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date: 05 December 2020

(p. 621) Index

(p. 621) Index

Note: Page numbers followed by ‘f ’ and ‘t’ refers to figures and tables

abhinaya, 434f
Abramovic, Marina, 5n15, 230, 356, 366n26
accumulation, 191n12, 330
Accumulation, 350
acheion (house), 20
acheiropoietic images, 232–33, 233n7, 238
Achterland, 367–68
acoustic construction of knowledge, 60
active cultural memory, 146–47
acts of transfer, Taylor’s idea of, 440
Adorno, Theodor W., 538–39, 539n5, 541
Aeon, 129, 387–90, 393
affect. See also specific works
affective chiasms, 49–51
affective engagement, 52
affective tonality of language, 61
affective transmission of witnesses, 279
affective turn, 33n1, 34, 35n3
Agnew’s skepticism about, 33–34, 35, 43, 50, 51
common conceptualization of, 34
definition of, 33–35
de Soto on, 47
distinction between affections and, 476–77
double interaction of making sense and sensing in, 39, 52–53, 52n22
feminist definition of, 49n18
historical distance and, 35–36, 35n4, 41–44
as inquiry, 330
knowledge production and, 51–52, 51n21
Lacan’s reading of, 477, 478
non-affective movement in Conrad and Beckett, 464–66
as non-rational, 49
self-reflexivity and, 53, 613
sensations and, 47, 342
spell-like, 73–74
Spinoza’s theory of, 476–79
subjectivity and, 33–34
theory of, 33–35, 36
affect, technique, and discourse, 474
affect in Urheben Aufheben, 475–78
Albrecht Knust Quartet use of discourse, 480–82
confrontation with the unattainable, 480, 483–84
technique in, 478–80
Affectos Humanos, 22, 476–78, 594. See also Nachbar, Martin; Urheben Aufheben
Ausdruckstanz and, 196, 496
copyright issues, 23
date of, 1
inspiration for, 22n3
internationalism and, 195, 196
Linke’s reconstruction of Hoyer’s, 1, 1n2, 494
Nachbar’s reconstruction of, 19, 26, 196
reenactments of, 1, 2–3, 278
unattainable element for reconstruction of, 474
affects, 23n5
Affects/Rework, 85, 195
affordances, 217, 225, 529–30
Africa, 384, 386nn8–9, 387, 392, 577
hip-hop circle rooted in, 558–59
South, 375, 382, 382n6, 386
African-Americans, 560
“black beauty” and aesthetics, cultural contribution and, 538n3
Harrell as, 545
African freedom fighters, Douglas’s representations of Angola, 574, 577
African Immanuel Essemblies Brass Band, 392
African slaves, decolonized movements and, 566
“The Aftermath,” 45, 47
The Afternoon of a Faun (L ’Après- midi d’un faune), 474, 481
afterword, genre of, 607
(p. 622) Agamben, Giorgio, 272, 282, 387, 518–19, 519n16
agency, 126, 130, 535, 541
Agnew, Vanessa, 13, 33–34, 35, 50, 572
on a-historicity, 497
Elswit and, 43
Agon, 125n57
a-historicity, 497
Alberti, Leon Battista, 237–38, 508
Albrecht Knust Quartet, 5, 40, 474, 480–82
AlmgrenRecén, Daniel, 221, 223, 224
“Altermodern Manifesto,” Bourriaud’s, 205
Always Already New: Media, History and the Data of Culture (Gitelman), 215–16
The American Moon, 239–40
“An American Perspective on Tanztheater” (Manning, S.,), 538, 538n4
Ameriquains, 286, 286f, 286n6, 290–92
anarchival practice of, 303–5, 304n51
amplic phase, in Isouan theory of dance history, 167–68, 169
anarchive
Ballets of the Americas and, 289, 302–5
Baroque burlesques as, 289
Happenings and, 240
Rabel’s drawings and, 289, 302
Andes, 286, 287
de Las Casas writings on, 287n5
controversy over artworks of, 303n47
cosmologies of metals in pre-colonial, 295
metalworking in Pre-Columbian, 295nn28–29
processions and ceremonies in, 293–95, 294f
“ANDROGINES,” 288–89, 295, 297–98, 297f
censorship and, 299–301, 299n42
Angolan rebels, 574, 577, 583–84
Angst, 279
The Ankle Bracelet (Silapaddikaram), 318
“Annihilating Reality,” 229–30
anticipatory time
early memory theory and, 509
in fifteenth-century instruction manuals, 506–14, 509n6
Antic Meet, 130n73
Antigone Sr./Twenty Looks or Paris Is Burning at The Judson Church, 537, 542
all-male cast of, 543
double structure of, 543–44
strings between Harrell and audience in, 545–46
versions of, 543n10
Anxiety, 21, 475
apartheid, 375
aporia, 451–53, 458, 461, 465
Appalachian Spring, 71
apparatus of capture, 123
Appiah, Anthony, 541
appropriation
as Beyoncé MO, 361–62, 361n11
Ciupke and Till research for, 599–601
history as past, 603
institutionalization of, 248
inversion of white, 358–63
across media, 596–97
reenactment and reconstruction as, 251, 258
Roller’s team and research on, 597–99
L ’Après- midi d’un faune (Afternoon of a Faun)., 474, 481
apsaras, 428, 428n19
arabesque, Forsythe’s dictum on, 479
The Arcades Project (Benjamin), 583
archaeochoreology, 148–49
Archimedes, 215, 221
archive, 13. See also body, as archive; documentary archives
anarchive, 240, 289, 302–5
archival drag, 192n13
bodily memory and, 147, 149, 155
canonical performance view and, 91
censorship of performance, 299–301
Cunningham Trust and Pina Bausch Foundation opposing practices of, 596
dance as anti-, 155
embodied memory interaction with documentary, 157–58
Foster, H., on recent archival impulse, 180
fragmentary nature of dance, 90–91
global reach of baroque, 305
Greek derivation of, 20
of imprints, 27–28, 27n8, 30
legibility and, 29
meta-, 501
(p. 623) as multi-sited, 20–21
of perception, 289
repertoire and, 192n13, 596
as site of accidental emergence, 20
sonic, 59
spectator and, 329, 332
stage as space for, 488
as translation site, 497
“will to archive,” 362
Archive Fever (Derrida), 28, 493
arch-walk, from Crises, [link]
“Argumentum disciplinorum” (Guglielmo), 512
Aristotle, Ricoeur and, 450n1, 452
art
Fluxus, 234, 241
heritage and, 197
institutions, 243
old masters compared with Happenings, 238
political, 393
reenactment and contemporary, 3n9, 5n15
witnessing and, 279n14
art documentation, 6, 6n17
art history, Kopienkritik, 230–32
Artificial Hells (Bishop), 242
The Artist’s Studio (Courbet), 572n4
Ashbery, John, 520–21
Assmann, Aleida, 146–47, 158, 273, 275, 473n5
Assmann, Jan, 156, 473n5
Atahualpa, 288–89, 289n12, [link] , 305
effigy, 293–95, 294f, 298
attentive listening, 62
audience, 323–24
as collectors of information, 328
Crises response of, 106
focalization strategies to capture imagination of, 220
importance of critiquing reaction of, 249
participation, 329, 348, 543, 544, 545–46
previous studies of, 328
reception paradox, 332
reconstruction of, 343
referent unfamiliarity of, 207
talkbacks, 269–70
witness-hood of, 279
Augustine, Ricoeur and, 453, 461
Ausdruckstanz (German expressionist dance), 36, 496
AMWDE and, 43, 410
attempts to analyze, 196
dance history and, 528
first usage of term, 194, 194n14
Hoyer and, 2
inability of US dance studies dialogue with, 536
Laban and, 143, 150, 154
learning “from,” 406
National Socialism and, 195
Nazism and, 2
in problematic dance history of Germany, 194–95
temporal distance of Quito dance scene and, 407
Australia, 597, 598, 616
authenticity, 149
debate, 492
Franko on modern dance and, 545
historic, 390
illusions of, 615
autobiographical narrative, 117–18, 146
avant-garde, 342
anxiety of white, 363–67
in communist Yugoslavia, 341, 341n2
Bach Suite, 494
Baecker, Dirk, 483–84
Bagouet, Dominique, 168, 174
Bakhtin, M. M., 499
Bal, Mieke, 382, 393
Balanchine, George, 6n19, 125n57
ballet, 474. See also Baroque period, of France; specific companies; specific dance works
affect theory and, 476
Forsythe on codes of, 479–80
technique and body memory in, 478
temporal layers in history of, 528
Ballet de la douairière de Billebahaut, 291, 291n18, 294f, 295–99, 302
Ballet Frankfurt, 479
Ballet Review, 73
Ballets ciselants, 166, 167, 172t
(p. 624) Ballets of the Americas, Rabel’s drawings of, 286f, 297f
album, 285, 285n1, 288, 290–91, 300, 301, 304
as anarchival, 289, 302, 303–5
Andean processions and, 293–95, 294f
censorship and, 299–301
