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date: 21 November 2019

(p. 711) Index

(p. 711) Index

Print sources are followed by the names of authors or editors, comics by the date of their first appearance, films by the names of directors, if known, and release dates. Page numbers followed by italicized letters indicate figures or tables.

Aarseth, Asbjørn, 159
Abbas, Ackbar, 389–390, 395–396
Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein (Barton, 1948), 147
abduction, in interpreting the arts, 184
abolitionist novels, adaptation of, 242–243
academic writing, practice of
and adaptation studies, 645–646
concept of originality in, 651–652
and model of cover songs, 652–655
plagiarism and, 648–651
response and revision in, 645, 647
revision and the afterlife of writing, 656–658
Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, adaptations nominated for Best Picture, 668–669
Ackerman, Forrest J., 147
acting styles, in transitional period of U.S. film history, 156, 157
Ada (Nabokov), 598–602, 601f, 602f
adaptation
adaptation displacement, 328–329
autonomy of adaptations, 610
beyond direct transfer of media characteristics, 519–520
beyond literature or theater to film, 516–517
beyond solely narrative traits, 517–518
beyond transfer from only one medium, 518–519
cognitive approach to, 502–503
in communities, 503–505
conscious vs. unconscious, 106–107
as cultural reaction, 37–38, 39
as cultural reaction and force, 40, 42
developing an understanding of, 49–50
and development of intelligence, 498–499
as expansion, 377
first use of term, 39
franchise adaptation, 270
history of, 24–27
identifying adaptations, 481
identifying with characters in, 191–192
interdisciplinary approach to, 15
layers and movements of, 23–24
learning from failures of, 408
marginalization of, 48
methods of, 670–672
in the natural world, 13, 588–589, 590–591, 600–601
networked model of, 628–629
or intership, 179
in post-celluloid age, 268–269
procedural rhetoric of, 545
as process and product, 43–44
reasons and methods behind, 81–83
reciprocal adaptation, 416–417
recognizing adaptations as such, 611, 614, 619
selecting stories for, 664–670
as simple abstraction, 50n1
stages of process, 197–198
as transfer among artistic media, 515–516
as transfer among media products, 514–515
as transfer among premeditated media, 516
as transfer among self-reliant media, 515
as transfer of characteristics among complete media, 519
(p. 712)
transformative model of, 134
transtextuality and, 247–248
as two-way transfer of characteristics, 520–521
user-generated adaptation, 452–454
viewing and perceiving adaptations, 72–73
vs. appropriation, 372
vs. transfictionality, 528
vs. transmedia storytelling, 293–294, 527–529
in the wider world, 34, 500
Adaptation. (Jonze, 2002), 23–24, 549, 603–604, 603f, 644–645, 656
and adaptations of Frankenstein, 139
and defining adaptation, 23–24
process of adaptation portrayed in, 656
and teaching adaptation, 644–645
writing of screenplay, 603–604
adaptation, and process of revision
concept of originality, 651–652
and cover versions of popular songs, 652–655
plagiarism, 648–651
and practices of academic writing, 644–648
revision and the afterlife of writing, 656–658
adaptation, as problem-solving
along spectrum from retention to innovation, 596–598, 602, 603–604
gaining audience attention, 593–594
in literature and evolution, 590–591
and Nabokov’s Ada, 598–602
realizing costs and benefits, 592–593
retention and innovation needed for, 595–596
and storytelling, 592
adaptation, defining
adaptations in the wider world, 34
and dialogic thought, 80–81, 85
earliest uses and meanings of term, 39
expanding adaptive practices, 31–34
film and media adaptation, 28–31
mythological adaptations and transformations, 25
perspectives on, 23–24
socio-scientific framework of, 25
theological and scriptural adaptations, 26
what do adaptations adapt?, 78–80
Adaptation: From Text to Screen, Screen to Text (Cartmell & Whelehan), 1, 3
“Adaptation, or the Cinema as Digest” (Bazin), 30
adaptation, performative model of
archive vs. repertoire in, 613
importance of anticipation for, 611–612
recognizing adaptations as such, 611, 614, 619
and simultaneity, 619–620
vs. product-oriented model, 608
adaptation, reception model of, 609–610, 613
adaptation, writing history of
background of, 661–662, 676–677
envisioning adaptation history, 672–674
and intertextuality, 675–676
and methods of adaptation, 670–672
models for, 663
obstacles to, 662, 676–677
and research into history of filmmaking, 663–664
resources for, 676–677
and selecting stories for adaptation, 664–670
Adaptation and Appropriation (Sanders), 27, 641n4
“Adaptation” (Andrew), 30–31
Adaptation in Contemporary Culture: Textual Infidelities (Carroll), 1
Adaptation Industry, The (Murray), 628, 664, 700–701
adaptation in practice
adapting novels to film, 110–114
combining reading pleasure with analysis, 107–114
deconstructive perspective on source material, 110–111
reading and absorbing source material, 102–103
writing adapted vs. original screenplays, 103–104
adaptation in theory
adaptation scholar as reader, 104–107
deconstructive perspective on source material, 110–111
adaptationist literary studies, 587
(p. 713) Adaptation (journal), 6, 8, 673
Adaptation of History: Essays on Ways of Telling the Past, The (Welsh & Tutan), 578–579
Adaptation Revisited (Cardwell), 4
adaptation studies
adaptation scholar as reader, 104–107
analytical vs. evaluative basis of, 8
application of Grand Theory to, 699–700
and associated theorizing, 16
and Bakhtinian understanding of adaptation, 72–73, 83–85
belief studies, possibility of, 97–98
biological analogies in, 286
and Bollywood model, 262–263
books examining, 1
borders of, 513–521
case study as methodology in, 8–9
descriptive adaptation studies (DAS), 495, 497, 498
and digital media studies, 288–289
distinctions and boundaries in, 701–702
duality of, 703
expansion beyond literature-to-film, 287
fidelity studies, endorsements of approach, 91–92
fidelity studies, future for, 95–99
fidelity studies, history of, 92–95
foundational debates of, 7–8
history of, 2–6, 92–95
history of books on, 1
importance of dialogic thought to, 73–78, 85
interdisciplinary nature of, 17–18
intermediality of, 9
isolation from illustration studies, 489–490
literary/screen nexus of, 6
notion of fidelity in, 7–8
opportunities offered by videogame adaptation, 443–444
overcoming strictures of novel-to-film model, 294
and pedagogical practice, 625–626
possibility of a study canon, 6
and practice of academic writing, 645–646
and practice of localization, 452
relevance of videogame adaptation for, 453–454
as a science, 16–17
teaching, 702
and telenovelas, 360–361
and translation studies, 450–451
adaptation studies, and translation studies
academic collaboration in, 2, 505–506, 506n1
cognitive approach to adaptation and translation, 502–503
defining each, 494–495
and learning process, 502–503
methods of approaching translation, 498
role of creativity in defining translation, 499–500
and screenwriting, 501–502
translation and adaptation in communities, 503–505
translation and adaptation on a societal level, 500
the untranslatable or unadaptable text, 495–498, 500
Adaptation Studies: New Challenges, New Directions (Bruhn, Gjelsvik, & Hanssen), 1, 700
Adaptation Theories (Saint Jacques), 1
Adaptation Theory and Criticism (Slethaug), 4–5
adaptation theory and scholarship
adaptation’s resistance to theorization, 682–683
dialectical argument, encouragement of, 704–706
difficulties of theorizing adaptations, 681–682, 687
distinctions and boundaries in, 701–702
failures in citation, 688–690, 691
hierarchical relationship between theory and adaptation, 683–684
history of, 679–680
incomplete histories and summaries of, 690–694, 694 [link]
model of demonstration vs. model of persuasion, 705–706
