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date: 18 January 2020

(p. xv) About the Contributors

(p. xv) About the Contributors

Nick Admussen is Assistant Professor of Chinese Literature and Culture at Cornell University. He is a poet and translator of poetry, and his first scholarly book, Recite and Refuse: Contemporary Chinese Prose Poetry, is forthcoming from the University of Hawai’i Press.



Andrea Bachner is Associate Professor of Comparative Literature at Cornell University. Her research explores comparative intersections between Sinophone, Latin American, and European cultural productions in dialogue with theories of interculturality, sexuality, and mediality. She is the author of Beyond Sinology: Chinese Writing and the Scripts of Cultures (Columbia University Press).



Mark Bender is Professor of Chinese Literature and Folklore at The Ohio State University. He is the author of Plum and Bamboo (Illinois), the co‐editor of The Columbia Anthology of Chinese Folk and Popular Literature (Columbia), and translator of Butterfly Mother (Hackett).



Brian Bernards is Assistant Professor of East Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of Southern California. He is the author of Writing the South Seas: Imagining the Nanyang in Chinese and Southeast Asian Postcolonial Literature (University of Washington Press) and co-editor (with Shu-mei Shih and Chien-hsin Tsai) of Sinophone Studies: A Critical Reader (Columbia University Press).



Kwok Kou Leonard Chan is Chair Professor of Chinese Literature at the Hong Kong Institute of Education. He is the author of the Chinese-language volumes On Lyrical China (Hong Kong), How Did Literature Become Knowledge? Literary Criticism, Literary Studies, and Literary Education (Beijing), and Structuring Chinese Literary Tradition (Wuhan); he is also the chief editor of the twelve-volume Compendium of Hong Kong Literature 1919–1949 (Hong Kong).



Shelby Kar-yan Chan is Associate Professor of Translation at Hang Seng Management College. She is author of Identity and Theatre Translation in Hong Kong (Springer), and is the co-editor of Islands or Continents, Words and the World, and The Other Voice (all published by the Chinese University Press).



CHANG Cheng is a journalist in Taiwan and is one of the founding editors of the multilingual newspaper Sifang Bao (Four-Way Voice). In 2015, he established an event called “Bringing Back Books That You Cannot Read,” to encourage people to bring (p. xvi) back books for migrants. He also established a Southeast Asia–themed bookstore in Taiwan called Brilliant Time.



Sung-sheng Yvonne Chang is Professor of Asian Studies at the University of Texas, Austin. She is the author of Modernism and the Nativist Resistance: Contemporary Chinese Fiction from Taiwan (Duke University Press) and Literary Culture in Taiwan: Martial Law to Market Law (Columbia University Press), and co-editor (with Michelle Yeh and Ming-ju Fan) of The Columbia Sourcebook of Literary Taiwan (Columbia University Press).



CHEN Pingyuan is Professor of Chinese Literature at Peking University. His books in Chinese include The Transformation of Narrative Models in Chinese Fiction; The Literati’s Chivalric Dreams: Narrative Models of Chinese Knight-Errant Literature; Establishing Modern Chinese Scholarship; Touches of History: An Entry into “May Fourth” China; Pictures on the Left, History on the Right: A Study of Late Qing Picture Magazines; and History of Literature as an Academic Discipline.



Xiaomei Chen is Professor of Chinese and Comparative Literature at the University of California at Davis. She is the author of Occidentalism: A Theory of Counter-discourse in Post-Mao China (Oxford University Press; Rowman and Littlefield), Acting the “Right” Part: Political Theater and Popular Drama in Contemporary China (University of Hawai’i Press) and the editor of the Columbia Anthology of Modern Chinese Drama (Columbia University Press) and Reading the Right Text: An Anthology of Contemporary Chinese Drama with a Critical Introduction (University of Hawai’i Press).



Rey Chow is Anne Firor Scott Professor of Literature at Duke University. Her publications in the past decade include The Age of the World Target (Duke University Press, 2006), Sentimental Fabulations, Contemporary Chinese Films (Columbia University Press, 2007), Entanglements, or Transmedial Thinking about Capture (Duke University Press, 2012), and Not Like a Native Speaker: On Languaging as a Postcolonial Experience (Columbia University Press, 2014).



John A. Crespi is Luce Associate Professor of Chinese at Colgate University. He is the author of Voices in Revolution: Poetry and the Auditory Imagination in Modern China (University of Hawai’i Press).



