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date: 21 August 2019

(p. xi) Contributors

(p. xi) Contributors

Robert Apel is Associate Professor of Criminal Justice at Rutgers University. His research interests include the economy, crime control policy, and the life course.



Lauren A. Austin is a doctoral student in the Public Policy program at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Her research interests include at-risk youth, resiliency, and the history of North Carolina’s public health policies. She is currently completing her dissertation on the risk and protective factors of resilient at-risk youth.



Margit Averdijk is a senior research associate at the Jacobs Center for Productive Youth Development of the University of Zurich. Her research interests include the study of victimization, social contexts of crime, and individuals’ development of violent behavior.



Ronet Bachman is a professor in the Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice at the University of Delaware. She has published several books on research methods, statistics, and violence and victimization. Her most recent federally funded research examined the long-term desistance patterns of a drug-involved cohort of offenders.



Eric Beauregard is a professor in the School of Criminology at Simon Fraser University and Director of the Centre for Research on Sexual Violence. His research interests include the crime-commission process, decision making, criminal investigation, as well as the factors influencing criminal outcomes for different types of sex offenders.



Wim Bernasco is a senior researcher at the Netherlands Institute for the Study of Crime and Law Enforcement (NSCR) and Professor of “spatial analysis of crime” in the Department of Spatial Economics of the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. He studies spatial aspects of crime, including offenders’ travel behavior and target selection. His work also comprises research on situational causes of crime, including the analysis of crime captured on camera.



Daniel Birks is a lecturer in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Griffith University, and a research fellow at the Griffith Criminology Institute. His research interests are broadly based in the fields of environmental criminology, crime analysis, and computational social science.



Wouter van den Bos is a research scientist at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development. His research focuses on the neural underpinnings of reward-based learning and social decision making across adolescent development.



(p. xii) Jeffrey A. Bouffard is a professor in the College of Criminal Justice at Sam Houston State University and Research Director for the Correctional Management Institute of Texas. His research interests include offender decision making, criminological theories, and offender rehabilitation.



Iain R. Brennan is a senior lecturer in criminology and psychology at the University of Hull. His research interests include weapon use, alcohol-related violence, and victim responses to crime.



Fiona Brookman is Professor of Criminology at the University of South Wales and Director of the Criminal Investigation Research Network (CIRN). Her major research interests are homicide, violence, and the police investigation of homicide. She is currently undertaking ethnographic research on the role of forensic science and technology in homicide investigations in the United Kingdom.



Paolo Campana is University Lecturer in Criminology and Complex Networks at the Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge. His research interests include the study of organized crime and forms of extralegal governance as well as the application of network analysis techniques to the research of organized forms of criminality.



Gabriel T Cesar is a doctoral candidate in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Arizona State University. His research explores child welfare, youth development, violence, and policing as sources of formal and informal social control.



Megan Eileen Collins is a doctoral student in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Maryland. Her research interests include gun violence and markets, procedural justice, policing, and public policy.



Heith Copes is a professor in the Department of Justice Sciences at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. His research addresses the criminal decision-making strategies of offenders and understanding the ways that offenders make sense of their lives and crimes.



Timothy Coupe works at the Institute of Criminology, Cambridge University. His research interests are policing, crime detection and investigation, and burglary.



Scott H. Decker is Foundation Professor in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Arizona State University. His main research interests are in the areas of gangs, violence, criminal justice policy, and the offender’s perspective.



John E. Eck is Professor of Criminal Justice at the University of Cincinnati. His work encompasses investigations management, problem-oriented policing, and preventing crime at high crime places, focusing on practical solutions to crime problems based on sound research and rigorous theory.



Paul Ekblom is Professor Emeritus of Design Against Crime at Central Saint Martins University of the Arts. His research interests include criminal adaptability and coevolution (p. xiii) with crime prevention, developing conceptual frameworks for crime prevention theory and practice, designing products and places to resist crime, and horizon scanning.



Henk Elffers is a senior researcher at the Netherlands Institute for the Study of Crime and Law Enforcement (NSCR); Emeritus Professor in the Department of Criminal Law and Criminology, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam; and Adjoint-Lecturer at Griffith University, Mount Gravatt. He works on rational choice, guardianship, spatial criminology, and the interaction between judges and the general public.



Justin D. Franklin is a graduate of the Master of Science program in Criminal Justice at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. His interests include rehabilitation strategies that target juvenile offenders.



Jean-Louis van Gelder is a senior researcher at the Netherlands Institute for the Study of Crime and Law Enforcement (NSCR). His research interests include the interplay of affect and cognition in criminal decision making, multiple self models, the application of novel methods and technologies in criminological research, and informality.



Berna Güroğlu is Associate Professor in Developmental Psychology and a principal investigator in the Brain and Development Laboratory at Leiden University. Her research focuses on the neurocognitive development of social decision making across childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood. She is particularly interested in the role of peer relationships and their links with socioemotional functioning.



Wim Huisman is Professor of Criminology at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. His research interests are organizational and white-collar crime, among which the involvement of business in serious human rights violations, fraud, and corruption.



