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date: 18 June 2019

(p. 607) Index

(p. 607) Index

Abysmal Brute, The, 5, 52, 195, 558, 561n37
Acorn Planter, The
authorship of, 203
conflicting ideologies in, 218–221
contradictions and tensions in, 217
evaluating message of, 216–217
historical sources for, 214–215
as operetta, 214
organizing principle of, 218
origins of, 213–214
plot of, 215–216
polar opposition in, 217–218
A Cry for Justice (Sinclair), 51
action vs. language, theme of, 266–267
Adam, Philip, 150, 598
Adam Bede (Eliot), 338
Adams, George
Jack London as Playwright, 203–223
Adams, Henry, 573
Adams, Herbert B., 253
Adams, Rachel, 461
adaptibility, and individualism, 269–270, 271–273
adolescence, mentoring in, 43–45
Adventures of a Scholar-Tramp (Mullin), 474
adventure stories, and appeal of London’s writing, 41
advertising
introduction to newspapers and magazines, 113, 126n2
London’s image in, 497, 498, 595
Aegis, high school literary magazine, 43, 44, 241–242, 482
Africans
and idea of “savages” in London’s age, 461–462
and racist construct of the “ape,” 462–463
“Again the Literary Aspirant,” 188
Agamben, Giorgio, 505, 512
Age of Miracles, The (Walker), 324
“agit-prop” drama, 212
agriculture
Alaskan Indians, perspective on, 182
Alger, Horatio, 359
Allen, E. F., 90n13
Allen, Grant, 187
Already Dead: The New Time of Politics, Culture, and Illness (Cazdyn), 325
Althusser, Louis, 345, 531–532
“American Adam,” discourse of, 345, 346
American Antivivisection Society, 463
American Federation for Sex Hygiene, 422
American Federation of Labor (AFL), 162
American Humane Association, 463
American Magazine, The, 163
American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), 463
American Sunday Monthly Magazine, 360
“American Tramp Considered Geographically, The” (Flynt), 473, 479
America’s Asia (Lye), 183–184
“Analytical Language of John Wilkins, The” (Borges), 456
Anderson, Amanda, 121
Anderson, Paul Thomas, 509, 514n30
Anderson, Sherwood, 311
androgyny, portrayed in The Sea-Wolf, 311
“Androgyny in the Novels of Jack London” (Stasz), 376
“And Some Night,” 228
Anglo-American Magazine, The, 182
Anglo-Saxon superiority
and The Acorn Planter, 219–220
assertions of in Valley of the Moon, 66
and racial writings, 182
(p. 608)
and recapitulation in The Valley of the Moon, 445–450, 452n16
and social Darwinism, 263
animal advocacy organizations, founding of, 463
animality
attributes of in humans, 462–463, 463–464
and economic conflict, 465–466
animality studies
the ape, racist appropriations of, 462–463
and discourse of “the jungle,” 463–464
human/animal binary, politics of constructing, 466–467
and potential bestiary of London’s age, 456–457
the wolf, characteristics and history of, 459–461
animal law, as defined by property law, 468n7
animals
animal criminality, history of, 457–458
animal vs. human agency, 468n7
the ape, racist appropriations of, 462–463
classes of in Borges’s “The Analytical Language of John Wilkins,” 456
consequences of categorizing as “other,” 297–298
and discourse of “the jungle,” 463–464
human/animal binary, politics of constructing, 466–467
human beings among displays of, 461–462
interspecies emotional bonding, 296, 299
potential bestiary of London’s age, 456–457
the wolf, characteristics and history of, 459–461
“Animal That Therefore I Am, The” (Derrida), 297, 298, 299, 466
Annie Kilburn (Howells), 568
anthropocentrism, in The Valley of the Moon, 450n4
anti-imperialism
and The Overland Monthly, 16–20, 24n3
in stories of Hawaii and the South Seas, 29
and U.S. annexation of overseas territories, 412
antinomy, as weakness in literature, 217
apes, in the bestiary of London’s age, 462–463
apocalyptic literature, and methods of governance, 367–368
“Apostate, The,” 29
demands of hard labor in, 555
and experiences in factory jobs, 180
and “gutter-wolves” portrayed in The People of the Abyss, 443
historical reality of, 33
human suffering depicted in, 550
Appeal to Reason, 51, 163, 172
Applegarth, Edmund “Ted” and Mabel, 45, 53, 224, 232
Arcadia (Groff), 324
Archer, Alison
The Valley of the Moon: Quest for Love, Land, and a Home, 373–386
Arnold, Matthew, 132
Arosteguy, Katie, 376
Arthur, Anthony, 53, 203
articles, scope of work on, 178–179
As It Was in the Beginning, 206
Ask, The (Lipsyte), 320
Assassination Bureau, The, 52
“A Story of the Stone Age” (Wells), 244
atavism
atavistic regression game in The Sea-Wolf, 311
Jack London’s atavistic metropolis, 440–445
and recapitulation and modernity in The Valley of the Moon, 445–450
and role of technology in evolution, 439–440
Atherton, Frank, 31, 42, 43
“A Thousand Deaths,” 47
Atlantic Monthly
“An Odyssey of the North,” 186
essays on tramps in 1890s, 473, 479
response to The Valley of the Moon, 374
Auden, W. H., 509
Auerbach, Jonathan
“adventure writer” image, 91–92n18
allegorical interpretation of The Call of the Wild, 292
compilation of The Son of the Wolf, 265
London and consumer culture, 116
London’s conversion to socialism, 517
London’s “trademark,” 186
(p. 609)
maritime literature, 507
opening lines of The Call of the Wild, 300n10
portrayals of Indian women, 563–564
racial contradictions in fiction, 557
Australian Star, The, newspaper, 184, 190, 192
authorial and personal identity, 2, 595, 606n42
authorial viewpoint, and temporal omniscience in Klondike stories, 270
Author Under Sail: The Imagination of Jack London (Williams), 11n2
Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man (Johnson), 463
Autobiography of Jack London, An (Brennan), 178
automatic writing, in “Planchette,” 568
Awakening, The (Chopin), 505
Aylward, William J.
history as illustrator, 579
illustrated serialization of The Sea-Wolf, 580
illustration for The Sea-Wolf, 581–582, 582f
painting of nautical scenes, 580–581
Babcock, A. L., 500
Babylonia, 206
Bachner, Sally, 322
Baggett, Paul
Jack London and Physical Culture, 490–503
Bakhtin, M. M.
concept of intertextuality, 578
dialogically directed discourse, 153, 158n6
Bamford, Frederick Irons, 44, 53, 232
Barbarous Mexico (Turner), 163, 166
Barclay, Florence, 95
Barnes, Djuna, 9
Barrymore, Ethel, 207
Bashkov, Gennady, 107
Basket, Sam S., 311
Bates, Blanche, 207
Bauman, Zygmount, 506
Beach, Rex, 96, 104, 110n35
bear, symbolism of in The Iron Heel, 444–445
Beauchamp, Gorman, 407n5
Beau Geste (Wren), 106
Beaumont, Matthew, 531
Beauty Ranch, concept of, 220–221
Beech, Rex, 35
Before Adam
contrasting ideas of time in, 244–245, 250
credibility of, 246
cultural memories and individual memories, 248
doubling of characters in, 252
“Fire People” and the Machine Age, 438–440
“Fire People,” technological advantage of, 438–439
lines from “Story of an Eyewitness,” 364
plot of, 364–365
serialized publication of, 36
Beinart, Peter, 318
Bellamy, Edward, 62, 517, 519–520, 530–531, 540n15, 542–543n31
Bellow, Saul, 312
Belmont Academy laundry, work at, 31
Bender, Burt, 215, 422, 430, 505
benevolence novels, 568
Benga, Ota, 461, 462
Benjamin, Walter, 9, 122, 123, 126n3
Bentley, Nancy, 120
Berguson, Henri, 9, 123
Berkman, Alexander, 181, 199
Berliner, Jonathan, 260–261, 265, 359
Berne Convention, 95, 108n2
Besant, Walter, 280
bestiary, of London’s age
the ape, 462–463
and discourse of “the jungle,” 463–464
and inclusion of “the savage,” 461–462
the octopus and the cow, 464–466
potential bestiary, 456–457
the wolf, 459–461
Bierce, Ambrose
as literary influence, 243, 355
London on continuum with, 12
and mentoring of George Sterling, 50
and The Overland Monthly, 25n17
postapocalyptic stories by, 364
and public taste in literature, 28
reaction to The Sea-Wolf, 311, 314
“The Hidden Valley,” 23
Big Money, The (Dos Passos), 347
“Big Socialist Vote is Fraught with Meaning,” 181, 184
(p. 610) bildungsroman
and the castaway adventure in The Sea-Wolf, 303, 308
closing gulf between self and narrator, 332
The Iron Heel as a, 316–317, 327n11
and opening of Martin Eden, 331
origins of, 324
significance of choice in, 333
Billy the Kid, 206, 207
Binns, Archie, 209
Birth Control Review (Sanger), 424
Birthmark, The, 203, 204–205
Birth of the Jungle: Animality in Progressive-Era Literature and Culture (Lundblad), 295–296, 460, 463
Birth Rates, Overpopulation, and the Cost of Living (Woodruff), 367
“Bit of Data, On the Japanese Question,” 184
Black Cat magazine, 47, 188
Black Riders (Crane), 8, 235
“Black Vulture, The” (Sterling), 233, 234
Blackwood’s Magazine, 587
Bloch, M., 197
Blum, Hester, 508
Blumenschein, Ernest L.
