability of Indian cotton155
power to transform self618–619
relevance to consumption628–630
theoretical approaches620–621
US influences621–622
Indian cotton trade
diversity of production147–148
Europe and transatlantic trade157–163
exports to Africa and Asia150–156
global reach160–166
importance145–147
luxury and fashion148–150
luxuries and necessities distinguished185–188
Ming China
cultural visibility58
negative side of consumption53
modern Japan
early modern consumption486
emergence of modern consumer495–496
pre-colonial East Africa
diversity93–95
(p. 676) modern and religious influences101–102
politics of consumption89–91
prioritization of spending356–357
rural consumption205–206
seventeenth-century Britain
maintenance and durability78
re-statement of consumption as an active force66
Soviet Union455
standards of living
movers of change222–223
pre-industrialization trends215–217
transatlantic goods121
urban consumption201–205
Co-operatives271–272
Colonial societiessee also Africa
alteration of trade routes in late 19th century104–105
India
diversity of cotton production147–148
Europe and transatlantic trade157–163
exports to Africa and Asia150–156
global reach160–166
impact on British food129
impact on East Africa103–104
impact on luxury and fashion148–150
importance of cotton trade145–147
waste control338–340
modern colonialism
flawed assumptions about culture and social impact480–484
importance of middle class473–478
post-colonial consumers470–472
relationship with particular commodities478–479
revisionist approach467–470
modern Japan
emergence of modern consumer488–497
wartime modernity497–500
shift in perspective of consumption2
tobacco trade with 17th century Britain74
trade in food and drugs128–130
transatlantic consumption
changing profiles of consumers119–121
commodification113–114
growth in importance of economic history112–113
importance111–112
Indian cotton161–163
possibilities for future study124–125
relationship between consumption and production122–124
slave trade115–119
‘staples theory’114–115
therapeutic and recreational drugs140–142
Comfort
changing patterns of consumption303–306
cleanliness542
department stores576
domestic environment579
domestic lighting315
eating, dressing, and dwelling545
eating habits390
everyday life
early studies535
global exchange and diffusion545–546
post-war studies526, 528, 532
flows of influence6
function of credit365
impact on environment295–297
interpretation and development of standards292–295
meaning and scope290–292
modern Japan499
Nazi Germany434, 436, 443–447
new approach to consumption289–290
Renaissance Italy14, 535
seventeenth-century Britain70
travel317
waste339
Commodification
alternative approaches
capitalist manipulation of taste and lifestyle10–11
symbolic communication11
effects on study of food380–381
modern colonialism
post-colonial consumers471
(p. 677) revisionist approach468
movement of people381
role of pre-colonial Africa85
sexual services in ancient Athens36–37
transatlantic consumption
growth in importance of economic history113–114
slaves115–119
victim of post-modernism17
‘Conspicuous consumption’
instrument of social power9
luxury goods174–175
post-Communist Russia464
Consumer activism
core political element400
new wave14
Consumer movements
boycotts514–517
concerns for people508–513
core political element400
eating habits379
emerging studies507–508
future avenues of research517–519
importance506
modern China424
organized activities505–506
protection and promotion of interests407–408
shift to rights-based approach513–514
United States417
Consumer regimes
challenge to individual autonomy410–411
core political element400
dilemmas for consumers413–414
emergence513
Government boycotts409–410
lack of study408–409
protective measures414–416
public spending411–412
shaping of consumer practices412–413
‘Consumer society’
chronological preoccupations with3–6
emergence in Europe23
gender and family569
Ming China62, 64
questioning of terms433
unhelpful model16
Consumerism
Americanization5
ancient Athens37, 42–45
appeal of comparative testing513
consumption distinguished418
immorality367
importance of credit351
luxury goods173, 186
Ming China62
modern colonialism
importance of middle class476
revisionist approach468
modern Japan
beginnings488
post-war ascendance500–503
nationalist China
link with commodity spectacles422–423
link with nationalism via boycotts419–422
Nazi Germany448
pervasive promise178
politics of consumption403
public anxieties10
questioning of terms433
Renaissance Italy231
waste production339, 344
youth's golden age611–617
Consumption
alternative approaches
capitalist manipulation of taste and lifestyle10–11
significance of materiality17–18
status9–10
symbolic communication11–14
chronological preoccupations with two particular periods3–8
consumerism distinguished418
creative consumption
design and media628
everyday life546
housewife's power571
shift in perspective of consumption11–14
source of study8
diversity of economic theories15–17
early modern Japan485–488
(p. 678) importance of financial conduct351–352
importance of sociability252
semantic roots376–377
shift in perspective1–3
significance of public spending14
Convenience
association with time-saving298–299
changing patterns of consumption303–306
clothes300–301
early modern Europe199–200
eating, dressing, and dwelling545
eating habits379
everyday life535–536, 538, 545–546
food299–301
luxury goods180
meaning and scope297
new approach to consumption289–290
relation between material culture and social practice301–303
United States411
warm food73
waste339
Cotton
comfort and convenience290