Kirk A. Denton is Professor of East Asian Languages and Literatures at The Ohio State University. He is author of The Problematic of Self in Modern Chinese Literature: Hu Feng and Lu Ling (Stanford University Press) and Exhibiting the Past: Historical Memory and the Politics of Museums in Postsocialist China (University of Hawai’i Press). His edited books include Modern Chinese Literary Thought: Writings on Literature, 1893–1945 (Stanford University Press), (with Michel Hockx), Literary Societies in Republican China (Lexington), and the Columbia Companion to Modern Chinese Literature (Columbia University Press). He is also editor of the journal Modern Chinese Literature and Culture. (p. xvii)



Gilbert C. F. Fong is Professor of Translation at Hang Seng Management College. He has translated many plays by Gao Xingjian into English, which were published in The Other Shore, Snow in August, Cold Literature: Selected Works by Gao Xingjian (with Mabel Lee), Escape and The Man Who Questions Death, and Of Mountains and Seas. He is also co-editor of Islands or Continents and Words and the World: An Anthology of Poetry Translation (both published by University of Hong Kong Press), among other volumes.



Matthew Fraleigh is Associate Professor of East Asian Literature and Culture at Brandeis University. His research concerns the literature of early modern and modern Japan, especially kanshibun (Sinitic poetry and prose). He is the author of Plucking Chrysanthemums: Narushima Ryūhoku and Sinitic Literary Traditions in Modern Japan (Harvard University Asia Center) and has published annotated translations of some of Ryūhoku’s best-known works, including New Chronicles of Yanagibashi and Diary of a Journey to the West: Narushima Ryūhoku Reports From Home and Abroad (Cornell East Asia Series).



Junning Fu is a doctoral candidate in Comparative Literature at Cornell University.



GE Zhaoguang is Professor of History at Fudan University. His Chinese-language publications include Chan Religion and Chinese Culture, Daoist Religion and Chinese Culture, Intellectual History of Chan Buddhism, and History of Chinese Thought.



Jonathan Christopher Hamm is Associate Professor of Asian Languages and Literatures at the University of Washington. He is the author of Paper Swordsmen: Jin Yong and the Modern Chinese Martial Arts Novel (University of Hawai’i Press) and Book, Sword, and Nation: Jin Yong and the Modern Chinese Martial Arts Novel (University of Hawai’i Press).



Michael Gibbs Hill is Associate Professor of Chinese and Comparative Literature, University of South Carolina. He is the author of Lin Shu, Inc.: Translation and the Making of Modern Chinese Culture (Oxford University Press) and the translator of Wang Hui’s China from Empire to Nation-State (Harvard University Press).



Nathaniel Isaacson is Assistant Professor of Modern Chinese Literature at North Carolina State University. He is currently completing a book on colonial modernities and Chinese science fiction.



JI Jin is Professor of Chinese Literature at Suzhou University, and is the author, in Chinese, of Qian Zhongshu and Modern Western Thought, The Sage in Fortress Besieged, Dialogues between Ji Jin and Leo Ou-Fan Lee, Chen Quan: A Borrowed Mirror from a Foreign Land, Another Kind of Voice: Interviews with Foreign Sinologists, and Reciprocal Perspectives. He is the editor of the Chinese-language volume Letters Between C.T. Hsia and T.A. Hsia, and editor-in-chief of the series “Collection of Canonical Works by Modern Western Critics” and “Collection of Overseas Chinese Literary Studies.” (p. xviii)



Belinda Kong is Associate Professor of Asian Studies and English at Bowdoin College. She is the author of Tiananmen Fictions Outside the Square: The Chinese Literary Diaspora and the Politics of Global Culture (Temple University Press).



Jie Li is Assistant Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations at Harvard University. She is the author of Shanghai Homes: Palimpsests of Private Life (Columbia University Press) and co-editor of Red Legacies: Cultural Afterlives of the Communist Revolution (Harvard Asia Center).



LIAO Chaoyang is Professor of Foreign Languages at the National Taiwan University. He has been consistently interested in the intersection between Western theory and Asian traditions, and has published numerous articles in academic journals.



Ping-hui Liao is Professor of Literary and Critical Studies and Chuan Lyu Endowed Chair in Taiwan Studies at the University of California, San Diego. He is the author of Keywords 200 in Literary and Critical Studies (in Chinese) (Ryefield), and co-editor (with David Wang) of Taiwan under Japanese Colonial Rule (Columbia University Press) and (with Ackbar Abbas) of Internationalizing Cultural Studies (Blackwell).



LIAO Yun-chang is a journalist in Taiwan and previously served as acting deputy editor-in-chief of the Taiwan newspaper Lihpao Daily. She is dedicated to the promotion of multicultural reading, and currently works at CommonWealth Magazine Education Foundation as director of research and development.