illustrations for “Love of Life,” 586–587, 588f
illustrative style of, 587–588
London’s admiration for illustrations by, 583
specializationn in Western scenes, 579
Boehner, John, 515, 538n2
Boer War, 145
Bohemian Club, play written for, 213
Bond, Marshall, 45
Bondman, The (Caine), 98–99
Bookman, The, 187, 479
Book of Jack London, The (Kittredge), 209, 449
Book of Sharks, A, 83
book reviews, in the national and international press, 239
Bookseller, The, 104
Bookspan, Shelley, 388
Boon, Charles, 100
Booth, William, 278–279, 280, 286
Borges, Jorge Luis, 108, 456
Boston Evening Transcript, 373
Bosworth, Hobart, 374
bourgeoisie
and access to books and literature, 34–35
ennui as illness exclusive to, 343n16
Martin Eden’s decline and failure within, 338
bourgeois novel, in twenty-first century
coming-of-age novels, 324
focus on individual needs and obligations, 323, 324
bourgeois resilence, against conversionary model of politics, 536–538
bovarysme, defined, 313
boxing
as an ideal of masculine toughness, 550–552
article on Jim Jeffries--Jack Johnson fight, 195
displays of masculinity in, 558
endurance portrayed in stories of, 554
“Gladiators of the Machine Age,” essay article, 194
personal interest in, 195
and “The Mexican,” 165–166
Boyden, Albert, 577
boyhood
characteristics of, 41–43
employment in, 31
Boy Scouts of America, and special editions of London’s novels, 497, 498f, 502n8
“boy socialist,” origin of nickname, 517
Brace, Charles Loring, 279
Braid, James, 249, 256n8
Brandt, Kenneth K.
Jack London, George Brett, and the Macmillan Company, 73–94
Brandywine School, of illustration, 579, 584
Brantlinger, Patrick, 366, 416
Brass Check, The (Sinclair), 58–59
Brechin, Gray, 15
Brennan, Stephen, 178
Brett, George
and biography by George Sterling, 53
commonalities with London, 75
continuing collaboration with, 87–89
contract discussions with, 85–87
farms and homes of, 75–76
first contact with London, 98
influence on London’s international reputation, 97
(p. 611)
influence on London’s writing and career, 73, 89n1
The Iron Heel, correspondence regarding, 78–81
The Iron Heel, editorial guidance on, 78–79
letter to Charmian Kittredge, 92n24
letter to Charmian upon the death of Jack London, 76
life of, 74–75
and London’s translation rights, 99–100
Martin Eden, response to, 82–84
People of the Abyss, correspondence regarding, 77, 89n5, 280
political broadmindedness of, 89n6
prepublication process with, 76–78
response to letter written aboard the Mariposa, 89n2
The Road, correspondence regarding, 78–81
The Road, editorial guidance on, 79–80, 90n13
The Sea-Wolf, letter discussing, 309
The Sea Wolf, theme of marriage in, 60–61
“Sincerity Letter” from London, 80–81
The Valley of the Moon, letter discussing, 380
White Fang, letter regarding illustrations in, 583
willingness to let London experiment, 73–74, 81, 91n17
Bridge, James, 12, 21, 22
Brigman, Annie, 594
British publishers
Blackwood Magazine, 587
books with Heinemann, 100–102
“Colonial Editions” by, 99, 102, 106
and earliest books, 97–99
increased sales and offers, 99–100
marketing strategies, 102–104
nature of conflicts with, 101–102
size of print runs in Britain, 109n13
sphere of influence, 96
strategies for sale of backlist, 104
British Society for the Study of Sexual Psychology, 422
Brooks, Noah, 21
Brooks, Van Wyck, 264
Browning, Robert, 8, 45
Bruce, Henry Addington, 248, 256n7
Bruce, Miner, 304
brutality depicted, and critical public sphere, 117
Bryce, James, 30
“Bugs and Beasts Before the Law” (Evans), 457–458
Bull, Charles Livingston, illustration of White Fang, 583, 584f
Burbank, Luther, 408n9
Burke, Kenneth, 317, 318
Burning Daylight
British publication of, 102
capitalist corruption as element of, 346–348, 350–351
contradictions and tensions in, 353
as conversion narrative, 349
Daylight’s fear of women, 346
discovery of gold as final temptation in, 350–351
ideal of Sonoma landscape, 345
Klondike narrative of, 345–346
landscape of Glen Ellen in, 349
popularity of, 84
portrayal of women characters in, 570–571
romantic solution in, 348–350, 350
seemingly utopian ending of, 351
three types of American hero in, 352
Burns, Tommy, 558
Burroughs, Edgar Rice, 462, 463
Burroughs, John, 293
Bykov, Vil, 107
Byrne, Angela, 11n6
Cabbages and Kings (Henry), 106
Caesar’s Column (Donnelly), 369n5
Caine, Hall, 95, 98–99
California
evolution of prison system in, 406n3
exceptionalism of, 15, 21
repressive penal practices in, 388–389, 391
Californian magazine, 14, 17
“California school” of writing, and The Overland Monthly, 17
Call of the Wild, The
allegorical interpretation of, 292, 299, 300n5
beginnings as a short story, 187
(p. 612)
bond of love portrayed in, 295, 296
Boy Scouts of America edition, 497, 498f
British publication of, 98, 99, 106
Buck’s capacity to respond to humans, 298
composition of, 293
consumption of sensation in, 117–118
and depiction of the public sphere, 112, 116
establishing Buck’s canine consciousness as narration, 294–295
evolution in, 451n6
as favorite of London Observer readers, 108
French translation of, 100
and increased fame, 35–36
interspecies communication in, 297–298, 299
journey from consumption to creativity, 121
memory and recapitulation in, 250
origins of, 5, 201
poetry of language in, 236
portrayal of female characters in, 563
possibility of “collective unconscious” in, 298–299
relationship between wolves and men in, 460–461
retraining of Buck and physiological principle of conversion, 533–535
specific love between humans and dogs, 297
transformation of experience in, 122–123
translations into Chinese, 107
use of human names in, 295, 301n12
Campbell, Donna M., 262
Women’s Rights, Women’s Lives, 562–576
Campbell, Joseph, 375, 376
Camus, Albert, 305
canine narration, 292
Capital: A Critique of Political Economy (Marx), 527–528, 542n25
capital, concentration of, and socialist thought, 528–529, 540n14
Capital in the Twenty-First Century (Piketty), 319
capitalism
capitalist corruption, as element of London’s fiction, 345
capitalist corruption, in Burning Daylight, 346–348, 350–351
capitalist game of chance, in Burning Daylight, 349
critiques of, 29
destructiveness of competitive system, 197, 198
lifespan of, 542n27
patrimonial capitalism, return to in twenty-first century, 319
patrimonial capitalism, The Iron Heel as alternative to, 326
Captain Pete, Washoe Indian chief, 183
Captains Courageous (Kipling), 303–304
career choices, in order of preference, 203, 224
Carlyle, Thomas, introduction to, 44
Carmany, John, 15
Carnegie, Andrew
portrayals of, 29
social Darwinism in “Gospel of Wealth,” 359
Carpenter, Edward
correspondence with, 420
The Intermediate Sex, 420
representation of women, 424
writings on homosexuality, 427
writings on sexual relations and marriage reform, 60, 64
Carpenter, Grace, 50
Casseres, Benjamin De, 313
Cassuto, Leonard
Jack London, Suffering, and the Ideal of Masculine Toughness, 549–561
Cazdyn, Eric, 325
Century Company publishing, 86
Century magazine
essays on tramps in 1890s, 473, 479
illustrated serialization of The Sea-Wolf, 580, 582f
Certeau, Michel de, 477
Chacón, Simon Berthold, 163
Chambers, Robert W., 35, 103, 110n30
chance
role of in London’s fiction, 333, 349
role of in Martin Eden, 338
Chaney, Warren, 14
Chaney, William (father of Jack London)
encouragement of reading and writing, 42
marriages and divorces of, 59
travels of, 4–5
(p. 613) Chaplin, Ralph, 163
charitable writing, as a genre, 278–280
Charles H. Kerr publishing, 518
“Charmian London as a Writer” (Stasz), 381
Chatauquan magazine, 189
Chauncey, George, 292, 460
Cherry
Asian protagonist of, 185
colonial tropes in, 415
completion of, 186
depiction of personal will in, 417–418
ethnicity vs. class in, 414–415
experimentation in, 88
and Japanese populations in Hawaii, 413–414
and London’s evolving views on race, 411
origin of heroine, 184
popular romance format of, 412, 418–419
portrayal of women characters in, 574–575
resistance to Western suitors in, 416
chess games, as fights or duels, 241–242
Cheverton, A. G., 104
Chicago Daily Socialist, 518
Chicago Socialist, 523
childbearing
infertility in Little Lady of the Big House, 68
significance in marriage, 57, 58
childhood
depictions of night terrors in, 246
mentoring in, 41–43
misrepresentations of, 45
children
birth and death of daughter Joy, 52, 380–381
birth of daughter Joan, 49
estrangement from Joan, 52
and marriage to Charmian Kittredge, 67
poems about, 230
sociocultural realities of stories for, 33
upbringing of daughter Joan, 58, 59
Children in Prison and Other Cruelties of Prison Life (Wilde), 389