colonialism and, 291, 296, 300
gender-crossing and, 290
Inca Empire and, 286, 287
metals use and significance in, 285–88, 287n5, 291–92, 295, 295nn28–29
paradox and criticisms of Spain, 291–92
parrots in, 295–96, 296f, 296n33
Peruvian mines and, 287, 287n5, 288n9, 292n22, 300
qualia and experience of, 285–87
reception and reconstruction of, 301–2
slavery and, 287
tattoos in, 292, 292n20, 300
transculturation and, 295, 298, 298n38, 299, 305
Barba, Fabián, [link] , 615. See also A Mary Wigman Dance Evening
Ausdruckstanz and, 43
in Brussels and Quito, 399–402, 399n3, 406
corporeal investigations of, 13, 79, 93–96
dance education of, 399–400, 399n3, 408
Decouflé and, 89, 91–92
“80s looking” dance pieces of, 402
Franko collaboration with, 40n8
historicism and, 402–6
internationalism and, 195–96
on meaning of costumes in Wigman reenactment, 37n6
PARTS and, 400, 406, 407
solos performed in Wigman reenactment, 36–40, 88–89
de Soto and, 44, 46, 48, 49, 52
Stalpaert and, 82
work with former Wigman students, 79, 85
Barnett, Susan, 593
baroque decade, of choreography, 1980s reconstruction as, 492–94
Baroque period, of France
ballets of, 291, 291n18
eighteenth-century, 301–2
global reach of archives on, 305
Incaic procession and, 288–90, 288n7
queer studies and, 300n43
research-spectatorship and, 290
Barthes, Roland, 59–61, 64, 86
Baryshnikov, Mikhail, 251, 473
Basel, Switzerland, multidisciplinary conference in, 536–39
bassadanza
basse danse compared to, 507
floor patterns of, 507, 507n1
instruction manual contents, 508–13
basse danse, instruction manuals on bassadanza and, 505
anticipatory time in, 506–14, 509n6
“Argumentum disciplinorum” in, 512
bassadanza texts, 508–13
Brussels 9085, 513–14, 519, 520
Cornazano’s Italian treatise, 510–11, 515, 518
Domenico’s manual, 508–9, 511–12, 518
estampie dance form in, 517, 517n13
fantasmata dialectical reading, 518
forward and backward motion in, 516–17, 517n14, 520–21
intersecting temporalities in, 514–21
material features of manuscript, 519
memory discussed in, 508–9
movement transitions, 510–11
reconstruction through instruction in, 506–14
reenactment issues, 516–21
rhythm patterns and changes, 515–16, 515n11
theoretical discourse in, 514, 517–18, 518n15
Batson, Quinn, 71–72
Bausch, Pina, 198, 198n20, 202, 350
witnesses to, 271, 274–75, 599–601
Bay-Cheng, Sarah, 216, 221, 226
Beat poets, 560
beings of fiction, Latour’s concept of, 287
Bel, Jérôme, 85, 122, 247, 589n4, 594
Benjamin, Walter, 327–28, 332, 334–35, 342
on blasting out oppressed past, 340
on Proust, 583–84
Benso, Silvia, 86
Berlin Wall, fall of, 535
(p. 625) Bernes, Jasper, 520–21
Beutler, Nicole, 219, 474
Beuys, Joseph, 331–32, 334
Beyoncé, De Keersmaeker choreography restaging by, 355–57. See also “Countdown” video, Beyoncé
De Keersmaeker’s response to, 355, 364–65
inaccuracies in process description, 360–61
Petty and, 360–61, 363n13
pregnancy coincidence and, 367
reproductive bodies and, 367–70
“Single Ladies” and, 361, 361n11, 368
“Snuggie” version of “Countdown” and, 368–69, 369n31
statement issued by, 360–61
white avant-garde anxiety and, 363–67
as white privilege inversion, 358–63
YouTubers response to, 363
Bhakti tradition, 417, 417n9
Bildung, 540, 541
Birmingham School, 541
Bishop, Claire, 122n50, 242
black aesthetic, “black beauty” and, 537–38, 538n3
Blackman, Lisa, 33–34
Bleeker, Maaike, 11, 13, 542
Blood Memory (Graham), 58, 58n1
boarding culture, 560–66
Bodenwieser, Gertrud, 597–99, 616–17
bodies
decolonized, 551, 556, 564–66
reproductive, 367–70
bodily memory, 147, 149. See also archive; body, as archive; embodied memory
ballet technique and, 478
of Laban’s pupils, 155
Bodin, Jean, 292
Bodmer, Sylvia, 146, 151
body
ambiguity of researcher’s, 21
of deity Jagannath, 421–22
distributed, 414
future, 172n18
gap between notation and, 481
Hinduism relation of divine to, 427
Kalingan temple as, 425–28, 426f, 428f
mahari naach layers of, 415
as messenger, 282
spatial relationship of human and divine, 427
stored learned movements in, 20
temple as, 422–28
body, as archive, 10, 25–30, 59, 88–89, 94
bodily memory and, 147, 149, 155
performative event incorporation of, 611
recording performances of, 611
body-knowledge, 591
encountering gap in, 589–90
handing down choreographic and, 270–72
post-bodily knowledge and, 592
body-of-ideas, Foster, S., on, 257
The Body of the People (Giersdorf), 535–36
Bogue, Ronald, 389
Bohner, Gerhard, 538n4, 588
bonds, Crises and, 124–31, 127n60
Booty Looting, 330–35
Born, Georgina, 614
Bourdin, Martial, 387, 388
Bourriaud, Nicholas, 205
Brandstetter, Gabriele, 450, 451, 452, 456
Brazil, Capoeira and, 574
breakdancing, 557–58
breath, Graham’s principle of, 65
Brecht, Bertolt, 42
British colonial rule, devadasis outlawed by, 418
British Cultural Studies, 541
Brook, Peter, 233
Brooks, Daphne, 360
Brown, Carolyn, 104n8, 108, 110, 129n69, 132
Cunningham’s duet with, 111–12, 119–20, [link]
on learning Cunningham steps, 124
on Summerspace reconstruction, 136–37
Brown, Ivar, 70
Brown, James, 557
Brown, Trisha, 350, 565
Judson Church and, 553–54
1980s company of, 554
release technique and, 554–55
Soho and, 552–56
Streb’s reenactment of 1970s work of, 553
Brunn, Heinrich, 232
(p. 626) Brussels, 407
Barba in Quito and, 399–402, 399n3, 406
Brussels 9085, 513–14, 519, 520
Burrows, Jonathan, 343
Butler, Judith, 38, 614
Butterfield, Ardis, 506–7
Le Cabaret discrépant, 165, 165n1
comparison of Isou’s Ballets ciselants and, 172t
decontextualization and, 170
description and structure, 169–74, 172n18, 172t
discursive ambiguity and, 174–76
Lettrist-inspired texts in, 170
quotations in, 171, 172, 172n18, 173, 173n20, 175
temporal indeterminacy and, 170, 171, 174–76
Cabinet des dessins (Cabinet of Drawings) in Paris, 285
Café Muller, 350, 351
Cage, John, 101, 102, 110, 111, 131
on Crises, 109
Cunningham’s use of terms from, 104n8
canonical performance view, of dance identity, 90–91, 90n11, 92
Cape Town Colony, 382, 382n6
capitalism, 232, 232n6, 253, 342, 377
Capoeira (Douglas, S.), 573f, 574, 575f
Carmelich, Guido, 350, 351
Carnatic vocal music, 317n7
Carriage Discreteness, 252–53, 253n9
Carter, Alexandra, 525
Cartesian dualism, 34, 42
de Las Casas, Bartolomé, 287, 287n5
Cave of the Heart, 72–73
Chakrabarty, Dipesh, 403–5, 403n7, 404n8, 411
Chakravorty, Pallabi, 197
Chamatz, Boris, 472, 594
Chance and Circumstance (Brown), 110
Chand, Soma, 424n17, 425–26
Changeling, 112, 112n36
Charan Das, Pankaj (Guru), 418n11
char dham, 420
Charles (king), 383
Charlip, Remy, 110
Chatterjea, Ananya, 203
Chatterjee, Sandra, 203, 203n24
chiasms
affective, 49–51
one hand touching other example of, 50, 50n19
chicken slaughter, at end of Pupilija, 347–48, 347n6
Chilembwe revolt of 1915, 387
chiseling phase, in Lettrism, 168, 169, 172
choirs, movement, 150, 151
choreographers
former companies of deceased, 595–96
independent, 471–72
“past” dance projects by European, 594
The Choreographer’s Handbook (Burrows), 343
A Choreographer’s Score: Fase, Rosas danst Rosas, Elena’s Aria, Bartok (De Keersmaeker), 367
choreographic re-embodiment, in Conrad and Beckett
abstract choreography in Beckett’s dramas, 460–61
Beckett’s staging of human condition as, 462–63
framework for studying, 451–54
Heart of Darkness, 454, 455–60, 458n9, 465–66
Ill Seen Ill Said, 449–50, 463, 464–65
movement phrases, 454–55, 459n10, 463
narratological disruption in, 466
non-affective movement use by, 464–66
Schlemmer and, 461, 461n14, 463–64
tryptych and, 462
Choreographies of 21st Century Wars (Giersdorf), 535–36
choreography. See also baroque decade, of choreography; notation; specific works
Albrecht Knust Quartet on difference between dance and, 480