Jianmei Liu is Associate Professor of Chinese Literature at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. She is the author of Zhuangzi and Modern Chinese Literature (Oxford University Press) and Revolution Plus Love: Literary History, Women’s Bodies, and Thematic Repetition in Twentieth-Century Chinese Fiction (University of Hawai’i Press).



MEI Chia-ling is Professor of Chinese Literature at National Taiwan University. Her Chinese-language publications include New Criticism on the Literature of the Six Dynasties: Pastiche, Narrator as the Author’s Mouthpiece and Interchange Poetry, Language and Narrative in a New Account of Tales of the World, Gender or Nation? Criticism on Taiwan Fiction of the 50’s and the 80’s–90’s, and From China’s Youth to Taiwan’s Youth.



Viren Murthy is Assistant Professor of Transnational Asian History at the University of Madison-Wisconsin. He is the author of The Philosophy of Zhang Taiyan: The Resistance of Consciousness (Brill) and co-editor (with Axel Schneider) of The Challenge of Linear Time: Nationhood and the Politics of History in East Asia (Brill) and (with Prasenjit Duara and Andrew Sartori) of A Companion to Global Historical Thought (Blackwell).



Laikwan Pang is Professor of Cultural Studies in the Department of Cultural and Religious Studies at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. She is the author of Building a New China in Cinema: The Chinese Left-wing Cinema Movement, 1932–37 (Rowman and Littlefield), Cultural Control and Globalization in Asia: Copyright, Piracy, and (p. xix) Cinema (Routledge), The Distorting Mirror: Visual Modernity in China (University of Hawai’i Press), and Creativity and Its Discontents: China’s Creative Industries and Intellectual Property Right Offenses (Duke University Press).



David Porter is Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of Michigan. He is the author of The Chinese Taste in Eighteenth-Century England (Cambridge University Press) and Ideographia: The Chinese Cipher in Early Modern Europe (Stanford University Press), and the editor of Comparative Early Modernities (Palgrave), Internet Culture (Routledge), and Between Men and Feminism (Routledge).



Carlos Rojas is Professor of Chinese Cultural Studies, Women’s Studies, and Arts of the Moving Image at Duke University. He is the author of Homesickness: Culture, Contagion, and National Transformation (Harvard University Press), The Great Wall: A Cultural History (Harvard University Press), and The Naked Gaze: Reflections on Chinese Modernity (Harvard University Asia Center). He is also the co-editor (with Eileen Cheng-yin Chow) of The Oxford Handbook of Chinese Cinemas (Oxford University Press), among other volumes, and has translated book-length literary fiction by Yu Hua, Yan Lianke, and Ng Kim Chew.



Tze-lan Deborah Sang is Professor of Chinese Literature and Media Studies at Michigan State University. She is the author of The Emerging Lesbian: Female Same-Sex Desire in Modern China (Chicago University Press) and co-editor (with Sylvia Li-chun Lin) of Documenting Taiwan on Film: Issues and Methods in New Documentaries (Routledge).



Shuang Shen is Associate Professor of Comparative Literature and Chinese at the Pennsylvania State University. She is the author of Cosmopolitan Publics: Anglophone Print Culture in Semi-Colonial Shanghai (Rutgers University Press).



Haun Saussy is University Professor and Professor of Comparative Literature at the University of Chicago. He is the author of The Problem of a Chinese Aesthetic (Stanford University Press) and Great Walls of Discourse and Other Adventures in Cultural China (Harvard University Asia Center) and co-editor (with Kang-I Sun Chang) of Chinese Women Poets, An Anthology of Poetry and Criticism from Ancient Times to 1911 (Stanford University Press), (with Eric Hayot and Steven Yao) of Sinographies: Writing China (University of Minnesota Press), and (with Roger des Forges, Chiao-mei Liu, and Gao Minglu) of Chinese Walls in Time and Space (Cornell Asia Center), among other volumes.



Mingwei Song is Associate Professor of Chinese Literature at Wellesley College. He is the author of Young China: National Rejuvenation and the Bildungsroman, 1900-1959 (Harvard University Asia Center) and, in Chinese, of Criticism and Imagination (Shanghai) and The Sorrows of a Floating World: A Biography of Eileen Chang (Taipei). He is the guest editor of Renditions 77/78, a special issue that features Chinese science fiction. (p. xx)



E. K. Tan is Associate Professor of Comparative Literature and Cultural Studies in the Department of Cultural Analysis and Theory at the State University of New York, Stony Brook. He is the author of Rethinking Chineseness: Translational Sinophone Identities in the Nanyang Literary World (Cambria).