Children of the Frost, The, 5
China
fears of Chinese-Japanese alliance, 367
popularity in, 107
Chinese poetry, influence of, 235
Chopin, Kate, 505
Christian mythology and figures, in The Acorn Planter, 216–217
Christus: A Mystery (Longfellow), 225
Christy, Howard Chandler, 591–594, 592f, 593f
“Chun Ah Chun,” short story, 415
Churchill, Winston (novelist), 74, 89n6, 96, 103, 110n30
“City Tramp, The” (Flynt), 480
Clark, John Bates, 527, 541n24
class conflict
continuing specter of, 515–516
and Cripple Creek gold mine strikes, 522
modern-day references to, 538n2, 539n3
class consciousness, 516–517
“Class Struggle, The,” 198, 515, 526
Cocks, H. G., 420–421
cognition vs. sensation, 120, 121
Cole, Timothy, 580
“collective unconscious,” in The Call of the Wild, 298–299
Collier’s Weekly
advances for The Valley of the Moon, 377
articles on Mexican Revolution, 168, 171–173, 175n33, 195
attempt to publish “Revolution,” 28–29
“Story of an Eyewitness,” 130, 194–195
“Colonial Editions,” by British publishers, 99, 102, 106
colonialism
intellectual and popular thrust of, 412–413
significance of female gender in portrayal of, 416
and U.S. annexation of Hawaii, 412
Commercial Herald, 15
“common man,” London’s work elevating, 30–31
Common Sense journal, 42
Communist Manifesto, The (Marx & Engels), 518, 525, 528
Complete Poetry of Jack London, The (Wichlin), 206, 224–225
composition process, significance of travel for, 7–8
comrade, meaning of term, 535–536
Comrade, The, 516, 520, 522, 523, 523f, 541n18
(p. 614) “Confession,” 485, 597
Conlon, Stephen, 34, 38n20, 282, 285, 286
Connors, Mollie, 43
Conrad, Joseph
allusions to race in, 337
factual underpinning of London’s work, 8
Heart of Darkness, 314, 419
illustrations for, 580–581
intermittent anti-imperialism of, 415
reference in Martin Eden, 342n6
and Stone Age story, 244–245
Conroy, Hilary, 414
conservatism, pragmatic, and Klondike stories, 264
conservative temporality, in The Son of the Wolf, 270–273
contraception
and eugenics, 430
literature on, 422
Control of Trusts, The (Clark), 541–542n24
conversion narrative, Burning Daylight as, 349
Coodley, Lauren, 203
Coolbrith, Ina
departure from Oakland Free Library, 44
losses in San Francisco earthquake, 54n7
role as mentor and friend, 42
Cooper, James Fenimore, 356, 505
Cooper, James G., 264–265
Co-operative Commonwealth, The (Gronlund), 44–45, 527
Corelli, Marie, 95, 106
Cosmopolitan
advances for The Valley of the Moon, 385n23
essay prize from, 197
illustrated “Smoke Bellew” stories, 589, 590f
illustration of The Cruise of the Snark, 598
illustration of The Little Lady of the Big House, 591, 592–593, 592f, 593f
illustration of The Road, 595–597, 596f
illustration of The Valley of the Moon, 591–592
lectures published in, 197
letter to editor outlining The Star Rover, 387
“My Life in the Underworld,” 130
rates paid by, 103
serialization of The Valley of the Moon, 373, 384n2
serial rights to work, 87
“What Communities Lose by the Competitive System,” 526
Country Life in America, and research for The Valley of the Moon, 378
Country of the Pointed Firs, The (Jewett), 505
Countryside magazine, 383
cow, in the bestiary of London’s age, 464–466
Cox, Elmer H., 222
Coxey’s Army, 482
Craig, Layne Parish
reading of psychoanalysts, 8
Sex and Science in Jack London’s America, 420–437
Crane, Hart, 9
Crane, Stephen
and adventuresome romance of war correspondents, 145–146
books in Jack London library, 290n1
career in “new journalism,” 130, 131, 133
“Experiment in Misery,” 478
fiction focused on lives of the poor, 279
influence on poetry, 234–235
London’s admiration of, 8
“The Open Boat,” 505
Cranston, Mary Rankin, 375
creative process
advice to young writers on, 186
course of, 9
and poetic instinct, 237
significance of travel for, 7–8
works composed during sailing trip, 6–7
credibility, in ghost and fantasy stories, 245–246
Criminal Prosecution and Capital Punishment of Animals, The (Evans), 457–458
Cripple Creek gold mine strikes, 522
Crisis of Imprisonment: Protest, Politics, and the Making of the American Penal State (McLennan), 405n2
Crissey, Forrest, 375
Critical Response to Jack London, The (Nuernberg), 307
Critic magazine, 140, 188–189
Cronon, William, 462
(p. 615) Crow, Charles, 365
Crowd, The (Le Bon), 30
Cruelties of Civilization: A Program of Human Reform (Salt), 389
Cruise of the Dazzler, The, 5, 505, 580
Cruise of the Snark, The
“Adventure” chapter in, 597
autobiographical reliability of, 601
composition on sailing trip, 7
facts on maritime navigation, 27
illustration of, 599f, 600f
London photographs illustrating, 578
loss of photos for, 85, 86
as maritime literature, 504, 510–513
photographs for, 597–601
“Cruising in the Solomons,” 193
Cullen, Dan, in The People of the Abyss, 289–290
Curtis, Edward S., 366
Damascus Road, The, 206
Dana, Richard Henry, 86, 504, 508
“Danger of the Trusts, The” (Clark), 527
Dangerous Classes of New York and Twenty Years’ Work among Them, The (Brace), 279
Dangling Man (Bellow), 312
Darrow, Clarence, 59, 60, 518
Darwin, Charles
and applying theory of evolution to cultures, 197
Expression of Emotion in Man and Animals, The, 296
Origin of Species, The, 304
significance in London’s intellectual development, 262
and “survival of the fittest,” 182, 274n61
Darwinism
and Anglo-Saxon superiority, 263
early social Darwinism, 261–262
and individualism in Northland stories, 267–270, 271–273
in Klondike stories, 260–261
and London’s liberal politics, 262, 265
“social-Darwinian generation,” 359
see also evolution
Daughter of the Snows, A
Anglo-Saxon racial pride in, 447
model for Flora Welse, 49
origins of, 5, 201
portrayal of women characters in, 424, 565–567
Daughters of the Rich, The
authorship of, 206–207
bibliography of plays in Sisson edition, 203
David Copperfield (Dickens), 331–332
Davis, Rebecca Harding, 568
Davis, Richard Harding
and adventuresome romance of war correspondents, 145–146
intercession on behalf of London, 136
news as theater, 130, 131, 133
reports from Veracruz, 170
“Daybreak,” 229
“Day’s Lodging, A,” 206
death of Jack London, 7, 53, 76, 105–106
Debs, Eugene V.
founding of Social Democratic Party, 180
“How I Became a Socialist,” 520, 522, 524
as popular speaker, 518
social spirit vs. individualism, 532
support for Mexican Revolution, 162
“The Socialist Spirit,” 543n34
Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, 43
deed vs. word, theme of, 266–267
Deep Sea Vagabonds (Sonnichsen), 3, 4
Deering, Frank P., 213
Degeneration (Nordau), 441, 451n8
Delineator, The, 115
Dell, Ethel M., 106
DeMille, William C., 213
Den Tandt, Christophe, 376–377
DePastino, Todd
“floating subculture” of tramps and hoboes, 479
rhythm of tramping, 477
on The Road, 483
depression
emphasis on in poetry, 228
London’s discussions of, 306, 308
Derrick, Scott, 65, 556
(p. 616) Derrida, Jacques
body’s place in the sovereign order, 505
the question of the animal, 466, 467
sphere of sovereignty, 512
“The Animal that Therefore I Am,” 297–299
“Devil’s Dice Box, The,” 225
Dicken-Garcia, Hazel, 132
Dickens, Charles
closing gulf between self and narrator in, 333
Martin Chuzzlewit, 342n4
and scenes characteristic of the bildungsroman, 331
works depicting poverty, 279
“Direct Legislation through the Initiative and Referendum,” 180
Dirlick, Arlif, 2–3
Dixon, Joseph Kossuth, 366
Dixon, L. Maynard
illustator of Western life, 579
illustrations for Malamute Kid series, 580, 581f
and The Overland Monthly, 580
dog, symbolism of in The Valley of the Moon, 449–450
Dog Love (Garber), 295
dogs
capacity to respond to humans, 298
and interspecies communication, 297–298
and interspecies emotional bonding, 296, 299
London’s intentions in The Call of the Wild, 293
quest for knowledge of, 36n1
self-consciousness of, 295, 300n13
“simple reasoning” of, 293–294, 295, 299, 300n8
specific love between humans and dogs, 297
Doll’s House, A (Ibsen), 566
Dolson, Ethel Mowbray, 163
Donnelly, Ignatius, 369n5
Donner, Pierton W., 366
Donovan’s Reef, film, 351
Dos Passos, John, 347, 404
drama by Jack London
The Acorn Planter, 213–221
“agit-prop” drama, 212
The Birthmark, 204–205
categories of, 204
consensus on plays written, 203–204
evaluation of individual plays, 222
London’s estimation of his plays, 222
motivation for writing, 203
Scorn of Women, 207–210
strengths and weaknesses of London’s, 205–206
Theft, 210–213
A Wicked Woman, 205–206
“Dream of Debs, The,” 29, 225–226, 537
Dreiser, Theodore, 332–333, 338, 343n15
Duffy, Ethel, 163, 164, 167
Duggan, Lisa, 422
Dunkle, Iris Jamahl
The Valley of the Moon: Quest for Love, Land, and a Home, 373–386
Dunn, Harvey T.