anti-movement bias in, 122n50
as apparatus of capture, 86, 122n48, 123
as architectural site of memory, 497n21
bodily archive and, 30
(p. 627) choreographer responsibility for dance, 87n9
coercion element in, 123, 123n52
comparison of US and German dance studies and, 541–42
as contagion, 118–22, 125n57
DNA analogy, 612
gaps in, 592–94
Graham’s speech as, 68
Greek derivation of term, 321
identity conditions and, 83–84
intention and, 86–88
Isou’s infinitesimal, 169
Laban’s radical approach to, 153–54
Lepecki’s theory of, 86, 122, 122n50, 123n55
Lettrism impact on, 165–67
linguistic, 64–66
lost, 593
reenactment based on specifications of, 85–90
scores, 84, 84n7
for specific dancers, 117
state of dance as separate from, 480
tendency to quote, 321
transferring or handing down, 270–72
tyranny and, 122–24, 123n53, 139
Vikharev’s restaging of Petipa’s, 80–81
choreology, Laban and, 149
choreo-thoughts, 61–62, 66–67
The Chosen One, 593–94
Christopherson, Peter, 229–30, 230n1, 239, 243–44
chronological history, alternative to, 527–28
chronological time, 377
Chronos, time as, 379–81, 390, 393–94
circle, in hip-hop, 558
Ciupke, Christina, 269, 274, 589, 599–601. See also undo, redo and repeat
Clarke, Melanie, 143, 149
classical Indian dance, 413n1. See also Indian dance
in Future Memory, 203–4
Odissi status as, 417n8, 418
reenactment ideal in, 413–14
revival and reconstruction of, 416–17
styles in canon of, 415
The Clock Room, in Kentridge’s The Refusal of Time, 383f
clock time, 380, 382
Clough, Patricia, 33n1, 35n3
Club Versailles (Douglas, S.), 573f, 578f, 588
Coat Check (Douglas, S.), 573f, 579, 580f
Codex of Emperor Theodosius, 216–17
coevalness, 402–3, 408–11
cognition, embodied, 225
cognitive sensations, 226
collective memory, 350, 473–74
metis and, 343–45, 353
working through, 610–11
Collingwood, R. G., 1n2, 215, 217, 218, 221, 505
bassadanza manuals and, 520
on historiography, 45–46, 45n12
Landsberg on, 51n21
recent scholarship on, 46n13
colonialism
Chakrabarty on historicism and, 403–5, 403n7, 404n8
chronological time and, 377
classical Indian dance and, 413n1
colonized time, 382
Douglas, S., representations of Angola and, 574
historical parade and, 392–93
Kentridge installations and, 381–87
Colonial War Office, 384, 388
The Columbia Literary History of the United States, 529
communicative memory, 157, 590n5
conceptual dance, 174, 175
conceptual movement, of 2000s, 174, 175
Confessions (Augustine), 452–53, 458
Conrad, Joseph, 449–50, 462. See also choreographic re-embodiment, in Conrad and Beckett
movement of women depicted by, 459, 459n10
narrative skepticism of, 460
Conroy, Renee, 91
conservation, irretrievability and, 596
construction, Franko on, 261, 274n9
contemporaneity of the noncontemporaneous, 527–28, 530–31
contemporary art, 3n9, 5n15
(p. 628) contemporary dance
advent of new scene in, 483
Brussels scene and, 401, 407
digital revolution and, 483
Duncan and, 492n11
freelance dancers in, 472
historicizing modes of 1980s, 489, 492–94
history exclusion of communist countries’, 340
institutional support for companies of, 471
interest in own history of, 587–89, 587n1, 588n2
linear evolution view of, 340, 408
1990s reconstructions, 472, 473
oppressed past and, 340
originality notion as rejected by, 473
political dimensions of appropriation efforts in, 590–92
contemporary Indian dance
Nair’s reconstructions and, 178, 197, 204, 204n26, 206f
Neo-Bharatam and, 320
Continuous Project-Altered Daily (CP-AD), 257
first performance of, 250
performance modes of, 255–56
Continuous Project-Altered Daily (CP-AD), appropriation of Rainer’s
as case study, 259–61
improvisation scores and educational setting, 248–49, 256–58
Judson Dance Theater and, 250n6
performance score challenges, 255–58
project introduction, 249n4
rehearsal mode and self-reflexivity challenge in, 261–62
skills involved in, 259–61
surprise element in, 262
conventions, reactivation of, 409
Cook, Alexander, 92, 219–20
copyright, 356, 357, 364n19
Cornazano, 510–11, 515, 518
corporeality, 542
Barba and, 13, 79, 93–96
identity politics and, 540
“Countdown” video, Beyoncé, 357
alternate version of, 363–64, 364n18
De Keersmaeker’s choreography sequence in, 359
lyrics and aesthetic of, 358–59
music track leak before release of, 361
referents for, 359–61
“Snuggie” version of, 368–69, 369n31
white experimental dance and, 362–63, 362n14
“Couples” in CP-AD, 259, 260
Courbet, Gustave, 572n4
Cramer, Franz Anton, 41
Crane, Frederick, on basse danse and bassadanza, 515
Crary, 457, 457n6
Craske, Margaret, 132
Crises
allegory perception of, 124
arch-walk from, [link]
atypical qualities of, 105
audience reaction to, 106
autobiographical narrative speculation for, 117–18
bonds and bondage in, 124–31, 127n60
chance operations in, 113n39, 126–27
choreography as contagion in, 118–22, 125n57
creative process behind choreography of, 104–6, 127
crisis alluded to by title, 105, 111, 118
decontextualization discourse and, 107
drama in, 101n1, 103, 105–6, 109
elastic bands in, 108, 109, 109n29, 113, 118, 126–29
gamut of movements in, 104–5, 104n8, 111–12
gender and, 121, 121n46
Martha Graham Dance Company interest in, 140
motivated movement in, 139
movement vocabulary of, 112
music choice for, 104, 104n8
pas de deux in, 111, 117, 121, 125
photo of Farber and Cunningham in, 113, [link]
prop significance question, 118, 129–30
(p. 629) recent discourse on, 106–7, 106n16
removal from repertory, 132
sexuality and, 115–16, 128n63
spectatorship type encouraged by, 108–9
Summerspace and, 139n93
title of, 105n13
Crises, reconstruction of
affective bonds in, 136
Cunningham’s technique and, 133–35
dancers in, 134–36, [link]
drama and, 101–2, 116
first rehearsals for Goggan’s, 133
male students and, 134–35, [link] , 135n85
props and, 131
2006, 110
Critchley, Simon, 342, 344–45
critical study
dance potential in, 262
improvisation and, 262
of reconstruction, 247–48, 249
reenactment, 3–4, 304, 603
Croatia, 341
Crockett, Katherine, 60
cross-temporality, 52, 53
cultural hybridity, identity politics and, 205
cultural memory, 146–47, 158, 473
communicative memory distinguished from, 157, 590n5
culture. See also Kulturstiftung des Bundes; specific topics
Adorno’s definition of, 539
African-American contribution to US, 538n3
boarding, 560–66
digital, 215, 216, 483
geo-cultural locations, 403
media and, 224–25
movement, derivative logic and, 550
nature-culture divide, 451
phantasm in Middle Ages literary, 518–19, 519n16
transculturation, 295, 298, 298n38, 299, 305
Cummins, Thomas B., 293, 294, 294n27
Cunningham, Merce, 88n10, 108n26, 129, 129n69, 131. See also Crises
aesthetic goal of, 101, 103
afterlife of works by, 103
background of, 102
Balanchine and, 125n57
Brown, C., on, 110, 124
Cage relationship with, 111
choreographic notations of, 113n39
on crisis, 109
critics and, 104
dancer’s gaze element in style of, 133
death of, 103
on drama, 101n1, 137–38
Foster, S. L., on critiques of, 107, 107n24
Franko on, 106n20, 109n31
gender, narrative and, 111
Goggans and, 134
Graham and, 105n13
interview with Lesschaeve, 137, 138n90, 139
Lamentation parody by, 130n73
Lettrist chiseling phase and, 168
male and female dancers referred to by, 138n90
Nijinsky comparison with, 128n63
procedure, gesture and movement described by, 137–39
technique, 133–35
Cunningham Trust, 101n3, 103, 595
Curtis-Jones, Alison, 143, 149
Cusicanqui, Silvia Rivera, 301
dance. See also specific styles; specific topics; specific works
Albrecht Knust Quartet on difference between choreography and, 480
as anti-archive, 155
of attention, 303, 303n49
choreographer responsibility for, 87n9
choreography as separate from state of, 480