retheorization of, 680–681
theoretical progressivism vs. nostalgia, 684–686, 689–690
theoretical sprawl, 686–688
(p. 714) Adapting Frankenstein (Cutchins & Perry), 140
Adaptivity as a Transformative Disposition for Learning in the 21st Century (Hung, Lim, & Shee), 502
Adler, Harry M., 226
A Doll’s House (Ibsen), 154
Adriaens, Fien, ix
adaptation through localization, 364
gender relations, and process of adapting telenovelas, 364
“Reflections on Local Adaptations of Global Telenovelas,” 356–369
telenovela adaptations, 12, 16
Adventures of Caleb Williams, The (Godwin), 43, 44–45, 49
Adventures of Ulysses (Lamb), 589
aesthetics, of comic books and animation, 410–411, 416
“Aesthetics of Transmedia, The” (Jenkins), 538
“Afraid” (Bowie), 332
Afyonsu, Erhan, 583–584
Against World Literatures (Apter), 496
“A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall” (Dylan), 330
Ahlberg, Mac, 428
À la recherche du temps perdu (Proust), 470, 601
Alexander, Leigh, 291
Alice in Wonderland (Carroll), 335
Alien series, 279
Allen, Emily, 54
Allen, Graham, 373
Allen, Hervey, 674
Allen, Robert C., 358
Allen, Woody, 248
All Life is Problem-Solving (Popper), 590
“Allo-Portraits” (Bal), 193n1
All the News That’s Fit to Sing (Ochs), 336
allusion, as adaptation, 26
Almereyda, Michael, 240
Aloul, Ayman, 289
Alpha 0.7 (German television series), 530–531, 532–533, 536
Altman, Robert, 408, 410, 412
Amahl and the Night Visitors (Menotti), 319
American Film Institute Catalog of Motion Pictures, 665–666, 665t, 666t
“Amusements of the People, The” (Dickens), 54, 59, 60
anachronism
as guide for assessing loyalty to source, 180, 192–193
necessity to anachronize, 185–187
and productive dialogue with the past, 181–182
and recall from memory, 194n3
results of unreflected anachronism, 180, 185
analogues, as adaptation, 31, 325, 333
Analyzing Literature-to-Film Adaptation (Snyder), 637
“An de Freude” (Schiller), 335–336
Anderson, Jane, 103–104, 112
Anderson, Margaret, 175
Andrew, Dudley, 3
adaptations beyond novel-to-film, 517
cultural history of French film, 663, 665, 669
essay on adaptation, 30–31
perspective on fidelity, 90, 199
sociological analysis of adaptation, 8
taxonomy of adaptation, 634
and theoretical nostalgia, 685
Angoor (Gulzar, 1982), 255–256
Anka, Paul, 328
Annunziato, Sarah, 552
Anthony Adverse (Allen), 674
anticipation, role of in performing adaptation, 611–612
Anxiety of Influence, The (Bloom), 74
appropriation, as adaptation, 26
and Internet memes, 289
playful process of appropriation, 141–142
and popular song, 324
recombinant appropriation, 286, 289–290
reproductive dimension of appropriation, 141
“shred” as type of appropriation, 332
unauthorized appropriations in digital age, 270–271
appropriation, recombinant
criteria for, 289–290
and emerging forms of adaptation, 286
and intertextuality, 286–287
parody and response videos, 290–291
parody as, 299–300
politics of, 295–298
protocols of, 285–291
(p. 715)
and transgressions of privacy, 291–292
vs. transmedia storytelling, 292–295
appropriation vs. adaptation, 372
Apter, Emily, 496, 502
Aragay, Mireia, 1
Archer, Neil, 272
Archer, William, 54, 56–57
architectonics, definition of, 84
architectural sites, adaptation of, 26
Arenas, Reinaldo, 242
Ariosto, Ludovico, 307
art, answerability to consummation of, 78, 84
artistic and literary variations on adaptation, 27, 318
Art of the Moving Picture, The (Lindsay), 28, 158–159, 450
Asch, Sholem, 130
Asheim, Lester, 681
As the World Dies trilogy (Frater), 378
Astruc, Alexander, 2, 29
Atanarjuat: The Fast Runner (2001), 597
Athenaeum journal, 57
Atkinson, Adam, 1
Auden, W. H., 307
audiences
and aura of againness in adaptation, 619
expansion of in late eighteenth century, 41–42, 51n3
expansion of in nineteenth century, 54–55
gaining attention of, 593–594
imagination and intellect for opera, 316
memory and experience of opera, 307–308
as partners in textuality, 294–295
prior and extra-textual knowledge of source, 615–616, 626–627
and reception model of adaptation, 609
recognition of adaptation, 620
selection of, 594–595, 597
audio image, deployment of in Madame B, 188
Auerbach, Erich, 120, 122, 189
“Auld Lang Syne,” transcultural adaptation of, 330
aura, of works of art, 609–610, 613, 614, 654–655
Auslander, Philip, 319, 614, 615
Austen, Jane
illustrations for text of Pride and Prejudice, 483–484
Pride and Prejudice, revisionist adaptation of, 244–246
stage adaptations of Sense and Sensibility and Pride and Prejudice, 83, 84–85
auteur theory of film, 662
authors, presence of in cinematic adaptations, 158
authorship
and contemporary debates, 33–34
of film adaptations, 663, 664, 670–672
of librettos for opera, 308–312
in popular song adaptations, 330
and stages of adaptation process, 197–198, 212, 213
twin-track authorship, 628
autonomy, of adaptations as works of art, 610, 635–636
Autumn zombie novels (Moody), 378
Avallaneda, Alonso Fernández de, 528
Avengers, The (Whedon, 2012), 98
Avenging Conscience, The (Griffith, 1914), 172
“Avoid Crime and Carrion” (Bush), 171
back catalogue, increased access to, 276–277
backstory, revelation in adaptations of Ibsen’s plays, 160, 162
Bakeless, John, 226
Bakhtin, Mikhail
active readership, 76, 77
defining adaptation, 7, 79
defining artistic text, 78
depiction of the real world, 247
dialogism of, 577
grotesque body, 81–83
hidden agenda of term “source texts,” 14
importance of dialogic thought to adaptation studies, 73–78, 85
importance to adaptation studies, 72–73, 83–85
intertextual approach of, 10, 71
intertextuality and adaptation scholarship, 4, 5
intertextuality and history of adaptation, 662
notion of polyphony, 299, 330
novelization, 242
(p. 716) Bal, Mieke, ix
adapting classic works, 11
“Allo-Portraits,” 193n1
interdisciplinary nature of adaptation studies, 17–18
“Intership: Anachronism between Loyalty and the Case,” 179–196
intership vs. adaptation, 14
Madame B, 186, 187–191
Balázs, Béla, 325
Baldick, Chris, 144
Balestrini, Nassim, 305
Balio, Tino, 667–668, 669–670
Balanchine, George, 471
ballets
and adaptations from opera, 318
and adaptations from popular song, 334
Bamidbar (Frischmann), 125–126
Bancroft, Squire and Marie, 61
Bandmann, Daniel, 64
Barnet, Miguel, 242
Barnouw, Erik, 349
Baroque period in music, and adapting libretto to musical score, 313
Barry Lyndon (Kubrick, 1975), 488
Barrymore, John, 66
Barthes, Roland, 27, 659n2
adaptation as form of criticism, 105
combining reading pleasure with analysis, 108–109
notion of original authorship, 330
The Pleasure of the Text, 647
“The Death of the Author,” 646–647
Barthes, Sophie, 181
Bassnett, Susan, 506
bastardization, notion of in popular song adaptations, 324, 330, 338
Bate, Jonathan, 505
Batman Begins (Nolan, 2005), 280
Batman trilogy (Nolan, 2005–2012), 407–408
Bauhoff, Dorothy, 18
Bazin, Andre, 29–30
boundaries of space in cinema vs. theater, 159
Philip Rose on, 97
and theoretical nostalgia, 685
Beatty, Warren, 408, 413
Becker, Carl
compiling of history, 576, 577, 578
methodology of history, 578
Becker, Robin, 375
Becky Sharp (Mamoulian, 1935), 29
Beethoven, Ludwig von, 335–336
Behn, Aphra, 50n2
Belgium, adaptations of telenovelas in, 364–365
belief studies, 97–98
“Bells, The” (Poe), 336
Ben-Hur (Wallace), 33
Benjamin, Walter
aura of works of art, 609–610, 611
nature of adaptation, 49
political activity and cinematic adaptation, 28–29
on storytelling, 127
translation as adaptation, 654, 656
ben Meir, Rabbi Samuel, 127
Bennett, Jill, 191
Benton, Robert, 199
Beranger, Clara S., 66
Berg, Alban, 314–315
Berger, Arthur Asa, 577
Bergfelder, Tim, 271
Bergman, Ingmar, notebooks as sources for adaptation, 515
Berlant, Lauren, 183–184
Berlioz, Hector, 312, 472
Bernard, Catherine, 579
Bernhart, Walter, 520
Bernstein, Leonard, 75–76
“Beyond Fidelity” (Stam), 47
Bhagat, Chetan, 256–257
Bhaji at the Beach (Chadha, 1993), 246
Bhansali, Sanjay Leela, 254
Bhardwaj, Vishal, 252, 256