background of, 579
illustrations for John Barleycorn, 583, 601–603, 602f, 603f
Durica, Paul
Jack London and the Transformation of the Tramp, 471–489
“Dusk, The,” 228
“Dynamo and the Virgin, The” (Adams), 573
eagle, symbolism of in The Iron Heel, 444–445
Eames, Ninetta, 49, 50, 83–84, 594
Earth Abides (Stewart), 369
Eastman, Max, Énjoyment of Poetry, 231, 237
Eby, Clare Virginia
Jack London, Marriage, and Divorce, 56–72
Progressive Era marital reform, 563
economic violence, as portrayed in fiction, 322
Edenic promise, as element in London’s fiction, 345, 350
Edgett, E. F., 373
Editor, The, 186, 188
editorial guidance, of George Brett
on The Iron Heel, 78–79
on Martin Eden, 82–84
prepublication process, 76–78
on The Road, 79–80, 90n13
(p. 617)
see also Brett, George
Edmond, Rod, 2–3, 11n6
Edmonds, W. A., 249
education
high school experiences, 43
lifelong quest for, 27, 36n1
university and self-study, 46
years of formal, 5
Edward VII, coronation of, 277
Egan, Jennifer, 319
Eggers, Dave, 319
electric streetcars, advent of in urban landscape, 441
elephant executed at Coney Island in 1903, 457–458
Eliot, George, 331–332, 338
Eliot, T. S., 9
Elizabeth, Empress of Austria, 262, 264
Ellis, Havelock
“erotic rights” of women, 424
homosexuality and elevation of culture, 427
husband’s responsibility for courtship, 65
literary endeavors of, 421
marriage reform, 60
sexology and eugenics, 429
sexology and gender, 423–424
Studies in the Psychology of Sex, 422
writing on homosexuality, 426
writings on sexual relations and marriage reform, 64
employment of London, in manual and menial labor, 31, 37n11
End of the World, The (Meyer), 370n9
endorsements, product, 595
endurance, and stories of masculine toughness, 24, 554, 560nn23
engagement
of readers in a story, 9
with the world, and creative process, 8
Engels, Friedrich
The Communist Manifesto, 518, 525, 528
and democracy of the aspiring classes, 537
Enjoyment of Poetry (Eastman), 231, 237
ennui, as bourgeoisie illness, 343n16
Ephemera collection, kept by London
poems by Sterling in, 233
poetry clippings in, 224, 231, 232
Equality (Bellamy), 517, 520
essays
categories of, 179
journalism, 193–196
lectures, 196–199
literary writings, 185–189
political writings, 179–182
preference for writing, 178
racial writings, 182–185
scope of work, 178–179
social writings, 189–191
travelogues, 191–193
“Eternal Woman,” concept of, 574–575
“Eternity of Forms, The,” 243, 250
ethnicity vs. social class, in Cherry, 414–415
Etulain, Richard, 226, 237
eugenics
enthusiasm for in last century, 57, 70n3
and sexology, 429–432, 434n62
Eugenides, Jeffrey, 320
Evans, E. P., 457–458
Everhard, Mary Wellman (aunt of Jack London), 43, 539n5, 575n7
Everybody’s Magazine, 36, 364
Everyman’s magazine, 589
evolution
application of Darwin’s theory of, 200
and The Call of the Wild, 451n6
history, evolutionary narrative of, 518
and idea of “savages” in London’s age, 461–462
and interest in physical culture movement, 493
and notion of “pastoral idyll,” 450n3, 453n18, 453n19
and portrayal of “Buck” in The Call of the Wild, 293, 295, 298–299, 300n17
race and theory of natural selection, 450n2
social evolution, and individualism, 263–264
and topics of social and political lectures, 197–199
see also Darwinism
Evolution and Ethics (Huxley), 305
(p. 618) evolution and technology
in Jack London’s atavistic metropolis, 440–445
in the Machine Age, 438–440, 450n3
and recapitulation and modernity in The Valley of the Moon, 445–450
Expansion of Races (Woodruff), 367
“Experiment in Misery” (Crane), 478
Expression of Emotion in Man and Animals, The (Darwin), 296
Eyes of Asia, 186
Faith of Men, The, 245
Famous Fantastic Mysteries magazine, 369
Far From the Madding Crowd (Hardy), 338
Farmer, Philip José, 254
farming
agricultural modernity in The Valley of the Moon, 445–450, 452n16
importance of sustainable farming to London, 383
interest in efficient farming methods, 408n9, 448–449
portrayal of efficient farming methods, 448
techniques described in The Valley of the Moon, 378, 379, 380
fatherhood, celebration and practice of, 58
“feels, the”
and engagement of readers in the story, 9
and historical events in fiction, 33
and mass cultural public sphere, 117, 120
and transforming sensation, 121
Feied, Frederick, 1
Feminization of the Quest Romance (Heller), 376
fencing, sport of, in The Star Rover, 408n10
fiction
about economic crises in the twenty-first century, 318, 319, 320, 321, 327n9
biographical approaches to understanding, 260
boundaries between news and, 130, 132, 140, 141n11
characteristics of nineteenth century popular fiction, 335–336
fact-based fiction, 27–29, 32–33
incorporating themes from essays in, 178
“newspaper fiction,” 133
origins of postapocalyptic pieces, 364
speculative and fantastic literary influences, 355
university settings for, 327n6
violence in twentieth and twenty-first century novels, 322
Fiedler, Leslie, 560n18
Field, Kate, 22
“Fighting at Long Range Described,” 137, 138
fight narratives, 245
film adaptations
and London legacy, 53
London’s willingness to work in film, 118–120
fire, significance in Klondike stories, 440
“Fire People,” and evolution in Before Adam, 438–440
“First Aid to Rising Authors,” 187, 230
“First Impressions,” 192
First Poet, The, authorship of, 206
Fischer, Anton Otto
background of, 579
fan letter from London, 589
illustration of “Smoke Bellew” stories, 589, 590f
pictorial language in The Mutiny of the Elsinore, 583
Fishkin, Shelley Fisher, 141n11
Fiske, Minnie Maddern, 207, 209
Fitzsimmons, Robert, 204
flame, as symbolic of sexuality and love, 227
Flaubert, Gustave, 294, 313
Fleissner, Jennifer, 562
Fletcher, Frank F., 168
Flores Magón, Ricardo, 161, 162
Flower, Desmond, 106
Flynt, Josiah
humanized portrayals of tramps, 479
Tramping with Tramps: Studies and Sketches of Vagabond Life, 473
Foner, Philip S., 156
Footnotes to Evolution (Jordan), 543n37
Ford, John, and American cultural tradition, 351
(p. 619) Forel, August Henri, 420, 426–427, 431
“For the Ahkoond” (Bierce), 364
Foss, Daniel, 399–400
Foucault, Michel
Discipline and Punish, 389, 458
The History of Sexuality, 331, 339–340, 342n2, 344n26
medical science and surveillance in the nineteenth century, 421
The Order of Things, 456
relationship between an act and an identity, 487n14
sexuality in nineteenth century, 339–340
France, Anatole, admiration for London, 108
Frances Ha (film), 318
Franzen, Jonathan, 319, 322–323, 326
Freedom (Franzen), 319, 322–323, 324, 326
Freeman-Mitford, David, 109n19
Freud, Sigmund
analysis of Wolf Man, 459–460
The Interpretation of Dreams, 249
London’s reading of, 8
Totem and Taboo, 461
writing on homosexuallity, 426
Freytag Triangle
and dramatic structure of Scorn of Women, 208
in poems, 230
Friedman, Isaac Kahn, 210
Friedman, Milton, 542n29
“Frisco Kid”
accounts of hoboing in, 5
narrative voice in stories, 482
Frisco Kid, The, early high school stories and, 43
From Fact to Fiction: Journalism and Imaginative Writing in America (Fishkin), 141n11
Funston, Frederick, 168, 170, 195
Furer, Andrew J., 492
Future of War, The (Bloch), 197
Gaboriau, Émile, 242
Gair, Christopher
Burning Daylight, contradictions and tensions in, 353
complicity vs. resistance, 3
disillusioned London heroes, 393
London’s renunciation of socialism, 66
London’s view of California penal system, 388–389
Martin Eden and the Question of Genre, 330–344
The Valley of the Moon, journey of self-realization in, 452n15
The Valley of the Moon, metaphoric quest in, 571
Galbraith, John Kenneth, 539n4
game, recurrent metaphor of life as a, 209
Game, The
additions to, 90n11
British publication of, 99
depiction of boxing in, 551, 556
display of masculinity in, 553
editorial guidance of George Brett, 77–78
and essay article on boxing match, 194
as sporting life novel, 5
Garber, Marjorie, 295
Garbutt, Frank A., 118–119, 121
Garelick, J. P., 42
Garland, Hamlin, 478, 481–482
Garvice, Charles, 95
Gatti, Susan I.