Shayne Jones is Associate Professor in the School of Criminal Justice at Texas State University. His research interests include the relationship between personality and offending, the extent to which criminological constructs mediate and moderate this relationship, and factors that influence various actors (juries, judges, and criminal defendants) in making legal decisions.



Eduard T. Klapwijk is a PhD candidate in the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the Leiden University Medical Center. His research focuses on the neurocognitive mechanisms of empathy and social decision making in adolescents with conduct disorder and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders.



Marie Rosenkrantz Lindegaard is a senior researcher at the Netherlands Institute for the Study of Crime and Law Enforcement (NSCR) and an Associate Professor at the Department of Sociology of the University of Copenhagen. Her research interests are situational aspects of crime, agency, street culture, qualitative methods, use of camera footage for crime research, and urban ethnography in South Africa.



Thomas A. Loughran is Associate Professor in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Maryland. His research interests include offender (p. xiv) decision making and deterrence, illegal market participation, public policy, and methods for inferring treatment effects from nonexperimental data.



M. Lyn Exum is Associate Professor in the Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. His research interests include criminal decision making and the forces that impact those cognitive processes.



Tamara D. Madensen is Associate Professor in the Department of Criminal Justice at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Her research interests are problem-oriented policing, crime opportunity structures, place management, and crowd violence.



Chae Mamayek is a doctoral student in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Maryland. Her research interests include offender decision making, statistical methodology, deterrence, and public policy.



Daniel S. Nagin is Teresa and H. John Heinz III University Professor of Public Policy and Statistics at the Heinz College, Carnegie Mellon University. His research focuses on the evolution of criminal and antisocial behaviors over the life course, the deterrent effect of criminal and noncriminal penalties on illegal behaviors, and the development of statistical methods for analyzing longitudinal data.



Nicole Niebuhr is a doctoral student in the College of Criminal Justice at Sam Houston State University. Her research interests include offender rehabilitation, re-entry, life course theory, and program evaluation.



Ray Paternoster is a professor in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Maryland. He is interested in rational choice models of offender decision making, the transition from adolescence to adulthood, desistance theory and research, and issues related to capital punishment.



Lieven J. R. Pauwels is Professor of Criminology in the Department of Criminology, Criminal Law and Social Law at Ghent University. He is interested in crime causation theories, unifying frameworks and empirical tests, philosophy of causation, and innovative methods in quantitative criminology.



Heiko Rauhut is Associate Professor of Social Theory and Quantitative Methods at the Institute of Sociology, the University of Zurich. His substantial research interests include social norms, the evolution of cooperation, crime, punishment, and control. His methodological research interests are experimental game theory, quantitative social research methods, and analytical sociology.



Carter Rees is Assistant Professor of Sociology at Brigham Young University. His research focuses on social networks, juvenile delinquency, and the structure of adolescent friendships.



Danielle M. Reynald is a senior lecturer in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Griffith University and a criminologist at the Griffith Criminology Institute in Brisbane, Australia. Her research focuses on how guardianship functions as a crime control (p. xv) mechanism in a variety of domains including in residential, workplace, public, and cyber contexts; crime prevention through environmental design; and offender decision making.



Stijn Ruiter is Senior Researcher at the Netherlands Institute for the Study of Crime and Law Enforcement (NSCR) and Professor of Social and Spatial Aspects of Deviant Behavior at Utrecht University. His research focuses on spatiotemporal aspects of crime and the role of activity patterns in crime target selection.



Aiden Sidebottom is a lecturer in the Department of Security and Crime Science at University College London. His research interests are evidence-based policing, situational crime prevention, and crime prevention evaluation.



Robert Svensson is Professor in the Department of Criminology at Malmö University. His research interests include crime and deviance, particularly crime and deviance among adolescents.



L. Thomas Winfree Jr is Professor Emeritus of Criminal Justice at New Mexico State University, having retired in 2012. He has contributed extensively to the criminological literature, particularly in juvenile delinquency. His research interests include youth gangs, both domestically and internationally.



Nick Tilley is Professor in the Department of Security and Crime Science at University College London and Adjunct Professor at Griffith University, Mount Gravatt. His research concerns problem-oriented policing, prevention, community policing, and evaluation research.



Kyle Treiber is University Lecturer in Neurocriminology at the Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge, and Deputy Director of the Peterborough Adolescent and Young Adult Development Study (PADS+). Her research interests include the (bio)mechanics of decision making and the interaction between neurocriminological and social environmental factors and their influence on cognition and behavior, both at the point of action and throughout development and the life course.



Sarah B. van Mastrigt is Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology and Behavioral Sciences, Aarhus University. Her research interests include co-offending, developmental and life-course criminology, and the social psychology of crime and punishment.



Frank M. Weerman is a senior researcher at the Netherlands Institute for the Study of Crime and Law Enforcement (NSCR) and Endowed Professor at the Department of Criminology of the Erasmus University Rotterdam. His research focuses on the explanation of juvenile delinquency, co-offending and youth gangs, and the role of delinquent peers.



Michelle Wright is a Chartered Psychologist and Senior Lecturer in Forensic Psychology at Manchester Metropolitan University. Her research focuses on furthering understanding of homicide and criminal investigation processes to inform policing, policy. and practice.



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