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date: 19 February 2020

(p. xii) List of Tables

(p. xii) List of Tables

  1. 7.1 Logistic regression coefficients for a conservative issue position on Republican presidential vote and a liberal issue position on Democratic presidential vote, 1972–2004 132

  2. 7.2 Group components of the Democratic presidential coalition, 1952–2004 134

  3. 7.3 Group components of the Republican presidential coalition, 1952–2004 136

  4. 7.4 Logistic regression coefficients for group components of the Democratic presidential coalition, by decade, 1950s–2000s 140

  5. 7.5 Logistic regression coefficients for group components of the Republican presidential coalition, by decade, 1950s–2000s 140

  6. 8.1 Religious groups and partisanship in the public, 1952 153

  7. 8.2 Religious groups and partisanship in the public, 2008 156

  8. 11.1 Financial and campaign activities of state party organizations, Aldrich (1999), with comparisons to Gibson et al. (1983) 208

  9. 14.1 The disappearance of the nomination and the rise of the infomercial 267

  10. 14.2 The changing matrix of delegate selection 269

  11. 14.3 Ideological representation at national party conventions 279

  12. 15.1 The effect of district and activist preferences on incumbent liberal–conservative positions 298

  13. 15.2 Explaining incumbent vote share, 2006 300

  14. 16.1 Soft money receipts 1992–2002 308

  15. 16.2 Independent expenditures by national party committee 1996–2008 308

  16. 22.1 Organized interests in Washington politics 433

  17. 22.2 Distributions of organizations within categories 437

  18. 22.3 The changing Washington pressure community 443

  19. 22.4 In and out of the pressure community: births, deaths, and changes in political status 448

  20. 25.1 Three perspectives on the influence production process 489