Jack London’s The Star Rover and the Politics of Prison Reform, 387–410
Gaultier, Jules de, 313
Gay New York (Chauncey), 460
Geismar, Maxwell, 235, 407n5
gender
contradictions of in Cherry, 418–419
discussions of in The Little Lady of the Big House, 572–573
and ethnicity in Cherry, 416
gender equality in The Valley of the Moon, 425–426
and heroic quest in The Valley of the Moon, 376
maintaining masculinity, 561n40
and racial identity, 556–557, 562, 563–564
and sexology, 423–426
Generation of Vipers (Wylie), 304
Genette, Gérard, 578, 594
(p. 620) genres of writing
evident in The Sea Wolf, 303, 308–310
manipulation of in Martin Eden, 334, 341–342
permeable boundaries between, 199–200
“George Sterling,” poem by London, 233
Germanic Origins of New England Towns, The (Adams), 253
Germany, popularity in, 107
“germ plasm” theories, 407n6
Geronimo, autobiography of, 395
“Getting Into Print,” essay, 2, 188
Ghent, W. J., 30
ghost and fantasy stories
appeal of writing, 239–240
and contemporary psychology, 248–249
credibility of, 245–246
cultural and individual memory in, 248
doubling of characters in, 243–244, 251–252
fantasies of the primitive in, 251–252
literary influences of, 355
material vs. spiritual elements in, 242, 243, 246
night terrors depicted in, 246, 247–248, 249
themes of duality in, 243–244
themes of possession in, 241–242, 243–244
theory of recapitulation in, 240–241
Gibbs, Josiah, 395
“Gift of God, The,” 227
Gilbert, Hilda, 206–207
Giles, Herbert, 235
Gilman, Charlotte Perkins, 59, 60, 422, 425, 518
Gilmore, David D., 559n15
Girls, television series, 318
“Girl Who Crossed Swords with a Burglar,” 201, 555–556
Gissing, George, 279
“Give Battle to Retard Enemy,” 138
Givens, Terryl, 395
“Gladiators of the Machine Age,” 194
Glass, Loren
Canine Narration, 292–301
Glen Ellen
introduction to area, 51
landscape of in Burning Daylight, 349
God of His Fathers, The
British publication of, 97–98
“God of His Fathers, The,” 587
God of Our Fathers, The
origins of, 5
Gold
authorship of, 206, 226
“Golden Poppies,” 49, 115
Goldman, Emma, meeting with, 48
Gold Rush, stories of, and socialist politics and perspective, 10
“Gold,” social motif of, 226
“Goliah,” 183–184
Good Kids (Nugent), 318
Goodman, James, 45
Goodwin, Philip, 579
Gorky, Maxim, 59, 60
Gould, Nat, 95
Grant, Madison, 366
Great Interrogation, The, 206, 207
“Great Interrogation, The,” portrayal of female characters in, 563
“Great Panic,” of 1890s, 350
Greco-Turkish War, 145
Green, Charles, editorial role at The Overland Monthly, 12, 15, 22
Grenfell, Wilfred, 86
Grey, Zane, 106, 366
“Grit of Women,” portrayal of female characters in, 563, 564–565
Groff, Lauren, 324
Gronlund, Laurence, 44, 527, 532
“Grove Play,” definition and examples of, 213
Grunberger, Lisa, 492
Guldensuppe, Willie, 133
Guthrie, Leonard, 249
“gutter-wolves”
and alternative presented in The Valley of the Moon, 447
in Jack London’s atavistic metropolis, 440–445
Habermas, Jürgen
and critical public sphere, 117
Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere (Habermas), 126n8
Hadley, Arthur Twining, 30
Haeckle, Ernst, and theory of recapitulation, 240–241, 439, 446
(p. 621) Hagar’s Daughter (Hopkins), 432
Haggard, H. Rider, 106, 355
Halderman-Julius, Emanuel, 167
Haley, James L., 144
Hall, G. Stanley, 251, 543n40
Hall, Radclyffe, 421
Hamilton, David Mike, 27, 389, 407n6, 408n11
Hamilton, John Maxwell, 145
Hansen, Miriam, 122
Hansson, Laura Marholm, 420
Haraway, Donna, 466, 467
Hardy, Thomas, 338
Hare, James H., 145–146
Harper’s
editorial on tramps and tramping, 475
essays on tramps in 1890s, 473, 479
Harpham, Graham, 359
Harriman, Job, 163, 167
Harte, Bret
“My Friend the Tramp,” 474
and The Overland Monthly, 12, 20, 580
postapocalyptic stories by, 364
Harvey, David, 321, 322
Hawaii
American intervention in, 19–20
anti-imperialism in stories of, 29
books proposed by George Brett, 88
Cherry and colonial culture in, 412, 418–419
discovery of surfing in, 511–512
influence of trips in final years, 52
“On the Makaloa Mat,” portrayal of female characters in, 565
opposition to labor practices in, 185
planter class and labor practices in, 413–414
travelogues from, 192
Hawthorne, Julian, 1
Hawthorne, Nathaniel, 1
Hay, John
Jack London’s Sci-Fi Finale, 355–372
Hayes, Christopher, 317, 327n4
Haymarket Square, Chicago, 521
Hayward Electric Company, 31
Haywood, “Big” Bill, 518, 521, 522, 540n12
Hearn, Lafcadio, 184
Hearst, William Randolph
and boundaries between news and fiction, 130
and correspondence from Russo-Japanese War, 158n5
involvement of journalists in reporting, 132, 133
newspapers in The Iron Heel, 124
publishing empire of, 132, 142n18
and San Francisco Examiner, 6
Hearst Magazine, rates paid by, 103
“Heart, A,” 226
Heart of Darkness (Conrad)
African princess at end of, 419
allusions to race in, 337
concept of retrogression, 534
and “fascination of the abomination,” 314
intermittent anti-imperialism of, 415
and Stone Age story, 244–245
Heart of the Empire, The, 29
Hearts of Three, 105, 222
Heath, Frederic, 531
“Heathen, The,” illustration of, 589
Hedrick, Joan D.
London’s approach to writing as a trade, 493
London’s contradictory feelings for the poor, 286
London’s experience of marriage, 56, 70n2
The People of the Abyss, structure of, 285
Hegel, G. W. F., 506–507
Heller, Dana A., 376
Hendricks, King, 144
“He Never Tried Again,” 228
Henry, O., 106
Henry Clay Society, 45
Her Brother’s Clothes, 204
Herland (Gilman), 425
heroic quest
and disillusioned London heroes, 393
for home in The Valley of the Moon, 377–378
for land in The Valley of the Moon, 378–380
reinvention of in The Valley of the Moon, 375–377, 383–384
Heron, Herbert, 206
Hero with a Thousand Faces, The (Campbell), 375, 376
Herron, George D., 59
Hichens, Robert, 95
Hickmott Canning Company, 31
“Hidden Valley, The” (Bierce), 23
(p. 622) Higham, John, 490–491
Hillquit, Morris, 519
Hilton, James, 345
Himmelfarb, Gertrude, 278
Hirschkop, Ken, 158n6
historical development, monolinear model of, 271
historical events
and appeal of London’s writing, 40–41
and fact-based fiction, 32–33
and memoir, 33
history, evolutionary narrative of, 518
History of Chinese Literature, A (Giles), 235
History of Sexuality (Foucault), 331, 339–340, 342n2, 344n26
hoboes and tramps
evolving depictions of, 1
and The Road, 79–80
Hodson, Sara S.
