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date: 13 July 2020

(p. 405) Index

(p. 405) Index

Note: Page numbers followed by italicized letters indicate figures, notes, or tables

3-D Method (Forgatch, Knutson, & Rains), 200–201
A
academic engagement
coercion as barrier to, 331–332
creating instructional environments, 335–336
establishing a positive school climate, 335
academic performance, of anxious and aggressive children, 241
academic skills, effect of delayed acquisition, 314–315
acceptance and commitment therapy
addressing violent coercion, 223–224, 225
and parenting rules, 93
in relational frame theory, 96–98
and video feedback intervention, 322
acetylation, 33
actor-partner interdependence model
attempts at upregulation during conflict, 157
and dyadic relationships, 30
and peer coercion and contagion, 136
adolescents
coercive dynamics in romantic relationships, 156–159
electronic communication among, 141
peer coalitions among, 59–60
premature autonomy and sexual relationships, 61f
and progression to violence, 60–64
Adolescent Transitions Program, 206–207, 278
Adrian, M., self-inflicted injury in adolescents, 189
Adult Attachment Interview, 318
aggression
adaptive use of, 384, 385
among couples in early adulthood, 169–172
amplification of, 397
and anxiety, 231, 232, 233, 239–243
and attachment styles, 234–238
coercive/aggressive prototypes, 385–386, 386t
comorbidity in anxious children, 232–233
Conflict Tactic Scales, 224f
contexts, significance of, 61, 175–176
and depression, 174–175
and deviant peer groups, 60
and dominance hierarchies, 57
dyadic system perspective on, 396–397, 397f
examples of psychological, emotional, and sexual aggression, 216
influence on relationship outcomes, 177
interventions, child-focused, 273–274
interventions, group-based, 278–282
microsocial model predicting, 108f
reactive aggression and electronic communication, 143–144
reactive vs. proactive aggression, 232
reinforcement of, 63–64
on school playgrounds, 286–288, 288–289, 291f
and self-inflicted injury, 183
social cost of, 143
socialization patterns predictive of, 172–173
and unpredictable parenting hypothesis, 233–239, 240f
Ahrons, C. R., binuclear family, 382
Albrecht, E. C., effects of maternal depression, 81
allostasis, and physiological stress response, 46
Andrews, Dave, LIFT program, 288
anger
Anger Coping program for children, 275
Coping Power program, 275–277
and developing social styles, 390
dynamics and reinforcement of, 266, 267f, 268f
exposure to in social situations, 385
studying expressions of, 264–265
anonymity, and electronic communication, 142–143
antisocial behavior
amplification to violence, 63f
analyzing in children, 368, 374t, 375t
antisocial text messaging, 147–150, 149t
and coercive relationship dynamics, 106f
development of, 39–40
in intervention settings, 137
and intimate partner violence (IPV), 173–174, 173f, 174f
learning prosocial behavior, 97
micro- and macro-level coercive dynamics, 103f
and peer socialization, 59–60
and progression to violence, 60–64
rationale behind, 140
and reinforcement of coercion, 86
Antoine, Carla, LIFT program, 288
anxiety
and aggression, 231, 232, 233, 239–243
amplification of, 397
and attachment styles, 234–238
comorbidity in aggressive children, 232–233
etiology of, 249–250
family aggregation and heritability, 250, 256–257
genetically informed study design, 254–255
parenting factors in child anxiety, 250–252
parent involvement in treatment, 256
reciprocal effects in parents and anxious children, 252–253
and unpredictable parenting hypothesis, 233–239, 240f
assembly, of social interaction, 383–385, 387f
assessment, of coercive behavior in schools, 334
Atlas of Interpersonal Relationships, An (Kelley), 380
attachment styles, 234–238
attachment theory, 318, 320
attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder
and development of emotional lability, 44
early expression of, 42f
progression to other disorders, 43
attractors, in interdependent interaction, 388
audiovisual anonymity, 142–143
augmenting, and rule-governed behavior, 90, 91
autonomic reactivity, and self-injury, 45–46
(p. 406) autonomy
parental granting and withholding of, 251, 256
patterns of seeking, 61
premature autonomy and deviancy training, 136
premature autonomy and problem behavior, 61, 61f
and use of digital communication, 142
aversive behaviors
aversive online communication, 146
negative reinforcement of, 107
observed in families, 10–11
and psychophysiological measures, 188
rationale behind, 140
reducing rate of between students, 336–337
teaching nonaversive responses, 337, 361
avoidance, experiential, 94
avoidance conditioning in infancy, 12
B
Baer, Donald, survivable interventions, 342
Bakermans-Kranenburg, M. J.
multitheoretical intervention, 320
video feedback interventions, 321
Banister, E. M., aggression in intimate relationships, 306
Bank, L., coercive family relationships, 302
Bargh, J. A., goals of social interaction, 383
Barndollar, K., goals of social interaction, 383
Baron, R. M., mediational modeling, 18
Bartini, M., bullying and social dominance, 304
baseball, as example of ongoing intervention, 296, 297f
batterer intervention programs, 216–217
Beauchaine, Theodore P., emotional lability, 39–52
behavior, patterns of appraising, 382–383
behavioral and molecular genetics approach, 27–29, 33–34
behavioral and molecular levels of analysis, 31–33, 33–34
behavioral mechanisms in extrafamilial contexts, 47
behavioral theory
and family-centered positive behavior support, 342
integration with attachment theory, 320
behaviors coded in Family Process Code, 10t
Beldavs, Z. G., and Parent-Management Training, 353
Bell, R. Q., attachment and learning theory, 318
Benito, K. G., parental accommodation of child anxiety, 252
Berkowitz, L., links between anger and aggression, 389, 390
bidirectionality of coercive interaction
in intimate partner violence, 170–171
in parent-child interaction, 130, 314
Bierman, Karen, LIFT program, 288
Biglan, A.
identifying effective interventions, 401–402
school-wide positive behavioral interventions, 332
supporting prosocial behavior, 360
Bijou, Sidney, parent-training interventions, 194
Binnendyk, Lauren, children with developmental disabilities, 341–355
biological mechanisms in extrafamilial contexts, 47
Blood, R. O., resource theory of family power, 380
Bondy, E. M., parental self-efficacy, 71
borderline personality disorder
biosocial model of, 185
developmental theories of`, 184–185
etiology of and risk factors for, 182–183
and family support models for, 189
transactional developmental model of, 186f
Bowen, M., interdependent relationships, 381–382
Bowers, Bruce, LIFT, 288
Bowlby, J., internal working models, 318–319, 321–322
Boxmeyer, Caroline, 273–285
boyd, D., concept of drama in electronic messaging, 145
brainstorming, in parent management training, 202
Bristol, M. M., preventing problem behavior, 342
Brott, A. A., support groups for fathers, 123
Brunk, Molly A., dependent behavior in children, 252
Bugental, D. B.
domains of social life, 55
parental and child cognitions, 317
Bullock, B. M.
relational schema, 317
sibling collusion, 302, 382
bullying
as coercive relational process, 301–303
contextual and developmental factors, 303–306
definition of, 287
implications for intervention, 306–309
interventions targeting, 65
overview of behavior, 300–301
and sexual and romantic competition, 304
and sexual harassment, 304–305, 309–310
C
Cairns, Darin, 86–100, 399
Cambridge-Somerville study, 277–278
Canada, school playgrounds and aggression in, 287
Capaldi, Deborah M.