coevalness between traditions, 410–11
critical potential of, 262
disease of the dance (Taki Onquy), 300–301
eighteenth-century shift in perception of, 301–2
establishment, 251, 254
film as means of reviving, 84, 88–89
(p. 630) as gift and offering, 433–36
hybrid forms of, 181, 194, 203–4
Isouian theory of, 167–69
lack of photographic documentation of, 6
Lettrism and conceptual, 174, 175
messengers, 276–80
nritta as pure (abstract) dance, 434n29
pastness relation to, 5, 13n32
of perception, 303
protest and, 300–301
reenactment across text and, 451
research and, 488
retrievability of lost, 79
three rubrics for writing historically about, 474
union of voice, gesture and, 66–67
white experimental, 362–63, 362n14
world, 197n19
Dance as Text: Ideologies of the Baroque Body (Franko, M.,), 291
dance avant-garde, dance establishment and, 251
Dance Heritage Fund. See Tanzfonds Erbe
dance historians, 496, 527
relation to pastness of, 13n32
dance history
contemporaneity of the noncontemporaneous and, 527–28, 530–31
contemporary dance interest in, 587–89, 587n1, 588n2
dance studies and, 525
Franko on alternative, 530
German dance problematic, 194–96
historiography crisis and, 526–27
Isouan theory of, 167–69
in light of general history criticism, 525–26
oppressed past in linear contemporary dance, 340
paradox in contemporary projects on, 589
plurality of, 400–401
dance identity
canonical performance view of, 90, 90n11, 92
conditions and constraints, 83–85, 83n5, 91–92
dance of death (Totentanz), 45, 47
Dance Research Journal, 536
dancers
choreography for specific, 117
Cunningham’s use of gaze of, 133
distances between spectator and, 329–30
early memory theory and self of, 509
financiers and, 555
freelance, 472
gap between notation and, 481
interviewed by Laban’s company, 148, 148n8
lecture performance and dual identity of, 488, 499
loss of knowledge with death of, 592
study of medieval, 506
dance studies
comparison of US and German choreography, 541–42
dance history and, 525
German-US divide and lack of dialogue across, 536–40
Giersdorf’s work on, 535–36
hegemonic national politics of, 536
national discourses presentation, 536–39
stability within national contexts, 537
US identity politics and German conceptualization, 537
Dance Theater Workshop, 59–60
dance works
corporeal engagement with past, 13, 79, 93–96
type-token view of, 82–85, 86–89
dancing, speaking while, 68
da Piacenza, Domenico. See Domenico da Piacenza
The Darker Side of the Renaissance (Mignolo), 304
“The Darkest Side” (The Middle East), 544
Dark Ladies (Brown), 70
death
Cornazano’s metaphor of, 510–11
of Cunningham, 103
dance of, 45, 47
of ephemerality, 7–8
of Farber, 117n43
Graham and, 58, 58n1, 67, 71
of Häger, L., 180
(p. 631) legacy and inheritance questions prompted by, 595
loss of knowledge with dancers’, 592
reenactments inspired by prominent choroegraphers’ recent, 595
Debord, Guy, 253, 565
Débords: Reflections on The Green Table, 40n8, 44, 45, 45n12, 46–49, 48f
contested legacies and, 195, 196
documentary method used in, 44n10
de Bry, Theodor, 300, 300n44
Debussy, Claude, 481
decenterings, 551n2, 564
de Certeau, Michel, 343–44, 353
on production of space, 487, 497, 498
Veyne in opposition to, 505
Déclaration sur la personne humaine, 173, 173n20
decolonization, of body and movement, 551, 556, 564–66
Decolonizing the Sodomite (Horswell), 298
deconstruction, Serpentine Dance Kentridge’s, 376–77, 376f
decontextualization, Le Cabaret discrépant and, 170
Decouflé, Philippe, 3, 79–81, 82
Barba and, 89, 91–92
corporeality and, 93
DeFrantz, Thomas, 362, 365
deindustrialization, 561
De Keersmaeker, Anne Teresa
authorial control and, 367
Beyoncé’s reference to, 360–61
on Flanders schoolgirls dance, 364, 366
plagiarism statement issued by, 355, 364–65
remix project of, 369–70
on Rosas conditions of production, 362–63
Deleuze, Gilles, 59, 61, 62, 74, 380, 394
on coercion in choreography, 123, 123n52
on language of movement, 461, 461n12
on Masilo’s dance movements, 389–90
onto-aesthetics of, 377
repetition and, 459
on societies of control, 564
Spinoza and, 477–79
on tempo of Chronos, 379
truth functions idea of, 381, 381n4
De Mey, Thierry, 361, 363
demon, in Kaisika Natakam. See rakshasa
derivatives and derivative practice
dance vocabulary associations with, 555
generative risk through, 564–67
hip-hop connection with, 556–59
logic of, 550–52
movement practices connected to, 550
release technique likened to mathematical, 555
risk in dance and, 549–50
social media and, 565–66
2008 financial bailout and, 549, 566–67
Le Dernier spectacle (The Last Performance), 85, 471
Derrida, Jacques, 28, 29, 157, 234, 289, 493
on “distance,” 501
poststructuralism and, 488n5
preface passage by, 607–8
resistance as restance, 608–9
on translation and archive, 497
Desbrosses, Colette, 167, 171
Déserts d’amour, 168
Desire, 21, 475
de Soto, Olga, 40n8, 45, 45n12, 48f
Barba and, 44, 46, 48, 49, 52
Future Memory and, 184n10
internationalism and, 195–96
strategic use of reenactment, 47
devadasis, 318, 418. See also maharis; mahari system
campaigns to abolish, 432
gender and caste interplay, 436n30
social roles and status, 436–37, 436n30
devalaya (home of the gods), 424–25
Diaghilev, Serge, 528
Dialogue with Lucinda, 221
Die Befragung des Robert Scott, 273
Die Grünen Clowns (The Green Clowns), 152
digital culture, 215, 216, 483
digital photography. See also Disco Angola suite
nonsynchronous temporality and, 579
temporal manipulation in, 582
Disco Angola suite (Douglas, S.), 573f, 576f, 578f, 580f
absence of actual past in, 609
(p. 632) constructed nature of, 609
fictional representation and, 579, 581–84
gallery installation, 574
nonsynchronous temporality in, 579
press release on, 581
reference images for, 583
restance and, 609
war paired with disco dancing in, 577, 579, 581
disco movement, 574, 577, 583
discordant concordance, Ricoeur and, 454
discursive formations, Foucault’s, 540
disease of the dance (Taki Onquy), 300–301
disfocus technique, 480
displacement
double, 2, 2n7
historical, 3, 289
textual, 608
Dissemination (Derrida), 607–8
distance
difference and, 494–96
in Linke’s reconstruction, 1
Merleau-Ponty’s écart concept of, 51, 51n20
production of, 500–501
spectator-dancer, 329–30
distentio animi, 453, 458
distributed body, mahari ritual dance, 414, 439–42
distributed personhood, Gell’s definition of, 438
Dixit Dominus, 179f, 181n6
choreography theme in, 179–80
Häger, L., and, 179f, 182, 189, 190f
Indian dance in, 179, 181, 202–3
Jooss on Häger, L., and, 202–3
Nair’s inheritance of, 180, 183n8
as outside Jooss canon, 181, 185–86, 199
rehearsal tape, 188, 204–5
Dixit Dominus, Nair 2003 reconstruction of, 179–80, 182–83, 183f
dOCUMENTA, 378
documentary archives, 88, 157–58
bodily imprints interaction in, 19–21, 30
corporeal gap with, 94
digital access to, 216
distortion potential, 507
of Happenings, 234–35
on Laban, 145, 155–56
Lepecki on limits of, 86
Rainer and, 254–55, 254n12
reperformance of documentation, 216
documentation
art, 6, 6n17
performance as, 234–35
trace, 12, 13
Dog Town and Z-boys, 563
Domenico da Piacenza, 508–9, 511–12, 518
Do-Nguyen, Ton, 368–69, 369n31
Dore Hoyer tanzt--eine Gedenksendung (Dore Hoyer Dances--A Broadcast in Commemoration), 19
D’Oros, Guiseppina, 218
Dörr, Evelyn, 145, 145n7
doubleness, 521, 577
double displacement, 2, 2n7
double vision affliction, 8–9
Douglas, George (“Carl”), 574
Douglas, Stan, 572–73, 573f, 576f, 577, 579, 580f
as fictional photojournalist, 581–83
Doze, Matthieu, 249n4
drama, 221. See also Crises; Future Memory
movement and, 101n1, 136–38
without narrative, 116n42, 460–61
dual emplacement, of practice and theory, 488, 499, 502
Duets, 121
