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date: 25 February 2020

(p. 605) References

(p. 605) References

Middleton Criticism

Alwes, Derek B. (2008), ‘The Secular Morality of Middleton's City Comedies’, Comparative Drama, 42.2: 101–19.Find this resource:

Anglesey, Natalie (2008), review of The Revenger's Tragedy (Royal Exchange Theatre), The Stage, 3 June, http://www.thestage.co.uk/reviews/review.php/20894/the-revengers-tragedy.

Asp, Carolyn (1974), A Study of Thomas Middleton's Tragicomedies (Salzburg: Institut für Englische. Sprache und Literatur).Find this resource:

Astington, John (2007), ‘Visual Texts: Thomas Middleton and Prints’, in Gary Taylor and John Lavagnino (eds.), Thomas Middleton and Early Modern Textual Culture (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 226–46.Find this resource:

Baines, Barbara (1973), The Lust Motif in the Plays of Thomas Middleton (Salzburg: Institut für Englische Sprache und Literatur).Find this resource:

Bald, R. C. (1937), ‘The Chronology of Middleton's Plays’, Modern Language Review, 32: 37–9.Find this resource:

——  (ed.) (1938), Hengist, King of Kent; or The Mayor of Queenborough, by Thomas Middleton (New York: Scribner).Find this resource:

Barker, Richard Hindry (1958), Thomas Middleton (New York: Columbia University Press).Find this resource:

Barker, Roberta, and David Nicol (2004), ‘Does Beatrice Joanna Have a Subtext? The Changeling on the London Stage’, Early Modern Literary Studies, 10.1: 1–43.Find this resource:

Bate, Jonathan (2008a), ‘Dampit and Moll’, TLS: Times Literary Supplement (25 April), 5482: 7.Find this resource:

——  (2008b), ‘The Mad Worlds of Thomas Middleton’, Times Literary Supplement, 13 April.Find this resource:

Bentley, Gerald Eades (1941–68), The Jacobean and Caroline Stage, 7 vols. (Oxford: Clarendon Press).Find this resource:

Bergeron, David (1983), ‘Middleton's Moral Landscape: A Chaste Maid in Cheapside and The Triumphs of Truth’, in Kenneth Friedenreich (ed.), ‘Accompaninge the players’: Essays Celebrating Thomas Middleton, 1580–1980 (New York: AMS Press).Find this resource:

Billington, Michael (2008), ‘The Revenger's Tragedy, Olivier, London’, The Guardian, 8.8 June: 38.Find this resource:

Bly, Mary (2010), ‘Puritan Geographies: Mapping and Mocking the Religious Body’, in Roze Hentschell and Amanda Bailey (eds.), Masculinity and the Metropolis of Vice, 1550–1650 (Basingstoke: Palgrave), 89–113.Find this resource:

Briggs, Julia (1990), ‘Middleton's Forgotten Tragedy: Hengist, King of Kent’, Review of English Studies, ns 41: 479–95.Find this resource:

——  (2000), ‘New Times and Old Stories: Middleton's Hengist’, in D. G. Scragg and Carole Weinberg (eds.), Literary Appropriations of the Anglo-Saxons from the Thirteenth to the Twentieth Century (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), 107–21.Find this resource:

Brissenden, Alan (ed.) (1968), A Chaste Maid in Cheapside (New York: W. W. Norton).Find this resource:

——  (1981), ‘Jacobean Tragedy and the Dance’, Huntington Library Quarterly, 44.4: 249–62.Find this resource:

Brittin, Norman A. (1972), Thomas Middleton (New York: Twayne).Find this resource:

(p. 606) Bromham, A. A. (1984), ‘The Contemporary Significance of The Old Law’, Studies in English Literature, 24: 327–39.Find this resource:

——  (1986), ‘The Tragedy of Peace: Political Meaning in Women Beware Women’, Studies in English Literature, 1500–1900, 26.2: 309–29.Find this resource:

——  (1990), ‘Thomas Middleton's Plays, 1619–1624: Contemporary Concerns Apocalyptic Consciousness’, in A. A. Bromham and Zara Bruzzi (eds.), ‘The Changeling’ and the Years of Crisis, 1619–1624: A Hieroglyph of Britain (London: Pinter).Find this resource:

——  and Zara Bruzzi (eds.) (1990), ‘The Changeling’ and the Years of Crisis, 1619–1624: A Hieroglyph of Britain (London: Pinter).Find this resource:

Brown, Peter (2008), review of The Revenger's Tragedy (National Theatre), London Theatre Guide—Online, retrieved 5 June 2008, http://www.londontheatre.co.uk/londontheatre/reviews/revengerstragedy08.htm.