aggression in intimate relationships, 305
dyadic approach to intimate partner violence, 269
early adult relationships, 169–181
caregiving
alternative caregivers, 72, 74–75, 79, 79f
reactive vs. optimal, 31
Carrère, S., mimicking functional couples, 270
Casillas, K. L., “match-and-step-down” process, 265
Caverly, S. L., exposure to anger in social situations, 385
Center for Epidemiological Studies on Depression Scale, 75, 159
Chamberlain, Patricia
Linking the Interests of Families and Teachers (LIFT), 288
parent management training, 206
change, resistance to, 199–200
Chen, Nan, gene-environment interplay, 23–38, 397–398
Cheremshynski, Christy, children with developmental disabilities, 341–355
Child Behavior Checklist, 292
children
aggression, group-based treatments for, 278–282
aggression, reducing in, 273–274
Anger Coping program, 275
antisocial behavior, analyzing, 368, 374t, 375t
aversive behavior, negative reinforcement of, 107
child adjustment and predictive factors, 120
coercion and cortisol levels in, 47
coercion in early childhood, 58–59
coercion in parent-child relationships, 23–24
coercive processes, identifying role in, 29–31
comorbidity in aggressive children, 232–233
Coping Power program, 275–277
coping strategies among, 157
with developmental disability, 350, 352
development in toddler years, 70
differentiation in parent-child dynamics, 31
effective interventions with, 282–283, 315–316
establishment of negative practices with, 114
family processes and child problem behaviors, 314–315, 314f
fathers with infants and toddlers, 117–120
The Incredible Years intervention program, 274–275
(p. 407) independent and interdependent play, 381
mother-child dyads, negativity in, 30f
negative reinforcement, early patterns of, 119–120
noncompliance, development of, 59
offering clear directions to, 197
peer coalitions among, 59–60, 60f
and relational schemas, 316–320, 322–323
self-regulation, development of, 24–26
social interactions of anger-prone children, 383
socialization processes of, 313–314
transactional cascade of coercive dynamics, 103f
video feedback interventions, 320–322, 325
Child Skills Training, 289
Chinn, Stephen, children with developmental disabilities, 341–355
chi-square statistic, defined, 354n
Christensen, A., interdependent relationships, 381
Cillessen, A. H. N.
bullying and peer popularity, 303–304
popularity vs. social status, 58
Clark, S., intimate partner violence, 173
cluster computing, 378
Coaching Our Acting-Out Children, 123–124
coalitions
cross-generational coalition formation, 381–382
peer coalitions in school, 59–60, 60f
Coan, J. C., mimicking functional couples, 270
coercion
as barrier to academic engagement, 331–332
coercive/aggressive prototypes, 385–386, 386t
complementary processes, 262–263
and conflict resolution, 154, 163–166
construct of, 2–3
and countercoercion, 5
defining, 8–11
developmental perspective on, 12–14
dyadic and family styles involving, 388–389
dyadic coerce, 75–76
dyadic perspective on, 397
in early adult relationships, 169–170
in early childhood, 58–59, 314–315, 314f
and epidemiology, 359
evolutionary function of, 400
in friendships, 63
generalization of to extrafamilial contexts, 47, 87, 102, 107
in high-risk families, 73–76, 76–82, 78t
interpersonal grammar of, 56–64
longitudinal outcomes of, 53, 54f
and “match-and-step-down” process, 262–264, 264–270
maternal coercion and origins of coercive behavior, 13
nationwide advocacy to reduce, 360–361
and parent-child interaction, 70–71
peer coercion, 129, 130–131, 133–136, 142–143
person-environment processes of, 23–25, 33–34
and physiological stress response, 46–47
playground coercion, sources of, 287
progress and innovation in study of, 398–399
and public health, 356–357, 359–360
and risk of disease, 357
and self-injury, 45–46
and social interaction patterns, 62–63
social relationships and self-regulation, 25–27
targeting incidence and prevalence of, 357–359
coercion, violent
assessing women's experiences of, 217–218
cognitive-behavioral interventions for, 220–221
definition and examples of, 216
Duluth Model of Intervention, 217–218
efficacy of existing treatments, 221–222
feminist/patriarchal perspective on, 217
functional analytic approach to, 222–224
interventions for, 216–217
and negative reinforcement in childhood, 215
self- and partner-reports of, 219–220
social learning perspective on, 219–221
coercion theory
applications of, 17–20
contemporary issues in, 41–42
and couples, 260–261
descriptive insights into, 40
and distressed marriages, 155
and emergence of maladaptive behaviors, 182
expanding, 262–264
and family-centered positive behavior support, 342
and fathers, 115–116
origins of, 7–8
and positive psychology, 351
search for mechanisms, 40–41
and self-inflicted injury, 182–183
and unpredictable parenting, 234
coercive behavior
among couples in early adulthood, 170–171, 171–172
assessment of in schools, 334
bullying as, 301–303
coded in Family Process Code, 10t
cycles of in schools, 330–332, 331f
dynamic systems approach to, 72–73
effect of electronic messaging, 140
influence on relationship outcomes, 177
intergenerational transmission of, 27–29
natural and developmental origins of, 3–4, 12–14
origins of, 3–4, 12–14
persistence of, 4–5
and psychophysiological measures, 188
public benefits of reducing, 358–359
rationale behind, 140
recognizing alternatives to, 3, 361
respondent conditioning analysis of, 87–88
school-wide programs to reduce, 334–337
significance of relationship contexts, 175–176
and social exclusion, 3
socialization patterns predictive of, 172–173
and symptoms of depression, 174–175
topography and function of, 2
variations in, 4
coercive dynamics
and adolescent romantic couples, 156–159
effect of elective relationships, 135
micro- and macro-level, 103f
microsocial relationship dynamics, 111–112
parent-child relationships, 111t
and parent training intervention, 110t
social learning and antisocial behavior, 106f
vulnerability to in relationships, 42–43, 47–48
coercive interactions
bidirectionality of, 130, 170–171, 314
coercive social behaviors, 2
and electronic communication, 141–146
forms of coercive exchange, 398
origin of, 86
and problematic behavior, 195
recording parent-child interactions, 324
coercive processes
assessing, 351
coercive joining, 131
determining risk and protective factors for, 359
and emotion, 261–262
and emotional dysregulation, 189
in families, 70, 101–102
identifying children's role in, 29–31
and individual resilience and vulnerability, 397–398
microsocial model, 103–108
multivariate multilevel survival analyses of, 363–364, 368–378
resistance as coercive process, 199–200
social processes, development of, 3–5
transforming in family routines, 343–345, 346t, 347, 349–352, 353
(p. 408) cognitive-affective processing system
links to behavioral repertoires, 383f
parent training and relational schemas, 322–323
cognitive-behavioral interventions
Adolescent Transitions Program, 278
benefits of group-based treatment, 274–277
Coping Power program, 275–277
The Incredible Years intervention program, 274–275
parental involvement in anxiety treatment, 256
to reduce aggression in children, 273–274
for violent coercion, 220–221
cognitive development
building metacognitive capacity in intervention, 324
influence of fathers on, 115
cognitive fusion
fusion with parenting rules, 93–94
and harsh and coercive parenting, 89
cognitive self-regulation, and preventing coercive interactions, 25–26
Coie, J. D., peer rejection, 59
Collaborative for Social and Emotional Learning, 308
collection of simple single level estimates
defined, 366
descriptive statistics for, 369t, 370t
and multivariate multilevel survival analyses, 367
Collins, N. L., prosocial prototype, 387
Colvin, G., school-wide interventions, 332
committed action, in acceptance and commitment therapy, 97–98
communication, and parent management training, 198
community contexts, and rates of aggression, 61
comorbidity, in aggressive children, 232–233
Compas, B. E., definition of “coping,” 157
Compernolle, Theo, role play in parent management training, 200
competing risks censoring, in multivariate multilevel survival analyses, 364
conditional adaptation models, and coercive environments, 45
conditional probability results of questionable significance, defined, 354n
conditioned emotional response, and origins of coercive behavior, 88
conduct disorder, and respiratory sinus arrhythmia, 44
conflict
avoidance of in adolescent couples, 163–164
coercion and conflict resolution, 154
conflict chains, 11–12, 12t
conflict resolution programs, 116–117
ending conflict with escalation, 187–188
escalation and de-escalation of, 262–264
and functional view of emotion, 269
promoting noncoercive conflict, 262
and psychopathology, 64
resolution in adolescent couples, 156–158, 158f, 160
resolving successfully, 397
use of text messaging in, 151
Conflict Tactics Scale, 219, 224f, 264, 292
Connell, A. M., Family Check-Up intervention, 82
Connolly, J., aggression in intimate relationships, 306
consequences of behavior
and derived relational responding, 91
short-term vs. long-term, 86
contagion
peer contagion, 129, 130, 131–133, 133f
peer contagion vs. peer coercion, 133–136
context
cultural context of parent management training, 204–206, 207–209
derived rules and family functioning, 91–92
significance in coercive behavior, 3, 87–88, 297–298
systems of care in parent management training, 206–207
Context of Intimate Partner Violence Interview, 222–223, 228–230
contingencies, reframing, 91
Control Interview, to assess violent coercion, 222
Cook, W. L., concept of interdependence, 392n
Coping Power program
combined with Family Check-Up, 282
overview of, 275–277
randomized clinical trial of, 279
coping strategies among adolescents and children, 157
cortisol
levels in children from coercive environments, 47
and physiological stress response, 46
countercoercion, 5
couples
coercion theory and, 260–261
distress in, 261
fathers and co-parenting, 116–117
reducing coercive escalations, 401
Cowan, P. A. and C. P., authoritative parenting, 390
Coyne, L. W., acceptance and commitment therapy, 96
Coyne, Lisa W., coercive family process, 86–100, 399
Crowley, Michael J., anxiety in children, 249–259
cultural context, of parent management training, 204–206, 207–209
culture of deviance model, 116
Cunningham, N. J., attractiveness and sexual bullying, 304
Cutrona, C. E., interdependent relationships, 381
D
Dads for Life, 122
dating violence
and bullying behavior, 305, 309–310
programs to reduce, 307
Davis, K., group leader coding system, 281
Deater-Deckard, Kirby, gene-environment interplay, 23–38, 397–398
DeBaryshe, B., descriptive insights into coercive behavior, 40
de Castro, B. O., reactive vs. proactive aggression, 232
defusion strategies, in acceptance and commitment therapy, 96
DeGarmo, David S.