Duncan, Isadora, 489, 492, 492n11
narrative skepticism and, 449, 456–57
Dunn, Judith, 111, 119, 124–25
Dying Procession, 152
“East-Dance-Academy” (Janša, Kunst, Milohnič, Pristaš), 342
Eastern European performance art, historicism and, 402–3
écart (distance), Merleau-Ponty’s concept of, 51, 51n20
Echo anticipé, 169
The Ecological Approach to Visual Perception (Gibson), 217
Ecuador, historicism and, 404
education, political activism and, 540–41, 541n7. See also pedagogy
(p. 633) eigenartige Vergeisterung (peculiar spiritualization), 539
18 Happenings in 6 Parts, 233
Ein Selbstversuch (An Experiment on Myself), 495
Ekadesi festival, 312, 320
Eliot, T. S., 449
Elkins, James, 36
Elswit, Kate, 43, 45n11
embodied memory, 155, 157–58, 321, 590
transmedial performance of, 601–2
embodiment
embodied cognition, 225
embodied knowledge and improvisation, 257
empathy, 551
sonic, 72, 615
Enders, Jody, 509, 509n6
Engblom, Skip, 562–63
“Entry of King Atabalipa,” 294f
“Entry of the ANDROGINES,” 297–99, 297f
“Entry of the Parrots,” 296f
Environments, Assemblages, and Happenings, 236
ephemerality
body-knowledge, 591
death of, 7–8
of improvisation, 253–54
modern view of dance, 591–92, 592n8
myth of dance’s, 440
post-ephemeral era, 613
episteme, 550–51
“Epistemo-Critical Prologue” (Benjamin), 327–28
epistemological model, of witnessing, 272–74, 272n6, 273n8, 275, 280–81
equality of the ignorant, Filliou on, 244, 244n12
Errand into the Maze, 597–99, 616
Escalade non Anesthesiée (Unanaesthetized Climb), 230
estampie, 517, 517n13
Ethics (Spinoza), 476–78
European choreographers, “past” dance projects in 2000s, 594
Exodos Festival, 349–50, 351
Exodus (Douglas, S.), 573f, 579, 580f
Expanded Cinema Symposium, 240–41
experimental dance
reenactment fascination of, 362
Experimental Dance Theater, 166
An Experiment on Myself (Ein Selbstversuch), 495
expressionist dance, Germany. See Ausdruckstanz
Fabian, Johannes, 402, 405n10
Fake It!, 339, 349–51, 350n7, 351, 352
fantasmata, 518
Farber, Viola, 103, 108, 612
death of, 117n43
departure from Merce Cunningham Dance Company, 132
duet with Cunningham, 112–16, [link] , [link] , 124–25
husband on Cunningham and, 117–18, 117n43
movement idiosyncrasies of, 109–10, 111, 112n38, 121
Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), German government, 248n3
feminism, affect defined in queer theory and, 49n18
fiction
beings of, Latour’s, 287
historical, 95, 96–98
intentional, 583
fictional representation, historical reenactment and, 579, 581–84
Figurine, 376
Filliou, Robert, 234, 236, 236n10, 241–44, 244n12
film, 21–22, 23, 84, 88–89, 495
Dixit Dominus, 179
early example of filmed reenactment, 5n16
Rosas danst Rosas, 365
Film Culture, 241
financial crisis, of 2008, 549, 566–67
financiers, dancers and, 555
The First and Second Wilderness, 232
(p. 634) “First entry of the Americans, six figures,” 286, 286f, 287
Florêncio, João, 610
Fluxus art, 234, 241
focalization strategies, 220
Fokine, Mikhail, 219, 528
Forsythe, William, 273, 350, 351, 479–80
Fosse, Bob, 361, 361n11
Foster, Elizabeth Jean Marie, 62n2
Foster, Hal, 180, 181, 578–79
Foster, Susan Leigh, 6n19, 13n32, 314, 496, 521
body-of-ideas notion of, 257
on Cunningham’s critiques, 107, 107n24
Foucault, Michel, 13, 257, 415, 550–51, 564
discursive formations concept of, 540
Fox, Richard G., 441
Frakcija, 341
France, seventeenth-century trade and, 291n19. See also Baroque period, of France
Franco, Susanne, 43
Frankfurt Ballet, Forsythe’s, 474
Franko, Mark, 38–39, 82, 124, 124n56, 321
Barba’s collaboration with, 40n8
on Baroque, 291
on construction and reconstruction, 261
on critical potential of reenactment, 247, 249
on Cunningham, 106n20, 109n31
on dance history alternatives, 530
dual identity of, 487–88, 487n4
historicism and, 408
metakinetic exchange idea of, 551, 551n1
on modern dance and authenticity, 545
on 1980s, 487–88, 489, 492–94
Odissi reenactment and, 414
post-ephemeral era named by, 613
on redoing as construction, 274n9
reenactment envisioned by, 158
Schlemmer discussed by, 461n14
subjective reminiscence idea of, 331
on theoretical discourse in Italian manuals, 518n15
free dance, musical and literary correlates of modernist, 456–57
freelance dancers, 472
Freud, Jakob, 28
Freud, Sigmund, 28, 610
Frézier, Amédée-François, 293–94
Fricker, Elizabeth, 281
fugitive oscillation, 498, 498n22, 502
fugitives, reenactments as, 356
Fugue mimique n° 1 (Mimic Fugue no. 1), 166
Fuller, Loïe, 376–77, 376f, 449
future, refusing idea of, 342, 344
Future Memory, 180n3. See also inheritance, Future Memory and; letters to Häger, from Nair
alternative history created by, 181
audience unfamiliarity with referent of, 207
classical Indian dance in, 203–4
contested legacies reworking in, 194–200
decision-making processes, 182–86
Dixit Dominus gift basis of, 180
Dixit rehearsal tape in, 188, 204–5
dramaturg role and, 181, 181n7
funding, 184, 185
goal of, 203
Häger’s costumes and, 180, 182, 188, 191, 192, 192f, 200f
historical dimension of, 205
memory tasks in, 189–90
performance venues, 184, 184n10
preservation issues in, 192–93, 192n13
relationship with Häger, L., 183–84, 183n8
“Singing the Score,” 189f
staging inheritance in, 188–93
Galison, Peter, 378, 387
Gamson, Annabelle, 489
Ganga period, 423f
Ganguly, D. K., 427
gaps
aesthetic, 592
body-knowledge and encounter with, 589–90
between dancer’s body and notation, 481
knowledge, 41
between movement and meaning, 139
Garafola, Lynn, 528
Geitel, Klaus, 21–22
Gelfand, Alan (“Ollie”), 563
Gell, Alfred, 130, 438, 438n32
gender, 121, 121n46, 171, 319, 430, 543. See also “ANDROGINES”
(p. 635) caste and, 436n30
Cunningham and, 111
distance created through cross-gender performances, 79
French baroque gender-crossing, 288–90, 295, 297–99, 297f, 298n37
media, culture and, 224–25
swapping, 79, 80
gentrification, 556–57
geo-cultural locations, as past, 403
Genette, Gérard, 607
German dance history, problematic areas of, 194–96
German expressionism, US identity politics and, 546
German expressionist dance. See Ausdruckstanz
German Federal Cultural Foundation. See Kulturstiftung des Bundes
German language, 496
trace in, 19
Germany. See also US-Germany dance studies, in-between-ness and
African territories acquired by, 386, 386nn8–9
educational programs in, 248, 248n3
Hoyer’s difficulty in postwar, 2, 2n4
post-modern dance in US compared with choreography in, 541–42
science and colonialism history in, 386–87, 386n9
US-German dance symposium, 538
Gerstmeier, Joachim, 23
Gesicht der Nacht. See A Mary Wigman Dance Evening
gesture, 8
Cunningham, M., movement, procedure and, 137–39
memory logic and, 602–3
sonic embodiment and, 72
theoretical potential of, 461
union of voice and, 66–67
Geulincx, Arnold, 461
Gibson, James J., 217, 225
Giersdorf, Jens Richard, 2, 196, 500, 535–39
Gitelman, Lisa, 215–16
global memory, 205, 205n28, 207
gods. See Hindu deities
Goebbels, Joseph, 150
Goethe House, 538, 541
Goggans, Jennifer, 101, 102, 102n3, 109–10, 612. See also Winterbranch
Cunningham early dancers and, 134
duet directions for reconstruction, 116–17
on Farber, 112n38
Mitchell and, 136
Goldberg, Jonathan, 300
Goldberg Variations, 350, 351
Gopal, Ram, 187
gopa sari ritual, 431
gotipua tradition, 417, 418
Graham, Martha. See also Martha@ . . .The 1963 Interview
attentive listening of, 62
breath principle and, 65
choreography for Hawkins, 117
choreo-thoughts of, 61–62, 66–67
contraction technique of, 65–66, 68–69
Cunningham and, 105n13
fabric prop use by, 130
favorite role of, 71
first death of, 58, 58n1
friendship between Terry and, 69–70
heartbeat listening of, 63
Hodes, L., and, 67–68
Hoyer reenactment by, 10
Indian dance and, 194