energy consumption309
fashion621
Indian production and trade
diversity of production and147–148
Europe and transatlantic trade157–163
exports to Africa and Asia150–156
global reach160–166
importance145–147
luxury and fashion148–150
Japanese consumption487
luxury goods189–190
Ming China55
pioneering histories7
relationship with slavery412
role in East Africa90–95, 99, 101, 103
seventeenth-century Britain67, 82
small shops269
standards of living216, 222
Western European consumption203–205
widespread4
Creative consumption
design and media628
everyday life546
housewife's power571
shift in perspective of consumption11–14
source of study8
Credit
early modern Europe
developing system244–249
the Priuli family in Venice230
importance14–15
modern Japan
early modern consumption487
emergence of modern consumer492–495
post-war ascendance of consumers501–502
not the only path to affluence6
pre-colonial East Africa92–93, 97
public consumption17
regional contrasts16
retail trade277
United States360–361, 362–365
Cultural values
alternative approaches
capitalist manipulation of taste and lifestyle10–11
instrument of social power9
symbolic communication11–14
ancient Athens
clothes37–38
food34
settlement of accounts29
depictions of consumption in early modern Europe236–244
eating habits386
everyday life529
fashion
form of modern social change631–632
impact of globalization619–620
link with urban life622–628
male fashionability of Indian cotton155
power to transform self618–619
relevance to consumption628–630
theoretical approaches620–621
US influences621–622
(p. 679) gender and family
revisionist approach578–580
tension between public spheres575–578
importance of middle class in modern colonialism474
Indian cotton155
lifestyle
early modern Europe246
everyday life531, 542
importance7
luxuries174–177
Ming China58
modern Japan489, 496
nationalist China422, 424
Nazi Germany448
Renaissance Italy230
saving and spending356
shopping273, 280
Soviet Union454, 458, 463
supermarkets marketing strategies516
transatlantic consumption123
urban consumption193, 207
luxury goods176–177
Ming China50, 58–59
modern colonialism481–482
modern Japan
emergence of modern consumer489
post-war ascendance of consumers502–503
wartime modernity498
possibilities for future study125
pre-colonial East Africa89
‘public sphere’
importance256–259
post-Habermasian movement259–264
self and body641–649
seventeenth-century Britain
focus on materialism68–69
tobacco-smoking73–76
significance of public spending14
Soviet Union457–460, 462
post-Stalin era460–462
privileged access455–457
status
complex moral and political baggage557
distinctiveness and social change560–564
early modern Europe235
elite values in Ming China54–56
general approach to consumption9–10
importance551–552
importance of middle class in modern colonialism473–478
Indian cotton148
intertwining with trade and commodities in Ming China49
luxury goods174–175
modern Japan488
pre-colonial East Africa90, 99–100
sociable elites253–255
urban and rural communities compared197–201
Weberian approach552–556
taste
capitalist manipulation of taste and lifestyle10–11
energy consumption308–309
impact of transatlantic trade121–122
Indian cotton148–149, 155
instrument of social power9
Nazi Germany435
pre-colonial East Africa94–95
role of imperialism129
self and body641–649
shift in perspective of consumption1
Soviet Union457–460
urban consumption192
youth consumption
films607
golden age of consumerism611–617
impact of gang culture603–606
presentation of self606–607
Democratic societiessee also Britain; Europe; United States
ancient Athens
abundance of goods26–28
clothes37–38
constraints on consumption39–41
food as a status symbol34
household spending37
(p. 680) luxuries and necessities distinguished30–32
need for provisional assumptions23–25
organization of market-place28–30
place of special interest42–45
pleasures of consumption35–36
public consumption35
sexual services36–37
social activity in the marketplace32–34
association with well-being669
choice577
consumer movements512–513
everyday life522, 526, 531, 536, 542
luxury goods177
new emphasis on living conditions581
standards of living218
status554–555
waste infrastructures338
Department stores
comfort576
confrontation with small shops272–274
modern Japan490
origins and development270–272
part of global exchange284
politics of retailing281–282
tensions created by family and gender576
Dietsee Food and drink
Disposable goods
downplay of interconnectedness124
Ming China49
modern China343
tobacco-smoking in 17th century Britain75–76
waste335–336
Diversity
distinctiveness and social change560–564
food and drink131
historical perspectives8
Indian cotton147–148
Ming China50–51
pre-colonial East Africa93–94
quality and branding in ancient Athens30–32
tobacco-smoking in 17th century Britain75
youth consumption608–609
Domesticitysee also Gender and family; Household consumption
African women472
central element568
comfort and convenience300
innovative approach569–570
Western investment664
Drugs
areas of future research144
determinants of ill-being659
global exchange
development of global role143
psychotic beverages138–139
role of imperialism128–130
significance127–128
therapeutic and recreational drugs140–142
new approach to health633
quasi-mythic status as generators of addiction650
US controls411, 417
Durables
ancient Athens37
debates over luxury goods181
transatlantic goods121, 123
East Africa
accommodation of consumer demand102–106
marketing of consumer objects91–96
social relations of consumption96–102
Eatingsee Food and drink
Elitessee Status
Emulation
children's consumption590
