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date: 12 July 2020

(p. xiii) List of Tables

(p. xiii) List of Tables

  1. 4.1 Examples of technological convergence and vertical disintegration 92

  2. 4.2 Matching corporate technology and organizational practices with market needs and demands 103

  3. 5.1 Mintzberg's structural archetypes and their innovative potentials 120

  4. 6.1 GERD/GDP ratios across countries 156

  5. 6.2 Classification of industries based on R&D intensity 157

  6. 6.3 Appendix 6.1: Recent (2002 onwards) journal publications using CIS data 170

  7. 6.4 Appendix 6.2: Publications using CIS data sponsored by the European Commission—topic and institutions 171

  8. 8.1 The relevance of university science to industrial technology 223

  9. 8.2 Importance to industrial R&D of sources of information on public R&D (including university research) 224

  10. 9.1 Venture capital and early-stage investment as a percentage of GDP 253

  11. 10.1 Eras in the history of patents and IP 268

  12. 10.2 Chronological overview of major events in US post-war IPR development (through 2000) 276

  13. 10.3 Means for commercializing new product technologies 281

  14. 10.4 Sensitivity of the R&D investments of large Japanese corporations to length of term (1992) 282

  15. 12.1 A taxonomy of the globalization of innovation 320

  16. 12.2 Rates of growth of industrial R&D and patenting in the OECD countries 321

  17. 12.3 Selected indicators of FDI and international production, 1982–2001 (US $billion at current prices and percentage values) 323

  18. 12.4 R&D expenditure of foreign affiliates as a percentage of total R&D expenditures by all firms in selected host economies, 1998 or latest year 324

  19. 12.5 Shares of US patenting of largest nationally owned industrial firms due to research located abroad, 1920–90 324

  20. 12.6 Share of US patents of the world's largest firms attributable to research in foreign locations by main area of origin of parent firms, 1969–95 325

  21. (p. xiv)
  22. 15.1 Market shares, 1970–95 (ratio of national exports to world exports, %) 412

  23. 16.1 Share (%) of gross value added in services in total GDP in EU countries 434

  24. 17.1 Diffusion in Japanese households (%) 469

  25. 19.1 Income groups, 1960–99 (GDP per capita, 103 $US, 1990 constant PPPs) 526

  26. 20.1 The decomposition of the predicted growth in national market shares from an estimated empirical model of cross-country competitiveness, for 1961–73 548

  27. 20.2 Actual growth rates achieved by countries, 1960–89, over and above that predicted by (inter alia) their rates of capital accumulation 549

  28. 20.3 Educational enrollments in technical subjects at tertiary level as a percentage of the total population in selected countries, in 1995 or closest year available 554

  29. 20.4 The industries in which the largest nationally owned firms have persistently held comparative advantage in innovation, 1920–39 and 1978–95 556

  30. 20.5 The shares of patenting of the largest industrial firms attributable to research facilities located in the biggest single region of selected European countries, in 1969–95 558

  31. 20.6 The statistically significant determinants of comparative growth among the world's largest industrial firms, 1972–82 560

  32. 21.1 A summary of approaches to innovation and employment 570

  33. 21.2 Effects of innovation on the quantity of employment 577

  34. 21.3 Effects of innovation on the quality of employment: skills, wages, and organizations 585