second death of, 58, 67, 71
on “seizures” as creative impulses, 64
sonic embodiment of, 72, 615
spell-like affect of voice of, 72–73
technique classes taught by, 68–69
voice and grain of, 64
Grand Union collective, 256
Grandville, Olivia, 165, 165n1, 167, 169. See also Le Cabaret discrépant
Bagouet and, 168
Lettrism stance of, 174
Greek language
archive derivation in, 20
choreography derived from, 321
The Green Clowns (Die Grünen Clowns), 152
(p. 636) The Green Table, 44–46, 45n11, 48–49
affect in, 47
contested legacies and, 199
Indian dance in, 204
internationalism and, 196
Greenwich, Royal Observatory in, 383, 383f, [link] f, 385–87
Gregg, Melissa, 34, 34n2
de Groot, Jerome, 33
“Group Hoist” in CP-AD case study, 260
Groys, Boris, 6
The Guardian, 370
Guattari, Felix, 59, 379, 380, 394
on coercion in choreography, 123, 123n52
on Masilo’s dance movements, 389–90
Guglielmo Ebreo, 508, 508n3, 509, 512
Gumbrecht, Hans Ulrich, 36, 46, 49n17, 52
Häger, Bengt, 180, 182, 185f, 199
Häger, Lilavati, 179f, 198, 198f, 615. See also Dixit Dominus
costumes of, 180, 182, 188, 191, 192, 192f
death of, 180
Jooss on, 202–3
“Memory of Lila” section in Future Memory, 190–91
mythologized India of, 198, 199, 199n21
reconstruction in 2003, 182–83
Haitzinger, Nicole, 590
Halbwachs, Maurice, 344
Hamburg, Barba in, 402
Hamlet, by Wooster Group, 332–33
Hammergren, Lena, 182, 198–99
Händel, George Frideric, 179
hands touching, 50, 50n19
Hansen, Mark, 225
Happenings
absence of method in, 236–40
capitalism and, 232, 232n6
criticism, 234
discourse on, 233–34
documentary archives of, 234–35
first and second generations of, 237
Janša’s reconstructions of, 339–40
life cycle of, 233
misreading of, 235–36
pedagogy and, 236–40, 244
performance art as replacing, 236
poetical economy of, 240–44
Pupilija, papa Pupilo pa Pupilčki, 339, 345–48
Reuben Gallery venue for, 233, 235, 240, 244
student restagings of, 238–40
Happy Days (Beckett), 460–61
Hardt, Yvonne, 180, 197, 591, 591n7
Harlem Renaissance, 538n3
Harrell, Trajal. See also Antigone Sr./Twenty Looks or Paris Is Burning at The Judson Church
as African-American, 545
choreographic practice of, 540
in-between-ness in reenactment by, 537
lecture performances of, 543–44, 546
Harris, Cheryl, 360
Hartmann, Martin, 280–81
Hartog, François, 11, 12
Hate, 21, 23, 25, 475
Hauptbahnhof, 378, 386
Hawkins, Erick, 117
Heart of Darkness (Conrad), 449–50, 454, 455–60
language and movement in, 459
Quadrat I and II comparison with, 465–66
Shades and, 458n9
heritage, art and, 197
Herrmann, Brigitta, 593n10
hierarchies of transmission, 192n13
Hijikata, Tatsumi, 339, 350
Hindu deities, 311, 312n3, 316–17, 318, 324. See also Jagannath temple, in Puri
devadasis and, 436–37
devalaya home of, 424–25
Lord Shiva, 431n24
Purusha, 426–27, 426f
Vedic religions and, 416n8
Hinduism
body relation to divine in, 427
in early Odisha, 416n8
purusha in, 420
Vedic religions and, 416n8
Hindu temple, dance trajectory to stage from, 414
(p. 637) hip-hop
breakdancing in, 557–58
circle in, 558
derivative practice and, 556–59
dissemination of boarding, postmodern dance and, 565–66
gentrification roots of, 556–57
historical displacement, 3, 289
historical distance, 48, 406–8
affect and, 35–36, 35n4, 41–44
Nachbar’s use of difference and, 494–96
Phillips on conceptual modes of, 41
historical fiction, 79, 89, 95, 96–98
historical narratives, Preston-Dunlop’s mix of autobiographical and, 146
historical past, coevalness and, 402–3, 408–11
historical reconstruction, 322
impossibility of, 349, 610
historical reenactment, fictional representation and, 579, 581–84
historicism and historicity
Agnew on a-, 497
apych and, 403–6
Eastern European performance art and, 402–3
improvisation and, 260
reenactment claims to, 9–10
regimes of, 11, 12
self-reflexivity and, 12–14
space and, 3
temporalities and, 11–14, 43
historicizing modes, of 1980s, 489, 492–93
Urheben Aufheben as case study for, 494–501
“Historie(s) of Literature” (Pechlivanos), 528
historiography, 612–13
Collingwood on, 45–46, 45n12
constructive nature of, 526
crisis of, 526–27, 531
on Laban, 155–56
methodologies, 528–31
Peru and, 289n14, 300
Spanish, 298
history. See also dance history; memory; temporalities; time
adding sensoriality to, 39
alternative models of spatial, 528–31
alternative to chronological, 527–28
as appropriation, 603
associative reading of, 581–82
contemporaneity of the noncontemporaneous and, 527–28, 530–31
controversial relation of reenactment to, 13, 13n32
corrigibility of, 95
erasure of, 148
Future Memory as alternative, 181
general, 92–93, 96
Happenings in light of Western art, 238
historical imaginary, 219–21
historical parade, 390–93, 391f
historical positivism, 9
impossibility of reenactment and, 483–84
kinesthetic, 192n13
knowledge production and, 51–52, 51n21
Kopeinkritik in art, 230–32
linear view of, 340, 404, 408
oral, 83
political aesthetics approach to, 342–43, 352
reenactment as dialogues with different versions of, 40n8
reenactment as experience within, 33
Ricoeur on noetic vision of, 581
rubrics for historical writing about dance, 474
Schneider on authenticity and, 390
shared present sonic with moment in, 72
spatialized, 528–31, 614–15
history painting, 572
Ho, Jeff, 562–63
Hodes, Linda, 67–68, 69
Hodes, Stuart, 71, 73–74
Hoffmann, Reinhild, 269, 270, 538
as Jooss witness, 271, 274–78, 277n12, 280, 599
Hollier, Denis, 529
Holocaust, 205n28, 275, 275n11
home of the gods (devalaya), 424–25
Hommage to Dore Hoyer, 494
homosexuality, disco culture and African, 577
Horn, Henrietta, 589, 592–94
Horswell, Michael J., 298
How It Is (Beckett), 462
(p. 638) Hoyer, Dore, 1. See also Affectos Humanos; Dore Hoyer tanzt--eine Gedenksendung
affect-body of, 478
androgynous look of, 22
The Chosen One role of, 593–94
difference between bodies of Nachbar and, 475, 476
imagined body of, 474
logic of way of moving, 219, 223
Nachbar as witness to, 271–72, 274, 275, 278, 280
Nachbar’s reenactment of solos by, 85, 195, 226
obituary in film of, 21–22
postwar Germany and, 2, 2n4
ReConstruct inspired by film of, 23
Siegmund on Nachbar and, 278n13
traits exemplified by works of, 4
Urheben Aufheben as part of archive, 501
on Urheben cover, 490f
Hrvatin, Emile. See Janša, Janez
Hume, David, 272
Humphrey, Doris, 130, 480–81, 555
Husemann, Pirkko, 542
Hutchinson, Ann, 47n15, 481, 525
Huyssen, Andreas, 205, 205n28, 207
hybrid dance forms, 181, 194, 203–4
hyperbolic imitation, 38–39, 52
hypergraphic phase, in lettrism, 168–69, 172
I Am Not Me, the Horse Is Not Mine, 375
The Idea of History (Collingwood), 45–46, 45n12, 215
identity politics
corporeality and, 540
cultural hybridity and, 205
establishment of US, 540–41
German expressionism and, 546
The Ignorant Schoolmaster, 241–42
Ikeda, Fumiyo, 362n14
I Like America and America Likes Me, Ultima Vez reenactment of, 330–32, 333–35
Ill Seen Ill Said (Beckett), 449–50, 463–65
impossibility, 349, 479, 483–84, 610
sameness of original, 91
imprints, archive of, 27–28, 27n8, 30
improvisation
capitalism and, 253
Carriage Discreteness rules for, 253n9
critical study and, 262
in dance establishment, 254
decision-making process in Rainer’s, 256
embodied knowledge and, 257
ephemerality of, 253–54
historicity and, 260
implied rules within, 261–62
institution and, 252–55
musical scores and, 248–49, 252, 256–58
performance art and, 253
reconstruction possibility for, 251
score, 248, 249, 252, 256–58
self-reflexivity and, 261–62
Improvisation Technologies, 351, 600
in-between-ness, 535, 536–39
Bildung and US identity politics, 541
India, 418
mahari decline in post-colonial, 413n1
quartet of pilgrimage locations in, 419–20
stone temples of, 422n16