fathers and coercion dynamics in families, 114–128
Parent Management Training, 353
Delgado, M. R., neurobiology of negative reinforcement, 255
delinquency
delinquent peer groups and intimate partner violence, 173–174
Elliot Delinquency Questionnaire, 292
predicting changes in, 19, 19f
Denham, S. A., prosocial prototype, 386–387
Denigration scale, and reports of violent coercion, 219
depression
in adolescent romantic relationships, 155, 156, 158
in alternative caregivers, 79, 79f, 80–82
and attempts at upregulation, 157, 164–165
findings in studies of high-risk families, 77–79, 78t
and peer rejection, 59
testing effects of upregulation, 159–162, 161t, 162t, 163t
depression, parental
and coercive parent-child interaction, 71–72
and family systems theory, 72
in high-risk families, 73–76
maternal depression, 59–60, 79f, 80–82
depressive symptoms
and intimate partner violence (IPV), 174–175
derived relational responding, 88–89, 89–90
developmental cascade, and emergence of coercion, 314–315
developmental disability
and challenges faced by families, 341–342
and clinical supervision of families, 352
(p. 409) ecological family-centered positive behavior support, 342–343
etiology of child problem behavior in family context, 350
family ecology and family-focused supports, 352
transforming coercive processes in family routines, 343–345, 346t, 347, 349–352, 353
developmental perspective
on coercion, 12–14
on self-inflicted injury, 183–184
deviancy
changes in the form of deviancy, 14–17, 15f, 16f
deviancy training, 131, 134–136
deviancy training and electronic messaging, 146–150, 399
deviancy training on school playgrounds, 287
deviant peer groups, 13–14
and group-based intervention, 277–278
social reinforcement of, 130
de Wied, M., coercive/aggressive prototype, 385
dialectical behavior therapy for self-inflicted injury, 189, 190
diathesis stress model, 157
Dishion, Thomas J.
Adolescent Transitions Program, 206–207
caregivers' relational schema, 318
child-focused cognitive-behavioral interventions, 273–285, 396–403
coercion and digital communication, 141–142
coercive joining, 131, 148
coercive social processes, 1–5
default friendships among youth, 135
deviancy training, 134, 135f
deviant peer groups, 13
evolutionary framework for understanding coercion and aggression, 53–68
Family Check-Up intervention, 82
fathers, influence of, 116
fathers, interventions for antisocial, 123
group intervention and deviant peer effects, 278, 280
Linking the Interests of Families and Teachers (LIFT), 288
maternal coercion, 13
parental relational schema, 317
peer interactions, 132
premature autonomy, 136
relational frame theory and relational schema, 322
sibling collusion, 302, 382
video feedback intervention, 321
violence, precursors to, 16–17
violent behavior, progression into, 102
disrupted family management model, 114–115
divorce, and parent management training, 206
DNA methylation, 33
Dodge, K. A.
links between anger and aggression, 389
peer rejection, 59
Domenech Rodriquez, Melanie M., interrupting coercion, 194–214, 400
dominance, role in interpersonal relations, 57
Dominance/Intimidation scale, and reports of violent coercion, 219
dopamine neurotransmitter systems, 28–29
Drake, C. R., derived relational responding, 90
drama, and electronic messaging, 145
Duluth Model of Intervention, 217–218
Dumas, J. E.
anxiety in parent-child dyads, 253, 254
children's search for predictability, 87
dyadic relationships
behavioral and molecular genetics analysis of, 31–33
behavioral and molecular genetics approaches to, 27–28
coercion in parent-child relationships, 23–24
co-regulation between parents and children, 25–27
dyadic assembly of interdependent interaction, 387–388, 387f
dyadic coercive interactions, 75–76, 76f
dyadic flexibility, 76, 80
dyadic mutuality and co-regulation, 132, 133f
dyadic reactivity and regulation, 26f
dyadic styles involving coercion, 388–389
dyadic styles involving prosociality, 389
dyadic system perspective on aggression, 396–397, 397f
mother-child dyads, negativity in, 29–30, 30f
and navigating interdependence, 390
repair of, 81–82
dynamic assembly, of social interactions, 383–384
dynamic developmental systems model
and intimate partner violence, 171, 172f, 177
processes in romantic relationships, 175–177
dynamic systems approach
to coercive behavior, 72–73
to parental and alternative caregiver depression, 80–82
to unpredictable parenting, 239
dysfunctional social relationships, related social problems, 1
E
Early Steps Multisite Project, 74, 77, 316, 318
ecocultural theory
and family-centered positive behavior support, 342–343
ecological family-centered positive behavior support
and adjunctive mental health treatment, 352
contributions to the literature, 350–351
defined, 341
development of, 342–343
implementation of, 345, 347
positive collateral effects, 349
research designs and results, 347–348
strategies across children and families, 346t
study implications, 351–352
study measurement and variables, 344–345, 347f
study participants and settings, 344
study results, 348–349
transformational change, 349–350
Eddy, J. Mark, school playgrounds, 286–299
Edwards, P., children's physical aggression, 262
Ehrenreich, Samuel E.
adolescent text messages, 309, 399
peer coercion and electronic messaging, 140–153
Ekman, Paul, identifying emotions, 198
electronic communication
access, immediate and constant, 143–144
access, to large peer audience, 144–146
anonymity of, 142–143
challenges posed by, 150–151
and coercive discourse and behavior, 140, 141–142
and deviancy training, 399
use among adolescents, 141
Eley, T. C., genetically informed study design, 254–255
Elliot Delinquency Questionnaire, 292
Ellis, B. J.
aggression in intimate relationships, 306
bullying prevention, 307
El-Mallah, Shereen, gene-environment interplay, 23–38, 397–398
Embry, D. D., supporting prosocial behavior, 360
emotional aggression, examples of, 216
emotional lability
autonomic correlates of, 43–44
prefrontal mechanisms of, 44–45
and self-injury, 45–46
emotions
child and parent emotion displays, analyzing, 368
and coercive processes, 261–262
and development of social styles, 390
and emotional dysregulation, 41, 189
functional view of, 269
identifying and regulating, 198
parental emotion coaching, 390
(p. 410) ensembles, for navigating interdependence, 389–391
dyad-level mechanisms, 390
family mechanisms, 391
individual-level mechanisms, 389–390
environmental variables
and development of anxiety, 250
and genetic risk, 120–122, 124
epigenetics, 33, 64–65
escape conditioning
examples of, 4
function of, 40, 41
in infancy, 12
and navigating interdependence, 390
Espelage, D. L., social-emotional learning intervention, 308
Esposito, A.
coercive interaction patterns, 319
parental and child cognitions, 317
Everyday Parenting curriculum, 315
evolutionary function of coercion, 400
exclusion
limiting exclusionary discipline, 336, 337
and use of electronic communication, 144
experience sampling methods, 241
experiential avoidance, 89, 94
externalizing behavior
heritable vulnerability to, 42–43, 42f
ontogenic process model of, 42, 47–48
extrafamilial contexts
generalization of coercion to, 47, 87, 102, 107
F
Fabiano, Gregory A.