biblical adaptations
in popular songs, 335
and rabbinic revisions of Moses, 120–123
Bieber, Justin, 327
Biltereyst, Daniël, ix
adaptation through localization, 364
(p. 717)
gender relations, and process of adapting telenovelas, 364
mixing global formats with local contexts, 363
“Reflections on Local Adaptations of Global Telenovelas,” 356–369
telenovela adaptations, 12, 16
biogenetic analogies in adaptation studies, 286, 327, 587, 594, 596
biographical drama for radio, 352–353
“Birth of a New Avant-Garde, The” (Astruc), 2
Bishop, Kyle William, 373, 382
Black Mask comic book series, 394
Blackmore, Susan, 327
Bloom, Harold, 74
Bloom’s taxonomy, 632
Bluestone, George
citation in adaptation scholarship, 688
medium specificity, 450
Novels to Film, 2–3, 29–30
perspectives on fidelity, 88, 89–91, 692
retheorization of adaptation scholarship, 681
structuralist understanding of adaptation, 49
Bogost, Ian, 442, 447, 545
Bollywood, adaptation in, 251–266
adaptations of Shakespeare, 252
appropriation and adaptation in practice, 257–263
Bollywood defined, 251–252
from canonical Indian literature, 254
from contemporary novels, 256
critical texts examining, 253
issues of copyright, 259
lessons for adaptation studies, 262–263
literary adaptations, 251
marketing of adaptations, 255–256, 257
mythological texts and, 254–255, 260
recent biopics, 263 [link]
remakes of older films, 257, 258, 261–262, 263n3
Bolter, Jay David, 416, 417, 512
Bonansinga, Jay, 380
Bonner, Frances, 75
Book of the Dead (Skipp & Spector), 376
books
on adaptation studies, 1
coloring books for adults, as interactive media, 546
significance of publication and adaptation history, 629–630
three dimensional and pop-up books, 488
unadaptable texts, 495–497, 500
Books in Motion: Adaptation, Intertextuality, Authorship (Aragay), 1
Boon, Marcus, 629
Booth, Paul, 437
Boozer, Jack, ix
adapting classic works, 11
defining self-reliant media, 515
“The Intratextuality of Film Adaptation,” 197–213
Bordwell, David, 419
Grand Theory, 699
post-theory world, 698, 706
on transmedia storytelling, 538
“Boredom” (Gorky), 51n4
Borges, Jorge Luis, 26
Borman, Tracy, 581
“Born in the USA” (Springsteen), 326, 327
borrowing, as adaptation, 30
Bortolotti, Gary R., 286, 360, 361
Botting, Fred, 139
Bourdieu, Pierre, 627
Bourne, J. L., 378
Bowie, David, 332
Bowley, Chris, 293
“Boxer, The” (Simon), 331
Boyd, Brian, ix
adaptation in the natural world, 13
interdisciplinary nature of adaptation studies, 17–18
“Making Adaptation Studies Adaptive,” 587–606
use of term “adaptation,” 14
Boyd, Richard, 591
Boyle, Danny, 143
Boyum, Joy Gould, 690
Braddon, Mary Elizabeth, 55, 60–61
Braida, Antonella, 481
Brains: A Zombie Memoir (Becker), 374
(p. 718) Branagh, Kenneth, 520
brand identity and loyalty
and localization of videogame adaptations, 451–452
and reboots, 280
Brantlinger, Patrick, 55
Bratton, Jacky, 54
Braun, Axel, 433–434
Brazil, characteristics of telenovelas in, 358
Brecht, Bertolt, 330
Brel, Jacques, 328
Brennan, Niall, 359
Bresson, Robert, 30
Breton, André, 145–146
Brewster, Ben, 156–157
Bricusse, Leslie, 67
Bride and Prejudice (Chadha, 2004), 244–246
Bride of Frankenstein (Whale, 1935), 137, 141, 143–144
Bridge, The (US television series, 2013), 271
British Theatre (Inchbald), 48, 49
Britt, Brian, 122, 123
Broen/Bron (Danish/Swedish television series, 2011), 271
Brooker, Will, 444
Brooks, Max, 376–377
Brooks, Mel
portrayal of Moses in History of the World, 124–125
Young Frankenstein, 149, 150
Brown, Calvin, 473
Brown, Jeffrey, 202
Browning, Robert, 469
Bruhn, Jørgen, 1
dialogic thought and adaptation studies, 75
dialogic view of adaptation, 520
fidelity to source material, 479
Bruhn, Siglind, 472
Bruner, Jerome, 500, 503
Bryant, John, 14, 627, 629–630
Bubeníček, Petr, ix–x
political ideology and adaptation, 12
“Politics and Adaptation,” 559–575
Buber, Martin, 130
Buchanan, Judith, 477
Büchner, Georg, 314–315
Burke, Kenneth, 17, 705
Burns, Robert, 330
Burroughs, Edgar Rice, 278–279
Burton, Tim, 149, 150
Bush, Kate, 520
Bush, W. Stephen, 171
Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, The (1920), dramatization for radio, 352
Cahir, Linda, 630, 631, 634
Cain, James M., 426
Caleb Williams (Godwin), 138, 140
Camerata Fiorentina, 306
Campbell, Benedict, 612f
Campillo, Robin, 381
“Candle in the Wind” (John/Taupin), 330
canon, literary
adaptation and canonical status, 627
and adaptation for radio, 345
and adaptation studies texts, 6
literary vs. grotesque texts, 82–83
Canyons, The (Schrader, 2012), 276
Cardwell, Sarah, 4
adaptation as development of a meta-text, 490
assuming adapter’s intentions, 630
citation in adaptation scholarship, 691
defining adaptation, 478, 479
networked model of adaptation, 628–629
Carls, John, 549
Carmen, in various adaptations, 105–106
Carmen (Bizet)
role of audience memory and experience in libretto, 308
transcultural adaptations of, 243–244, 320
Carmen Jones (1943; 1954), 318
“Carmen Story—and Stereotype, The” (Hutcheon), 106
Carpentier, Alejo, 242
Carr, E. H., 576, 578
Carr, John Dickson, 344
Carroll, Lewis, 335
Carroll, Noël
Grand Theory, 699, 704
post-theory world, 698, 706
Carroll, Rachel, 1, 584–585
Cartmell, Deborah, 1, 3
adaptations as re-visionings, 479
categories of adaptation, 31
collections edited by, 9
(p. 719)
defining adaptation, 615
discourse of fidelity in popular reviews, 360
expansion of adaptation studies, 287
history of adaptation theory, 679–680
literary/screen nexus, 6
perspective on fidelity, 88
studies of adaptation in popular culture, 516
theoretical sprawl in adaptation scholarship, 687–688
case study
in examining Indian cinema, 253
and intership, 183–184
and loyalty, 180–184
as methodology in adaptation studies, 8–9
as theoretical object, 187–191, 192–193
Casetti, Francesco, 516
Cattrysse, Patrick, 6
categorical analysis of adaptation, 8
defining adaptation and translation, 494, 495
Descriptive Adaptation Studies, 504
intermedial approach of, 9
parody and recombinant appropriation, 300
polysystems theory, 680, 687
sources of adaptation, 514–515, 519
theoretical approaches to adaptation scholarship, 16, 680
untranslatable texts, 497
Cavalcanti, Alberto, 61
Cavell, Stanley, 155
Cech, John, 549
Cecilia Valdés (Villaverde), 242
celebrities, as subjects of opera, 307
censorship, and adaptation of works by Henrik Ibsen, 170–176
Chabrol, Claude, 180–181, 193n2
Chadha, Gurinder, 244–246
Chadha, Simran, 253
Chaikovsky, Pyotr Ilyich, 310–311, 597, 599
Chan, Jackie, 394
Chan Lit-ban, 391
Chaney, Lon, 148
characters
identifying with, 191–192
from plot characters to voice characters in opera, 312–313, 317
Chatman, Seymour, 3, 523, 544
Chatterbox Audio Theater, 353
Chattopadihyay, Sharat Chandra, 254, 256
Cheng Sau-man, Sammi, 399
Chestney, Lillian, 221
Chignell, Hugh, 341
Child of Our Time, A (Tippett, 1941), 333
children, adaptive practices of, 588
Children of Men, The (James), 112–114, 113f
China, adaptations of telenovelas in, 364
Chinese costume drama (guzhungpian), 394
Chinese Hero: Tales of the Blood Sword (1984), 394
Chinnasamy, Prabhu, 18
Chori Chori Chupke Chupke (Burmawalla and Burmawalla, 2001), 258
Chou Tat-wah, 390
Christel, Mary T., 639
Christian motifs, in Ibsen’s Peer Gynt, 173, 174f, 175
Christmas Carol, A (Dickens), 58–59
Chu Kei, 388
Chum Daily, 388
Chung Sing Daily, 388
Chung-wah Ying-hung (1984), 394, 395
“chutneyfication,” in Indian adaptations of films from abroad, 259
Chu Yiu-wai, 394
“Cinema, The” (Woolf), 2
cinematic adaptation
and advent of sound, 51n3
cultural uplift expected from, 175–176
and imitations of previous films, 261
intellectual limitations of, 171
from literature, 37, 38
monstration of early cinema, 160
narrative strategies of one-reel vs. four-reel adaptations, 162
origins in eighteenth-century theater, 38
presence of original author in, 158
remakes of older films in Indian cinema, 257, 258, 261–262
