Show Summary Details

Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD HANDBOOKS ONLINE (www.oxfordhandbooks.com). © Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a title in Oxford Handbooks Online for personal use (for details see Privacy Policy and Legal Notice).

date: 18 June 2019

Abstract and Keywords

While Jack London is renowned for hypermasculine narratives, this essay traces his ongoing interest in marriage and domestic themes. That thread becomes especially visible as the essay establishes as an overlooked historical context for understanding London’s thinking about gender: the Progressive era debate over marriage and divorce. While in early work (and in his own first marriage) London maintained a troubling distinction between “Mother”-women versus “Mate”-women, later work (and to some extent, London’s second marriage) reflects a more egalitarian and companionate model, such as was recommended by contemporary marriage reformers. In particular, this essay traces the marriage reformers’ idea of a voluntary relationship between economically independent coworkers as refracted through London’s evolving portrayals of the division of labor in romantic partnerships. Drawing from London’s two marriages, one divorce, and troubled relationship with his daughters, this essay examines as well his evolving portrayals of sexuality, adultery, and reproduction.

Keywords: divorce, biography, labor, heterosexuality, sexuality, gender, adultery, reproduction

Access to the complete content on Oxford Handbooks Online requires a subscription or purchase. Public users are able to search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter without a subscription.

Please subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you have purchased a print title that contains an access token, please see the token for information about how to register your code.

For questions on access or troubleshooting, please check our FAQs, and if you can''t find the answer there, please contact us.