COACHES program, 124
fathers and coercion dynamics in families, 114–128
Fagot, Beverly, LIFT program, 288
families
alternative caregivers, 72
assembly of social interaction in dyads and families, 387–388
aversive behavior, sequences of, 13
aversive behaviors, observed in, 10–11
binuclear family, 382
coalition building in, 381–382
coercion, family styles involving, 388–389
coercion, in high-risk families, 73–76, 76–82, 78t
coercion in parent-child relationships, 23–24
coercive processes, and child problem behaviors, 314–315
coercive processes, children's role in, 29–31
coercive processes, development of, 70
coercive processes, family styles involving, 102
coercive processes, transforming, 343–345, 347
conflict resolution in, 154
co-parenting, 116–117
derived rules and family functioning, 91–92
disrupted family management model, 114–115
family ecology and family-focused supports, 352
interdependence, mechanisms for navigating, 391
interdependence in, 380
intervention and family activity setting, 351–352
learned interpersonal grammar in, 56–57
marital instability, effects of, 116
marital stability, benefits of, 391
mother-child dyads, negativity in, 29–30, 30f
negative behavior repertoires, 114
parent-child dynamics, differentiation in, 31
prosociality, family styles involving, 389
respondent conditioning analysis of, 87–88
self-regulation in children, 24–26
social interactions and externalizing behavior, 189
socialization, role in, 101
survivable behavioral interventions, defined, 341
survivable behavioral interventions, settings for, 342–343
sustaining healthy relationships in, 410–402
and treatment nonadherence, 352
utilizing resiliency in, 190
Family Affective Attitudes Rating Scale, 317, 318
Family and Peer Process Code, 107, 118, 172
Family Check-Up
combined with Coping Power program, 282
context of care, 206–207
and Early Steps Multisite Project, 74
effectiveness in early childhood, 315
promoting positive behavior, 401
and shaping parent-child interactions, 189
Family Foundations, 122
Family Process Code
intensity and duration of coercion, 59
specific behaviors from, 10t
family systems theory, and parental depression, 72
fathers
and coercion theory, 115–116, 124
and co-parenting, 116–117
genetic relation to fathers' coercion, 120–122
with infants and toddlers, 117–120
preventive intervention and treatment with, 122–124
role in coercive family process, 115
Feeney, B. C., prosocial prototype, 387
Fekkes, M., playground as context for aggression, 287
Feldman, Betsy J., aggression on school playgrounds, 286–299
Fetrow, Becky, LIFT program, 288
finite time sampling, and multivariate multilevel survival analyses, 367, 372t
Finkelstein, M. A., prosocial prototype, 386
Finland, anti-bullying program in, 306–307
“flaming” behavior in digital communication, 143
flexibility
dyadic flexibility, 76, 80
and dynamic systems approach, 73
psychological inflexibility, 89
Ford, M. B., prosocial prototype, 387
Forgatch, Marion S.
aversive behavior in families, 11
dissemination of interventions, 400
interrupting coercion, 194–214
Linking the Interests of Families and Teachers (LIFT), 288
negative reinforcement models, 109
Oregon Divorce Study, 18
parent training in Norway, 207
positive outcomes of Parent-Management Training, 353
role of emotions in intervention, 9
formative augmentals, 91
Foshee, V., reducing dating violence, 307
Fossett, Brenda, 341–355
Fourth R: Skills for Youth Relationships Project, 307–308
friendships
coercion in, 63
elective vs. by default, 134–135
and peer contagion, 133
Fritz, P. T., relationship transitions and intimate partner violence, 176
Fükkink, R. G., video feedback interventions, 321
functional analytic approach to violent coercion, 222–224
Futh, A., social learning theory-based intervention, 320
G
Gambetti, E., social interactions of anger-prone children, 383
game theory, and nature of interdependence, 380
gangs
community contexts for, 61–62
development of in adolescence, 60
interventions targeting, 65
prevalence of coercive strategies, 135
(p. 411) Ge, X. J., genetic relation to fathers' coercion, 121
genetics
and coercive relationship dynamics, 27–29
and development of anxiety, 250
DNA methylation, 33
and epigenetics, 64–65
gene-environment interactions, 31–32
and gene expression, 32–33
genetically informed study design, 254–255
genetic relation to fathers' coercion, 120–122
and individual resilience and vulnerability, 397–398
Germany, school playgrounds and aggression, 287
Giusberti, F., social interactions of anger-prone children, 383
goals
and advantages of prosocial prototype, 387
defining in social interaction, 385–386
and prosocial family styles, 389
of social interaction, 383
Gollwitzer, P. M., goals of social interaction, 383
Good Behavior Game, 288, 289, 295–296
Gorman, B. S., benefits of group-based intervention, 274
Gottman, J. M.
coercion in distressed marriages, 155
mimicking functional couples, 270
parenting and emotion coaching, 390
prosocial family styles, 389
Gottman, John, Specific Affect Coding System, 198
Gould, Stephen Jay, 296
Granic, Isabela
anxiety in coercive family processes, 231–248
attractor state, 164
coercive patterns in families, 70–71
group-based interventions
for aggressive children, 278–282
benefits of, 274–277
group leader coding system, 281
potential problems associated with, 277–278
vs. individual interventions, 278–281
Guerra, Nancy G., school bullying to dating violence, 300–312
Guichard, A. C., prosocial prototype, 387
H
Ha, Thao, adolescent romantic relationships, 154–168
Hahlweg, K., negative reciprocity, 388
Hanf, Connie, parent-training interventions, 194
Hannan, M. T., social dynamics: models and methods, 368
harassment, and electronic communication, 143, 144
hard vs. soft assembly, of social interactions, 384–385
Harper, B. D., exposure to anger in social situations, 385
Hart, B., language and cognition, 96
Hawley, P. H., soft vs. hard assembly of social interactions, 385
He, J., social interactions of anger-prone children, 383
Heavey, C. L., interdependent relationships, 381
Heerdink, M. W., exposure to anger in social situations, 385
Henggeler, Scott W., dependent behavior in children, 252
Heyman, Richard E.
distressed couples, 261
intimate partner violence, 260–272
“match-and-step-down” process, 265
hierarchy, role in interpersonal relations, 57
Hoeve, M., influence of fathers, 116
holons, definition of, 72
Holton, A., children's physical aggression, 262
homework, strategies for addressing, 197
Hooven, C., parenting and emotion coaching, 390
Horner, Robert H.
positive reinforcement in schools, 397
reducing coercion in schools, 330–340
Horwitz, B., genetic variations and behavior, 27
Hostile Withdrawal scale, and reports of violent coercion, 219
Howe, George W., coercion in interdependent relationships, 379–395
Hudson, J. L.
parental accommodation of child anxiety, 252
reciprocal effects in anxious parents and children, 253
I
Ialongo, Nick, LIFT program, 288
iatrogenic effects of intervention, 400
Iceland, Parent Management Training in, 207–208, 209–210, 209f
identity development, and adolescent peer groups, 129
implicit schema, 318–319
impulsivity
and electronic communication, 143–144
and emotional lability, 45
and externalizing spectrum disorders, 43
Incredible Years program, 122, 274–275, 315
indirect conditioning models, and origins of coercive behavior, 88
infancy, origins of coercive behavior in, 12
interdependence
characteristics of, 379–380
ensembles and styles for navigating, 389–391
and prototype styles, 385–389
skills for navigating, 382–385
interdependent relationships
beyond dyads, 381–382
components of ensembles, 382–383
dimensions of, 380–381
nature of, 380–382
navigational skills as dynamically situated, 382
intergenerational transmission of coercive behavior, 27–29
internal working models, 318–319
intervention
addressing anxiety in treatment of aggression, 243–244
antisocial youth in intervention settings, 137
availability of, 5
for bullying, 306–309
child-oriented treatments, 282–283
in early childhood, 315–316
electronic communication, challenges posed by, 150–151
and family activity setting, 351–352
with fathers, 122–124
group-based interventions, benefits of, 274–277
group-based interventions, problems associated with, 277–278
group vs. individual interventions, 278–281
iatrogenic effects of, 400
individual interventions, identifying effective, 401–402
instructional environments, creating, 335–336
in intimate partner violence, 177
and “match-and-step-down” process, 260
and navigating interdependence, 391–392
nonaversive responses, teaching of, 337, 361
as ongoing process, 295–296
parent-child relationship, changes to, 110t
parent-training programs, 17–20, 21, 194–195, 203f
a positive school climate, establishing, 335
prevention as opposed to treatment, 401
primary, secondary, and tertiary levels of in schools, 333–334
reducing aversive behavior between students, 336–337
school playgrounds as settings for, 288, 289
social-emotional learning framework, 308
social expectations in schools, teaching, 332–333, 336
(p. 412) survivable behavioral interventions, 341, 342–343, 345, 346t, 347
targeting and timing of, 65–66
video feedback, 320–322, 323–325
for violent coercion, 216–218, 220–221, 221–222, 224–225
see also names of individual intervention programs
interviews for assessing violent coercion, 222–223
intimate partner violence (IPV)
among couples in early adulthood, 169–170, 170–171
and antisocial behavior, 173–174, 173f, 174f
and depressive symptoms, 174–175
dyadic context of, 269–270
and dynamic developmental systems model, 171
negative outcomes of, 170
and negative reinforcement of anger, 266–267
and Oregon Youth Study-Couples Study, 171–172
prevention and intervention, 177–178
and reciprocal processes in couples, 261
and relationship outcomes, 177
relationship processes and partner influence, 176–177
and relationship transitions, 176
research and prevention efforts, 178–179
significance of relationship contexts, 175–176
socialization patterns predictive of, 172–173
invalidation, and risk for self-inflicted injury, 188–189
Irvin, Larry, 341–355
Issues Checklist, 235
J
Jaccard, J., parental involvement in anxiety treatment, 256
Jaffee, S. R.