Karen Thornber is Professor of Comparative Literature and of East Asian Languages and Civilizations at Harvard University. She is the author of Empire of Texts in Motion: Chinese, Korean, and Taiwanese Transculturations of Japanese Literature (Harvard University Asia Center) and Ecoambiguity: Environmental Crises and East Asian Literatures (University of Michigan Press). She is also the editor of World Literature and Health (Literature and Medicine, Johns Hopkins University) and the translator of Tōge Sankichi and Poems of the Atomic Bomb (Center for East Asian Studies, University of Chicago).



Xiaofei Tian is Professor of Chinese Literature at Harvard University. She is the author of Tao Yuanming and Manuscript Culture: The Record of a Dusty Table (University of Washington Press), Beacon Fire and Shooting Star: The Literary Culture of the Liang (502–557) (Harvard University Asia Center), and Visionary Journeys: Travel Writings from Early Medieval and Nineteenth-century China (Harvard University Asia Center), as well as several volumes in Chinese. She is also co-editor of the Oxford Handbook of Classical Chinese Literature (1000 bce –900ce) and the translator of a late-nineteenth-century memoir, The World of a Tiny Insect: A Memoir of the Taiping Rebellion and Its Aftermath (University of Washington Press).



Chien-Hsin Tsai is Associate Professor of Asian Studies at the University of Texas, Austin. He is co-editor (with Shu-mei Shih and Brian Bernards) of Sinophone Studies: A Critical Reader (Columbia University Press).



Ban Wang is William Haas Professor in Chinese Studies at Stanford University. He is the author of The Sublime Figure of History (Stanford University Press) and Illuminations from the Past (Stanford, 2004), editor of Words and Their Stories (Brill), and co‐editor of Trauma and Cinema (University of Hong Kong Press), China and New Left Visions (Lexington, 2012), and Debating the Socialist Legacy and Capitalist Globalization (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014).



David Der-wei Wang is Edward C. Henderson Professor of Chinese Literature at Harvard University. He is the author of The Lyrical in Epic Time: Modern Chinese Intellectuals and Artists Through the 1949 Crisis (Columbia), The Monster that is History: History, Violence, and Fictional Writing in Twentieth-Century China (University of California Press), Fin-de-Siècle Splendor: Repressed Modernities in Late Qing Fiction, 1849–1911 (Stanford University Press), and Fictional Realism in 20th-Century China (Columbia University Press), and the editor of Harvard New Literary History of Modern China (Harvard University Press).



WANG Hui Professor in the Department of Chinese Language and Literature at Tsinghua University, Beijing. His English-language publications include The End of (p. xxi) Revolution: China and the Limits of Modernity (Verso), China’s New Order: Society, Politics, and Economy in Transition (Harvard University Press), The Politics of Imagining Asia (Harvard University Press), and The Rise of Modern Chinese Thought (Harvard University Press).



Xiaojue Wang is Associate Professor of Modern Chinese Literature and Culture at Rutgers University. She is the author of Modernity with a Cold War Face: Reimagining the Nation in Chinese Literature across the 1949 Divide (Harvard University Asia Center).



XIA Xiaohong is Professor of Chinese Literature at Peking University. Her books in Chinese include Late Qing baihua Vernacular Literature and Enlightenment Readings, Liang Qichao: Between Politics and Scholarship, Enlightenment and Inheritance: Liang Qichao’s Literary Routes, Late Qing Literati’s Ideas on Women, Late Qing Women and Modern China, Reading Liang Qichao, and Fragmented Records from Late Qing Shanghai.



YAN Lianke is an author and professor at Renmin University in Beijing. English translations of his novels include Serve the People!, Dream of Ding Village, Lenin’s Kisses, and The Four Books (all published by Grove Atlantic).



Yingjin Zhang is Distinguished Professor of Modern Chinese Literature at the University of California, San Diego. He is the author of Cinema, Space, and Polylocality in a Globalizing China (University of Hawai’i Press), Chinese National Cinema (Routledge), Screening China: Critical Interventions, Cinematic Reconfigurations, and the Transnational Imaginary in Contemporary Chinese Cinema (Center for Chinese Studies, University of Michigan), and The City in Modern Chinese Literature and Film: Configurations of Space, Time, and Gender (Stanford University Press), and co-author (with Kuei-fen Chiu) of New Chinese-Language Documentaries: Ethics, Subject and Place (Routledge). His edited books include A Companion to Chinese Cinema (Wiley-Blackwell) and A Companion to Modern Chinese Literature (Wiley-Blackwell).



(p. xxii)