civilizing process253
colonial societies475
comfort and convenience291
early modern Europe208
explanation of consumer culture10
‘female vice’178
luxury180
‘Veblenesque’ desire569
(p. 681) well-being663
youth consumption608
Energy consumption
areas for future research320–323
changes in transport316–318
changing approach to consumption307–309
Chinese heavy industry425–426
comfort and convenience293, 295
everyday life537, 544
factories312–313
households
early changes314–315
universal electricity supplies318–320
man and animal power309–311
nationalist China425–426
private consumption16
public lighting313–314
reactions to high consumption315–316
significance of materiality18
urban communities311–312
Europe
ancient Athens
abundance of goods26–28
clothes37–38
constraints on consumption39–41
effect of power struggles25
food as a status symbol34
household spending37
lack of previous study of consumption23–24
need for provisional assumptions25
organization of market-place28–30
place of special interest42–45
public consumption35
sexual services36–37
social activity in the marketplace32–34
source of modern inspiration24–25
Britain
co-operative stores271–272
consumer movements512
everyday life540
impact of India on food129
impact on East Africa105
Indian cotton consumption164
saving habits368–372
self-service and supermarkets274
youth's golden age615
consumer movements512, 514
consumption in early modern Europe
gender divisions232–237
importance of social and material negotiations249
mobility between country and city237–244
the Priuli family in Venice229–230
pushing the consumer revolution back in time231–232
role of credit244–249
decline of influence on lifestyle563
energy consumption320
gender and family573
historical culture of consumption7
history of retail trade
‘active’ and ‘passive’ consumers278
co-operative stores271–272
department stores271
impact on urban environment279–280
part of global exchange283–284
politics of retailing282–283
small shops269
imports of luxuries from Asia182–185
Indian cotton trade156–163
luxury goods178
material culture in seventeenth-century Britain
attitudes to preservation and durability78–83
dangers of seeking point of take-off83
focus on materialism67–70
impact of technological change71–73
need for re-working of values64–65
new cultural practices73–76
re-statement of consumption as an active force66–67
supply of necessities76–78
Nazi Germany
importance of consumption434–438
legacies of fascism447–449
politics of consumption438–441
relationship between consumption and consent444–447
relevance433–434
role of producer441–444
(p. 682) politicization of everyday life in twentieth century580–583
rise of ‘public sphere’256–259
saving habits368–372
seventeenth-century Britain
attitudes to preservation and durability78–83
dangers of seeking point of take-off83
focus on materialism67–70
impact of technological change71–73
need for re-working of values64–65
new cultural practices73–76
re-statement of consumption as an active force66–67
supply of necessities76–78
shift in perspective of consumption2
studies of everyday life525–526
transatlantic consumption
changing profiles of consumers119–121
commodification113–114
growth in importance of economic history112–113
importance111–112
possibilities for future study124–125
relationship between consumption and production122–124
slave trade115–119
‘staples theory’114–115
therapeutic and recreational drugs140–142
youth's golden age612–615
Everyday life
comfort and convenience297, 545–546
concerns over resistance543
early history532–539
extension of aesthetic value380
future studies546
‘governmentality’540–541
historical approach8
impact of socialism544–545
impact of urban water supplies541–542
luxuries191
meaning and scope522–524
methodological questions542–543
new source of study522
politicization in twentieth-century Europe580–583
post-war history522–524
practices543–544
relevance521–522
revolutionary life540
seventeenth-century Britain83
Soviet Union454
Exchange of goodssee Barter
Familysee Gender and family
Fascist societies
Nazi Germany
importance of consumption434–438
legacies of fascism447–449
politics of consumption438–441
relationship between consumption and consent444–447
relevance433–434
role of producer441–444
support for Marxist view10
youth consumption608–609, 610
Fashionsee also Taste
form of modern social change631–632
impact of globalization619–620
link with urban life622–628
male fashionability of Indian cotton155
power to transform self618–619
relevance to consumption628–630
theoretical approaches620–621
Female consumptionsee Gender and family
Financialization372–374
Food and drink
ancient Athens
organization of market-place29
as a status symbol34
areas of future research144
convenience299–301
eating habits
eating out385–386
effects of commodification380–381
effects of globalization379–380
future avenues of research389–391
gastronomy386–387
grounds for study376–379
international movement of people382–383
(p. 683) nutritional information and advice386
suburbanization383–384
use of cookery books388–389
everyday life528–529, 545
global exchange
development of global role142–143
role of imperialism128–130
salt130–132
significance127–128
spices132–135
sugar135–138
modern Japan
early modern consumption486
pre-colonial East Africa89
prioritization of spending356–357
rituals of symbolic communication12
rural consumption
preparation and service207–208
urban communities compared195–196
salt
contribution to the creation of new food cultures133
early modern Europe248
East African trade92
eating habits389
global exchange and diffusion130–132