effect of antisocial fathers, 115–116
Jenkins, J., social relations model and dyadic relationships, 31
Johnston, C., parental and child cognitions, 317
Josephson, W. L., reducing dating violence, 307
K
Kame'enui, E. J., school-wide behavioral interventions, 332
Kane, H. S.
prosocial prototype, 387
Kärnä, A., social context of bullying, 303
Kashy, D. A., concept of interdependence, 392n
Kassinove, H., benefits of group-based intervention, 274
Katz, L. F., parenting and emotion coaching, 390
Kavanagh, Kate, LIFT program, 288
Keeping Foster Parents Trained and Supported, 206
Kellam, Shep
LIFT program, 288
long-term impacts of Good Behavior Game, 292
Kelley, Harold H.
concept of interdependence, 392n
interpreting behavior, 382
nature of interdependence, 380
Kelm, J. L., instructional environments, 336
Kemp, C. J., effects of maternal depression, 81
Kendler, K. S., genetic risk and environmental variables, 121–122
Kenny, D. A.
concept of interdependence, 392n
mediational modeling, 18
Kerig, P., authoritative parenting, 390
Khan, Sophia, children with developmental disabilities, 341–355
Kilgore, K., children's physical aggression, 262
Kim, H. K.
aggression in intimate relationships, 305
Kim, Hanjoe, adolescent romantic relationships, 154–168
Kim, Hyoun K.
early adult relationships, 169–181
Knutson, N. M., 3-D Method, 200–201
Kobak, R.
coercive interaction patterns, 319
parental and child cognitions, 317
Koops, W., reactive vs. proactive aggression, 232
Kuha, J., multivariate multilevel survival analyses, 378
Kurtines, W. M., parental involvement in anxiety treatment, 256
Kwon, Samantha, children with developmental disabilities, 341–355
L
LaBorde, C. T., derived relational responding, 90
LaFreniere, P. J., anxiety in parent-child dyads, 253
Lamb, J. H., community context and gang activity, 62
Lamey, A. V., research on anxiety and aggression, 235
Lathrop, Margaret, LIFT program, 288
Laurent, H. K., depression and couples in early adulthood, 175
Lawrence, Erika, violent coercion in intimate relationships, 215–230
Leadbeater, B. J., aggression in intimate relationships, 306
leadership, moderating deviant group effects, 281–282
Lebowitz, E. R., parental accommodation of child anxiety, 252
Lee-Chai, A., goals of social interaction, 383
Lemerise, E. A., exposure to anger in social situations, 385
Lengua, L. J., self-regulation in children, 26
Lenzenweger, M. F., assembly of social interactions, 384
Letendre, J., group leader coding system, 281
Lewin, Kurt, understanding child aggression, 20
Lewis, M. D., pre-specified constraints, 70–71
life history theory, 54–55, 56f
limbic-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis
and family and peer relations, 47
and physiological stress response, 46, 47
and pre-frontal mechanisms of emotional lability, 45
Linehan, M. M., borderline personality disorder, 45–46, 185
Linking the Interests of Families and Teachers (LIFT)
background and participants, 288
components of, 288–289
randomized controlled trials, 289–292, 291f, 292–294, 294–297, 294t
Lipsey, M. W., group intervention and deviant peer groups, 278
Lochman, John E
child-focused cognitive-behavioral interventions., 273–285
group interventions, 400–401
Lohrmann, Sharon, children with developmental disabilities, 341–355
Long, J., bullying and social dominance, 304
Lorber, Michael F.
intimate partner violence, 260–272
“match-and-step-down” process, 265
Lougheed, Jessica P., role of anxiety in aggression, 231–248
Lucyshyn, Joseph M.
children with developmental disabilities, 341–355
functional dynamic of coercion, 397
research on positive behavioral interventions, 338
Lunkenheimer, E. S., effects of maternal depression, 81
M
macrosocial interaction patterns, 54–56, 400
Main, M., internal working models, 321
maladaptive behavior, and derived relational responding, 89–90
(p. 413) Manke, B., genetic and environmental factors, 31
marginalization
and niche finding behavior, 55
and selection of deviant peer groups, 64–65
marital stability and instability
benefits of marital stability, 391
effects of marital instability, 116
Marriage and Parenting in Stepfamilies, 122
Marriage and Parenting in Stepfamilies manual, 206
marriages, coercion in distressed marriages, 155–156
Martin, J. A., emergence of coercion in early childhood, 314–315
Martinez, Charles R.
aggression on school playgrounds, 286–299
negative reinforcement models, 109
Martinez, E., acceptance and commitment therapy, 96
Marwick, A., concept of drama in electronic messaging, 145
Mash, E. J., parental self-efficacy, 71
“match-and-step-down” process
as complementary to coercion, 262–264
and interventions, 260
study of, 264–270
matching law
defined, 87
and social reinforcement, 130
Matias, C., social learning theory-based intervention, 320
Matthys, W., coercive/aggressive prototype, 385
Mayer, G. R., school-wide behavioral interventions, 332
Mayeux, L., bullying and peer popularity, 303–304
McDonald, G. W., power in families, 380
McGraw, K., children's physical aggression, 262
McHugh, L., acceptance and commitment therapy, 96
McIntosh, Kent
positive reinforcement in schools, 397
school-wide behavioral interventions, 330–340
McLeod, B. D., parental behaviors and child anxiety, 251
McMaster, L. W., sexual harassment and bullying, 305
McNulty, T., role of impulsivity, 42f
mediation
conflict resolution programs, 116–117
mediational model, 18–20, 159f
Meeus, W., coercive/aggressive prototype, 385
Menesini, E., bullying and social dominance, 303
Merk, W. W., reactive vs. proactive aggression, 232
Messick, S., model of construct validation, 343
metacognition
building metacognitive capacity, 324–325
and parenting, 318
methylation, DNA, 33
microsocial interaction patterns
among adolescent romantic couples, 157–158
and macrosocial patterns, 54–56, 400
and negative reinforcement, 155
and relationship dynamics, 111–112
between therapists and clients, 199–200
microsocial models
experimental tests of, 108–111
negative reinforcement and coercive social processes, 103–108
predicting child physical aggression, 108f
Miller, G. E., poverty and disease risk, 357
Miller, Lynn, children with developmental disabilities, 341–355
Miller, S., dating violence and bullying, 306
mindfulness
in intervention, 96–98
in parenting, 318, 323
Minuchin, Salvador
cross-generational coalition formation, 381–382
role play in parent management training, 200
Mischel, W.
navigating interdependence, 382
soft vs. hard assembly of social interactions, 384–385
Mlynarski, Laura, interdependent relationships, 379–395
molecular and behavioral genetics approach, 27–29, 33–34
molecular and behavioral levels of analysis, 31–33, 33–34
Moore, K. J.
