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date: 23 August 2019

(p. xxiii) List of Tables

(p. xxiii) List of Tables

  1. 6.1 Spatial and ecological distribution of the more intensively studied, from an ethnoarchaeological perspective, hunter-gatherer-fisher societies 110

  2. 6.2 Main differences between dry and wet season Ju/’hoãnsi (!Kung) base camps 113

  3. 6.3 Foragers versus collectors 119

  4. 6.4 ‘Simple’ and ‘complex’ hunter-gatherer-fishers compared 121

  5. 6.5 Classes of hunter-gatherer-fisher tools 124

  6. 6.6 Spatial distribution of female and male activities associated with moose hunting among Chipewyan hunter-fishers 132

  7. 10.1 A comparison of definitions of modern cranial morphology 220

  8. 10.2 Morphological and temporal groupings of African Pleistocene fossil hominids relevant to MHO 221

  9. 10.3 Fossil specimens, sites, and dates relevant to MHO in Africa 222

  10. 14.1 Key evidence for modern behavioural traits in South Asia 337

  11. 16.1 Subdivisions of marine oxygen isotope stages used in this chapter with dates 370

  12. 16.2 Numbers of sites (a) in each region by time period indicating numbers of 2,000-year gaps in sequence in a 5,000-year period; (b) in the form b/a 383

  13. 16.3 Numbers of sites (a) in each region by time period indicating numbers of 2,000-year gaps in sequence in a 5,000-year period; (b) in the form b/a 383

  14. 20.1 Timeline of important events in Africa 486

  15. 22.1 Approximate dates (calibrated bp) for the six Jomon and four Chulmun sub-periods 508

  16. 25.1 The demographic framework for the resettlement of northern Europe 559

  17. 25.2 The causes for migration found in the ethnography and ethnohistory of the Canadian Arctic 568

  18. 27.1 Estimated dates for appearance of significant production methods and artefact forms 609

  19. 30.1 A selection of radiocarbon dates for Late Pleistocene sites with hunter-gatherer pottery in Japan, China, Korea, and eastern Russia 670

  20. (p. xxiv) 30.2 A selection of radiocarbon dates from sites with early hunter-gatherer pottery across Siberia, European Russia, and Ukraine 671

  21. 30.3 A selection of radiocarbon dates from sites with early hunter-gatherer pottery across Fennoscandia and around the Baltic coast 672

  22. 30.4 A selection of radiocarbon dates from sites with early hunter-gatherer pottery across northern Africa 673

  23. 30.5 A selection of radiocarbon dates from sites with early hunter-gatherer pottery across South America and southern North America 674

  24. 30.6 A selection of radiocarbon dates from sites with early hunter-gatherer pottery across the Arctic and subarctic of eastern Asia and western North America 676

  25. 37.1 Overview of Late Mesolithic and Neolithic bone assemblages 811

  26. 37.2 Overview of Late Mesolithic and Neolithic wild plant food resources 817

  27. 40.1 Examples of the forest products collected by hunter-gatherers from the Malay Peninsula and Borneo for trade 863

  28. 43.1 Numbers of San and Khoekhoe in southern Africa, 2010 919

  29. 44.1 Major ethnolinguistic groups of Congo Basin hunter-gatherers 937

  30. 47.1 Some causal factors in the rise of complexity towards the ‘Developed Northwest Coast Pattern’ 1002

  31. 48.1 The most widely known common names of hunter-gatherer groups 1014

  32. 54.1 Content, context, and mode of information transmission 1130

  33. 54.2 Cognitive biases in CT 1131