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date: 21 February 2020

(p. ix) Notes on Contributors

(p. ix) Notes on Contributors

Elizabeth Allen teaches in the English Department at the University of California, Irvine. Her book on False Fables and Exemplary Truth in Later Middle English Literature was recently published by Palgrave Macmillan. She is currently investigating narratives of sanctuary in late medieval England. eallen@uci.edu



Christopher Baswell teaches medieval subjects at the University of California, Los Angeles. His interests include Arthurian literature, and is the author of Virgil in Medieval England: Figuring the Aeneid from the Twelfth Century to Chaucer. baswell@humnet.ucla.edu



Jessica Brantley teaches Old and Middle English literature at Yale University. Her book on Reading in the Wilderness: The Drama of Devotion in an Illustrated Carthusian Miscellany is forthcoming with University of Chicago Press. She is currently engaged in a study of the iconography of Chaucer’s ‘Complaint of Mars’. jessica.brantley@yale.edu



Diane Cady teaches English at Mills College. She has published essays on gender and money and on language and disease, and is completing a monograph on gender and medieval fears and fantasies about money. dcady@mills.edu



Christopher Cannon is a member of the Faculty of English in the University of Cambridge. His most recent book is The Grounds of English Literature, published by Oxford University Press, and he is currently writing a cultural history of Middle English. cdc1001@cam.ac.uk



Andrew Cole teaches in the Department of English at the University of Georgia. He is co-editor of the Yearbook of Langland Studies and his forthcoming book will concern England after heresy, 1382–1420. awc@uga.edu



Lisa H. Cooper is a member of the Department of English at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She has written on the grail legend and on Caxton’s Dialogues, and is working on a book entitled Crafting Narratives: Artisans, Authors, and the Literary Artifact in Late Medieval England. lhcooper@wisc.edu



Joyce Coleman is a member of the English Department at the University of Oklahoma. Recent articles have concerned Philippa of Lancaster, the frontispiece to a French City of God, and the prologue of Wynnere and Wastoure. Her next book will focus on book iconography in manuscript illumination. joyce.coleman@ou.edu



(p. x) Carolyn Dinshaw teaches in the Departments of English and of Social and Cultural Analysis at NYU. She is author of Getting Medieval: Sexualities and Communities, Pre-and Post-Modern, with Duke University Press. Her current project concerns medieval and post-medieval experiences of temporality. carolyn.dinshaw@nyu.edu



Matthew Giancarlo teaches in the English Department at Yale University. Recent articles have appeared in Representations and Studies in the Age of Chaucer. His book Parliament and Literature in Late Medieval England is forthcoming from Cambridge University Press. matthew.giancarlo@yale.edu



Alexandra Gillespie teaches in the English Department at the University of Toronto. Her most recent publication is Print Culture and the Medieval Author: Chaucer, Lydgate, and Their Books, 1476–1557, with Oxford University Press. She is currently co-editing a collection of essays on book production in England, 1350–1535. alexandra.gillespie@utoronto.ca



Vincent Gillespie teaches English literature at the University of Oxford. A selection of his articles and papers will appear next year as Looking in Holy Books, to be published by the University of Wales Press. He is currently working on a study of fifteenth-century orthodox religious culture in England. vincent.gillespie@ell.ox.ac.uk



Alfred Hiatt teaches Old and Middle English literature at the University of Leeds. He is author of The Making of Medieval Forgeries: False Documents in Fifteenth-Century England, published by the British Library, and is currently engaged in a study of terra incognita in the medieval and early modern geographical imagination. a.hiatt@leeds.ac.uk



Bruce Holsinger teaches in the departments of English and Music at the University of Virginia. His most recent book is The Premodern Condition: Medievalism and the Making of Theory. His chapter in this volume is part of a longer-term project on liturgical culture and vernacular writing in England. bh9n@virginia.edu



Sheila Lindenbaum is the editor of the forthcoming Westminster volume in the Records of English Drama series and the author of articles on medieval spectacle and dramatic entertainments. Formerly at Indiana University, she now lives in London, where she is completing a study of literate practice in late medieval London. lindenb@indiana.edu