of song titles, 334
of theatrical works by international playwrights, 155
transcultural adaptation of films, 271–272
and transitional cinema of 1910s, 156
and videogames, 444
(p. 720) Cinematical journal, 113
citation, failures of in adaptation scholarship, 688–690
Citron, Marcia, 305
Clandfield, Peter, 635
Clark, Brian, 537
Clarke, Micael M., 518
classical authors, adaptations by, 589–590
Classic Serial, The, BBC radio series, 346
Classics Illustrated series of adaptations, 11
critiques of, 217, 218f, 219–221
earliest adaptations and history of, 214–215, 216–217
era of fidelity, 230–231, 233, 235
hybrid era of, 225–226, 227f, 228, 229f
interpretive era of, 221–222, 223f, 224f, 225
textual fidelity and storytelling in, 215–217
three eras of, 221
Clay, Andrew, 293
Cleopatra (Mankiewicz, 1963), 671–672
close reading, and fidelity studies, 96
Clueless (Heckerling, 1995), 91
Clüver, Claus, x
adaptation and ekphrasis, 12
“Ekphrasis and Adaptation,” 459–476
“Ekphrasis Reconsidered,” 461
interdisciplinary nature of adaptation studies, 17–18
intermediality and visual ekphrasis, 13
rationales to organize adaptation studies, 14
Cobb, Shelley, 641n5
Cockburn, Bruce, 332
Code, Lorraine, 182–183
Cohen, Keith, 3
Cohen, Leonard, 331, 335
Cohen, Michael, 414, 416
Coixet, Isabel, 204, 206–211
Coleridge, Samuel Taylor, 496
collaboration, and adaptation studies, 2, 505, 506n1
collaborative image, notion of, 126
collage, as adapted by poets and novelists, 473
collective intelligence, and the politics of recombinant appropriation, 297, 298
Collins, Wilkie, 54
Colman the Younger, George, 42, 43, 45, 49
Colombia, characteristics of telenovelas in, 358
color, use of in cinematic adaptations of comic books, 417
coloring books for adults, as interactive media, 546
Coltrane, John, 325
Comedy of Errors (Shakespeare), 255–256
comic-book adaptation
Classics Illustrated series, 11
Classics Illustrated series, critiques of, 217, 219–221
Classics Illustrated series, era of fidelity, 230–231, 233, 235
Classics Illustrated series, history of, 214–215
Classics Illustrated series, hybrid era of, 225–226, 227f, 228, 229f
Classics Illustrated series, interpretive era of, 221–222, 223f, 224f, 225
Classics Illustrated series, textual fidelity and, 215–217, 218f
Classics Illustrated series, three eras of, 221
failed attempts at, 12
historical limitations on, 421
of Hong Kong manhua, see comics, Hong Kong, and film adaptations
of novels, 470–471
for opera, 307
of Proust’s À la recherche du temps perdu, 470
and staging, framing, and narration, 416
three successive waves of in Hollywood, 407
and zombie subgenre, 380
comic books
and adaptations of operas, 318
aesthetics of, 410–411, 412, 416
and continually evolving culture, 395–399
depicting shift from past to present ways of life, 389–392
and diversification of culture, 393–395
historical limitations on adapting, 421
intellectual property of superhero, 417–418
Japanese manga, 397
as tools of socialization, 387–389
comics, Hong Kong, and film adaptations
comics and films as tools of socialization, 387–389
and continually evolving Hong Kong culture, 395–399
(p. 721)
current markets and products, 401–402
depicting shifts from past to present ways of life, 389–392
filmography of adaptations, 403–406
history and influence of manhua comics, 12, 386–387
and implicit Hong Kong identity, 399–401
peak of Hong Kong movie industry, 395
sense of permanency and a diversification of culture, 393–395
as tools of socialization, 387–389
Comics Code Authority, 230
Commentaries on the Gallic War (Julius Caesar), 230
commentary, as adaptation, 31, 325, 333, 337
Common Core curricular standards, literacy objectives of, 631–632, 640–641 [link] 3, 641n6
Companion to Literature, Film, and Adaptation (Cartmell), 1
Companion to Literature and Film, A (Stam & Raengo), 1, 4
Conan the Barbarian (Nispel, 2011), 278
Concepts in Film Theory (Andrew), 90
confirmative image, notion of, 126
Congdon, Charles, 479
conglomeration
effect on post-production, 267–268
and multiple platforms of film performance, 272–273
Conjectures on Original Composition (Young), 47
Connolly, Billy, 331
Connor, J. D., 88
Conquest of Mexico, The (Classics Illustrated series), 231, 232f
Conrad, Joseph, 349
Constandinides, Costas, 268
consumption, modes of, 295
Contesting Tears (Cavell), 155
context
permeability with text, 79
text and, 705, 707
contrafactum, definition and uses of in popular song, 329–330, 331, 333
Convergence Culture (Jenkins), 33, 542
Conway, Kyle, 359, 362, 364
Cooper, James Fenimore, 225–226, 227f
Coposecu, Liliana, 495
Coppola, Francis Ford, 112
copyright issues
in Indian cinema, 259, 261–262
in popular song adaptations, 330, 332–333
Corbaley, Kate, 665
Córdova, Nathaniel, 628
Corrigan, Timothy, x, 1, 2
beginnings of adaptation, 14
and biblical adaptation, 119
defining adaptation, 10, 14
“Defining Adaptation,” 23–35
theoretical progressivism vs. nostalgia, 685–686
Cortés, Hernando, 231, 232f
cover versions, of popular songs, 332, 652–655
Cox, Philip, 36
career of Charles Dickens, 59
theatrical adaptations in Romantic period, 40
Craig, Daniel, 272
Crandall, Reed, 225, 230
Crime and Punishment (Dostoevsky), comic book adaptation of, 217, 218f, 219
Crippen, James, 162, 164
“Critic as Host, The” (Miller), 110–111
Crocker, Chris, 289
Crook, Tim, 340–341, 341, 354
cross-cultural adaptation
and revisionist adaptations of Shakespeare, 240–241
Cruz, Penelope, 204, 205f, 207f, 208f, 209f, 210f
Cthulhu Saves the World (2010), 446–447, 448
Cuarón, Alfonso, 113–114
Cuban, Larry, 504
Cubist art, adaptation in poetry and narrative, 473
Culler, Jonathan, 188
cultural and linguistic translation, and videogame adaptation, 443–444, 450–452
cultural capital, and literary studies, 627
cultural code translation, and adapting telenovelas, 361, 365
cultural reaction and force, adaptation as, 37–38, 39, 40, 42, 287, 289
cultural specificity, and localization, 452
(p. 722) cultural transmission, evolutionary models of, 591
culture-text, of novels and plays
definition and examples of, 58–59
effect on repertoire and revival system, 62
and repeated theatrical adaptations, 67
of Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (Stevenson), 63–67
Cumberbatch, Benedict, 142, 295, 296
Curry, Tim, 147
Curse of Frankenstein (Fisher, 1958), 139
Cushing, Peter, 148–150
Cusic, Don, 653
Cutchins, Dennis, x, 10
Adapting Frankenstein, 140
“Bakhtin, Intertextuality, and Adaptation,” 71–86
creative engagement in studying adaptation, 638
defining adaptation, 7
distortions of history in adaptations, 14
interdisciplinary dialogue, 18
Mikhail Bakhtin, 10
parameters of studying adaptation, 633–634
translation studies and adaptation, 15
Czechoslovakia
educational reappropriation of Hussitism in Czech culture, 563–566
nationalized film industry of, 559–560, 567–568
Dafora, Asadata, 240
Dagger, Sword, Laugh (1994), 395
Daisy Miller (James), 480, 487
Dakin, Mary Ellen, 639
dance
adaptations from opera, 318
adaptations from verbal narratives, 471
Danielewski, Mark Z., 533
Dans le labyrinthe (Robbe-Grillet), 470
Dante, adaptations by, 589–590
da Ponte, Lorenzo, 309
Dargis, Manohla, 94
Darwin, Charles, 598, 600
Davies, Andrew, 597
Davis, Jack, 137, 148
Davis, Jim, 59
Davis, Miles, 325
Davis, Paul, 58–59
Davis, Robert Gorham, 9
Dawkins, Richard
biogenetic models and adaptation, 327
biogenetic models and cultural studies, 286
concept of memes, 360
memes and defining adaptation, 25
memes as cultural replicators, 591
Day by Day Armageddon trilogy (Bourne), 378
DC Comics, 407, 413
“Dead Country” (Hammond), 377
Dear, Nick, 142
Death in Venice (Mann), 310, 313
“Death of the Author, The” (Barthes), 646–647
debates around adaptation studies, 7–8, 14–17
DeBona, Guerric, 349–350, 674
Deitch, Gene, 549
Delabatista, Dirk, 494–495
Delannoy, Jean, 88–89
Deleuze, Gilles, 191–192
del Monte, Domingo, 242
DeMille, Cecil B.