new focus on ornamentation199
slave labour118
seventeenth-century Britain72–73
shift in perspective of consumption1
Soviet Union
scarcity and privilege455–457
spices
eating habits383
global exchange and diffusion132–135
Indian trade150
Ming China55
retailing283
Western European diet206
standards of living
movers of change222–223
pre-industrialization trends215–217
sugar
American consumption413
East African trade91
eating habits378, 389
energy consumption309
global exchange and diffusion135–138
Indian trade150
luxuries176, 181
model of a commodity biography7
relationship with slavery478, 545
seventeenth-century Britain74
Soviet consumption452
standards of living223
transatlantic consumption113, 117, 121
transatlantic goods121
urban consumption
limited data206–207
rural communities compared195–196
Gender and familysee also Domesticity
children's consumption
children defined586–587
differing frames of reference588–589
early drinking habits207
everyday life540, 545
future avenues of research597–599
importance585–586
market recognition592–595
material culture596–597
modern Japan496
nationalist China427
parents as primary consumers589–592
place of children in family587–588
saving and spending356
confrontation between small shops and department stores273
consumer movements510–511
domesticity
innovative approach569–570
early modern Europe
divisions of labour232–237
grounds for debate231
the Priuli family in Venice230
everyday life530
female shoppers
ancient Athens29
source of social life13
impact of transatlantic trade119–120
impact of universal energy supplies on the role of women319
(p. 684) importance568–569
innovative approach569–570
linkage between concepts571–575
luxury as a female vice181–182
male fashionability of Indian cotton148
modern colonialism
importance of middle class475–476
modern Japan490–491
Nazi Germany442–443
politicization of everyday life580–583
revisionist approach578–580
rural clothes205
symbolic sources of identity13
tension between public spheres575–578
urban clothes204–205
urban consumption
importance192
youth consumption601
Generational identities
children's consumption
children defined586–587
differing frames of reference588–589
early drinking habits207
everyday life540, 545
future avenues of research597–599
importance585–586
market recognition592–595
material culture596–597
modern Japan496
nationalist China427
parents as primary consumers589–592
place of children in family587–588
saving and spending356
youth consumption
Africa101
golden age of consumerism611–617
impact of films607
impact of gang culture603–606
nationalist China427
presentation of self606–607
Renaissance Italy253
self and body645
significance602–603
Soviet Union462
towards mass consumption609–611
Global exchange and diffusion
consumer activism406
drugs
development of global role143
psychotic beverages138–139
role of imperialism128–130
significance127–128
therapeutic and recreational drugs140–142
Eastern Europe462
food
development of global role142–143
role of imperialism128–130
salt130–132
significance127–128
spices132–135
sugar135–138
impact of China's growth342–343
market reform342
MSW343
overview341–342
recycling343–346
impact on eating habits
movement of goods379–380
movement of people381
impact on everyday life545–546
impact on fashion
link with urban life626
US influences619–620
import and export of goods by ancient Athens26–28
importance of foreign rarities in Ming China57
Indian cotton trade
diversity of production and147–148
Europe and transatlantic trade157–163
exports to Africa and Asia150–156
global reach160–166
importance145–147
luxury and fashion148–150
luxuries
importance173–174
scramble for world commodities188–190
modern colonialism
flawed assumptions about culture and social impact480–484
(p. 685) importance of middle class473–478
post-colonial consumers470–472
relationship with particular commodities478–479
revisionist approach467–470
nationalist China424–430
need for ongoing analysis16
problems of financialization372–374
retail trade283–285
role of pre-colonial Africa
accommodation of consumer demand in East Africa102–106
consumer trends before 19th century89–91
importance of pre-colonial consumption106–107
marketing consumer objects in East Africa91–96
overview85–86
social relations of consumption in East Africa96–102
value of pre-colonial study86–89
role of pre-colonial Africa in global flow of goods7
tobacco trade with 17th century Britain74
transatlantic consumption
changing profiles of consumers119–121
commodification113–114
growth in importance of economic history112–113
importance111–112
possibilities for future study124–125
relationship between consumption and production122–124
slave trade115–119
‘staples theory’114–115
‘Governmentality’540–541
Habits
comfort and convenience290, 303–304
‘cultured socialist trade’458
early modern Europe193, 199
eating
eating out385–386
effects of commodification380–381
effects of globalization379–380
future avenues of research389–391
gastronomy386–387
grounds for study376–379
international movement of people382–383
nutritional information and advice386
suburbanization383–384
use of cookery books388–389
energy consumption322
everyday life
early studies534–536, 539
impact of water supplies542–543
post-war studies526, 528–529
revolutionary period540
fashion620
impact on waste333, 336–338
Indian cotton150
modern Japan498
relevance15
self and body643
sociability261
standards of living213
well-being659
youth616
‘Hedonic indices’175–176
Household consumptionsee also Domesticity
ancient Athens37
energy
early changes314–315
universal electricity supplies318–320