Brunning, Alizon (2007), ‘City Comedy’, in Andrew Hiscock and Lisa Hopkins (eds.), Teaching Shakespeare and Early Modern Dramatists (Basingstoke: Palgrave).Find this resource:

Bruster, Douglas (2007), ‘Introduction to The Changeling’, in Gary Taylor and John Lavagnino (gen. eds.), Middleton: The Collected Works (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 1632–6.Find this resource:

Bullen, A. H. (ed.) (1885), The Works of Thomas Middleton, 8 vols. (London: John C. Nimmo.)Find this resource:

Burnett, Mark Thornton (2006), ‘The Changeling and Masters and Servants’, in Garrett A. Sullivan, Jr., Patrick Cheney, and Andrew Hadfield (eds.), Early Modern English Drama: A Critical Companion (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 298–308.Find this resource:

Chakravorty, Swapan (1996), Society and Politics in the Plays of Thomas Middleton (Oxford: Clarendon Press).Find this resource:

——  (2007), ‘Canon and Chronology: “The Penniless Parliament of Threadbare Poets” ’, in Thomas Middleton and Early Modern Textual Culture: A Companion to the Collected Works (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 337–45.Find this resource:

Chambers, E. K. (1923), The Elizabethan Stage, 4 vols. (Oxford: Clarendon Press).Find this resource:

Christian, M. G. (1935), ‘Middleton's Acquaintance with the Merrie Conceited Jests of George Peele’, PMLA 50: 753–60.Find this resource:

Cohen, Ralph Alan (2007), ‘Introduction to Your Five Gallants’, Gary Taylor and John Lavagnino (gen. eds.), Middleton: The Collected Works (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 594–7.Find this resource:

Cook, Patrick J. (2007), ‘Adapting The Revenger's Tragedy’, Literature Film Quarterly, 35: 85–91.Find this resource:

Cordeiro, William (2005), ‘Cruel and Unusual Pleasures’, review of The Revenger's Tragedy (Red Bull Theatre), Off Off Online, 9 December, http://www.offoffonline.com/archives.php?id=570.

Covatta, Anthony (1973), Thomas Middleton's City Comedies (Cranbury, NJ: Associated University Presses).Find this resource:

Daileader, Celia R. (1998), Eroticism on the Renaissance Stage: Transcendence, Desire, and the Limits of the Visible (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).Find this resource:

——  (2007), ‘The Courtesan Re-Visited: Thomas Middleton, Pietro Aretino, and Sex-Phobic Criticism’, in Michele Marrapodi (ed.), Italian Culture in the Drama of Shakespeare and his Contemporaries: Rewriting, Remaking, Refashioning (Aldershot: Ashgate Press).Find this resource:

——  (2008), ‘Middleton's Vindication of Women’, theatre programme (The Royal National Theatre, London, May), 14–17.Find this resource:

Danson, Lawrence, and Ivo Kamps (2007), ‘Introduction to The Phoenix’, in Gary Taylor and John Lavagnino (gen. eds.), Middleton: The Collected Works (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 91–4.Find this resource:

(p. 607) Darby, Trudi L. (1997), ‘Cervantes in England: The Influence of Golden-Age Prose Fiction on Jacobean Drama, c.1615–1625’, Bulletin of Hispanic Studies, 79: 425–41.Find this resource:

——  (2006), ‘The Black Knight's Festival Book? Thomas Middleton's A Game at Chess’, in Alexander Samson (ed.), The Spanish Match: Prince Charles's Journey to Madrid, 1623 (Aldershot: Ashgate), 173–88.Find this resource:

——  and Alexander Samson (2009), ‘Cervantes on the Jacobean Stage’, in J. A. G. Ardilla (ed.), The Cervantean Heritage (Oxford: Legenda), 206–22.Find this resource:

Dawson, Anthony B. (1987), ‘Women Beware Women and the Economy of Rape’, Studies in English Literature, 1500–1900, 27: 303–20.Find this resource:

——  (1993), ‘Giving the Finger: Puns and Transgression in The Changeling’, in A. L. Magnussen and C. E. McGee (eds.), The Elizabethan Theatre XII (Toronto: P. D. Meany, 1993), 93–112.Find this resource:

Dollimore, Jonathan (1984), Radical Tragedy: Religion, Ideology, and Power in the Drama of Shakespeare and his Contemporaries (Chicago: University of Chicago Press).Find this resource:

——  (2004), Radical Tragedy: Religion, Ideology and Power in the Drama of Shakespeare and his Contemporaries, 3rd edn. (Basingstoke: Palgrave).Find this resource:

——  (2010), Radical Tragedy: Religion, Ideology and Power in the Drama of Shakespeare and his Contemporaries, 3rd edn. reprint (New York: Palgrave).Find this resource:

Dutton, Richard (2004), ‘Thomas Middleton's A Game at Chess: A Case Study’, in Jane Milling and Peter Thomson (eds.), The Cambridge History of British Theatre, vol. i (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).Find this resource:

Dyce, Alexander (ed.) (1840), The Works of Thomas Middleton now first collected, with some account of the author, and notes, 5 vols. (London: E. Lumley).Find this resource:

Eccles, Mark (1931), ‘Middleton's Birth and Education’, Review of English Studies, 7: 431–41.Find this resource:

Eliot, T. S. (1932a), Essays on Elizabethan Drama (New York: Harcourt Brace).Find this resource:

——  (1932b), ‘Thomas Middleton’, in Selected Essays, 1917–1932 (New York: Harcourt, Brace), 140–8.Find this resource:

——  (1934), Elizabethan Essays (London: Faber & Faber).Find this resource:

Ellis-Fermor, Una (1936), The Jacobean Drama: An Interpretation, 1st edn. (London: Methuen).Find this resource:

——  (1947), The Jacobean Drama: An Interpretation, 2nd edn. (London: Methuen).Find this resource:

——  (1953), The Jacobean Drama: An Interpretation, 3rd edn., rev. (London: Methuen).Find this resource:

——  (1958), The Jacobean Drama: An Interpretation, 4th edn. (London: Methuen).Find this resource:

——  (1965) The Jacobean Drama: An Interpretation, 4th edn., rev. (London: Methuen).Find this resource:

Engelberg, Edward (1990), ‘Tragic Blindness in The Changeling and Women Beware Women’, in R. V. Holdsworth (ed.), Three Jacobean Revenge Tragedies: A Casebook (Basingstoke: Palgrave), 186–95.Find this resource:

Engle, Lars (2008), ‘Oedipal Marlowe, Mimetic Middleton’, Modern Philology, 105.3: 417–36.Find this resource:

——  and Eric Rasmussen (2010), ‘Review Essay: The Oxford Middleton’, Shakespeare Quarterly, 61.2: 246–61.Find this resource:

Erne, Lukas (2010), ‘ “Our other Shakespeare”: Thomas Middleton and the Canon’, Modern Philology, 107: 493–505.Find this resource:

Evans, Robert C. (1987), ‘Women and the Meaning of The Revenger's Tragedy’, Postscript, 4: 65–73.Find this resource:

Ewbank, Inga-Stina (1991), ‘The Middle of Middleton’, in Murray Biggs (ed.), The Arts of Performance in Elizabethan and Early Stuart Drama: Essays for G. K. Hunter (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press), 156–72.Find this resource:

Feldmann, Doris, and Kurt Tetzeli von Rosador (2007), ‘Lost Plays: A Brief Account’, in Gary Taylor and John Lavagnino (eds.), The Collected Works of Thomas Middleton (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 328–33.Find this resource:

(p. 608) Flynn, Barbara (2010), Personal interview, 28 January.Find this resource:

Forman, Valerie (2001), ‘Marked Angels: Counterfeits, Commodities, and The Roaring Girl’, Renaissance Quarterly, 54: 1531–60.Find this resource:

Friedenreich, Kenneth (1983), ‘Introduction: How to Read Middleton’, in Kenneth Friedenreich (ed.), ‘Accompaninge the Players’: Essays Celebrating Thomas Middleton, 1580–1980 (New York: AMS), 1–14.Find this resource:

Gardner, Lyn (2000), Review of The Roaring Girl, The Guardian. London, 6 December, http://www.guardian.co.uk/stage/2000/dec/theatrearts.features.Find this resource:

Godwin, Laura Grace (2008), ‘Revenge Backwards, and in Heels: Hamlet and The Revenger's Tragedy, England, Summer 2008’, Shakespeare Bulletin, 26.4: 115–31.Find this resource:

Golz, David (2002), ‘Playing Cards on the Early English Stage’, unpublished doctoral dissertation (University of Nevada-Reno).Find this resource:

Gordon, D. J. (1941), ‘Middleton's No Wit, No Help like a Woman's and Della Porta's La Sorella’, Review of English Studies, 17: 400–14.Find this resource:

Gossett, Suzanne (1984), ‘ “Best Men are Molded out of Faults”: Marrying the Rapist in Jacobean Drama’, English Literary Renaissance, 14.3: 305–27.Find this resource:

Hallett, Charles (1972), ‘Penitent Brothel, the Succubus and Parson's Resolution: A Reappraisal of Penitent's Position in Middleton's Canon’, Studies in Philology, 69: 72–3.Find this resource:

——  and Elaine S. Hallett (1980), ‘The Revenger's Tragedy’, in The Revenger's Madness: A Study of Revenge Tragedy Motifs (Lincoln, Nebr.: University of Nebraska Press).Find this resource:

Hand, Molly (2008), ‘ “Now is hell landed here upon the earth”: Renaissance Poverty and Witchcraft in Middleton's The Black Book’, Renaissance and Reformation/Renaissance et réforme, 31.1: 69–94.Find this resource:

Heinemann, Margot (1980), Puritanism and Theatre: Thomas Middleton and Opposition Drama under the Early Stuarts (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).Find this resource:

Heller, Herbert Jack (2000), Penitent Brothellers: Grace, Sexuality, and Genre in Thomas Middleton's City Comedies (Newark, Del.: University of Delaware Press).Find this resource:

Henning, Standish (ed.) (1965), A Mad World, My Masters (London: Edward Arnold).Find this resource:

Hillebrand, Harold (1927), ‘Thomas Middleton's The Viper's Brood’, Modern Language Notes, 42: 35–8.Find this resource:

Holdsworth, R. V. (1990), ‘Women Beware Women and The Changeling on the Stage’, in R. V. Holdsworth (ed.), Three Jacobean Revenge Tragedies (Basingstoke: Macmillan).Find this resource:

Holmes, David M. (1970), The Art of Thomas Middleton (Oxford: Clarendon Press).Find this resource:

Howard-Hill, T. H. (ed.) (1993), A Game At Chess (Manchester: Manchester University Press).Find this resource:

——  (1995), Middleton's ‘Vulgar Pasquin’: Essays on A Game at Chess (Newark, Del.: University of Delaware Press).Find this resource:

‘In Conversation: Greg Hersov, Artistic Director at the Royal Exchange, Talks to Jonathan Moore, Director of The Revenger's Tragedy’ (2008), The Revenger's Tragedy Programme (Manchester), unpaginated.Find this resource:

Ioppolo, Grace (1996), ‘Sexual Treason, Treasonous Sexuality, and the Eventful Politics of James I in Middleton's Hengist, King of Kent’, Ben Jonson Journal, 3: 87–107.Find this resource:

Jackson, MacDonald P. (1979), Studies in Attribution: Middleton and Shakespeare (Salzburg: Institut für Anglistik und Amerikanistik, Universität Salzburg).Find this resource:

——  (2007), ‘Introduction to The Revenger's Tragedy’, in Gary Taylor and John Lavagnino (gen. eds.), Middleton: The Collected Works (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 543–57.Find this resource:

Jones, Ann Rosalind, and Peter Stallybrass (2000), Renaissance Clothing and the Materials of Memory (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).Find this resource:

(p. 609) Jones-Davies, M. T., and Hoenselaars, Ton (2007), ‘Introduction to Masque of Cupids’, in Gary Taylor and John Lavagnino (gen. eds.), Middleton: The Collected Works (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 1027–33.Find this resource:

Jowett, John (1994), ‘Middleton's Song of Cupid’, Notes and Queries, 41: 66–70.Find this resource:

——  (ed.) (2004), William Shakespeare and Thomas Middleton: Timon of Athens (Oxford: Oxford World's Classics).Find this resource:

——  (2007a), ‘For Many of Your Companies: Middleton's Early Readers’, in Gary Taylor and John Lavagnino (gen. eds.), Thomas Middleton and Early Modern Textual Culture (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 286–327.Find this resource:

——  (ed.) (2007b), ‘Introduction to No Wit/Help Like a Woman's; Or, The Almanac’, in Thomas Middleton: Collected Works, gen. eds. Gary Taylor and John Lavagnino (Oxford: Clarendon Press), 779–832.Find this resource:

——  (ed.) (2007c), More Dissemblers Besides Women, in Gary Taylor and John Lavagnino (eds.), The Collected Works of Thomas Middleton (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 1034–7.Find this resource:

——  (ed.) (2007c), ‘Textual Introduction to Timon of Athens’, in Gary Taylor and John Lavagnino (eds.), Thomas Middleton and Early Modern Textual Culture: A Companion to the Collected Works (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 704–11.Find this resource:

Kathman, David (forthcoming 2011), ‘The Boys’ Plays and the Boy Players’, in Suzanne Gossett (ed.), Thomas Middleton in Context (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).Find this resource:

Kitch, Aaron (2007), ‘The Character of Credit and the Problem of Belief in Middleton's City Comedies’, Studies in English Literature, 1500–1900, 47.2: 403–26.Find this resource:

Lamb, Charles (1808), Specimens of English Dramatic Poets. Who Lived about the time of Shakspeare (London: Longman).Find this resource:

——  (1893), Specimens of English Dramatic Poets Who Lived about the Time of Shakespeare (London: J. M. Dent).Find this resource:

Lancashire, Anne (1984), ‘The Emblematic Castle in Shakespeare and Middleton’, in G. C. Gray (ed.), Mirror Up to Shakespeare: Essays in Honour of G. R. Hibbard (Toronto: University of Toronto Press), 223–41.Find this resource:

Leggatt, Alexander (1999), ‘Middleton, Michaelmas Term’, in Introduction to English Renaissance Comedy (Manchester: Manchester University Press), 89–108.Find this resource:

Leinwand, Theodore B. (2007), ‘Introduction to Michaelmas Term’, in Gary Taylor and John Lavagnino (gen. eds.), The Collected Works of Thomas Middleton (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 334–5.Find this resource:

Levin, Richard (1971), The Multiple Plot in Renaissance Drama (Chicago: University of Chicago Press).Find this resource:

Lieblein, Leonore (1977), ‘The Lessons of Feigning in A Mad World, My Masters’, Modern Language Studies, 8: 23–32.Find this resource:

Leonidas, Eric (2007), ‘The School of the World: Trading on Wit in Middleton's Trick to Catch the Old One’, Early Modern Literary Studies, 12.3: 1–27.Find this resource:

Love, Harold (2007), ‘Thomas Middleton: Oral Culture and the Manuscript Economy’, in Gary Taylor and John Lavagnino (gen. eds.), Thomas Middleton and Early Modern Textual Culture (Oxford: Oxford University Press): 98–109.Find this resource:

McCanles, Michael (1983), ‘The Moral Dialectic of Middleton's Women Beware Women’, in Kenneth Friedenreich (ed.), ‘Accompaninge the players’: Essays Celebrating Thomas Middleton, 1580–1980 (New York: AMS Press), 203–18.Find this resource:

(p. 610) McGee, C. E. (2007), ‘Introduction to The World Tossed at Tennis’, in Gary Taylor and John Lavagnino (gen. eds.), Middleton: The Collected Works (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 1405–8.Find this resource:

McLuskie, Kathleen E., and David Bevington (eds.) (1999), Plays on Women (Manchester: Manchester University Press).Find this resource:

McMillin, Scott (2007), ‘Middleton's Theatres’, in Gary Taylor and John Lavagnino (eds.), The Collected Works of Thomas Middleton (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 74–87.Find this resource:

McMullan, Gordon (2008), ‘ “Plenty of blood. That's the only writing”: (Mis)representing Jacobean Tragedy in Turn-of-the-Century Cinema’, La Licorne, December, http://shakespeare.edel.univ-poitiers.fr/index.php?id=146.

Maginnis, Tara (2008), ‘1999 UK/Paris Costume Tour Pictures’, The Costumer's Manifesto, retrieved 26 June 2008, http://costumes.org/travel/00pages/uktour/uktour_p27.htm.

Manners, Katherine (2010), Personal interview, 10 February.Find this resource:

Martin, Matthew R. (2001), Between Theater and Philosophy: Skepticism in the Major City Comedies of Ben Jonson and Thomas Middleton (Newark, Del.: University of Delaware Press).Find this resource:

Massai, Sonia (2008), ‘Review of Thomas Middleton: Collected Works and Thomas Middleton and Early Modern Culture’, Cahiers élisabéthains, 74: 85–7.Find this resource:

Masten, Jeffrey (2007), ‘Introduction to An/The Old Law’, in Gary Taylor and John Lavagnino (gen. eds.), Middleton: The Collected Works (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 1331–4.Find this resource:

Mehl, Dieter (2009), ‘A Multivocal Game of Editing: The Collected Works of Thomas Middleton’, Archiv für das Studium der neueren Sprachen und Literaturen, 246.1: 127–36.Find this resource:

Mount, David B. (1991), ‘The “[Un]reclaimed Forme” of Middleton's A Trick to Catch the Old One’, Studies in English Literature, 31.2: 259–72.Find this resource:

Mulholland, Paul (2007), ‘Canon and Chronology: “The Patient Man and the Honest Whore” ’, in Thomas Middleton and Early Modern Textual Culture: A Companion to the Collected Works (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 351–3.Find this resource:

Mullaney, Steven (1994), ‘Mourning and Misogyny: Hamlet, The Revenger's Tragedy, and the Final Progress of Elizabeth I, 1600–1607’, Shakespeare Quarterly, 45.2: 139–62.Find this resource:

Munro, Ian (2001), ‘Making Publics: Secrecy and Publication in A Game at Chess’, Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England, 14: 207–26.Find this resource:

Munro, Lucy (2004), ‘A Neglected Allusion to Pericles and Hengist, King of Kent in Performance’, Notes and Queries, 51: 307–10.Find this resource:

Neill, Michael (1996), ‘Bastardy, Counterfeiting and Misogyny in The Revenger's Tragedy’, SEL: Studies in English Literature, 1500–1900, 36: 397–416.Find this resource:

——  (1997), Issues of Death: Mortality and Identity in English Renaissance Tragedy (Oxford: Clarendon Press).Find this resource:

——  (2008), ‘Old Dad Dead?’, London Review of Books, 30.23: 23–8.Find this resource:

Newman, Karen (2006), ‘A Chaste Maid in Cheapside and London’, in Garrett A. Sullivan, Jr., Patrick Cheney, and Andrew Hadfield (eds.), Early Modern English Drama: A Critical Companion (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 237–47.Find this resource:

O’Callaghan, Michelle (2009), Thomas Middleton: Renaissance Dramatist (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press).Find this resource:

O’Connor, Marion (2007), ‘Textual Introduction to The Witch’, in Gary Taylor and John Lavagnino (eds.), Thomas Middleton and Early Modern Textual Culture: A Companion to the Collected Works (Oxford: Clarendon Press), 995–1009.Find this resource:

Oliphant, H. C. (1927), The Plays of Beaumont and Fletcher; An Attempt to Determine their Respective Shares and the Shares of Others (New Haven: Yale University Press).Find this resource:

(p. 611) Panek, Jennifer (2003), ‘The Mother as Bawd in The Revenger's Tragedy and A Mad World, My Masters’, SEL: Studies in English Literature, 1500–1900, 43.2: 415–37.Find this resource:

——  (2004), Widows and Suitors in Early Modern English Comedy (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).Find this resource:

Parker, R. B. (1965), ‘Middleton's Experiments with Comedy and Judgment’, repr. in John Russell Brown and Bernard Harris (eds.), Jacobean Theatre (New York: St Martin's).Find this resource:

——  (1969), ‘Introduction’, in R. B. Parker (ed.), A Chaste Maid in Cheapside (London: Methuen).Find this resource:

Parr, Anthony (2007), ‘Introduction to Honourable Entertainments and An Invention’, in Thomas Middleton: The Collected Works, gen. eds. Gary Taylor and John Lavagnino (Oxford: Clarendon), 1431–4.Find this resource:

Paster, Gale Kern (1973), ‘The City in Plautus and Middleton’, Renaissance Drama, 6: 29–44.Find this resource:

——  (1985), The Idea of the City in the Age of Shakespeare (Athens, Ga.: University of Georgia Press).Find this resource:

——  (1993), The Body Embarrassed: Drama and the Disciplines of Shame in Early Modern England (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press).Find this resource:

Patterson, Annabel (2007), ‘Introduction to The Changeling’, in Thomas Middleton: Collected Works, gen. eds. Gary Taylor and John Lavagnino (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 1632–6.Find this resource:

The Revenger's Tragedy, Olivier, London’, The Guardian, 8 June 2008, 38.Find this resource:

Rhodes, Neil (2007), ‘Introduction to The Owl's Almanac’, in Thomas Middleton: The Collected Works, gen. eds. Gary Taylor and John Lavagnino (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 1271–4.Find this resource:

Ribner, Irving (1962), Jacobean Tragedy: The Quest for Moral Order (New York: Barnes and Noble).Find this resource:

Ricks, Christopher (1960), ‘The Moral and Poetic Structure of The Changeling’, Essays in Criticism, 10.3: 290–306.Find this resource:

Roberts, Marilyn (1985), ‘A Preliminary Check-List of Productions of Thomas Middleton's Plays’, Research Opportunities in Renaissance Drama, 28: 37–61.Find this resource:

Rooth, Liv (2010), Personal interview, 16 February.Find this resource:

Rowe, George E. (1979), Thomas Middleton and the New Comedy Tradition (Lincoln, Nebr.: University of Nebraska Press).Find this resource:

Saccio, Peter (2007), ‘Textual Introduction to A Mad World, My Masters’, in Gary Taylor and John Lavagnino (gen. eds.), Thomas Middleton and Early Modern Textual Culture (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 586–91.Find this resource:

Schoenbaum, Samuel (1955), Middleton's Tragedies: A Critical Study (New York: Columbia University Press).Find this resource:

Shand, G. B. (1983), ‘The Elizabethan Aim of The Wisdom of Solomon Paraphrased’, in Kenneth Friedenreich (ed.), ‘Accompaninge the players’: Essays Celebrating Thomas Middleton, 1580–1980 (New York: AMS), 67–77.Find this resource:

——  (2007a), ‘Introduction to The Black Book’, in Thomas Middleton: The Collected Works, gen. eds. Gary Taylor and John Lavagnino (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 204–6.Find this resource:

——  (2007b), ‘Introduction to The Ghost of Lucrece’, in Gary Taylor and John Lavagnino (gen. eds.), Middleton: The Collected Works (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 1985–8.Find this resource:

Shewring, Margaret, and J. R. Mulryne (2007), ‘Dancing towards Death: Masques and Entertainments in London and Florence as Precedents for Thomas Middleton's Women Beware Women’, Dance Research: Journal of the Society for Dance Research, 25.2: 134–43.Find this resource:

(p. 612) Shuger, Debora (2007), ‘Introduction to The Wisdom of Solomon Paraphrased’, in Thomas Middleton: The Collected Works, gen. eds. Gary Taylor and John Lavagnino (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 1915–19.Find this resource:

Simkin, Stevie (2001), ‘Introduction’, in Steve Simkin (ed.), Revenge Tragedy, New Casebooks Series: Drama (Basingstoke: Palgrave), 1–23.Find this resource:

Stachniewski, John (1990), ‘Calvinist Psychology in Middleton's Tragedies’, in Roger V. Holdsworth (ed.), Three Jacobean Revenge Tragedies: A Casebook (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan), 226–46.Find this resource:

Stage, Kelly J. (2009), ‘The Roaring Girl's London Spaces’, SEL: Studies in English Literature, 49: 417–36.Find this resource:

Stallybrass, Peter (1991), ‘Reading the Body: The Revenger's Tragedy and the Jacobean Theatre of Consumption’, in David Scott Kastan and Peter Stallybrass (eds.), Staging the Renaissance: Reinterpretations of Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama (New York: Routledge), 210–20.Find this resource:

——  and Ann Rosalind Jones (2001), ‘Fetishizing the Glove in Renaissance Europe’, Critical Inquiry, 28.1: 114–32.Find this resource:

Steen, Sara Jayne (1993), Ambrosia in an Earthen Vessel: Three Centuries of Audience and Reader Response to the Works of Thomas Middleton (New York: AMS Press).Find this resource:

Stenger, Jr., Harold L. (1968), ‘The Language of Middleton's Tragic Vision’, in Katherine S. Van Eerde and Nelvin L. Vos (eds.), Muhlenberg Essays in Honor of the College Centennial (Allentown, Pa.: Muhlenberg College), 33–57.Find this resource:

Sugimura, N. K. (2006), ‘Changelings and The Changeling’, Essays in Criticism, 56.3: 241–63.Find this resource:

Sullivan, Ceri (2007), ‘Thomas Middleton's View of Public Utility’, Review of English Studies, 58.234: 162–74.Find this resource:

Taylor, Gary (1987), ‘The Canon and Chronology of Shakespeare's Plays’, in William Shakespeare: A Textual Companion (Oxford: Clarendon Press), 69–144.Find this resource:

——  (1989), Reinventing Shakespeare: A Cultural History from the Restoration to the Present (New York: Weidenfeld and Nicolson).Find this resource:

——  (1993), ‘The Renaissance and the End of Editing’, in George Bornstein and Ralph G. Williams (eds.), Palimpsest: Textual Theory and the Humanities (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press), 121–50.Find this resource:

——  (1994a), ‘Bardicide’, in Tetsuo Kishi et al. (eds.), Shakespeare and Cultural Traditions: The Proceedings of the International Shakespeare Association World Congress, Tokyo, 1991 (Newark, Del.: University of Delaware Press), 333–49.Find this resource:

——  (1994b), ‘Forms of Opposition: Shakespeare and Middleton’, English Literary Renaissance, 24, 283–314.Find this resource:

——  (2000a), Castration: An Abbreviated History of Western Manhood (New York: Routledge).Find this resource:

——  (2000b), ‘Thomas Middleton, Thomas Dekker, and The Bloody Banquet’, Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America, 94: 197–233.Find this resource:

——  (2001a), ‘Divine [ ]sences’, Shakespeare Survey 54: 13–30.Find this resource:

——  (2001b), ‘Gender, Hunger, Horror: The History and Significance of The Bloody Banquet’, Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies, 1: 1–45.Find this resource:

——  (2001c), ‘Thomas Middleton, The Nice Valour, and the Court of James I’, Court Historian, 6: 1–36.Find this resource:

——  (2002), ‘Middleton and Rowley—and Heywood: The Old Law and New Attribution Technologies’, Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America, 96: 208–14.Find this resource:

——  (2004), ‘Thomas Middleton, The Spanish Gypsy, and Multiple Collaboration’, in Brian Boy (ed.), Words That Count: Essays on Early Modern Authorship (Newark, Del.: University of Delaware Press).Find this resource:

(p. 613) ——  (2007a), ‘A Game at Chess: General Textual Introduction’, in Thomas Middleton and Early Modern Textual Culture: A Companion to the Collected Works (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 712–73.Find this resource:

——  (ed.) (2007b), ‘Introduction to A Game at Chess: An Early Form, in Thomas Middleton: The Collected Works, gen. eds. Gary Taylor and John Lavagnino (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 1773–824.Find this resource:

——  (2007c), ‘Introduction to A Game at Chess: A Later Form’, in Thomas Middleton: The Collected Works, gen. eds. Gary Taylor and John Lavagnino (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 1825–9.Find this resource:

——  (2007d), ‘Introduction to The Widow’, in Thomas Middleton: The Collected Works, gen. eds. Gary Taylor and John Lavagnino (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 1074–7.Find this resource:

——  (2007e), ‘Occasional Poems, 1619-25’, in Gary Taylor and John Lavagnino (gen. eds.), Thomas Middleton: Collected Works (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 1886–89.Find this resource:

——  (2007f), ‘The Order of Persons’, in Thomas Middleton and Early Modern Textual Culture: A Companion to the Collected Works (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 31–79.Find this resource:

——  (2007g), ‘Thomas Middleton: Lives and Afterlives’, in Thomas Middleton: The Collected Works, gen. eds. Gary Taylor and John Lavagnino (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 25–58.Find this resource:

——  (2007h), ‘Introduction to The Nice Valour’, in Gary Taylor and John Lavagnino (gen. eds.), Thomas Middleton and Early Modern Textual Culture: A Companion to the Collected Works (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 1679–83.Find this resource:

——  (2007i), ‘Introduction to The Widow’, in Gary Taylor and John Lavagnino (gen. eds.), Thomas Middleton and Early Modern Textual Culture: A Companion to the Collected Works (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 1074–7.Find this resource:

——  (2008a), ‘Historicism, Presentism and Time: Middleton's The Spanish Gypsy and A Game at Chess’, SEDERI 18: 147–70.Find this resource:

——  (2008b), ‘Middleton, Shakespeare and Caravaggio’, in The Revenger's Tragedy programme, Royal National Theatre, June (reprinted as ‘A Mad World’, The Guardian, 7 June 2008), http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2008/jun/07/theatre.stage.

——  and Andrew J. Sabol with John Jowett and Liz Ketterer (2007), ‘Middleton, Music, and Dance’, in Gary Taylor and John Lavagnino (gen. eds.), Thomas Middleton and Early Modern Textual Culture (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 119–81.Find this resource:

——  and John Jowett (1993), Shakespeare Reshaped, 1606–1623 (Oxford: Oxford University Press).Find this resource:

——  Paul Mulholland, and MacD. P. Jackson (1999), ‘Thomas Middleton, Lording Barry, and The Family of Love’, Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America, 93: 213–42.Find this resource:

Taylor, Neil, and Bryan Loughrey (1984), ‘Middleton's Chess Strategies in Women Beware Women’, SEL: Studies in English Literature, 1500–1900, 24.2: 341–54.Find this resource:

Thomson, Leslie (2003), ‘ “As proper a woman as any in Cheap”: Women in Shops on the Early Modern Stage’, Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England, 16: 145–61.Find this resource:

Tomlinson, T. B (1960), ‘The Morality of Revenge: Tourneur's Critics’, Essays in Criticism, 10: 137–47.Find this resource:

Tricomi, Albert H. (1989), ‘Middleton's Women Beware Women as Anticourt Drama’, Modern Language Studies, 19.2: 65–77.Find this resource:

Vickers, Brian (2002), Shakespeare Co-Author (Oxford: Oxford University Press).Find this resource:

Wall, Wendy (2007), ‘Introduction to “Microcynicyon” ’, in Thomas Middleton: The Collected Works, gen. eds. Gary Taylor and John Lavagnino (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 1970–73.Find this resource:

(p. 614) Walter, Harriet (2010), Personal e-mail, 28 November.Find this resource:

Weiss, Adrian (2007), ‘Introduction to The Nightingale and the Ant and Father Hubburd's Tales’, in Thomas Middleton: The Collected Works, gen. eds. Gary Taylor and John Lavagnino (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 149–54.Find this resource:

Wells, Stanley (1978), ‘The Revenger's Tragedy Revived’, in G. R. Hibbard (ed.), The Elizabethan Theatre VI: Papers given at the Sixth International Conference on Elizabethan Theatre held at the University of Waterloo, Ontario, in July 1975 (London: Macmillan), 115–16.Find this resource:

White, Martin (1992), Middleton and Tourneur (Basingstoke: Palgrave).Find this resource:

Wilds, Lillian (1976), ‘The Revenger as Dramatist: A Study of the Character-as-Dramatist in The Revenger's Tragedy’, Rocky Mountain Review of Language and Literature, 30: 113–22.Find this resource:

Williams, William Proctor (2009), ‘Thomas Middleton’, Notes & Queries, 56.1: 145–8.Find this resource:

Wiseman, Susan (2007), ‘Introduction to The Nice Valour’, in Thomas Middleton: The Collected Works, gen. eds. Gary Taylor and John Lavagnino (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 1679–82.Find this resource:

Woodbridge, Linda (2007), ‘Introduction to A Chaste Maid in Cheapside’, in Thomas Middleton: The Collected Works, gen. eds. Gary Taylor and John Lavagnino (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 907–11.Find this resource:

Yachnin, Paul (1986), ‘The Significance of Two Allusions in Middleton's Phoenix’, Notes and Queries, 33.231: 3: 375–7.Find this resource:

——  (1987), ‘A Game at Chess: Thomas Middleton's “Praise of Folly” ’, Modern Language Quarterly, 48.2: 107–23.Find this resource:

——  (1997), Stage-Wrights: Shakespeare, Jonson, Middleton, and the Making of Theatrical Value (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press).Find this resource:

——  (1999), ‘Scandalous Trades: Middleton's The Witch, the “Populuxe” Market, and the Politics of Theatre’, Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England, 12: 218–35.Find this resource:

Yates, Louise (2010), Personal interview, 8 March.Find this resource:

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