maternal coercion, 13
video feedback intervention, 321
mothers
aggression in mother-son dyads, 262
interactions with 1-year-olds, 118
maternal coercion, 13
maternal depression, 59–60, 79f, 80–82
maternal sensitivity, 117
motivational techniques, and treatments for violent coercion, 221–222
motivative augmentals, 91
Multidimensional Measure of Emotional Abuse, 219–220, 224f
Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care, 206, 315
multivariate multilevel survival analyses
advantages and reliability of, 367
definition and uses of, 363–364
and depression among adolescent romantic couples, 158–159
discussion, 376–378
measurement system considerations, 376–377
methodological considerations, 377–378
methods, 368
multilevel aspect of, 366–367
path diagram, 365f, 372f, 373f
results, 368, 371–376
Murrell, A. R., derived relational responding, 90
N
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 118
National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, 169
negative behavior repertoires, establishment in childhood, 114
negative reciprocity, 388
negative reinforcement
of adolescent social harassment, 145–146
of anger, 266–267, 267f, 268f
and borderline personality disorder, 185
of child anxiety, 251
and coercive behavior, 2
and coercive social processes, 103–108
and deviancy training, 147–148
early patterns of, 119–120
identifying and measuring, 104–105, 105–107
neurobiology of, 255–256
proposed model for, 107–108, 108f
and self-inflicted injury, 185–186, 186–187, 189
and violent coercion, development of, 215
Neiderheiser, J. M., genetic variations and behavior, 27
Netherlands, The
Coping Power program in, 276–277
school playgrounds and aggression, 287
neurobiology
and individual resilience and vulnerability, 397–398
of negative reinforcement, 255–256
neurotransmitter systems, 28–29
Newman, R. S., dynamic assembly of social interaction, 384
niche finding
reciprocal nature of, 56f
and reinforcement of coercive behavior, 4
and social exclusion and marginalization, 55
Nix, R., harsh parental discipline, 317
Nocentini, A., bullying and social dominance, 303
noncompliance in children, 59, 197
Nordahl, Kristin B., fathers and coercion dynamics, 114–128
(p. 414) Norway
Behavior Outlook Norwegian Developmental Study, 117, 118, 119, 120
Parent Management Training in, 21, 204, 207, 209–210, 209f
O
O'Connor, T. G.
social learning theory-based intervention, 320
social relations model and dyadic relationships, 31
ontogenic process model, of externalizing behavior, 42
oppositional defiant disorder
and development of emotional lability, 44
development of in families, 102
Oregon Divorced Father Study, 121
Oregon Divorce Study, 18, 109, 195
Oregon Social Learning Center
changes in the form of deviancy, 14
Parent Management Training, 17–18
school playgrounds as intervention settings, 288
Oregon Youth Study, 60, 116
Oregon Youth Study-Couples Study
bidirectionality of intimate partner violence, 170–171, 178
influence of aggression on relationship outcomes, 177
and intimate partner violence, 171–172
partner influence in romantic couples, 176–177
relationship transitions and intimate partner violence, 176
significance of relationship contexts, 175–176
Orengo-Aguayo, Rosaura, 215–230
Orth-Gomer, K., marital conflict and disease risk, 357
outcomes
of addressing playground aggression, 290–292, 291f, 292–294
of coercion in relationships, 53, 54f
overlearned activity, coercive exchange as, 9, 56
Owen, L. D.
influence of aggression on relationship outcomes, 177
Owens, L.
jealousy and bullying, 304
sexual harassment and bullying, 304–305
P
Parent and Child Coding System, 344
parent-child behavioral patterns
and development of child anxiety, 249
examples of coercion, 302
genetically informed study design, 254–255
parental accommodation of child anxiety, 251–252, 256–257
reciprocal effects in anxious parents and children, 252–253
parent-child interactions
recording interactions, 324
and relational schema, 316–320, 322–323
repair of, 81–82
video feedback of, 320–321
Parent-Child Interaction Therapy, 110, 315
parent-child relationships
alternative caregivers and mother-child coercion, 79
coercion in, 23–24
differentiation in parent-child dynamics, 31
disrupted parenting and deviant peer groups, 62
effects of parental depression, 71–72
factors leading to coercion, 70–71
informative parenting, 95–96
parent-child coercion, 69
and parenting practices, 111t
parent training intervention, 110t
punishment vs. reinforcement of behavior, 86–87
resistance to change, 98
specific coercive behaviors in, 102
in toddler years, 70
parenting
authoritative parenting, 390
child adjustment and predictive factors, 120
as component of Coping Power program, 276
co-parenting, 116–117, 389
and development of child anxiety, 250–252
early childhood intervention programs, 315–316
early patterns of negative reinforcement, 119–120
fathers' early parenting, 117–118
feuding between parents, 391
insecure parenting and coercive interactions, 319
mindful parenting, 318
and neurobiological systems, 188
parental involvement in anxiety treatment, 256
permissiveness and aggression in children, 235, 236, 236f, 236t, 237, 237t
positive parenting and prosocial behavior, 195
and relational schemas, 316–320, 322–323
and relationship dynamics, 111t
reliance on preexisting schema, 319–320
unpredictable parenting hypothesis, 233– 239, 238f, 239
video feedback interventions, 320–322
Parenting Through Change manual, 206
Parent Management Training
and applying coercion theory, 17–20, 21
critical outcomes, 20f
with fathers, 122, 123, 124
issues in divorce, 206
in LIFT program, 289
Parent Management Training-Oregon Model (PMTO)
assessment of, 196
content of, 196–198
core principles of, 203f
described, 194
development and implementation of, 210–211
effectiveness in early childhood, 315
iterations and loops, 194–196
process of, 199–203
process skills in, 201t, 202t
program fidelity and flexibility, 203–210, 205f
sample content and order of sessions, 197t
parent-training programs
core principles of, 115, 194–195
cultural context of, 204–206
and relational schema, 316–320, 322–323
Parke, R. D., support groups for fathers, 123
Patterson, Gerald R.
coercion, emergence of in early childhood, 314, 319
coercion in couple relationships, 261
coercion model, 80
coercion theory: the study of change, 7–22
coercive behavior, descriptive insights into, 40
coercive family patterns, 70–71
coercive family process, 124
conflict bout, defined, 265
conflict chains, 11
contributions to psychological theory, 330
development of models, 2
dynamic systems approach, 72–73
emotion and coercive processes, 261, 262
escape-conditioning, 390
influence of, 116
Linking the Interests of Families and Teachers (LIFT), 288
matching law, 87
micro and macro mechanisms, 400
mother-son dyads, negative reinforcement in, 262
nonaversive responses, teaching, 337
parental cognition and behaviors, 317
parent-child coercion, model of, 69, 70
parent-child dyads, reciprocal effects in, 255
parent-child interaction, bidirectional, 130
(p. 415) Parent-Management Training, positive outcomes of, 353
Parent Management Training Program-Oregon Model, 194
parent training in Norway, 207
peer coalitions in school, 59
social interaction learning theory, 114, 196
struggle/work through hypothesis, 200
treatment failures, examining, 199
peer relationships
delinquent peer groups and intimate partner violence, 173–174
deviancy, changes in the form of, 14–17, 16f
and deviancy training, 14, 146–150, 287
deviant behavior, reinforcing, 196
deviant peer groups, 13–14, 14f, 60, 287
effects of coercive behavior, 4
and electronic communication, 141, 142–146
and group-based intervention, 277–278
partner influence in romantic couples, 176–177
peer coalitions in school, 59–60, 60f
peer coercion, 130–131, 134t
peer contagion, 129, 130, 131–133, 133f
peer contagion, risk factors for, 134t
peer contagion vs. peer coercion, 133–136
peer rejection, first encounters of, 240
poor- vs. high-quality interactions, 133
prosocial behavior, developing, 137
significance in adolescence, 129
Pelligrini, A. D.
bullying and social dominance, 304
deviant peer groups in adolescence, 62
Penner, L. A., prosocial prototype, 386
Pepler, D. J.
reducing dating violence, 307
sexual harassment and bullying, 305
permissiveness and aggression in children, 235, 236, 236f, 236t, 237, 237t
person-environment processes, 23–25, 33–34
perspective-taking and shifting abilities, 95–96
physical aggression, microsocial model predicting, 108f
physical violence, examples of, 216
physiological regulation, and preventing coercive interactions, 25–26
physiological stress response, and long-term effects of coercion, 46–47
Piehler, Timothy F.