Indian dance. See also classical Indian dance; Kaisika Natakam; Odissi dance
compositions and notation in, 321
contemporary, 178, 197, 204, 204n26, 206f, 320
contested legacies and, 197–98, 199, 199n21
diaspora and, 197n18, 198–99
in Dixit Dominus, 179, 181, 202–3
Graham and, 194
in The Green Table, 204
hybrid dance and, 194, 203–4
records of, 321
traditions comprising Future Memory, 203–4
industrialization, 552, 567
infinitesimal phase, in Lettrism, 169, 172n18
inheritance, Future Memory and
accumulation theme in, 191n12
critic on, 184–85
Dixit rehearsal tape and, 188
gift of Dixit Dominus as, 180, 181, 181n7, 183n8
(p. 639) “Memory of Lila” section, 190–91
staging of, 188–93
of tangible objects, 191–93, 192f
institutional critique, Rainer and, 250–52
institutions, improvisation and, 252–55
instruction, reconstruction through anticipatory time and, 506–14
“The Instruction Manual” (Ashbery), 520–21
intellectual property, 363, 471
intentional fiction, 583
Interior Drama, 221
Internet age, cultural memory redefined by, 473
intersecting temporalities
in basse danse and bassadanza, 514–21
Nachbar and, 500
intersubjective time, 410, 410n14
inter-temporality, 12, 614
intertextuality, 66
interval, Manning’s concept of, 510, 511, 512
An Introduction, 195
In Watching Weimar Dance, 45n11
Isou, Isidore, 165, 165n1, 174
dance theory of, 167–69
Grandville’s recreation compare to Ballets ciselants of, 172t
Italian dance, of fifteenth century. See basse danse, instruction manuals on bassadanza and
Itinerant Spectator/Itinerant Spectacle (Skantze), 328, 329
Jagannath, lord, 421–22, 421f
devadasi brides of, 437–38
Jagannath temple, in Puri, 413, 413n1, 415, 419–22, 420f, 426f, 436. See also Kalingan temple architecture; maharis; mahari system
body of, 429f
presiding deity of, 415n2
Vaishnavism and, 416
Janša, Janez, 199, 342
on betrayal requirement, 348
former name of, 339, 350, 350n7
as prime minister’s name, 350, 350n7
Janša’s reconstructions
Fake It!, 339, 349–52, 350n7
metis and collective memory in, 343–45, 353
Monument G2, 339, 348–49
Pupilija, papa Pupilo pa Pupilčki, 339, 345–48, 346n4, 347n6
re-works trend and, 341–43
Slovenian contexts for, 340–41, 340n1
Japp, Uwe, 526
Jara, Joan Turner, 48f
Jay-Z, 366n26
Jeschke, Claudia, 590, 590n5
Johnson, Torger, 562
Jones, Amelia, 234
Jooss, Kurt, 44–45, 46n11, 146, 481
absence from Germany, 195
audience talkback and, 269
Dixit Dominus as outside canon of, 181, 185–86, 199
Dixit Dominus message and, 179–80
Future Memory and, 185, 188
with Häger, L., 179f, 198f
Hoffmann as witness of, 271, 274–78, 275, 276–77, 277n12, 280, 599
Laban and, 196
legacy of, 199
in Nair’s letters, 177, 178, 186–87, 193, 201
return to Germany, 199
Tanztheater, Ausdruckstanz and, 195
Jordan, Stephanie, 528
Judson Dance Theater (Judson Church), 251, 252, 254, 259
Barba and, 407, 408
Barishnikov reconstructions of material by, 473
Brown, T., and, 553–54
Brussels dance scene link with, 407
characteristics of CP-AD and, 250n6
documentation, media and, 254n12
fiftieth celebration of, 542, 542n9
Grand Union collective arising out of, 256
strategies of, 543
Juku, Sankai, 350
Kairos, time as, 393–94
Kaisika Natakam, 313f, 316f, 317f
affective dimensions of, 324–25
annual performance of, 312, 312n4
audiences, 323–24
(p. 640) caste system as challenged in, 315, 315n6
gender reversal in, 319
historical reconstruction faithfulness of, 322
length of, 320
musical instruments in, 319
1999 performance of, 320
reconstruction of, 312, 314, 319–20
reenactment distinction from reconstruction, 313–14
reenactment of, 313, 314, 315–18
ritual dance-theater and, 311, 312, 312n4, 313, 314–15, 322–23, 324–25
source story, 311
story enacted in, 315–17
temporality and, 321–25
time period of, 318
Tirukurungudi village and, 311–12, 312n2, 319, 324
Kalingan temple architecture, 422–23
body as deity in, 426–27, 426f
body parts correspondence to, 428f
human body structure and conception of, 425, 425n18, 427, 428f
Konarak temple and, 421f, 423f, 424f, 425f
mandala model for, 424–25, 426f
spatial relationship of human-divine body in, 427
Kant, Immanuel, 540
Kaprow, Allan, 235, 235nn8–9, 239
Karsavina, Tamara, 482
Kentridge, William, 378–79, 379f. See also The Refusal of Time
dance in installations of, 375–77
political art and, 393
temporality approach of, 609
Khan, Akram, 178
Killick, Jerry, 331
kinesthetic history, 192n13
kinesthetic imagination, 510
kinesthetics
decentered practices of, 564, 565–66
definition of social, 550
kinestheme as opposed to episteme, 550
performance as kinesthetic exchange, 551
risk practices, 564
social, 550
King, Katie, 225–26
Kirby, Michael, 232, 239
Kirov Ballet, 80–81, 87, 91, 97
Kisselgoff, Anna, 69, 538
The Kitchen Eleven (Kuche Elf), 352n10
Kitzinger, Ernst, 233, 233n7
knowledge. See also body-knowledge
acoustic construction of, 60
gaps, 41, 589–90
handing down choreographic, 270–72
Horn’s reinventions and rescue of, 592–94
improvisation and embodied, 257
post-bodily, 596
production, 51–52, 51n21
worlds, 225–26
Knust, Albrecht, 480
Koestenbaum, Wayne, 57, 59, 61, 63
Kopeinkritik, 230–32
Koselleck, Reinhardt, 4, 12, 526, 527
Krämer, Sybille, 272–73, 276
Kron, Lisa, as Terry, 60, 69–71
Kruschkova, Krassimira, 251
Kuche Elf (The Kitchen Eleven), 352n10
Kulturstiftung des Bundes (German Federal Cultural Foundation), 269n1, 587–88, 588n2
Kung Fu Fighting (Douglas, S.), 573f, 574, 575f
Kunst, Bojana, 342, 352–53, 402
Kuppers, Petra, 195n16
Laban, Rudolf, 27
artistic and spiritual vision of, 152–53
Ausdruckstanz and, 143, 150, 154
autobiography, 152, 152n11
Barba, Jooss and, 196
bodily memories in pupils of, 155
books by, 144, 144n5
choreology of, 149
communitarian projects of, 154
companies founded by, 144, 144n4
departure from Germany, 155
documentary archives on, 145, 155–56
historiography on, 155–56
interviewed dancers from companies of, 148, 148n8
Isou and, 168
(p. 641) Jooss and, 196
legacies, 144, 144n6, 150–51, 158
movement choirs of, 150, 151
Nazi regime and, 145–46, 150–51, 152
notation of works by, 145
radical choreographic approach of, 153–54
way of moving invented by, 154
Laban Chamber Dance Group, 146, 153, 154
Labanotation
Knust’s contribution to, 480
original names of, 145
scores, 84
Laban recreations, by Preston-Dunlop, 143
adapted elements in, 148
Ausdruckstanz and 1960s and 1970s compared in, 154
bodily memory in, 147, 149
circular memory and, 156
erasure of history in, 148
fascist aspect neglect in, 609
historical context omission in, 152
ideological aspects as ignored by, 146
Laban’s legacy not served by, 158
limitations of model for, 146
narratives resulting in, 146
1920s pieces chosen for, 143n3, 144
past as present approach to, 157
performance authenticity and, 149
Preston-Dunlop on aim of, 147–48, 149
reason for selection of 1920s time period, 150, 151
recordings of, 143n3
shift from past to present in, 149
The Swinging Temple example of, 147, 151–54
The Laban Sourcebook (ed. McCaw), 156, 156n12
Lac, Thibault, 544
Lacan, Jacques, 477, 478
Lambert-Beatty, 253, 254, 254n12
Lamentation, 130, 130n73
Lancelot, Francine, 492, 493–94
Landsberg, Alison, 51, 51n21, 52
Lane, Jill, 289, 303–4
Lang, Pearl, 106, 110
language
affective tonality of, 61
choreography and, 64–66
Conrad’s use of movement and, 459
Deleuze on movement as, 461, 461n12
musicality of, 65
repetition in listening and, 62, 63
L’art et instruction de bien danser, 513–14
The Last Performance (Le Dernier spectacle), 85, 471
Latour, Bruno, 287
Lawton, David, 515
Layson, June, 527
lecture performances, 11, 483
double structure through, 543–44
dual identity of dancer in, 488, 499
Harrell’s, 543–44, 546
Nachbar’s use of, 494–95, 499, 500n25