Jack London, Photographer, 598
The People of the Abyss: Tensions and Tenements in the Capital of Poverty, 277–291
Russo-Japanese war correspondence, 150
Hoffman, Elwyn Irving, 48, 53
Hofstadter, Richard, 359
“Holding Her Down,” 485–486
Hologram for the King, A (Eggers), 319
Holston, A. R., 163
Holy Land, sites depicted in The Star Rover, 398–399, 409n12
home
quest for in The Valley of the Moon, 377–378
theme of in The Valley of the Moon, 373–374
travel as early escape from, 2
“Homecoming of the Oregon, The,” 129–130, 142n22, 193–194
Homer, and plot of Burning Daylight, 345–346, 351
Homo Sacer: Sovereign Power and Bare Life (Agamben)
homosexuality, and science of sexology, 426–429
American literary response to, 428–429
London’s interest in scientific study of homosexuality, 427, 428
“Hopalong Cassidy Stories” (Mulford), 583
Hopkins, Pauline, 431–432
Hopper, James “Jimmy,” 49, 53, 375
Hornaday, William, 461
“Hors de Saison,” 228
horses
as characters in ghost and fantasy stories, 242–243, 568
experience with as war correspondent, 134–135
Horwitz, Howard
Jack London, Socialism, and the Conversionary Model of Politics, 515–544
London’s path to socialism, 317
Houdini, Harry, 494
House of Pride, The, 104, 512
“House of the Sun,” 192
Howells, William Dean, 120, 336
Annie Kilburn, a benevolence novel, 568
and eugenics, 431–432, 434n62
“How I Became a Socialist” (Debs), 520, 522, 524
“How I Became a Socialist” (London)
and conversionary model of politics, 516
and experiences of hard labor, 550
model of conversion in, 520–521
origins in Bay Area life, 5
and physical limitations of the body, 494
“How Jack London Got In and Out of Jail in Japan,” 135, 147
How the Other Half Lives (Riis)
among exposés of the late 1800s, 33
journalist’s eye in, 279
London’s familiarity with, 280
and The People of the Abyss, 502
the poor as subculture, 480
Hueffer, Oliver Madox, 170–171
Huerta, Victoriano, 167
Human, All Too Human (Nietzsche), 304
human/animal binary, politics of constructing, 466–467
“human document,” use of phrase, 1, 11n2
Human Drift, The, 204
“Human Drift, The,” 506, 513
humor
in most-successful poems, 230
(p. 623)
in “new journalism” pieces, 134–135, 153–154, 159n10
in poems about love, sex, and women, 228–229
Huntington, Collis P., 29
“Husky: Wolf Dog of the North,” 201
“Hussy, The,” 50
Huxley, Thomas, 305
Ibsen, Henrik, 312, 566
idealism vs. materialism, in poetry, 227–228
Idea of Poverty, The (Himmelfarb), 278
identity, development of in early travels, 2
ideology, socialist discussions of, 531, 543n33
“If I Were God,” 226
“If Japan Awakens China,” 184
Iliad (Homer), and plot of Burning Daylight, 345–346, 351
illness
in final four years, 52
and human suffering, 549
recurring illnesses, 174n11
illusion, will to, 313–314
illustrations, of London stories and novels
developments in illustration in the nineteenth century, 577
illustrations of nonfiction, 594–604
illustrations of novels and stories, 579–594
lack of in modern-day works, 578
schools of illustration, 579
visual embellishment offered by, 577–578, 603–604
imagery, and The Call of the Wild, 236
imagination
role in transforming experience, 122
and science, conflict between, 231–232, 237
and transforming sensation, 118, 119–120
imagist movement, and poetry, 235
immigrant populations, as portrayed in Valley of the Moon, 66
impatience, as flaw in writing technique, 46–47
Imperative Duty, An (Howells), 432
impersonation
by London, 501f, 502
of London, 500
“Impossibility of War, The,” 197
improvisation, skill at, 194–195
Imre (Prime-Stevenson), 428–429
“In a Far Country”
individual responses to the Northland, 268
privileging action over language, 266–267
protean faculties and adaptibility, 269
incarceration in Buffalo, New York, 5, 31, 389, 471, 475
In Darkest England and the Way Out (Booth), 278–279, 286
Independent, The, 383
Indians
Alaskan Indians, perspective on, 182
California Indians, history and folklore, 214–215
experiences of in London’s era, 366
and idea of “savages” in London’s age, 461–462
Ishi, last surviving member of the Yahi, 365, 401, 461–462
and London’s reports from Mexico, 169–170
portrayals of Indian women, 563–564
as represented in The Acorn Planter, 219–221
Washoe Indians, meeting with, 183
individualism
London as “rampant individualist,” 520–521
London’s paradoxical sympathy for, 358, 359
and London’s perceived political paradox, 357–359, 532
and Martin Eden’s indifference to women, 341
in The Son of the Wolf, 266–267, 267–270, 271–273
vs. nationalism in The Scarlet Plague, 357
vs. privileged birthright in The Iron Heel, 319
youthful individualism and subsequent socialism, 261, 262
industrial age
depictions of in late 1800s literature, 33–34
London’s knowledge of work in factories and plants, 31
Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), 162, 164, 165, 521
Inside of the Cup, The (Churchill), 103
Insurgent Mexico (Reed), 170
intellectual labor, and London’s individualism, 261 262–263
(p. 624) Intercollegiate Socialist Society, 51, 518
Interestings, The (Wolitzer), 319
Intermediate Sex, The (Carpenter), 420, 427
internationalism, and London’s worldview, 4–5
Internationalist Socialist Review, 51
international reputation of Jack London
in aftermath of his death, 105–106
backlist, strategies for sale of, 104
books with Heinemann in Britain, 100–102
British publishers and earliest books, 97–99
conflicts with British publishers, nature of, 101–102
enduring popularity in Britain, 106, 108
first translations, 99
foreign sales and translations produced, 95
increased British sales and offers, 99–100
influence of British publishers, 96
marketing in Britain, 97–98
and onset of World War I, 104–105, 110n41
and Russian and Chinese editions, 106–107
strategies for British editions, 102–104
International Socialist Review
books reviewed for, 291n3
“The Dream of Debs,” 537
Interpretation of Dreams, The (Freud), 249
“In the Cage” (James), 336–337
“Intruder, The,” 204
Iron Heel, The
alternative vision offered by, 319–320, 323, 326
appeal of today, 316–317
challenge to reimagine the present, 325
character names in, 539n5, 575n7
class struggle in, 516–517, 524–526
combination, principle of, 529–530
economic violence in, 322
editorial guidance of George Brett, 78–79
evolutionary vs. revolutionary change in, 324–325
as fact-based fiction, 32, 33
Haymarket Square defendants in, 521
and ideal construction vs. the real world, 312–313
London’s intentions in, 326n1
marketability of, 80
and mass cultural public sphere, 114, 116, 123–125
matrimony, views of, 56, 62–63
middle-class privilege in, 318–319
mismanagement of resources in the “machine age,” 443–444
origins of, 51
patrimonial middle class in, 320
public reaction to, 316
regime portrayed in, 38n14
social Darwinism and brutes forces at play in, 321
societal needs and obligations, focus on, 323, 324–325
and twenty-first century fiction, 318, 319, 320
violent revolution, necessity of, 220
women characters in, 568–570
worker with missing arm, enduring significance of, 321, 327n7, 541n20
Isbister & Co., British publisher, 97
Ishi, last surviving member of the Yahi, 365, 401, 461–462
“Ishi, the Last Aborigine” (Kroeber), 365
Italy, banning of London books under fascism, 107–108
Jack London: An American Life (Labor), 1, 158n3, 408n8
Jack London, Photographer (Reesman, Hodson, & Adam), 598
“Jack London, Socialist,” in San Francisco Examiner, 196
“Jack London: The Author with the Sales,” 105
Jack London and His Daughters (Joan London), 71n12
Jack London and His Times: An Unconventional Biography (Joan London), 158n3
Jack London Newsletter Index, 352
Jack London Racial Lives: A Critical Biography (Reesman), 411–412
Jack London Ranch, described, 378–379
“Jack London’s New Woman in a New World” (Reesman), 376
Jack London’s Racial Lives (Reesman), 185
(p. 625) “Jack London Still Alive to His ‘Forgotten Widow’” (Kittredge), 593–594
Jacobi, Martin J., 317
Jacobs, Fred, 46
Jacobs, W. W., 106
James, George Wharton, 49
James, Henry, 120, 336–337, 343n14
Jameson, Frederic
decline and failure in naturalist fiction, 338
issues of class in realist fiction, 338
and Martin Eden as modernist text, 333, 343n14
modernism’s emergence, 333
and suicide in Martin Eden, 331, 342
“Jan, The Unrepentant,” 228
Japan
essay on Japanese mindset, 184
evolving knowledge of the Japanese, 185
fears of Chinese-Japanese alliance, 367
imperial power of in South Pacific, 413, 415
and Japanese populations in Hawaii, 413–414
Japan: An Interpretation (Hearn), 184
“Japanese Officers Consider Everything a Military Secret,” 135
Jeffersonian ideal, as found in literature, 345, 352
Jeffries, James J., 558
Jeffries, Jim, 194, 195
Jerry of the Islands, 87, 105
Jewett, Sarah Orne, 505
Johanningsmeier, Charles, 92n19
John Barleycorn
autobiographical elements in, 601
contradictions and tensions in, 217
ideal construction vs. the real world, 312–313
illustration of, 601–603, 602f, 603f
influence of The Heart of the Empire, 29
London’s choice of career, 203
magazine writing in, 114
and preferred genres of writing, 178
prison conditions described in, 389
sales in Britain, 104
women’s suffrage in, 218
Johns, Cloudesley, correspondence on
book and magazine illustrators, 580
capitalism, 542n27
crisis in first marriage, 305
essay form, 197
individualism, 262–263
initial correspondence with Johns, 47–48
later career of Johns, 53
literary marketplace, 406n4
Martin Eden, 82
parents and upbringing of Johns, 47
Russo-Japanese war, 146, 158n5
socialist essay, 197