child and adolescent peer relationships, 129–139
deviancy training, 399
Pijpers, F., playground as context for aggression, 287
Pike, A., genetic and environmental factors, 31
Pina, A. A., parental involvement in anxiety treatment, 256
Pincus, A. L., assembly of social interactions, 384
playgrounds
as context for coercion, 286–288
occurrences of aggression, 286
pliance
and rule-governed behavior, 90–91
vs. tracking, 92–93
Poduska, Jean, LIFT program, 288
Polman, H., reactive vs. proactive aggression, 232
polyvagal theory, 44
Porges, S. W., polyvagal theory, 44
Positive Behavioral Intervention and Supports, 307
Positive Life Changes program, 308–309
positive psychology, and coercion theory, 351
positive reinforcement
establishing a positive school climate, 335
role in shaping behavior, 2–3
positivity vs. upregulation, 165
Poskiparta, E., social context of bullying, 303
post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and Parent Management Training Program, 198
poverty
and likelihood of conflict and coercion, 357
policies to reduce, 360
Powell, Nicole, 273–285
Pratt, M. W., authoritative parenting, 390
predictability, children's search for, 87
predictive adaptive responses, 54
prefrontal cortex, and emotional lability, 44–45
pre-specified constraints, concept of, 70–71
prevention
establishing a positive school climate, 335
vs. treatment, 401
primates, social coalitions among, 55
Prinstein, M. J., popularity vs. social status, 58
problem solving, and parent management training, 198, 201–203
process skills, in parent management training, 201t, 202t
prosocial behavior
adaptive use of, 384, 385
and coping with adversity, 400
developing among peers, 137
dyadic and family styles involving, 389
learning, 97
and positive parenting, 195
prosocial prototype, 386–387, 386t
public benefits of strengthening, 358–359
prototype styles, and interdependence, 385–389
psychological aggression, 216, 224f
psychological inflexibility, 89
Psychological Maltreatment of Women Inventory, 217
psychopathology, and conflict, 74
psychophysiological measures, and aversive behavior, 188
public health
coercion as public health issue, 356–357
epidemiology and coercion, 359
key features of a public health effort, 356
nationwide advocacy to reduce coercion, 360–361
policies addressing coercion, 360
surveillance of coercion, 359–360
targeting incidence and prevalence of coercion, 357–359
punishment
developing effective, 8
parental reliance on, 92
and perception of authority figures, 91–92
vs. reinforcement of behavior, 86–87
Q
Quality of Marriage Inventory, 264
R
Rains, L. A., 3-D Method, 200–201
Ramsey, Betsy
descriptive insights into coercive behavior, 40
LIFT program, 288
Rapee, R. M., parental accommodation of child anxiety, 252
Rasbash, J., social relations model and dyadic relationships, 31
reciprocity, negative, 388
Reid, John, LIFT program, 288
reinforcement of coercive behavior
and “niche-finding” in social development, 4
relative reinforcement, 87
vs. punishment, 86–87
reinforcement of positive behavior
establishing a positive school climate, 335
and instrumental reinforcement, 8
Reiss, D., social relations model and dyadic relationships, 31
rejection
and default friendships, 134–135
effects of personal rejection, 64
first encounters of peer rejection, 240
parental rejection and child anxiety, 250
protection against in digital communication, 143
relational frame theory
defined, 86
and derived relational responding, 89–90
experiential avoidance, 94
(p. 416) fusion with parenting rules, 93–94
and information in context, 91–92
and intervention, 96–98
and overlearned coercive grammar, 57
overview of, 88–89
and relational schema, 322
and role of family in social development, 95–96
and role of language in human learning, 399
and rule-governed behavior, 90–91
tracking vs. pliance, 92–93
relational responding, 88–89, 90
relational schema
and early childhood intervention, 316
in parent-child interactions, 316–320
and video feedback intervention, 322
Relationship Affect Coding System, 75
relationships
aggression and relationship outcomes, 177
and altered stress-response systems, 188
effects of coercive behavior in youth, 4
microsocial coercive dynamics, 111–112
and negative reinforcement of anger, 266–267
open vs. closed, 134–136
partner influence, 176–177
sustaining healthy relationships, 401–402
transitions in early adulthood, 176
relative reinforcement, 87
research
challenges posed by electronic communication, 150–151
experience sampling methods, 241
on positive behavioral interventions and supports, 337–338
resiliency
individual resilience and vulnerability, 397–398
utilizing in families, 190
resistance to change, 199–200
respiratory sinus arrhythmia
and aversive and coercive behaviors, 188
and emotional lability, 44
respondent conditioning analysis, 87–88
Restrictive Engulfment scale, 219
Reuben, Julia D., parental depression, 69–85
Revenstorf, D., negative reciprocity, 388
Revised Conflict Tactics Scale, 264
Reyes, H. L., reducing dating violence, 307
Richters, J. E., attachment and learning theory, 318
rigidity, and dynamic systems approach, 73
Risley, T. R., language and cognition, 96
Rogers, L. J., derived relational responding, 90
role play
in parent management training, 200–201
in treating anxiety and aggression, 242
romantic couples in adolescence
avoidance of conflict, 163–164
and coercive processes and dynamics, 154–155, 156–159
resolution of conflict, 158f
role of upregulation, 165
and symptoms of depression, 155
romantic couples in early adulthood
coercion and aggression among, 169–171
depressive symptoms and intimate partner violence, 174–175
intervention methods with, 177–178
partner influence in, 176–177
relationship outcomes, 177
relationship transitions, 176
significance of relationship contexts, 175–176
socialization patterns and intimate partner violence, 172–173
rule-governed behavior
derived rules, 91–92
overview of, 90–91
tracking vs. pliance, 92–93
S
Safe Dates program, 307, 308
Salmivalli, C.
bullying and social dominance, 303
social context of bullying, 303
Sampson, R. J., community context and gang activity, 62
schematic cognitions, and parent-child interactions, 317
Schindler, L., negative reciprocity, 388
schools
Anger Coping program in, 275
coercive cycles in, 330–332, 331f
common day-to-day aggression in, 286
Coping Power program in, 275–277, 276, 281
creating instructional environments, 335–336
establishing a positive school climate, 335
Linking the Interests of Families and Teachers (LIFT), 288–289
playgrounds as context for aggression, 286–288
promoting school success, 197
reducing aversive behavior between students, 336–337
shortage of evidence-based interventions in, 295
teaching nonaversive responses, 337, 361
School Transitions Project, 107
School-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports
features and framework of, 332–334
prevention capabilities of, 330
reducing coercion through, 334–337
research agenda for schools, 337–338
status and outcomes of, 334
Schulz, H., playground as context for aggression, 287
Schwenk, C., coercive/aggressive prototype, 385
Scott, S., social learning theory-based intervention, 320
Second Step Violence Prevention Program, 308
self-defense, and women's use of violence, 223
self-inflicted injury
and autonomic reactivity, 45–46
correlates of, 189
developmental psychopathology perspective on, 183–184
developmental theories and related conditions, 184–185
etiology of and risk factors for, 182–183, 187–188, 188–189
transactional developmental model of, 186f
self-regulation
and behavioral and molecular genetics, 28, 29, 32
and coercion in parent-child relationships, 24–25
development of in children, 24–25, 58–59
in high-risk peer environments, 132–133
and social relationships, 25–27
sensitivity, of mothers vs. fathers, 117
sequences of behavior
and defining coercion, 8, 9–10, 9f
in families, 13
Serketich, W. J., anxiety in parent-child dyads, 253
serotonin
neurotransmitter systems, 28–29, 32
risk associated with low levels of, 187
sexting, challenges to intervention, 150–151
sexual aggression, examples of, 216
sexual harassment, and bullying, 304–305, 309–310
sexual relationships
and deviant peer groups, 62
and premature autonomy, 61f
Shadowen, Noel L., school bullying to dating violence, 300–312
Shaw, Daniel S.
caregivers' relational schema, 318
emergence of coercion in early childhood, 314–315
Family Check-Up intervention, 82
intensity and duration of coercion, 59
maternal coercion, 13
parental depression, 69–85
video feedback intervention, 321
Shifting Boundaries program, 308
Shoda, Y.
navigating interdependence, 382
(p. 417) soft vs. hard assembly of social interactions, 384–385
Shortt, J. W.
aggression in intimate relationships, 305
conflict in adolescent romantic relationships, 166
influence of aggression on relationship outcomes, 177
Shortt, Joann Wu, early adult relationships, 169–181
Shute, R., sexual harassment and bullying, 304–305
siblings
sibling collusion, 302
variations in behavior among, 29
Sijtsema, J. J., status-based bullying goals, 303
Silverman, Wendy K., anxiety in children, 249–259
simple right censoring, in multivariate multilevel survival analyses, 364–365
Sitnick, S. L., positive outcomes of Family Check-Up, 316
skills deficits, and violent coercion, 220
Skinner, B.F.
analysis of verbal behavior, 86
and development of coercion theory, 7
origin of operant behaviors, 40, 41
social reinforcement, 64
Skrondal, A., multivariate multilevel survival analyses, 378
Slee, P., sexual harassment and bullying, 304–305
Slep, A. M. S.