luxuries and necessities distinguished187–188
pre-colonial East Africa96–97
seventeenth-century Britain
impact of technological change71–73
maintenance and durability of goods78–83
re-statement of consumption as an active force67
shift in perspective of consumption1
source of social life12–13
standards of living211–212
urban and rural communities compared196
(p. 686) Identitysee also Generational identity
Athens as an historical source25
crisis in France528
debates over luxury goods180
eating habits382
fashion
link with urban life623
power to transform self618–619
food and drink378–379, 388
gender and family
linkage between concepts573
tension between public spheres575
importance of food and drugs127
Indian cotton148
new approach to consumption12
pre-colonial East Africa96–97
self and body
African dress101
ancient Athens25
attention to females575–576
comfort and convenience296, 303
consuming dualis649–652
cultural values641–649
energy consumption315, 316
European clothing102
everyday life538
fashion616, 631
Islamic dress95
luxuries175, 180
notions of consumption634–637
objects of consumption637–641
saving and spending350, 363–367, 370
seventeenth-century Britain79
Soviet Union454, 464
standards of living219
threefold relationship with consumption633–634
traditions of critical reason18
waste339
women's domestic life574
youth consumption606–607
youth culture606
shift in perspective of consumption1–2
symbolic sources of women's identity13
youth consumption601
India
cotton trade
diversity of production147–148
Europe and transatlantic trade157–163
exports to Africa and Asia150–156
global reach160–166
importance145–147
luxury and fashion148–150
impact on British food129
impact on East Africa103–104
waste control338–340
Industrial consumption
historical significance14
seventeenth-century Britain
impact of technological change71–73
re-statement of consumption as an active force67
Japan
everyday life538–539
history of retail trade
co-operative stores271–272
department stores271
impact on food129
modern Japan
early modern consumption485–488
emergence of modern consumer488–497
post-war ascendance of consumers500–503
wartime modernity497–500
saving habits368–372
standards of comfort293
trade with East Africa105
waste
pre-modern waste330
sanitary control338
Lifestyle
Bourdieu's approach557–560
capitalist manipulation of taste and lifestyle10–11
chequered and complex history556
complex moral and political baggage557
early modern Europe246
(p. 687) everyday life531, 542
importance7, 551–552
luxuries174–177
Ming China58
modern Japan489, 496
nationalist China422, 424
Nazi Germany448
Renaissance Italy230
saving and spending356
shopping273, 280
Soviet Union454, 458, 463
supermarkets marketing strategies516
transatlantic consumption123
urban consumption193, 207
Luxuries
ancient Athens
constraints on consumption41
as a source of study24
continuing debates179–182
economic theories174–177
gastronomy386–387
global trade in ancient world177
importance173–174
imports from Asia182–185
instrument of social power9
intertwining of trade, commodities and social status in Ming China49
Ming China
continuously developing literature61
necessities distinguished56–58
negative side of consumption52–53
modern Japan499
as the mother of slavery11
nationalist China425–426
necessities distinguished185–188
political framework177
post-war golden age177–178
quality and branding in ancient Athens30–32
recreational drugs140–142
scramble for world commodities188–190
‘sensuous luxury’178–179
seventeenth-century Britain
focus on materialism68–70
re-statement of consumption as an active force66–67
Soviet critique463
spices132, 138
standards of living211–213
Male consumptionsee Gender and family
Marketplacessee also Shopping
ancient Athens
abundance of goods26
centre of social activity32–34
organization and specialization28–30
place of special interest42–45
consumption in early modern Europe
gender divisions232–237
importance of social and material negotiations249
mobility between country and city237–244
the Priuli family in Venice229–230
pushing the consumer revolution back in time231–232
role of credit244–249
Ming China50–51
tensions created by family and gender577
urban consumption194
Marxism
capitalist manipulation of taste and lifestyle10–11
everyday life
early studies533–534
post-war studies525
food and drink378
impact on Chinese history59
marginalization of gender and family571
underlying principles451–452
Mass consumption
changes over time17
luxury goods177
Marxist approach10–11
resilience of American model8
tensions created by family and gender575
tobacco-smoking in 17th century Britain75
waste
disposability of MSW through the 1980s335
significance326–327
youth market609–611
(p. 688) Materialism
children's consumption596–597
effects on study of food380–381
fashion628–629
freed slaves98–99
importance of sociability252
modern colonialism478–480
relationship with convenience301–303
seventeenth-century Britain67–70
shift in perspective of consumption1
significance17–18
Soviet Union457
urban and rural communities compared197–201
Medicinessee Therapeutic drugs
Ming China
association of consumption with morality51–52
clothes and fashion53
continuously developing literature60–63
cultural abundance50
distaste of ostentation53–54
elite values54–56
impact of Marxism59
intertwining of trade, commodities and social status49
luxuries and necessities distinguished56–58
negative side of consumption52–53
relevance to modern study47–48
Monetization
absence of study352
explanations for absence of study352–353
history of money350–351
importance of financial conduct351–352
modern China342
