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date: 21 May 2019

(p. x) List of Figures

(p. x) List of Figures

  1. 2.1 Stylized relationships between the major categories of business groups 18

  2. 2.2 Archetypal structure of a diversified business group 21

  3. 2.3 Archetypal structure of a pyramidal business group 22

  4. 2.4 Emerging organization model of diversified business groups 60

  5. 4.1 Types of business groups in Japan, 1937 99

  6. 5.1 How horizontal and vertical keiretsu interconnect 137

  7. 5.2 CONCOR partitioning of 259 Japanese firms, 1978 139

  8. 5.3 Trends in cross‐shareholding within Japan's big six horizontal groups, 1987–2000 148

  9. 6.1 Diversification of the top thirty chaebols, 1987–2006 168

  10. 6.2 Ownership structure of the Samsung group, 2006 172

  11. 7.1 Density of operation and ownership networks of top 100 Taiwanese business groups, 1973–98 195

  12. 7.2 Ownership composition of group firms by year, 1988–98 197

  13. 7.3 Patenting over time by the 500 largest firms in Korea and Taiwan, 1992–2000 200

  14. 7.4 Investment and operating (buyer–supplier) ties among UMC groupand TSMC group affiliates, 1998 203

  15. 7.5 Advertising intensity for listed firms over time, 1995–2005 204

  16. 8.1 Trend in the number of business groups by ownership types (% in total) in China, 2000–8 213

  17. 10.1 The Singaporean business groups, 2006 272

  18. 10.2 Cross‐ownership within the OCBC group, 2006 284

  19. 10.3 Interlocking directorates within a family‐controlled business group: OCBC, 2006 285

  20. 11.1 Share of group‐affiliated firms in total assets, 1991–2006 300

  21. (p. xi) 11.2 Group‐level concentration ratios in top twenty groups, 1939–2006 303

  22. 11.3 Return on assets and market to book value ratio for Indian stand‐alone firms and group affiliates, 1991–2006 316

  23. 12.1 Business groups in Argentina: Origins and evolution 331

  24. 12.2 Business groups in Argentina: Diversification, main business sectors, 1990 338

  25. 12.3 Business groups hierarchical structure: Two cases 342

  26. 12.4 Business groups in Argentina: Diversification, main business sectors, 1997–2000 343

  27. 12.5 Business groups in Argentina: Diversification, main business sectors, 2007 345

  28. 12.6 New development of organizations: Business groups, 2002–7 349

  29. 14.1 Family business and group affiliation of Chilean listed companies, 2006 398

  30. 14.2 The Angelini group, 2007 418

  31. 14.3 The Luksic group, 2007 419

  32. 15.1 Changes in Alfa's business activities and principal subsidiaries 435

  33. 15.2 Hierarchical structure of Carso, 2006 437

  34. 15.3 Hierarchical structure of Grupo Bimbo, 2006 445

  35. 15.4 The executive committee of Grupo Bimbo, 2006 451

  36. 16.1 Evolution of business groups in Israel, 1950–90s: Historical milestones 462

  37. 16.2 Number of groups (right axis) and their share in total stock‐market capitalization (left axis), 1996–2006 475

  38. 16.3 The market share of the ten largest families, 1990s 476

  39. 16.4 The IDB pyramid, 2006 (publicly traded companies only) 477

  40. 16.5 Sample distribution by industry, 1995–2005 478

  41. 17.1 Concentration and diversification of the fifty largest economic players in Turkey, 2005 498

  42. 17.2 Extent of industry diversification of the fifty largest economic players, 2005 499

  43. 17.3 Part of a pyramidal ownership structure of the Koç group, 2007 512

  44. 17.4 Organizational structure of the Koç group, 2007 514

  45. 18.1 Russians on the Forbes list and Russia's stock market, 2002–8 541

  46. (p. xii) 19.1 Anglo American after restructuring, 2006 557

  47. 19.2 Rembrandt's structure before 2000 561

  48. 19.3 Rembrandt's structure after 2000 561

  49. 21.1 Great pyramids of the world 605

  50. 21.2 A stylized Anglo‐American corporation 606

  51. 21.3 A stylized pyramidal business group 607

  52. 23.1 Three types of diversified business groups 654

  53. 24.1 Determinants of business group configuration 678

  54. 24.2 Horizontal and vertical dimensions of business groups 681

  55. 24.3 Possible patterns of board ties for groups with other entitites 683

  56. 26.1 Research approaches on business groups 726

  57. 27.1 Foreign trade, foreign investment, and business groups in newly industrialized countries 748

  58. 27.2 Evolution of capabilities and “efficient” organizational characteristics 753

  59. 28.1 Diversity of catch‐up models: The four dragons 773