exegetical midrash in The Ten Commandments, 123–125
Lux Radio Theatre, 350
DeMuro, Rich, 543
De Niro, Robert, 149
De Palma, Brian, 274–275, 418
Der Freischütz (Weber), 312
Der Prozess (Kafka), 469
Derrida, Jacques, 112
Der Tod in Venedig (Mann), 310, 313
Der Untergang (Hirschbiegel, 2004), 292, 293
Descriptive Adaptation Studies (Cattrysse), 504
descriptive adaptation studies (DAS), 495, 497, 498
de Sena, Jorge, 461
Devdas (Bhansali, 2002), 254
devotional films, in Indian cinema, 260, 263n7
Dhoest, Alexander, 364
dialogic thought
and defining adaptation, 80–81, 85
importance to adaptation studies, 73–78, 85
intertextual dialogism, 78–79
(p. 723) “Dialogizing Adaptation Studies From One-Way Transport to a Dialogic Two-Way Process” (Bruhn), 75
dialogue, from original sources, 158
Diamond, Elin, 609
Diamond, Suzanne, 635–636
Diary of a Country Priest (Bresson, 1951), 30
Diaz del Castillo, Bernal, 231, 232f
Dicecco, Nico, x
adaptation as performative and receptive practice, 13
defining adaptation, 7
“Performing Adaptation,” 607–621
Dickens, Charles, 2
cinematic adaptations of and political activity, 28
culture-text of A Christmas Carol, 58–59
culture-text of Nicholas Nickleby, 62
Nicholas Nickleby, adapted scenes in modern adaptations, 61
Nicholas Nickleby, and Shakespeare as adapter, 47–48
Nicholas Nickleby, multiple adaptations of, 59
Nicholas Nickleby, scene from 1838 dramatization of, 62f
popularity of novels, 57
A Tale of Two Cities, and Romantic period in Britain, 40–41
theater as popular entertainment, 54
“Dickens, Griffith, and the Film Today” (Eisenstein), 2, 28
Dick Tracy (Beatty, 1990), 413–417
as ambitious failure, 408–409
marketing and merchandising campaign, 413–414
remediation and reciprocal adaptation, 416–417
stylization of, 414–416, 415f
Die Zauberflöte (Shickaneder/Mozart), 313
digest, adaptation as, 29–30
digital age
and developments in adaptation, 16, 270–271, 288–289
digital media protocols, 288–289
and digital media studies, 288–289
and dissemination of audio drama, 353
effect on post-production, 267–269
increased film content and availability in, 275–276
and multiple platforms of film performance, 272–273
and unauthorized appropriations, 270–271
Dinner at Eight (Cukor, 1933), 673
directors, as interpreters of opera, 316–318
Dix, William Chatterton, 331
Dobie, Ann, 105
Doc Frankenstein (2004–2007), 141
Doll’s House, A (Ibsen)
alternative ending of, 170
gender politics of, 157
theme of remarriage in, 155
Donaldson Act of 1774, 38
Donaldson-Evans, Mary, 193n2
Donaldson v. Beckett, 41
Donizetti, Gaetano, 314
Donner, Richard, 409
Dostoevsky, Fyodor, 217, 218f, 219
Do the Right Thing (Lee, 1989), 26
Downfall (Hirschbiegel, 2004), 292, 293
“Down in the Chinese Cafe” (Mitchell, 1982), 332
Doyle, Arthur Conan, 295
Dr. Franken II (videogame, 1997), 140
“Dracula,” radio drama production, 349
Dragon and the Tiger Kids (1979), 394
Dragon Tiger Gate (2006), 394
Drakakis, John, 342
drama
adaptation to the Kabuki stage, 471
audio drama, 341–342, 342–343
biographical drama for radio, 352–353
intimacy of radio drama, 347–349
mystery dramas for radio, 344, 347–349, 347f
Drazan, Anthony, 501
Dresser, Lawrence, 228
Drummond de Andrade, Carlos, 468, 469
Drunken Master (Liu, 1994), 394
dubbing, definition and uses of in popular song, 329–330
Duvall, Shelley, 410
Dwyer, Rachel, 254–255
(p. 724) Dying Animal, The (Roth), 199–203, 203–206, 206–213
Dylan, Bob, 326, 330
Earthbound (videogame, 1995), 451
East End theaters, London, clientele of in nineteenth century, 59–60
Easterlin, Nancy, 507 [link]
ecocriticism, and adaptation studies, 505, 507 [link]
“Ecological Perspective on Scaling: Balancing Structural and Individual Adaptivities” (Shu-Shing Lee), 503
“Ecstasy of Influence, The” (Lethem), 648–649, 650, 651
Edgar, David, 61
culture-text of Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, 66–67
theatrical adaptations of Dickens, 67 [link]
educational programming, 345–346
“Edward Hopper’s Seven A. M.” (Hollander), 464
Edward Scissorhands (Burton, 1990), 147, 150
Eggers, Dave, 550
Ehrmann, Jacques, 142
Eisenstein, Sergei, 2, 28
Eken Yee-kin Cheng, 395, 398, 399
ekphrasis
defining use of term, 461–463, 473–474
as media representation, 512
origin and history of term, 460
ekphrasis, and adaptation, 12, 13
comic-book adaptations of novels, 470–471
distinguishing between, 463–464, 473–474
fictive visual images, 469
musical ekphrasis, 472
paintings to poems, 466, 468–469
Ekphrasis: The Illusion of the Natural Sign (Krieger), 461
“Ekphrasis Reconsidered” (Clüver), 461
Elegy, 199–203
Isabel Coixet as director, 206–211, 207f, 208f, 209f, 210f
screenplay adaptation from Roth’s The Dying Animal, 203–206, 205f, 211–213
Elektra (Strauss), 314
Eliot, T. S., 130–131, 330
Elleström, Lars, x
“Adaptation and Intermediality,” 509–526
adaptation and intermedial studies, 12
defining adaptation, 14
dimensionality in films, 488
distinctions between static and dynamic media, 486–487
illustrations as adaptations, 477
intermedial approach of, 9
intermediality and visual ekphrasis, 13
isolation among disciplines, 489–490
Media Transformation, 522
rationales to organize adaptation studies, 14
Elliot, Kamilla, xi, 4
adaptation as reciprocal transformation, 520–521
adaptation scholarship, 18
“Adaptation Theory and Adaptation Scholarship,” 679–697
authors as illustrators, 482
defining adaptation, 515
“Doing Adaptation,” 554
fidelity, perspective on, 88
fidelity to source material, 479
illustration as intermedial practice, 477
illustrations as supplemental, 484
looking glass analogies, 14
media, distinctions among, 544
medium/platform specificity, 450
practice and theory of adaptation, 106
static and dynamic media, distinctions between, 486–487
taxonomy of adaptation, 634
theory and adaptation, 13
transformative model of adaptation, 134
Vachel Lindsay’s comments on adaptation, 159
ventriloquist effect and adaptations of comic books, 417
Ellis, Bret Easton, 276
Ellis, Maurice, 239
El otro Francisco (Giral, 1974), 242
Elsaesser, Thomas, 272–273
“Emasculating Ibsen” (Anderson), 175
embedding, as adaptation, 26
“Embodyings/Disembodyings” (Hutcheon), 106
(p. 725) Emeljanow, Victor, 59
Emig, Rainer, 685
engagement, by readers and viewers, 23, 27
“England’s Rose” (John), 330
Enlightenment Period, and origins of adaptation, 39
Enquiry Concerning Political Justice, An (Godwin), 43
ephemera, use of term in Victorian period, 56
Erb, Cynthia, 269
Escape (radio drama series), 344
Eugene Onegin (Pushkin), 310–311, 318, 599
Evans, Elizabeth, 293
Evans, George, 225, 230
Evans, Robert, 410
Eversion (videogame, 2010), 446, 447, 448
“Everything is a Remix” (Ferguson), 299
evolution
and defining adaptation, 25, 587, 590–591
and problem-solving in adaptation, 594
exegetical midrash, and midrashic adaptation, 123–125, 127–130
Exodus: God and Kings (Scott, 2014), 128, 134–135
exoticization, of landscapes and people, 166, 168
expansion, as adaptation, 377
failed cinematic adaptations, learning from, 408
Fairey, Shepard, 298
Faleh, Sadi, 298
Famous Monsters of Filmland (magazine), 147
fan culture
fan supercuts, 298
and recombinant appropriation, 295–296
Fanny Hill (Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure) (Cleland), 428–430
Fantasia on Greensleeves (Vaughan Williams, 1934)
Farren, Nelly, 62
Faubert, Patrick, 674
Faulkner and Film (Kawin), 661
Faust (Goethe)
adaptation in Classics Illustrated series, 231, 233, 234f, 235
and Frankenstein (Shelley), 138
Feel 100%, Hong Kong comic book series (1992-2007), 398–399
Feiffer, Jules, 410, 412
Feige, Kevin, 408
feminist midrash, and midrashic adaptation, 130–134
Feng Chi-ming, 395
Feng Feng, 387
Feng Po-po, 388–389
Ferguson, Kirby, 299
Ferguson, Otis, 94
Ferreira, Carolin Overhoff, 673
Feuerlicht, Roberta Strauss, 221, 230–231, 233, 235
fiction
adaptations for radio drama, 343
adaptations of canonical texts, 106–107
and adaptations of Cubist art, 473
characteristics and capabilities of, 486
as inspiration for popular songs, 335
literary fiction and political movements, 564, 566–567, 573n2
and methodology of history, 578
musicalization of, 473
transfictionality, 528
zombie fiction, 372–373
Fiction of Narrative, The (White), 193
fidelity, to source material, 87–100
and accompanying illustration, 477–478
and adaptation of telenovelas, 360–361
and anticipation of adaptations, 614
approaches to in screenwriting, 111–112
in Classics Illustrated series, 215–217
classroom discussions of, 634–635, 635–636
and contemporary debates on adaptation, 33–34