modern Japan489, 492
money as dominant means of exchange348–350
moralistic approaches358–359
need for fresh interpretations354–361, 374
new age of financialization372, 374
problems of financialization372–374
revisionist histories366
Municipal Solid Waste
disposability through the 1980s334–341
emergence as concept333
impact of China's growth343
Nationalist societies
China
link between consumerism and commodity spectacles422–423
link with consumerism via boycotts419–422
obsession with branding431–432
period 1949–76423–431
useful basis for comparison418–419
Nazi Germany
importance of consumption434–438
legacies of fascism447–449
politics of consumption438–441
relationship between consumption and consent444–447
relevance433–434
role of producer441–444
Nazi Germany
importance of consumption434–438
legacies of fascism447–449
politics of consumption438–441
relationship between consumption and consent444–447
relevance433–434
role of producer441–444
source of ‘Konsumterror530–531
Necessities
determinants of standard of living211–213
energy307–308
luxuries distinguished185–188
Ming China56–58
quality and branding in ancient Athens30–32
rituals of symbolic communication12
salt131
seventeenth-century Britain76–78
Soviet Union
scarcity and privilege455–457
Obsolescence
impact on waste329, 335–336
luxury goods174
rural consumption208
urban consumption198
(p. 689) Patterns of spending1, 356, 378
Pleasures of consumption
ancient Athens
constraints on consumption39–41
food35–36
debates over luxury goods180
everyday life526
function of credit365
‘hedonic indices’175–176
historical approach8
method of analysis10
new approach12
‘sensuous luxury’178–179
spices135
well-being
choice665–666
citizenship and the home582
comfort and convenience290–291
comparison666
conflicting truisms655–656
disciplined bodywork638
equal distribution of pleasures669–670
ethical considerations667–669
growth667
inventory of goods approach657–660
limiting consumption211–213
nationalist China432
novelty666
picture of ‘normality’650
saving and spending349, 367
social science research662–664
standard assumptions653–655
state of mind660–662
women's responsibility for family573
Politics of consumption
consumer activism
core political element400
networked solidarity404–406
new wave14
consumer movements
boycotts514–517
concerns for people508–513
core political element400
eating habits379
emerging studies507–508
future avenues of research517–519
importance506
modern China424
organized activities505–506
protection and promotion of interests407–408
shift to rights-based approach513–514
United States417
consumer regimes
challenge to individual autonomy410–411
dilemmas for consumers413–414
Government boycotts409–410
lack of study408–409
protective measures414–416
public spending411–412
shaping of consumer practices412–413
distinct forms416–417
energy320–321
everyday life454
comfort and convenience545–546
concerns over resistance543
early history532–539
future studies546
‘governmentality’540–541
impact of socialism544–545
impact of urban water supplies541–542
meaning and scope522–524
methodological questions542–543
new source of study522
post-war history524–532
practices543–544
relevance521–522
revolutionary life540
history of retail trade281–283
impact of transatlantic trade121
Indian cotton154
luxury goods177, 179–180
modern colonialism
flawed assumptions about culture and social impact480–484
importance of middle class473–478
post-colonial consumers470–472
relationship with particular commodities478–479
revisionist approach467–470
modern Japan
early modern consumption485–488
(p. 690) emergence of modern consumer488–497
post-war ascendance of consumers500–503
wartime modernity497–500
nationalist China
link between consumerism and commodity spectacles422–423
link with consumerism via boycotts419–422
obsession with branding431–432
period 1949–76423–431
useful basis for comparison418–419
Nazi Germany
importance of consumption434–438
juxtaposition of enticement and deprivation438–441
legacies of fascism447–449
relationship between consumption and consent444–447
relevance433–434
role of producer441–444
politicization of everyday life in twentieth-century Europe580–583
pre-colonial Africa
access to imported goods97–98
clothes89–91
importance86–87
Soviet Union
collapse of communism464–466
early practice452–454
post-Stalin era460–462
rediscovery of good taste457–460
role of Eastern Europe462–464
scarcity and privilege455–457
underlying principles451–452
spices133
standards of living
emergence of political debate213–215
luxuries and necessities distinguished212–213
‘three-phase’ model399–404
‘Positional goods’173, 176
Practices543–544 see also Habits
Production
ancient Athens30, 45
early modern Europe
gender divisions233–234
effects of mass production4
factory consumption of energy312–313
food and drink379
impact of industrialization on standards of living213–215
impact of transatlantic trade122–123
Indian cotton147–148
luxuries
effects of world trade189–190
significance174
Marxist approach10–12, 17
Ming China49, 51, 59
modern colonialism478
modern Japan491
Nazi Germany441–444
new approach to consumption1–2
seventeenth-century Britain
necessities76–78
technological and industrial change71–73
Soviet Union452–454
Psychotic beverages138–139
Public consumption
energy for lighting313–314
historical significance14
need for ongoing analysis16–17
sacrifices in ancient Athens35
‘Public sphere’
everyday life536
importance256–259
post-Habermasian movement259–264
tensions created by family and gender575–578
Recreational drugs140–142
Retailingsee Shopping
Rural consumptionsee also Urban consumption