coercion and “match-and-step-down” process, 265
relationship transitions and intimate partner violence, 176
Small Group Dinosaur curriculum, 274–275
smartphones, and increased access, 141, 143
Smith, Justin D.
caregivers' relational schema, 318
intensity and duration of coercion, 59
maternal coercion, 13
video feedback intervention, 313–329, 401
Smith Slep, Amy M., 260–272
Snyder, James J.
child antisocial behavior, 368
coercion, complementary processes to, 263
coercion, intensity and duration of, 59
coercion and digital communication, 141–142
coercion dynamics: past, present, and future, 396–403
coercive peer interactions, 130, 131
coercive social processes, an introduction, 1–5
conflict bout, 265
deviancy training in younger children, 136
dynamic systems approach, 72–73
emotion, quantified studies of, 41
“functional” aggression on playgrounds, 287
matching law, 87
mother-son dyads, negative reinforcement in, 262
parental cognition and behaviors, 317
peer rejection and antisocial behavior, 59–60
social behaviors
alternatives to coercion, 3
and LIFT program, 290
teaching social expectations in schools, 332–333, 336
social coalitions, among nonhuman primates, 55
social context
of bullying, 303
and intervention efforts, 295, 297–298
significance in coercive behavior, 3, 47, 87–88
social cultures
establishing a positive school climate, 335
importance of building positive cultures, 332
social development
damage from coercive processes, 92–93
effect of learned coercive behavior, 4
role of family in, 95–96
social-emotional learning intervention, 308
social exclusion
and digital communication, 142
and niche finding behavior, 55
social interaction learning model (SIL)
applying coercion theory, 18, 21
focus of, 114–115
and Parent Management Training Program-Oregon Model, 194
social interactions
assembly of in dyads and families, 387–388
and coercive/aggressive prototypes, 385–386, 386t
dynamic assembly of, 383–384
effects of pain in, 64
goals of, 383
patterns in deviant peer groups, 62–63, 130
and prosocial prototype, 386–387, 386t
soft vs. hard assembly of, 384–385
socialization
effect of delayed, 314–315
reciprocal nature of, 56f
role of families in, 101–102
social learning
coercive relationship dynamics, 106f
social learning perspective on violent coercion, 219–221
social media, and concept of drama, 145
social reinforcement, and deviant peer behavior, 130
social relationships
and developing self-regulation, 25–27
and related social problems, 1
social support as buffer to genetic risk, 121
social relations model, and dyadic relationships, 30
social status
and adolescent progression to violence, 62–63
and bullying behaviors, 302–303
defining and measuring, 57–58
and proactive aggression, 232
and use of electronic messaging, 145–146
and use of violence and aggression, 63–64
socioverbal community, reinforcement in, 89
Sorensen, A. B., estimating rates from retrospective questions, 368
source anonymity, 142, 143
Specific Affect Coding System, 160, 172, 198, 235, 368
stage model, of coercive behavior development, 13–14, 20
Stanford, K., playground as context for aggression, 287
State Space Grid, 158f, 240f
statistical interactions, at behavioral and molecular levels of analysis, 31–33
Stoolmiller, M. S.
deviant peer affiliation, 60
genetic risk and environmental variables, 121
measuring negative reinforcement, 106
premature autonomy, 61
resistance to change, 200
Strange Situation procedure, 318
Strodtbeck, F. L., interdependent relationships, 381
structural equation model framework, and multivariate multilevel survival analyses, 363
struggle/work through hypothesis, 200
Study of Early Child Care, 118
styles, and interdependent social situations, 384, 389–391
substance use, and premature autonomy, 61, 61f
Sugai, G., school-wide positive behavioral interventions, 332
Suhr, J. A., interdependent relationships, 381
suicidal behavior vs. nonsuicidal self-injury, 183–184
Sukhodolsky, D. G., benefits of group-based intervention, 274
(p. 418) Supporting Father Involvement, 122, 123
survivable behavioral interventions, 341, 342–343
survival analyses, and depression among adolescent couples, 158–159
Swanson, C., mimicking functional couples, 270
T
Tackett, J., social relations model and dyadic relationships, 31
Tantam, G., social learning theory-based intervention, 320
Teacher Rating Form, 368
teaching, in parent management training, 200–203
Tharp, Linda, LIFT program, 288
therapist behaviors, to moderate deviant group effects, 281–282
Thibaut, J. W., interdependence, 380, 392n
Thompson-Hollands, J., parental accommodation of child anxiety, 252
Thornberry, T. P., deviant peer coalitions, 61
Tiberio, Stacey S.
aggression in intimate relationships, 305
early adult relationships, 169–181
Time Out sequence
cultural contexts and, 205–206
problem solving and, 202
role play and parent training for, 201
Toddler and Parent Interaction Coding System, 118
topography of coercive behaviors, 2
tracking
in parent-child interactions, 96–97
and rule-governed behavior, 90
vs. pliance, 92–93
transactional process in parent-child dyads, 253–254, 256–257
transformation of function, in relational frame theory, 89
treatment
with fathers, 122– 124, 124
vs. prevention, 401
Tremblay, R. E., developmental perspective on coercion, 12
triangulation, in interdependent relationships, 381–382, 388
Triple P program, 122
Trötschel, R., goals of social interaction, 383
Tuma, N. B., social dynamics: models and methods, 368
U
Underwood, Marion K.
adolescent text messages, 309, 399
electronic messaging, 140–153
upregulation
and conflict resolution in adolescent couples, 156–157
testing model of, 159–162, 161t, 162t, 163t
uses and risks of, 164–165
vs. positivity, 165
V
vagal tone, and emotional lability, 44
Vaillancourt, T., playground as context for aggression, 287
values, in acceptance and commitment therapy, 97–98
van Boxtel, A., coercive/aggressive prototype, 385
van Boxtel, H. W., reactive vs. proactive aggression, 232
van der Bruggen, C. O., parental and child anxiety, 251
Van Doesum, N. J., prosocial prototype, 387
Van Doorn, E. A., exposure to anger in social situations, 385
van Geert, P., dynamic assembly of social interaction, 384
Van Kleef, G. A., exposure to anger in social situations, 385
Van Lange, D. A. W. and P., prosocial prototype, 387
Van Ryzin, M.
coercive joining, 131, 148
default friendships among youth, 135
deviancy training, 134, 135f
progression into violent behavior, 102
Van Zeijl, J., attachment-based intervention, 320
Verloove-Vanhorick, S., playground as context for aggression, 287
video feedback interventions
and cognitive-affective processing system, 323f
conducting effective interventions, 323–325, 324f
the theory behind, 320–322
Video-Feedback Intervention to Promote Positive Parenting, 323, 324
violence
amplification from antisocial behavior, 63f
and deviant peer groups, 60
escalations to, 16–17, 17f
progression to in adolescence, 60–64
reducing dating violence, 307
reinforcement of, 63–64
and skills deficits, 220
Volk, A. A., bullying prevention, 307
vulnerability
to coercive relationship dynamics, 42–43, 47–48
and individual resilience, 397–398
W
Wade, T. D., genetic risk and environmental variables, 121–122
Wahler, Robert G.
children's search for predictability, 87
parent-training interventions, 194
Walker, Hill, LIFT program, 288
Waller, R., Family Affective Attitudes Rating Scale, 318
Waters, E., attachment and learning theory, 318
Western Reserve Reading Project, 29
Williams, S. R., anxiety in parent-child dyads, 254
Williamson, Ariel A., school bullying to dating violence, 300–312
Wilson, K. G., derived relational responding, 90
Wilson, M. N.
caregivers' relational schema, 318
Family Check-Up intervention, 82
intensity and duration of coercion, 59
maternal coercion, 13
video feedback intervention, 321
Wolfe, D. M., resource theory of family power, 380
Wolke, D., playground as context for aggression, 287
Women's Experiences with Battering questionnaire, 217
Woodruff-Borden, J., anxiety in parent-child dyads, 253–254
Woods, S., playground as context for aggression, 287
work struggle hypothesis, 20
Wright, A. G. C., assembly of social interactions, 384
Wright, J. C., assembly of social interactions, 384–385
X
Xu, S., “match-and-step-down” process, 265
Y
Yeung, R., aggression in intimate relationships, 306
Youth Relationships Project, 307
Z
Zalewski, Maureen
emotional lability, 39–52
Zarling, Amie Langer
violent coercion, 215–230
Zoller, D., prosocial prototype, 386–387