and defining adaptation, 24
definition of, 87
evolutionary models of, 591, 595–596
in historical adaptations, 582–584, 584–585
honoring source text for screenplays, 104
illustration and film adaptation, 479–480
and interdetermination among texts, 76, 77
introduction of fidelity criticism, 43–44, 46–47, 48, 50
leading to gross infidelity, 181
notion of in adaptation, 7–8
(p. 726)
paintings to poems, 466
and pornographic parodies, 426, 433, 434
and porting in videogame adaptation, 448–449
and reboots of popular movies, 278–279
and the revision process, 657
role in adaptation scholarship and theory, 691–692
role of screenwriter in, 204–205
scholarly perspectives on, 87–89
scholarly rejection of, 89–91
textual infidelity as artistic innovation, 635
of videogames, 444
vs. concept of loyalty to, 182–183
vs. critical engagement with source material, 480
in zombie subgenre, 377–378
fidelity studies
endorsements of approach, 91–92
future for, 95–99
history of, 92–95
Field, Syd, 104, 111, 112
Fielding, Henry, 45
“Field of Literature and Film, The” (Ray), 8
“Fight, The” (Hazlitt), 93
figurative midrash, 123
film
auteur theory of, 662
immediacy and impact of, 595
as a social construction, 522–523
Film: A Psychological Study, The (Münsterberg), 28
film adaptation
authorship in, 663, 664, 670–672
of comic books, 417, 418, 419f, 420, 421
as compared with text illustration, 479–480, 484, 486, 489
continued focus on in adaptation studies, 595
dramatization for radio, 350–353
and intermediality, 516–517
and intertextuality, 480–481
as introduction to original text, 597
and new readers for classic books, 484
for opera, 307
and prestige pictures, 669–670
publishers’ plans for, 486
and recreating dynamism of reading experience, 488–489
references to source material in, 485–486
as replacement for books, 485
sexually explicit content in, 424, 426
as transmediation, 512
Film Adaptation and Its Discontents (Leitch), 8
Film Adaptation in the Hollywood Studio Era (DeBona), 674
Film Adaptation (Naremore), 679, 685
Film and Literature: An Introduction and Reader (Corrigan), 1, 119, 685
film and media adaptation
and advent of sound, 51n3
contemporary definitions of adaptation, 31
definitions and models in 1980s, 30–31
early history of, 28
extra-textual dimensions of, 29–30
and political and social activity, 28–29
Film and Work of Alois Jirásek (Nejedlý), 567
film history
teaching adaptation through, 641n5
transitional period of 1910s, 156–157
Filmmaker (journal), 113
filmmaking
archival research into history of, 663–664
conveying stasis in, 487–488
nationalized film industry of Czechoslovakia, 559–560, 567–568
originals vs. adaptations, selected for filming, 665–670, 666t, 667t, 668t, 669t
post-imperial period of, 276
prestige pictures, types of, 669–670
and studio story departments, 665
techniques to encourage contemplation, 488
three-dimensional techniques in, 488, 489
use of color in adaptations of comic books, 417
use of split screen in adaptations of comic books, 418
film noir
adaptations from various media, 514–515
and dramatization for radio, 351
films (p. 727)
appropriation of musical melodies from, 325
history with operas, 319–320
radio drama sequels to, 351–352
screenplays vs. opera librettos, 312
“Final Problem, The” (Doyle), 295
Fincher, David, 272, 273
Firth, Colin, 128f
Fish, George F., 66
Fish, Stanley, 705
Fisher, Judith L., 480
Fisherman’s Blues (1988), 336–337
Fitch, Kenneth W., 217, 221, 226, 228, 229f
Fitzgerald, F. Scott, 112, 269, 488–489
Five Point Someone (Bhagat), 256–257
Flanagan, Kevin M., xi
“Videogame Adaptation,” 441–456
videogames and adaptation, 12
Flaubert, Gustave
Chabrol’s 1991 Madame Bovary, 180–181
identification with the Other, 194n9
Madame B (Gamaker & Bal), 180
Madame Bovary, anachronistic reading of, 185–187
Madame Bovary, case study as theoretical object, 187–191
Madame Bovary, identifying with characters in, 191–192
Madame Bovary, revisionist adaptation of, 244, 248–249
Madame Bovary, role of food and eating in, 194n10
Madame Bovary, unsuccessful adaptations of, 181
Flesh for Frankenstein (Morrissey, 1974), 149
Fletcher, Lucille, 343, 347–349
Fletcher, Tony, 434
flexi-narrative structure, of telenovelas, 359–360
Flint, David, 375
Fluid Text, The (Bryant), 629
“Folker, The” (Wedlock), 331
Foote, Horton, 102–103, 112
Ford, John, 672
Ford, Sam, 297
Forepaugh, Luella, 66
Forster, E. M., 308, 539
Fortunes of Smike, The (Stirling), 61–62
Foster, Mark, 377, 378
Foucault, Michel
notion of original authorship, 330
Order of Things, 26
FrameWork (Stempel), 661
framing, in comic-book adaptation, 416
franchises
franchise adaptation, 270
franchise development, top-down vs. bottom-up, 530–531
significance of in popular culture, 295
and viewer engagement, 296–297
Francisco (Suarez y Romero), 242
François, Claude, 328
Frankenstein (Whale, 1931), 75, 143–144, 145f, 146f
Frankenstein (Dawley, 1910), 141
Frankenstein (Dear, 2011), 142
Frankenstein (Shelley)
adaptations by Universal Studios, 147–148
adaptations from stage to screen, 142–143
adaptations in post-World War II science-fiction era, 148–150
creator and creation in, 139
dramatization and sustained sales of novel, 60
hyperadaptability of characters, 15–16, 137–138, 151
importance of monster’s eyes in adaptation, 144–145
intertextuality of, 138–142
Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, 149, 520
movies based on, 11
recycling of illustrations for, 485
surrealist strain in adaptation, 143–147
Frankenstein (stage adaptation, 1927), 143, 144
Frankenstein (stage adaptation, 1965), 143
Frankenstein and the Monster from Hell, 149
Frankenstein Created Woman, 147
Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed, 149
Frankenstein; or, The Vampire’s Victim (stage adaptation, 1887), 143
Frankenstein: The True Story (US television miniseries, 1973), 75, 140–141
Frankenstein’s Wedding (2011), 143
Frankenweenie (Burton, 1984/2012), 150
Frankfurt, Harry G., 184
(p. 728) Frankfurt School
on comic book film adaptations, 408
and early cinematic adaptations, 29
Franklin, J. Jeffrey, 54
Frater, Rhiannon, 378
Frederic, Harold, 55
free indirect discourse, and point of view in Madame Bovary, 187, 188, 189, 192
Freely, Maureen, 496, 497, 506
Freeman, Martin, 295, 296
freeze-frames, used to convey stasis, 487–488
French New Wave cinema, 29, 673, 675, 676
Freud, Sigmund, 186, 194n6
Friedman, David, 427–428
friendship, model of Platonic, in overcoming adaptation-fidelity obsession, 182–183
Frischmann, David, 125–126
Frost, Robert, 98
Frozen (Lavery), 649, 650
Frus, Phyllis, 299, 641n4
Fuchs, Christian, 297
Fuchs, Cindy, 488
Fulci, Lucio, 377
Fung, Anthony, 364
Fung Wan (comic book series), 395
Gai, Djeinaba Diop, 243–244
Gamaker, Michelle Williams, 11, 180, 186, 187–191, 188
Gamer, Michael, 41
Games of Love and Chance (Kechiche, 2004), 246
Gangnam Style, 327
gangster organizations, depiction in Hong Kong comic books, 397–398
Ganti, Tejaswini, 257, 258, 263n3
Gatiss, Mark, 295, 296
Gaudreault, André, 160, 522
Gee, James Paul, 453
General Mills Radio Adventure Theater, The, 344
Genette, Gérard, 4
on Flaubert’s silences, 188
hypertext, and adaptation of popular songs, 327
hypotext, 14, 372
transtextuality, categories of, 241
Genius of the System, The (Schatz), 663–664
Geraghty, Christine, 97, 481, 701
Germaine, Thomas, 189, 194n11
Germany, adaptations of telenovelas in, 365–366
Gesamtkunstwerk, 315
Ghost of Frankenstein, The (Kenton, 1942), 146–147
Ghosts (Ibsen), 154
censorship of, 170
Ghosts (Nichols & Emerson, 1915), 154, 157, 158–159, 158f, 160, 165, 165f, 171, 172–173, 173f, 175
and cultural uplift expected from cinema, 175
family doctor in, 165f
Henry B. Walthall in, 162f
heredity in, 157
introduction of Ibsen in opening scene, 158, 158f
lack of dialogue from original source, 158
last-minute rescue scene in, 165, 166f
moral ambiguity in, 172–173, 173f
Gide, André, 88–89, 699, 707–708
Giral, Sergio, 242–243
Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, The (Oplev, 2009), 271–272, 271f
Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, The (Fincher, 2011), 271–272, 272f
Gissing, George, 55
Gitelman, Lisa, 288
Gjelsvik, Anne, 1, 479, 699–700
Gladwell, Malcolm, 649–650, 651
globalization
effect on post-production, 267–268
and multiple platforms of film performance, 272–273
and revived interest in the telenovela, 357
and transcultural adaptations, 260
glocalization, mixing global formats with local contexts, 363
Gluck, Christoph Willibald, 314
Godard, Jean-Luc, 686