Bourdieu's approach to lifestyle558–559
clothing205–206
early modern Europe237–244
energy319
(p. 691) food and drink
preparation and service207–208
urban communities compared195–196
importance208
modern colonialism477
modern Japan
early modern consumption487
wartime modernity497–498
nationalist China424
ownership of goods197–201
revisionist approach192–193
small shops269–270
Soviet Union455–456
standards of living213
urban consumption compared195–197
Salt
contribution to the creation of new food cultures133
early modern Europe248
East African trade92
eating habits389
global exchange and diffusion130–132
new focus on ornamentation199
slave labour118
Saving
comparative perspectives
G7 nations368–372
importance367–368
history of thrift361–367
indication of values355–356
need for fresh interpretations374
new source of study14–15
regional contrasts16
working-class households354–355
‘Scuttlers’605
Second-hand goods
early modern Europe
the Priuli family in Venice230
role of credit246
significance249
impact of China's growth on recycling343–346
possibilities for future study124
seventeenth-century Britain78–83
Self and body
African dress101
ancient Athens25
attention to females575–576
comfort and convenience296, 303
consuming dualis649–652
cultural values641–649
energy consumption315, 316
European clothing102
everyday life538
fashion616, 631
Islamic dress95
luxuries175, 180
notions of consumption634–637
objects of consumption637–641
saving and spending350, 363–367, 370
seventeenth-century Britain79
Soviet Union454, 464
standards of living219
threefold relationship with consumption633–634
traditions of critical reason18
waste339
women's domestic life574
youth consumption606–607
youth culture606
Self-service stores274–275
‘Sensuous luxury’178–179
Sexual services
ancient Athens35–37, 44–45
modern Japan491
Shoppingsee also Marketplaces
‘active’ and ‘passive’ consumers277–278
ancient Athens
place of special interest42–44
Athens a source of study24
department stores
confrontation with small shops272–274
origins and development270–272
early modern Europe
the Priuli family in Venice229
gender and family
linkage between concepts574
tension between public spheres576
impact on urban environment278–280
(p. 692) interactive process between buyers and sellers275–277
Ming China52
modern Japan
early modern consumption487
wartime modernity498–499
Nazi Germany442–443
organization of market-place in ancient Athens28–30
part of global exchange283–285
politics of retailing281–283
self-service and supermarkets274–275
small shops
confrontation with department stores272–274
new approach267–268
statistical predominance268–270
Slaves
ancient Athens27–30
consumer movements509
as consumers118–119
impact of transatlantic trade115–118
luxury as the mother of slavery11
materialism of freed slaves98–99
replacement by energy consuming appliances314–315
Small shops
confrontation with department stores272–274
new approach267–268
politics of retailing281
statistical predominance268–270
Sociability
connection with urban luxury181–182
department stores272
eating habits
eating out385–386
future avenues of research390
grounds for study378
female shoppers575
focus on elites253–255
food and clothing186–187
new approach to consumption12–13
post-Habermasian movement259–264
pre-colonial East Africa96–102
restaurants and cafés208
rise of ‘public sphere’256–259
‘scuttlers’605
seventeenth-century Britain73, 83
various meanings and significances264–265
Socialist societies
impact on everyday life544–545
need for critical attention17
Soviet Union
collapse of communism464–466
early practice452–454
post-Stalin era460–462
rediscovery of good taste457–460
role of Eastern Europe462–464
scarcity and privilege455–457
underlying principles451–452
Soviet Union
collapse of communism464–466
early practice452–454
everyday life
early studies537
post-war studies527
revolutionary period540
history of retail trade
‘active’ and ‘passive’ consumers278
department stores271
impact on urban environment279
part of global exchange284
increasing influence on lifestyle563
post-Stalin era460–462
rediscovery of good taste457–460
role of Eastern Europe462–464
scarcity and privilege455–457
small shops269
underlying principles451–452
Spices
eating habits383
global exchange and diffusion132–135
Indian trade150
Ming China55
retailing283
Western European diet206
Standards of living
changes in measurement220–221
changing approaches210–211
consumer movements512
emergence of political debate213–215
focus on demographic changes217–220
impact of transatlantic trade123
luxuries and necessities distinguished211–213
(p. 693) new movers of change222–224
pre-industrialization trends215–217
Soviet Union460
urban and rural communities compared195–197
‘Staples theory’114–115
Status
ancient Athens
clothes37–38
food34
settlement of accounts29
complex moral and political baggage557
distinctiveness and social change560–564
early modern Europe235
elite values in Ming China54–56
general approach to consumption9–10
importance551–552
importance of middle class in modern colonialism473–478
Indian cotton148
instrument of social power9
intertwining with trade and commodities in Ming China49
luxury goods174–175
modern Japan488
pre-colonial East Africa90, 99–100
self and body641
sociable elites253–255
Soviet Union
post-Stalin era460–462
privileged access455–457
urban and rural communities compared197–201
Weberian approach552–556
Sugar
American consumption413
East African trade91
eating habits378, 389
energy consumption309
global exchange and diffusion135–138
Indian trade150
luxuries176, 181
model of a commodity biography7