Sarah McNamer teaches in the Department of English at Georgetown University, where she specializes in medieval performance, meditative literature, and the history of devotion. She is writing a book on compassion. mcnamer@georgetown.edu



Maura Nolan teaches English literature at the University of California, Berkeley. Cambridge University Press recently published her John Lydgate and the Making of Public Culture. She is currently finishing a book on Fortune as a literary idea, and plans to study the problem of the aesthetic in medieval literature. mnolan@berkeley.edu



Susan Phillips teaches medieval and early modern literature and culture at Northwestern University. Her forthcoming book, with Penn State University Press, is Transforming Talk: The Problem with Gossip in Late Medieval England. She is currently studying premodern dictionaries, phrasebooks, and guides to conversation. susie-phillips@northwestern.edu



Kellie Robertson directs Medieval and Renaissance Studies at the University of Pittsburgh. She is author of The Laborer’s Two Bodies: Labor and the “Work” of the Text in Medieval (p. xi) Britain, and co-editor of The Middle Ages at Work. She is currently writing a book entitled Material Chaucer. krobert@pitt.edu



D. Vance Smith teaches medieval literature and continental philosophy at Princeton University, where he is directorof the Program in Medieval Studies.Hismost recent book was Arts of Possession, and he is finishing a book called Dying Medieval. dvsmith@Princeton.EDU



Robert M. Stein teaches English and comparative literature at Purchase College and is also affiliated with the department of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University. His most recent book is Reality Fictions: Romance, History, and Governmental Authority 1025–1180. He is currently studying crusade narratives. rms9@columbia.edu



Emily Steiner teaches medieval literature in the department of English at the University of Pennsylvania. She is the author of Documentary Culture and the Making of Middle English Literature, published by Cambridge University Press, and is currently engaged in a book on the relationship between medieval political theory and vernacular poetics. steinere@sas.upenn.edu



Paul Strohm teaches medieval literature and humanities at Columbia University. His most recent book is Politique: Languages of Statecraft between Chaucer and Shakespeare. He is currently thinking and writing about the vicissitudes of ‘conscience’, across the medieval-early modern divide. ps2143@columbia.edu



Carol Symes teaches in the Department of History at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Cornell University Press will publish her book A Medieval Theatre: Plays and Public Life in Thirteenth-Century Arras. She is currently studying the transmission of Greek tragedy and also the careers of professional entertainers in the pre-modern West. symes@uiuc.edu



Stephanie Trigg teaches in the Department of English at the University of Mebourne. Her most recent book concerns Medievalism and the Gothic in Australian Culture, published by Brepols, and she is currently working on a cultural history of the Order of the Garter from 1346 to the present. sitrigg@unimelb.edu.au



Marion Turner is a member of the English Department at King’s College, London. Oxford University press is publishing her Chaucerian Conflict: Languages of Antagonism in Late Fourteenth Century London. Her current research is focused on Thomas Usk and London textual production. marion.e.turner@kcl.ac.uk



Michelle R. Warren teaches in Comparative Literature at Dartmouth College. She is the author of History on the Edge: Excalibur and the Borders of Britain, published by University of Minnesota Press. Current projects include merchant translation in London and a colonial history of medieval French studies entitled Creole Medievalism. michelle.r.warren@dartmouth.edu



Nancy Bradley Warren teaches English and religion at Florida State University. Her most recent book is Women of God and Arms: Female Spirituality and Political Conflict, 1380–1600, published by University of Pennsylvania Press. She is currently writing a book on female spiritualities, contested orthodoxies, and English religious cultures. nwarren@english.fsu.edu



(p. xii) Karen Winstead teaches in the Department of English at the Ohio State University. Her most recent book is John Capgrave’s Fifteenth Century, and she is currently writing a book on late medieval and early modern English hagiography. winstead.2@osu.edu



Nicolette Zeeman teaches at King’s College, Cambridge. Her most recent publication is Piers Plowman and the Medieval Discourse of Desire. She is currently studying the impact of Latin literary theory on vernacular literature. nz202@cam.ac.uk