writing for money, 92n19, 187, 188
writing poetry, 8, 232
Johnson, Jack, 7, 195, 558
Johnson, James Weldon, 463
Johnston, Caroline
contradictions in London’s agrarian novels, 352
on The Iron Heel, 318
reconciling inconsistencies in London’s political views, 359
Jones, Gavin, 476
Jones, Mary “Mother,” 167, 518
Jordan, David Starr, 262, 532–533, 535, 543n37
Joseph, Michael, 106
journalism
advent of “new journalism,” 132, 141n15
incorporating themes from essays, 178
involvement of journalists in stories, 132–133, 147–148
newspaper-style essays, 193–196
overlapping careers in fiction and, 130–131, 141n11
Russo-Japanese War, articles covering, 133–137
Russo-Japanese War, characteristics of coverage, 138–140
Journal of the Shipwreck and Sufferings of Daniel Foss (Foss), 400
Judge, The, 207
“Jules de Gaultier: Super-Nietzschean” (De Casseres), 313
Jung, Carl, 8
Jung, Moon-Ke, 414, 418
jungle, discourse of in animality studies, 463–463
(p. 626) Jungle, The (Sinclair), 79, 465–466
Junior Munsey Magazine, The, 187, 230
justice, retributive, in Klondike stories, 270
juvenile fiction, sociocultural realities of, 33
Kardell, Margaret, 214–215, 219
Kazin, Alfred
and The Call of the Wild, 292
Jack London as traveling writer, 1
reconciling inconsistencies in London’s political views, 359
Keeler, Charles, 49
Keene, James R., 352
Keith, William, 49
Kellogg, Martin, 21
Kelly’s Army, march on Washington, 482, 494–495
Kempton-Wace Letters, The
British publication of, 98
collaborations on, 48–49
and courtship with Anna Strunsky, 6
ideal construction vs. the real world, 312–313
marketability of, 80
marriage and divorce in the Progressive Era, 56–58
poem regarding, 228–229
sexological theories, references to, 420
Kennan, George, 183
Kerouac, Jack, 1, 476
Kershaw, Alex, 539n7
Key, Ellen, 60, 64, 65, 69
Keynes, John Maynard, 544n46
Kimmel, Michael S., 552
Kingman, Russ, 144, 203
King Solomon’s Mines (Haggard), 106
Kinsey, Alfred, 421
Kipling, Rudyard
admiration of London for, 8, 159n7
colonized populations, depiction of, 415
as literary influence, 235, 239, 303–304, 355
and Stone Age story, 244–245
and U.S. annexation of overseas territories, 412
on war correspondents, 145–146
Kittler, Friedrich, 577
Kittredge, Charmian
background of, 385–386n39
birth and death of daughter Joy, 380–381
collaboration on The Little Lady in the Big House, 593–594
collaboration on The Valley of the Moon, 380–382, 385n34, 594
death of, 54
introduction to, 49
and legacy of Jack London, 52–53
letters to and from George Brett upon London’s death, 76
1903 letter to, 71n11
as London’s editor, 50–51
and London’s fact-based fiction, 27, 36n1
and London’s instinct for teaching, 28
and London’s interest in farming, 449
marriage to, 6
masculine behaviors displayed by, 555
as model for characters, 51
as New Woman and transitional figure, 70–71n8
and paradoxes in London’s personality, 358
publication of London biography, 106
published books by, 51
and reports on Mexican Revolution, 168
travels with, 6, 7
Klondike, the
endurance portrayed in stories of, 554
and fictional time travel, 356
the Klondike narrative, as element of London’s fiction, 345–346
and origin of stories in The Son of the Wolf, 259–260
and “Pacific literature” in The Overland Monthly, 22–23, 23–24
significance of fire in stories of, 440
symbolism of wolf in stories of, 441–442
temporal omniscience used in stories, 270
travels and stories of, 5
women characters in stories of, 563–564
Klondike River, rafting of, 5
“Klondyker’s Dream, The,” 228
Kluge, Alexander, 127n14
Knapp, Kathy
American Unexceptionalism, 327n9
The Iron Heel and the Contemporary Bourgeois Novel, 316–329
(p. 627) “Knife and the Naked Chalk, The” (Kipling), 244
Kolko, Gabriel, 540n14
“Koolau the Leper”
composition at sea, 506
indictment of imperial system in, 29
landlessness in, 512
racial and ethnic confrontationn in, 561n31
Korea and Koreans
effects of Russo-Japanese war on, 150–151
research for Korean episode in The Star Rover, 408–409n11
Krafft-Ebing, Richard von, 8, 421, 426
Kratzke, Peter, 260
Kroeber, Alfred, 365
Krugman, Paul, 538–539n2
Krupskaya, Natasha, 107
labor
concept of “repulsive” labor, 522
and human suffering, 549
labor movement and socialism, 180, 198
labor practices, opposition to in Hawaii, 185
labor practices and planter class in Hawaii, 413–414
London’s work as manual laborer, 520, 541n19
prison contract labor, controversy surrounding, 405–406n2
use of surplus labor force, 544n44
Labor, Earle
on East End in People of the Abyss, 543n35
essays on drama, 203
Jack London: An American Life, 1, 158n3, 492
Jeffersonian ideal in Burning Daylight, 352
London’s popularity, 96
London’s war correspondent work, 144
London’s work as manual laborer, 541n19
and poetry in London’s stories and novels, 235–236
spiritualism of London’s childhood, 408n8
labor, portrayals and discussions of
in Little Lady of the Big House, 68–69
in Sea Wolf, The, 60–61
in Valley of the Moon, 63–64, 66–67
Labor of Words, The (Wilson), 294
LaFarge, John, 580
La Follette, Robert, 27–28
land
quest for in The Valley of the Moon, 378–380
theme of in The Valley of the Moon, 373–374
“Language of the Tribe, The” (speech), 3, 4, 179, 184–185
Lanier, Henry, 101–102
Last American, The (Mitchell), 368
Last Call in the City of Bridges (Pane), 318
Last Days of the Republic, The (Donner), 366
Last Man, literary figure of, 356, 360, 365
Last of the Mohicans, The (Cooper), 356
Lawlor, Mary, 262
“law of club and fang,” 586
“Law of Life, The,” 442, 554
Lawson, Andrew, 35
“League of the Old Men, The,” 556–557
Lears, T. J. Jackson, 451n7, 491
Leaves of Grass (Whitman), 342n5
Le Bon, Gustave, 30
lectures
incorporating themes from his essays, 178
lecture tour, 1905-1906, 6
public impact of, 200
“Revolution,” 6, 28, 518
scope of work, 178–179, 196–199
Lee, Albert, 195
Lee, Ivy L., 30
legacy of Jack London, influence of friends and mentors on, 52–54
Lemon, Nita, 555–556
Le Monde newspaper, 108
Le Mythe de Sisyphe (Camus), 305
Lenin, Vladimir, as admirer of London’s work, 106–107
“Lessons from Our Alien Farmers” (Crissey), 375
Lewis, Austin, 532, 542n28
Lewis, Sinclair, 52, 252
Leyva, José Maria, 163
Library of Original Sources, The, 218
Life in Sing Sing, prison memoir in London’s library, 389
Light that Failed, The (Kipling), 145
“Like Argus of the Ancient Times,” 5
Lincoln, Abraham, 30
(p. 628) lingerie, descriptions of in Valley of the Moon, 65
Link, Eric Carl, 259
Lipsyte, Sam, 320
literary markeplace, influence on London’s writing, 81
literary traditions, response to, 27–28, 36n1
literature
American literary response to eugenics, 429–430
American literary response to homosexuality, 428–429
American literary response to sexology, 432–433
Fiedler thesis on male characters in American literature, 560n18
longeviety of worldwide, 363
regionalism and American literature, 481–482
literature, London’s writings and essays on, 185–189
appeal of gothic fiction, 188–189
comparing genres, 186–187
creative process, 189
economics of publishing business, 188
and London’s acceptance by literary establishment, 185–186
motives of writers, 187
profitability of writing fiction, 201
writing for money, 189
Little Lady of the Big House, The
agrarian life, disillusionment with, 351–352
Charmian Kittredge, collaboration with, 593–594
Charmian Kittredge as model for character, 51
eugenic ideology in, 431
illustrated serialization of, 591, 592–593, 592f, 593f
labor, views of, 56, 67–69, 70
matrimony, views of, 56, 67–69, 70
and myth of “self-made” man, 40
poems in, 230
portrait of philosopher in, 44
sexological theories, references to, 420
sexuality, expressions of, 432
sexual variety, representations of, 427, 428
women characters in, 424, 571–573
Liza of Lambeth (Maugham), 279
local color, stories and writings, 482
log-books, writings from, 224
Lombroso, Cesare, 254
London, city of
research for The People of the Abyss, 31–32
visit to Edward VII coronation, 277
London, Eliza, 41
London, Jack
books in library of, 280, 290n2, 407n5
boyhood of, 41–43
change in mindset in final years, 52
commitment to social and economic change, 384
as critic of wealth disparity, 358
enduring popularity of, 95–96, 108
engagement with the world, 8
engaging readers in story, 9
itinerary of travels, 4–7
last work published by, 179
legacy of, 52–54
and myth of “self-made man,” 40
photo from Wilshire’s Magazine, 501f
photo on beach, 494f
pose for camera, 493f
as “Prophet of the Last Frontier,” 355, 356
as public figure, 594–595
recurring illnesses of, 174n11
well-known portraits of, 594
worldview of, 3–4
writing career, 40–41
London, Joan (daughter of Jack London)
birth of, 49
description of London as father, 58
effect of parents’ marriage and divorce, 59
estrangement from father, 52
The Iron Heel, views of marriage in, 62–63
Jack London and His Daughters, 71n12
Jack London and His Times: An Unconventional Biography, 158n3
Jack London’s war correpondent work, reasons for, 144
on The Star Rover, 403
war correspondence, nature of, 150
London, John (stepfather of Jack London)
adoption by, 59
boyhood encouragement of, 42
(p. 629)
death of, 47
life with first family, 54n9
London, Joy, birth and death of, 380–381
London Labour and the London Poor (Mayhew), 278
London Magazine, serialized publication in, 359
Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth, 225
Looking Backward (Bellamy), 62, 517, 519–520, 531
Loomba, Ania, 415, 416
Lorimer, George, 8
Los Angeles Express, 163
Lost Horizon, The (Hilton), 345
love