relationship with slavery478, 545
seventeenth-century Britain74
Soviet consumption452
standards of living223
transatlantic consumption113, 117, 121
Supermarkets274–275
Symbolic communication
ancient Athens
as an historical source25
social activity in the marketplace32–34
Bourdieu's approach to lifestyle558
early modern Europe242–244
food and drink378, 384
Indian cotton154–155
luxury goods176–177
shift in perspective of consumption2, 11–14
youth's golden age615–616
Tastesee also Fashion
alternative approaches
capitalist manipulation of taste and lifestyle10–11
instrument of social power9
decline of highbrow taste564–566
energy consumption308–309
impact of transatlantic trade121–122
Indian cotton148–149, 155
Nazi Germany435
pre-colonial East Africa94–95
role of imperialism129
self and body641–649
shift in perspective of consumption1
Soviet Union457–460
urban consumption
importance192
Taxation
ancient Athens28, 39–41
costs of parish relief213
department stores281
early modern Europe249
goods legally imported into the towns206
Indian cotton154
itinerant traders270
luxuries174, 187
luxuries and necessities distinguished187
modern Japan488
nationalist China425
Nazi Germany444
revenue purposes212
salt131
United States412–413, 415
(p. 694) on villages211
water542
well-being658, 662, 665
Technology
abolition of man and animal power310
impact on everyday life542
impact on food and drugs trade142–143
luxuries
effects of world trade189–190
imports from Asia182
modern Japan497, 500–503
Nazi Germany434
nineteenth century concerns over urban waste332–333
seventeenth-century Britain
household goods71–73
necessities76–78
standards of comfort292–293
urban consumption
importance192
rural communities compared196–197
Therapeutic drugs
early modern Europe240
global exchange140–142
Tobacco
determinants of ill-being659
smoking in 17th century Britain
disposable goods75–76
first mass-consumption75
luxury consumption73–74
mercantile impact74
transatlantic consumption117
Townssee Urban consumption
Transatlantic consumption
changing profiles of consumers119–121
commodification113–114
growth in importance of economic history112–113
importance111–112
Indian cotton161–163
possibilities for future study124–125
relationship between consumption and production122–124
slave trade115–119
‘staples theory’114–115
sugar136
therapeutic and recreational drugs140–142
Transport
access to energy71, 316–318
disposability of MSW through the 1980s334
impact on eating habits380
location of department stores279
modern Japan491
Nazi Germany435
role of cities192
rural consumption of luxuries176
standards of living214
status237
waste disposal331, 334
United States
children's consumption589–592
chronological preoccupations with ‘consumer society’3–6
consumer activism404–406
consumer movements512–514
consumer regimes
challenge to individual autonomy410–411
dilemmas for consumers413–414
Government boycotts409–410
lack of study408–409
protective measures414–416
public spending411–412
shaping of consumer practices412–413
decline of highbrow taste565
energy consumption320
everyday life536
fashion influences621–622
history of retail trade
department stores271
impact on urban environment280
part of global exchange284
self-service and supermarkets274–275
history of thrift361–367
impact of transatlantic trade119–121
impact on pre-colonial East Africa103–104
increasing influence on lifestyle563
luxury goods178
politics of consumption416–417
shift in perspective of consumption2
(p. 695) shift to ‘consumer ethic’357
standards of comfort293
use of credit360–361
waste production327, 336–337
youth's golden age611–613
Urban consumptionsee also Rural consumption
clothing201–205
debates over luxury goods181
department stores
origins and development270–272
early modern Europe
mobility between country and city237–244
the Priuli family in Venice229–230
energy311–312, 318
food and drink
limited data206–207
rural communities compared195–196
suburban eating habits383–384
history of retail trade269–270
impact of China's growth342–343
impact of retail shopping278–280
importance192
importance of fashion622–628
lifestyle
Bourdieu's approach558–559
distinctiveness and social change563
modern Japan
early modern consumption486
wartime modernity497–498
nationalist China424
ownership of goods197–201
rural consumption compared195–197
Soviet Union456
waste
disposability of MSW through the 1980s334–341
nineteenth century concerns331–334
Waste
defined328
disposability
MSW through the 1980s334–341
nineteenth century concerns331–334
nineteenth century concerns over urban waste331–334
impact of China's growth342–343
market reform342
MSW343
overview341–342
recycling343–346
Ming China52–53
pre-modern human and animal waste329–331
shift in perspective of consumption1
significance326–329
topics for further examination344–345
Well-being
alternative approaches
inventory of goods approach657–660
social science research662–664
state of mind660–662
choice665–666
citizenship and the home582
comfort and convenience290–291
comparison666
conflicting truisms655–656
disciplined bodywork638
equal distribution of pleasures669–670
ethical considerations667–669
growth667
limiting consumption211–213
nationalist China432
novelty666
picture of ‘normality’650
saving and spending349, 367
standard assumptions653–655
women's responsibility for family573
Youth consumptionsee also Children's consumption
Africa101
golden age of consumerism611–617
impact of films607
impact of gang culture603–606
nationalist China427
presentation of self606–607
Renaissance Italy253
self and body645
significance602–603
Soviet Union462
towards mass consumption609–611