self-reflection in, 542
Lefebvre, Henri, 498
legacies
contested, 194–200
inheritance and transference issues, 595–96
Laban’s, 144, 144n6, 150–51, 158
legibility, 25, 29
Lemaître, Maurice, 166, 167, 168, 171
Leonardo’s Dream Machines, 225
Lepecki, André, 27–28, 58, 181n5, 362
apparatus of capture idea of, 86, 122n48, 123
on Bel, 589n4
choreography theorized by, 86, 122, 122n50, 123n55
fugitives idea of, 356
reenactment viewed by, 98
will to re-enact idea of, 550
Le Roy, Frederik, 390–92
Le Roy, Xavier, 122, 287n6, 377, 483
Lesschaeve, Jacqueline, 137, 138n90, 139
letters to Häger, from Nair, 179, 186–88, 193–94, 200–202, 208–9
about, 183–84
Jooss references in, 177, 178, 186–87, 193, 201
Nair’s onstage reading of, 194n9, 202
publication of, 184n9
relationship change resulting from, 184
Lettrist dance. See also Le Cabaret discrépant
conceptual movement of 2000s and, 174, 175
Grandville’s stance toward, 174
historical perspective on, 175
theory, 167–69
works and textual sources, 165–67, 165n1
(p. 642) Leys, Ruth, 34
Lifeforms, 131n78
lifeless parts, in Lettrism, 168
Lilian Karina Foundation, 179n1
Linke, Susanne, 1, 1nn2–3, 85, 196, 471, 494
L’Innommable (Beckett), 460
listening, 60
attentive, 62
repetition and, 61, 62, 63, 74
literature
free dance as correlated to modernist period music and, 456–57
literary theory since 1980s, 528–29
movement phrases in, 450, 459n10, 463
transtemporal movement in, 614
Live, 221, 223
liveness, media and, 323–24
Livingston, Jennie, 543
Locale, 137–38, 139n94
logic
of appropriation, kinesthetic practices of risk, 564
of movement, 219, 223
logic and gesture, of memory, 602–3
Lopez y Royo, Alessandra, 418
Lord Jim (Conrad), 455
Lord Vishnu, 311, 316–17, 324
Louis XIII, 290n15
Love, 475
Lubin-Levy, Joshua, 64–65
Luhman, Niklas, 483
Lukács, Georg, 9
Luley, Waltraud, 594
Nachbar’s rehearsals with, 23–25, 196, 226, 272, 272n5, 278, 279, 496
A Luta Continua (Douglas, S.), 573f, 574, 576f
Lyotard, Jean- François, 527
Macaulay, Alastair, 118
Macdonald, Sharon, 34–35
Madonna, 364, 542
mahaprashad, 432, 432n26
mahari naach (mahari dance), 413, 413n1
failed reenactment of, 414, 441–42
nritta (pure dance) component in, 434n29
Odissi dance and, 414, 415–19, 441–42
maharis
beauty and talents of, 430–31
caste and, 430n23
cultural tradition of, 416, 419
dedication ceremony, 431–32, 434
devadasis as, 413n1
distributed body and, 414, 439–42
gender expressions of, 430
last induction into temple, 418, 418n11
Odisi revivalists disavowing of, 434n29, 441–42
procreation and, 437, 437n31
sexual relations with king, 432, 433, 435
spiritual union symbolized by, 435
surviving, 413n1, 431f, 433–35
temple acceptance requirements, 430–31, 431n24
mahari system
dance as puja and gift, 433–36
failed appropriation of, 441–42
Mallarmé, Stéphane, 449, 481
mandala, 424–25, 426f
Manning, Erin, 59, 61, 62
dance of attention concept of, 303, 303n49
interval concept of, 510, 511, 512
Manning, Susan, 195, 408, 492n11, 538, 538n4
Mantel, Hilary, 95
manuals, fifteenth-century dance instruction. See basse danse, instruction manuals on bassadanza and
Man Walking Down the Side of a Building, 552, 553
Le marbre tremble (Marble Trembles), 40n8
La Marche des jongleurs (The Walk of the Jugglers), 166
marginalization, 360, 418, 577
Slovenian art projects, 349, 351, 352n10
Mariette, Pierre-Jean, 301–2
Martha Graham Dance Company, 60, 69–71, 140
Martha@ . . .The 1963 Interview
archival material for, 58, 62n2
audio recording basis of, 58–59, 60–61, 62, 62n2
(p. 643) audio transcription for, 62n2
choreographing Graham’s speech in, 68
collaboration with Hodes, L., in, 68–69
costumes, 70
dance segment in, 71
gender and, 58
illusion of original recording excerpt in, 71–72
Kron as Terry in, 60, 69–71
presentation venue, 59–60
Schafer’s “schizophonia” and, 60
sonic archive and, 59
sound design, 72
spell cast by, 73–74
voicescape and linguistic choreography in, 64–66
Martha@Town Hall, 67
Martin, John, 222
Maryinsky Theater, 80, 87–88
A Mary Wigman Dance Evening (AMWDE), 40n8
Ausdruckstanz and, 43, 410
belief and disbelief in, 42
coevalness and, 409–11
contested legacies and, 195, 196
costumes, 37, 37n6
engagement with Wigman’s work revealed in, 219
historical distance and affect in, 35–36, 35n4, 41–44
historical distance problem in creating, 406–8
as historical fiction, 96
hyperbolic imitation in, 38–39, 52
mixed reception of, 39, 39n7
Panorama and Sleeping Beauty contrasted with, 80–81, 90
personal experience of creating, 399, 406–11
Quito performance of 2011, 407
as reenactment, 409
solos comprising, 36–40, 79, 88–89
30s dance elements of, 407
Wigman’s spectral presence in, 39–40
Masilo, Dada, 375, 376, 376f, 388–90, 388f
Masina, Ann, 392, 393
Maska Institute, 341, 341n2
Massumi, Brian, 34, 49, 49n18
Mauss, Marcel, 257
McCaw, Dick, 156, 156n12
McFee, Graham, 83–84, 83n5, 87
McManus, Thomas, 271, 273, 274, 599
media
affordances of new, 529–30
appropriation and knowledge transfer across, 596–97
engagement with, 215–16, 218
gender, culture and, 224–25
liveness and, 323–24
methods and focus of dance transfer through various, 594–97
Rainer’s documentation and, 254n12
reenactment role of, 2–3
transmedial memory screening, 601–2
mediatization, 220–21, 579, 596, 597
medieval study. See Middle Ages
memory. See also specific works
bodily, 147, 149
choreography as architectural site of, 497n21
circularity of, 156
collective, 343–45, 350
cultural, 146–47, 157, 158, 473, 590n5
early theories on, 509
embodied, 155, 157–58, 321, 590, 601–2
evolution of classical theories of, 508
fifteenth and sixteenth-century dance emphasis on, 508–9
global, 205, 205n28, 207
logic and gestures of, 602–3
1990s interest in, 473, 473n5
performance as, 91
piano analogy for performance-evoked, 344
as re-presentation, 207
space and, 498–99
technology of, 59
tension between history and, 45n12
transmedial screening of, 601–2
utopia, history and, 341–43
“Memory of Lila,” 190–91
Merce Cunningham Dance Company, 596
Farber’s departure from, 132
Meriwn, Miranda, 231n4
Merleau-Ponty, Maurice, 50, 50n19, 51, 51n20
meta-archive, 501
(p. 644) Metahistory (White), 43, 43n9
metakinesis, 222
metakinetic exchange, Franko’s idea of, 551, 551n1
metis, collective memory and, 343–45, 353
metronomes, in Kentridge installations, 378–79, 379f
Meyer-Baer, Kathi, 515–16
Middle Ages
Odisha religious diversity, 416n8
phantasm in literary culture of, 518–19, 519n16
studying dances of, 506
The Middle East (band), 544
Mignolo, Walter, 304
Miller, Philip, 379, 392–93
Millones, Luis, 293, 294n27, 300–301
Milohnič, Aldo, 342, 352–53
mimesis, Aristotle and Ricoeur on, 450n1
Mimic Fugue no. 1 (mimique n°1), 166
“MISPERFORMANCE,” 341
misura, 508
Mitchell, Rashaun, [link] , 135–37, 135n85
Mnemosyne Atlas (Warburg), 451
mobile parts, in Lettrism, 168
mobile technologies, 225
modern dance
authenticity as solution to problems of, 545
Brandstetter on 1900s, 451, 452
linear evolution view of, 408
narratological skepticism and, 451–52, 466
in Quito, 407
release technique and, 554
modernism
dance ephemerality and, 591–92, 592n8
decenterings of, 551n2
free dance musical and literary correlates, 456–57
1980s reconstruction of dance, 494
reenactment and, 390–92
theory of aesthetic, 408
Mohapatra, Shri Mohan, 433
Monument for an Unknown Dancer, 350, 351
Monument G2 (Spomenik G2), 339, 348–49
More Sweetly Play the Dance, 375–76
Morris, Gay, 535–36
Morrison, Jim, 560
Move, Richard, 10, 79
movement. See also choreography; specific choreographers; specific works
anti-movement bias in choreography, 122n50
authorship, 132
choirs, 150, 151
conceptual movement, of 2000s, 174, 175
connection of feeling and,