Godwin, William, 43, 44–45, 138, 140
Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von
adaption of Faust in Classics Illustrated series, 231, 233, 234f, 235
Faust and Frankenstein (Shelley), 138
(p. 729) Golden, John, 639
Goldman, Albert, 332
Gomringer, Eugen, 466–468
Gondry, Michel, 496
Goodman, Evelyn, 221–222, 223f, 224f, 225
Goodman, Nelson, 533
Göpferich, Suzanne, 498, 499
Gorky, Maxim, 51n4
Gould, Marty, xi
boundaries of adaptation studies, 13
interdisciplinary dialogue, 18
on originary texts, 14
teaching adaptation, 13
“Teaching Adaptation,” 625–643
Goulding, Edmund, 664
Grand Hotel, history of production, 664
Grand Theft Auto IV (videogame, 2008), 441
Grand Theory, in cinema studies, 699, 703, 705
Grant, Catherine, 97, 481
Grapes of Wrath (Steinbeck), 29, 672
graphic novels, and adaptations of operas, 318
Graveyard of the Angels (Arenas), 242
Gray, F. Gary, 277
Gray, Hugh, 97
Great Gatsby, The (Fitzgerald)
remakes of, 269
screenplays based on, 112
visual intensity of film adaptation, 488–489
Greek playwrights and poets, adaptations by, 589–590
Green, Joshua, 297
Green, Seth, 289
Greenblatt, Stephen, 327
Greene, Graham, 351–352
“Greensleeves,” traditional melody of, 331
Gris Grimly’s Frankenstein (Grimly), 484
Groensteen, Thierry, 520, 522
Grossman, Julie, 10
grotesque body, Bakhtin’s concept of, 81–83
Ground Beneath Her Feet, 335
Grusin, Richard, 416, 417, 512
Guerrasio, Jason, 113
Guide to Using Where the Wild Things Are in the Classroom (Kilpatrick), 552–553
Gunning, Tom, 51n4
Gurr, Tony
literacy and studying process of adaptation, 628
process of adaptation, 453
teaching and research as inseparable, 503–504
Gustave III (Scribe), 311
Gu-waak Zai (comic books), 397–398
guzhungpian, Chinese costume drama, 394
Hack, Dynamite, 653–654
Hagstrum, Jean, 460
“Hallelujah” (Cohen), 335
Halliwell, Michael, 305, 311
Hamilton, Patrick, 347–349
Hamlet (Shakespeare)
intertextuality in, 618
revisionist adaptation of, 240–241
Hammer film series of Frankenstein adaptations, 148–150
Hammond, Bret, 377
Hammond, Percy, 240
Hand, Richard J., xi
adaptations for radio, 12, 16
“Radio Adaptation,” 340–355
taxonomy of adaptation, 634
Hanreddy, Joseph, 83, 84–85
Hansen, Mark, 192
Hanssen, Eirik Frissvold, xi, 699–700
Adaptation Studies: New Challenges, New Directions, 1
adapting classic works, 11
fidelity to source material, 479
“Silent Ghosts on the Screen: Adapting Ibsen in the 1910s,” 154–178
Harman, Graham, 446, 448
Harmon, Jim, 342
Harner, Devin, 645
Harold and the Purple Crayon (Johnson), 543, 546–548
Harris, Joseph, 645, 646, 647–648, 653, 658
Harrison, Louis Reeves, 157
Harry Potter novels and films, 33, 94, 529
Hassler-Forest, Dan, xi
and failed comic-book adaptations, 12
roads not taken in adaptation studies, 16
“Roads Not Taken in Hollywood’s Comic Book Movie Industry,” 407–423
(p. 730) Hattnher, Álvaro, xii, 3–4
boundaries of adaptation studies, 13
portrayals of zombies, 12
“Zombies Are Everywhere: The Many Adaptations of a Subgenre,” 370–385
zombies as tropes for adaptation, 16
Hawks, Howard, 707
Hayles, N. Katherine, 612–613
Haynes, Todd, 488
Hazelwood, Colin H., 60–61
Hazlitt, William, 48–49, 93
Heart of Darkness (Conrad), 349
Hedges, Chris, 488
Heffernan, James A. W., 461
Hemingway, Ernest, 351
Henry, Richard, 143
Herrmann, Bernard, 352
Hess, Mickey, 653–654, 659n4
Hesse, Hermann, 473
Heuet, Stéphane, 470
Hicks, Arnold L., 226
Hillenbrand, Laura, 104
Hirschbiegel, Oliver, 292, 293
Hirschy, Norman, 18
Hirst, Michael, 580–581
historicity, potential loss of in adaptation, 181–182
“Historicizings/Dehistoricizings” (Hutcheon), 106
history and adaptation
categories of historian, 577–578
compiling of history, 576–578
conception and audience reception of, 584–585
distortions of history in adaptations, 14
general phases of history, 578–579
Magnificent Century (Turkish television series), 582–584, 583f
perceived fidelity to source material, 582–584, 584–585
political and social context of, 579–580
structuring of narrative in history, 578
televised versions of adapted history, 580–585
The Tudors (US television series), 580–582
History as Art and as Science (Hughes), 577–578
history of adaptation
adaptations in the wider world, 34
expanding adaptive practices, 31–34
film and media adaptation, 28–31
mythological adaptations and transformations, 25
obstacles to, 676–677
and selecting stories for adaptation, 664–670
textual reading and interpretive practices, 26, 27
theological and scriptural adaptations, 26
history of adaptation, writing
background of, 661–662, 676–677
envisioning adaptation history, 672–674
and intertextuality, 675–676
and methods of adaptation, 670–672
models for, 663
obstacles to, 662, 676–677
and research into history of filmmaking, 663–664
resources for, 676–677
and selecting stories for adaptation, 664–670
History of Henry IV, The (Shakespeare), 590
History of the World: Part I (Brooks, 1981), 124–125
Hitchcock, Alfred
biographical radio drama on, 352
intertextuality and film, 138–139
radio drama by, 344
“Hitler Gets Banned From Xbox Live” (Bowley), 293
Hitler parodies, and transmedia storytelling, 292–293
Hobsbawm, Eric, 576
Hodgkins, John, 680
Hogarth, William, 307
Hogle, Jerrold, 138
Holdzkom, Marianne, 579, 580
Hole, William, 228
Hollaback! and Street Harassment Video, 290
Hollander, John, 462, 464, 466
Holliday, Billie, 336
Hollywood star system, emergence of, 172
Holm, Ian, 142
Holquist, Michael, 84
(p. 731) Homer, adaptations by, 589–590, 598
homiletic midrash, and midrashic adaptation, 123–125
Hong Kong comics, and film adaptations
comics and films as tools of socialization, 387–389
and continually evolving Hong Kong culture, 395–399
current markets and products, 401–402
depicting shifts from past to present ways of life, 389–392
filmography of adaptations, 403–406
history and influence of manhua comics, 12, 386–387
and implicit Hong Kong identity, 399–401
peak of Hong Kong movie industry, 395
sense of permanency and a diversification of culture, 393–395
as tools of socialization, 387–389
Hopper, Edward, 464–465, 465f
Hopton, Tricia, 1
Horncastle, H., 61
horror, literary genre of, and radio drama, 341–342
horror films, cycles of, 275
Horwatt, Eli, 287, 292–293
“Hotaru No Hotari” (Japanese popular song), 330
“10 Hours Walking in NYC as a Woman” and offshoots, 290–291
Household Words magazine, 54
Housekeeping (Robinson), 91
Houseman, John, 240
House of Leaves (Danielewski), 533
“House of the Rising Sun,” covers of popular song, 653
Howard, Sidney, 670–671
How Cai Shu Subdued the Tyrant (1962), 390
How Master Cute Thrice Saved the Idiot Ming (Chan, 1966), 391
Hrdy, Sarah, 588
Hughes, Stewart, 577–578
Hughes, Ted, 308
Hugo, Victor
comic-book adaptation of The Hunchback of Notre Dame, 222, 223f, 224f, 225
opera adaptations of works by, 307
Hulk (Lee, 2003), 417–421
as ambitious failure, 408–409
cinematic techniques and marketing of, 418–420, 419f
thematic depth and psychological realism of, 420
Human Stain, The (Roth), 199
Hunchback of Notre Dame, The (Hugo), 222, 223f, 224f, 225
Hunter, I. Q., xii
“Adaptation XXX,” 424–440
pornographic movie adaptations, 12, 16
Hurlyburly (Drazan, 1998), 501, 501f, 502f
Hus, Jan
biography of, 560–562
commemoration of life and death, 573
ideological reappropriation of life and works, 569–572
Hussitism and Hussite Revolution
dynamics of, 573n1
educational reappropriation of in Czech culture, 563–566, 568
history of, 561–562
Hutcheon, Linda, xii, 4
adaptation and emergence of interactive media, 542, 546
“Adaptation and Opera,” 305–323
adaptation and parody, 299–300
adaptation as a continuum, 490
adaptation as problem-solving, 592
adaptation as process of replication, 360, 361
adaptation of narrative traits, 517
adaptation process and product, 43–44
adaptations as autonomous works of art, 610
adaptive strategies in opera, 12, 16
aura of works of art, 611
authorship in film adaptation, 663, 664
biogenetic analogies in adaptation studies, 286
broadening scope of adaptation studies, 360
character of Carmen in various adaptations, 105–106
citation in adaptation scholarship, 691
complicitous critique, 246
(p. 732)
concept of originality, 651, 652
contexts for historical adaptation, 584
defining adaptation, 478, 587–588, 615
distinctions among media in participatory culture, 544
on expanding adaptive practices, 33
expanding definition of adaptation, 686
fidelity and screenwriting, 112
films as primary texts, 370
historical contexts for adaptation, 576, 577
history and postmodernism, 579