bond of affection in The Call of the Wild, 295
capacity for among the poor, 287–288
poems about, 228–229
quest for in The Valley of the Moon, 380–382
specific love between humans and dogs, 297
theme of in The Valley of the Moon, 373–374
Love Affairs of Nathaniel P., The (Waldman), 318
“Love of Life”
endurance portrayed in, 554
illustration of, 587, 588f
and link between suffering and male identity, 555
read at Lenin’s deathbed, 107
Love’s Coming of Age (Carpenter), 424
Lowell, James Russell, 280
luck, as recurring interest in stories, 269
Lundblad, Michael
A Bestiary from the Age of Jack London, 456–470
The Birth of the Jungle: Animality in Progressive-Era Literature and Culture, 295–296
The Call of the Wild, 292
Lye, Colleen, 183–184, 184
Lynch, George, 145–146
Lyric Year, The, and appreication of poetry, 231, 232
Macfadden, Bernarr, 491–492, 502n2
Machine Age
Jack London’s atavistic metropolis in the, 440–445
as London’s name for modernity, 10
recapitulation and modernity in, 445–450
technology and evolution in, 438–440, 450n3
Macmillan Company
advances for The Valley of the Moon, 377, 385n23
company publications in Progressive Era, 89n6
editorship of George Brett, 74–75
influence of George Brett, 73–74
and overproduction of short stories, 92n21
publication under pseudonym, 86–87
publishing of London’s books in Britain, 109n16
renewed work with, 87–89
and rival publishers, 92n23
termination of annual contract with, 85–87
Madame Bovary (Flaubert), 313
Maddern, Bessie
death of, 54
divorce from, 6, 62
as example of New Woman, 46
literary influence of, 49
sudden marriage to, 48–49
Madero, Francisco L., 163
Magazine in America, The (Tassin), 587
magazine pieces, and collaboration with mass market, 113–114
Maggie, A Girl of the Streets (Crane), 279
Magnus, Maurice, 427
Magonista Revolt
assortment of volunteers for, 164
early chronology of, 162–163
final phase of, 167
launch of, 162
Mahan, Alfred, 506
“Malamute Kid” series, illustrations for, 580, 581f
Malay Archipelago (Wallace), 245
Male Call: Becoming Jack London (Auerbach)
allegory of The Call of the Wild, 292
London’s advice to writers, 186
poems in, 228
tension in People of the Abyss, 281
Malemute Kid
in “Men of Forty-Mile,” 269
in The Son of the Wolf, 265, 266, 267
(p. 630) Malinowska, Agnes
Evolution and Technology in Jack London’s Urban Industrial Modernity, 438–455
Mammonart (Sinclair), 30, 53
“Mammon Worshippers, The,” 225, 226
mammoth, as character in “A Relic of the Pliocene,” 245
Man and Woman (Ellis), 423
Mandel, Emily St. John, 324
Maneuver Division, and Mexican Revolution, 165
Manhattan Transfer (Dos Passos), 404
Mannheim, Karl, 318
Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, The (film), 351
Marche, Steve, 320
Margret Howth (Davis), 568
maritime literature
addressing social and spatial sovereignty, 504, 513
The Cruise of the Snark as, 510–513
and increasingly blurred boundaries, 506
London’s forays into, 505–507
The Sea-Wolf as, 507–510
maritime navigation
discussion in The Cruise of the Snark, 27
quest for knowledge of, 36n1
marketplace influence on London’s writing, 81, 406n4
marriage, and divorce
childbearing, significance of, 57, 58
discussion of in Progressive Era, 56, 59, 62–63, 70
and Kempton-Wace Letters, The, 56–58
laws at turn of twentieth century, 62
reform of laws, 60
theme of marriage in The Sea Wolf, 60–61
marriage, to Bessie Maddern
conflict with friends surrounding divorce, 62
literary influence of, 49
practicalities of, 57–58
and press reaction to The Kempton-Wace Letters, 58
reaction to remarriage of, 71n12
wedding, 48
marriage, to Charmian Kittredge
characteristics of, 60
emotional vs. legal marriage, 69–70
final years of, 52–53
introduction to, 49
Little Lady of the Big House, portrayal of matrimony in, 68–69
nature of marriage, 58
Valley of the Moon, portrayal of matrimony in, 67
Marriage Plot, The (Eugenides), 320
Martin Chuzzlewit (Dickens), 331–332, 342n4
Martin Eden
autobiographical elements in, 601
and the bildungsroman, 327–328n11
British publication of, 102
chance, role of, 330–331, 332, 333, 338
composition on sailing trip, 7, 506
conventions of realism in, 338–339
editorial response of George Brett, 82–84
encounter with painting in, 331, 332, 334
entrance into bourgeois world, 333
existential suicide by drowning in, 306
false starts in, 334–335
as favorite of Le Monde readers, 108
ideal construction vs. the real world, 312–313
ignorance of sex and marriage portrayed in, 205
intermingling of race and class in, 337–338
magazine writing in, 114
manipulation of literary genres in, 334, 341–342
matrimony, views of, 56
model for Ruth Morse in, 45
as modernist text, 333, 343n14
and myth of “self-made” man, 40
opening vs. closing pages of, 330
physicality of characters, 496–497
and restructuring of newspaper storiette, 335–336, 340
search for “impassioned realism,” 312
self and narrator, closing gulf between, 332
sexual relations and marriage in, 339–341
social transformation in, 337–341
as “unhappy narrative of upward mobility,” 361
(p. 631)
women, Martin’s indifference to, 341
and workplace realities, 29
Martinez, Xavier, 49
Marx, Karl
Capital: A Critique of Political Economy, 527–528, 542n25
capital as collective product, 525
The Communist Manifesto, influence of, 518
and democracy of the aspiring classes, 537
disappearance of capitalist society and economics, 218
obstruction of monopoly, 527–528
proletariat solidarity and concentration of capital, 528
masculinity
display of at turn of the twentieth century, 552, 555
ideal of, 355
maintenance of, 561n40
as portrayed through female characters in The Valley of the Moon, 376–377
masculinity, and link between suffering and male identity
compulsory masculinity, 552–553
demands of hard labor, 555
effect of mechanized workplaces on masculinity, 550
interplay of race and gender, 556–557
movement from boyhood to manhood, 552, 559n15
necessary endurance, 554
and racial contradictions in fiction, 557, 558
and sport of boxing, 550–552, 561n39
mass cultural public sphere
affect/emotion in, 125n1
bifurcated and overlapping public spheres, 119–120
collaboration with, 112–113
and consumption of sensation, 117–118
evolving forms and genres of reading, 113
and The Iron Heel, 123–125
London’s reliance on and suspicion of, 114–116
London’s shaping by and shaping of, 116–117
London’s willingness to work in film, 118–120
role of affect, 121
role of imagination in transforming experience, 122
transformation of experience in, 127n14
and transforming sensation, 118–119
Massie, Hughes, 95, 102–103, 103–104
mass market
London’s collaboration with, 112–113, 113–117
London’s shaping by and shaping of, 116–117
new forms, technologies, and genres of reading, 4, 113, 126nn3
Massumi, Brian, 125n1
Master, The (film), 509, 514n30
materialism vs. idealism, in poetry, 227–228
Mate/Woman
concept of in The Kempton-Wace Letters, 58
concept of in The Sea Wolf, 61
concept of in Valley of the Moon, 67
Maudsley, Henry, 247
Maugham, W. Somerset, 279
“Mauki,” 29
Maybeck, Bernard, 49
Maybrick, Florence, 389
Mayhew, Henry, 278
Mayor of Goldfield, The, 207
Mays, G. Larry, 405–406n2
McAleer, Joseph
Jack London’s International Reputation, 95–111
McClure, S. S., 9, 47, 587
McClure’s magazine
editor’s rejected advice, 81
illustrations in, 577
interest in social responsibility, 587
“Love of Life,” 586–587
“Love of Life,” illustration of, 588f
McCook, John J., 479, 480
McKollip, A. B., 74
McLennan, Rebecca, 405n2
McTeague (Norris), 588–589
“Medieval and Modern Punishment” (Evans), 457–458
Melville, Herman, 366, 370n11, 504, 508
memoirs of prison life, 389
memory
inherited memory, and evolutionary notion of identification, 535, 543n40
(p. 632)
inherited memory, in A Doll’s House, 566–567
inherited memory, in Cherry, 574
inherited memory, in The Valley of the Moon, 446
inherited memory, London’s own interest in, 404
inherited memory in The Star Rover, 393–402, 407n6
memory, in ghost and fantasy stories
cultural memories and individual memories, 248
and doubling of characters, 243–244, 251–252
and London’s conception of the supernatural, 240–241
and night terrors or dreams, 246
Mencken, H. L., 358, 365
“Men of Forty-Mile, The,” 23, 26n45, 269
Mental Evolution in Man (Romanes), 240
mentors
in childhood, 41–43
in early writing career, 46–52
in young adulthood, 43–45
Mercy of the Sea, The, 83
Meredith, Anthony, 444
meritocracy, notion of America as, 317–318, 319
mestizos
and London’s reports from Mexico, 169
views on, 176n40
meta-discourse of Russo-Japanese war correspondence
conditions of common soldiers, 151
deconstructing heroic image of correspondents, 154
and dialogically directed discourse, 153, 155–157, 158n6
distinguishing characteristics of, 150–151
epistemological grounding of, 152–153
fundamental irrationality of war, 151–152
ideological situating of, 149–150, 154, 157
nature of, 145
and restrictions placed on correspondents, 146–147, 159n13
transforming experience through narration, 147–149
Methuen, Algernon, 91n15
Methuen & Co., 100
Mexal, Stephen J.
and binaries of savage and civilized in London stories, 9–10
Liberalism and Conservative Temporality in The Son of the Wolf, 259–276
Reading for Liberalism: The Overland Monthly and the Writing of the Modern American West, 24n1
Mexicali, Mexico, capture of by Magonistas, 163, 164
“Mexican, The”
critical response to, 174n20
masculinity and the sport of boxing in, 553–554
origins of, 5, 165–166
racialized portrayals in, 557
Mexican Revolution, Jack London’s role in