impossibility of literal adaptation, 656
intentionality in adaptation choices, 198
intertextuality and adaptation, 81
one-to-one comparison of novel and film, 179
origins of adaptation, 36
pleasure of repeated adaptations, 127, 142
production and reception, 608
repetition and variation in adaptations, 359, 436
socio-scientific framework of defining adaptation, 25
and theoretical nostalgia, 685
transcultural adaptations, 154, 168
transmedia storytelling as adaptation, 527–528
viewers as knowing participants, 72–73
Hutcheon, Michael, xii
“Adaptation and Opera,” 305–323
adaptive strategies in opera, 12, 16
Huwiler, Elke, 342, 354
I, Frankenstein (Beattie, 2014) 141, 150–151
I Am Legend (Matheson), 372–373
Ibsen, Henrik
censorship and moral ambiguities, 170–176
cultural and aesthetic ideals evident in, 159–170
and cultural uplift expected from cinematic adaptations, 175–176
depictions of redemption in, 172–173
and double stage, 159–161
and film history and cinematic traditions, 155–159
and highbrow culture, 157–158
as highbrow drama, 162, 164
limited number of adaptations, 155–156
location shooting of, 165–166, 168, 176n2
narrative strategies in, 159–160, 162, 164
Norwegian folklore and cultural traditions in, 166, 167f, 168f
and transcultural adaptation, 154–155
visual imagination of, 155
Ice Bucket Challenge meme, 289
ideology, and untranslatable texts, 497–498
“If I Told Him” (Stein), 473
Iliad, The (Homer), adaptations of, 589–590
illustration
capabilities and limitations of, 481–482
classic novels illustrated for early readers, 483–484
as compared with film adaptation, 479–480, 484, 486, 489
as compared with film adaptations, 479–480
conveying movement in illustration, 487
and critical engagement with source material, 480
cross-disciplinary approach to, 490
defining terms, 478–479
illustrated classic novels, 482–483
illustration as intermedial practice, 477
illustrations as gateways for readers, 484
interpretive patterns across disciplines, 483
and intertextuality, 480–481
isolation from adaptation studies, 489–490
notion of illustration as supplemental, 484–485
reading and interpreting illustrated text, 481
recycling of illustrations, 485
of source material, 181
imitations, secondary and tertiary, 261
Inchbald, Elizabeth, 48, 49
“In Defense of Mixed Cinema” (Bazin), 30
Indiana, Robert, 459, 460f
Indian cinema
categories of, 252
copyright issues for remakes, 259–260, 261–262
hegemonic character of domestic films, 259
hybrid nature of, 260, 261
recent biopics in, 263n5 (p. 733)
secondary imitations in, 261
superhero genre in, 260–261
Indianization, of films from abroad, 258–259
Indian Literature and Popular Cinema (Pauwels), 252
“Indigenizing Carmen” (Hutcheon), 106
Infant Phenomenon, The (Horncastle), 61
In/Fidelity: Essays on Film Adaptation (Kranz & Mellerski), 95
Ingels, Graham, 230
Ingham, Mike, xii
adaptation in popular songs, 12, 16
“Popular Song and Adaptation,” 324–339
Inglis, Fred, 505
Inherited Burden, The (Nichols & Emerson, 1915), 171–172
innovation, and adaptation as problem-solving, 595–596, 597–598, 602, 603–604
intelligence, stages of development, 498–499
interactivity
and adaptation as an operating system, 546, 553, 554
and adaptation of canonical children’s texts, 549–550
in adaptations of Sendak’s Where the Wild Things Are, 549–552
in books and touch-screen technology, 542–543
distinctions among new and old media, 544–545, 548
and forms vs. functions of adaptation, 545–546, 554–555
as play, 546–547
in transmedia storytelling, 533–535, 534f
interdetermination
among texts, 74, 75
and defining adaptation, 81
and fidelity criticism, 76, 77
weightiness among texts, 75
interdisciplinary approach to adaptation, 15
interdisciplinary nature of adaptation studies, 17–18
intermedial adaptation
to the Kabuki stage, 471
and popular song, 334–337
intermediality
of adaptation studies, 9
and adaptation theory, 687
defining, 510–511
and defining adaptation, 32, 513
intermedial translation, 465–466
and post-production, 267–269
and remakes, 269–270
three theoretical categories of, 459
and transposition as adaptation, 472
and videogame adaptation, 444
intermediality
and adaptation as a transfer of characteristics among complete media, 519
and adaptation as transfer among artistic media, 515–516
and adaptation as transfer among media products, 514–515
and adaptation as transfer among premeditated media, 516
and adaptation as transfer among self-reliant media, 515
and adaptation as two-way transfer of characteristics, 520–521
and adaptation beyond direct transfer of media characteristics, 519–520
and adaptation beyond solely narrative traits, 517–518
and adaptation beyond transfer from only one medium, 518–519
and adaptations beyond literature or theater to film, 516–517
and boundaries of adaptation, 509, 521–523, 524
relationship to adaptation, 510–513
Internet
and availability of pornographic parodies of classic films, 436
and dissemination of audio drama, 353
and dissemination of zombie literary narratives, 378
examples of engagement on the, 288–289
and issues of copyright in popular music, 330
parody and response videos, 290–291
platforms and genres of the, 288t
polyphony of the, 299
recombinant and remodeled texts on, 287
and viral hit songs, 327
(p. 734) interpretants, in translation, 79–80
interpretive practices, and history of adaptation, 26, 27, 134–135
intersecting, as adaptation, 30
intership
and the case study, 183–184
defined, 179
introduction and use of term, 14
as productive dialogue with the past, 181–182
vs. illustration, 181
inter-textual code translation, and adapting telenovelas, 361, 365
intertextuality
and adaptation approach, 71
and adaptation of literary classics, 11
adaptation scholars and, 4, 5
and adaptations of operas, 318
and adaptation theory, 687
and defining adaptation, 80–81
and dialogic thought, 72–73, 85
and early cinematic adaptation, 28
of Ibsen’s Peer Gynt, 166, 168
in illustration and film adaptation, 480–481
and interpretants, 79–80
intertextual dialogism, 78–79
of reading, 640
and recombinant appropriation, 286–287
in Shakespeare’s Hamlet, 618
of Shelley’s Frankenstein, 138–142
vs. influence of source texts, 662–663
and writing history of adaptation, 675–676
and the zombie subgenre, 373
In the Flesh (UK television series), 381
intramedial adaptation, and popular song, 329–333
intramedial reworking, and popular song, 325
Iron Chest (Colman), and origins of adaptation
background of, 42–43
conception and staging of, 44–45
London premiere in 1796, 42
nature of adaptation, 50
public and critical reception of, 43–44, 46–49
irony, defining, 299–300
Iser, Wolfgang, 292
Isherwood, Christopher, 140–141
I Was a Teenage Frankenstein (film), 141
Iwerks, Ub, 412
Jackson, Michael, 331, 332
Jackson, Peter, 77, 269
Jacobs, Jason, 75
Jacobs, Les, 156–157
James, Henry, 310
illustrations for text of Daisy Miller, 480, 487
illustrations for text of Washington Square, 483, 487
James, P. D., 112–114, 113f
Jameson, Fredric, 8
and fidelity to source material, 693
reconstruction of past events, 27
Jan Hus (Vávra, 1954), 569
Jan Hus (Czech television miniseries, 2015), 573
Japanese manga comic books, 397
Jarry, Alfred, 241
Jefferson Airplane, 335
Jellenik, Glenn, xii–xiii, 2
beginnings of adaptation, 14
fidelity in adaptation, 7
“On the Origins of Adaptation, As Such: The Birth of a Simple Abstraction,” 36–52
origins of adaptation, 10
Jenkins, Greg, 688, 691
Jenkins, Henry, 5
adaptation vs. transmedia, 528–529
Convergence Culture, 33
new media and convergence culture, 545
participatory culture and collective intelligence, 297, 542
“The Aesthetics of Transmedia,” 538
transmedia storytelling, 293, 294, 370
Jirásek, Alois, 564, 566–567, 569–572, 573n3
John, Elton, 330
Johnson, B. S., 353–354
Johnson, Crockett, 543, 546–548
Johnson, David T., xiii, 7
“Adaptation and Fidelity,” 87–100
fidelity as touchstone, 10
interdisciplinary dialogue, 18
Johnson, Nunnally, 670–672
(p. 735) Jones, Bethan, 436–437
Jones, Jonathan, 146
Jones, William B., xiii, 11
Classics Illustrated and the Evolving Art of Comic-Book Literary Adaptation,” 214–236
Journal of Adaptation in Film and Performance, 6
Joyce, James, 589
Joye, Stijn, xiii
discourse of fidelity in popular reviews, 360
“Reflections on Local Adaptations of Global Telenovelas,” 356–369
telenovela adaptations, 12, 16
Kabuki stage, adaptation to the, 471
Kacem, Mehdi Belhaj, 247
Kafka, Franz, 469
Kallman, Chester, 307
Kanter, Albert Lewis, 214–215, 217
Kanter, William E., 230, 233
Kaplan, Meyer A., 219–220