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date: 14 November 2019

(p. xiii) Notes on Contributors

(p. xiii) Notes on Contributors

Maria Baghramian is currently the Head of School of Philosophy at University College Dublin, Ireland. She received her Ph.D. from Trinity College Dublin under Tim Williamson’s supervision. Her books include Modern Philosophy of Language (1999), Pluralism (edited with Attracta Ingram, 2001), Relativism (2004), Reading Putnam (ed. 2012), Donald Davidson: Life and Words (ed. 2012) and Hilary Putnam (forthcoming). She has been the chief editor of the International Journal of Philosophical Studies since 2003. She is a founding member of Aporo: The Irish Network of Research in Philosophy and the Society of Women in Philosophy–Ireland. She was elected a Member of the Royal Irish Academy in 2010.



Thomas Baldwin is Professor of Philosophy at the University of York. He is the author of G. E. Moore (1990) and Contemporary Philosophy: Philosophy in English since 1945 (Oxford University Press, 2001). He has edited several of Moore’s writings, including a revised edition of Principia Ethica (1993), Moore’s Selected Writings (1993), and (together with Consuelo Preti) an edition of Moore’s Early Philosophical Writings (2011). He also edited The Cambridge History of Philosophy 1870–1945 (2003). He is currently editor of Mind.



Michael Beaney is Professor of Philosophy at the University of York. He is the author of Frege: Making Sense (1996) and Imagination and Creativity (2005), and editor of The Frege Reader (1997), Gottlob Frege: Critical Assessments of Leading Philosophers (with Erich Reck; 4 vols., 2005), and The Analytic Turn (2007). He is also editor of the British Journal for the History of Philosophy, and general editor of a series on the history of analytic philosophy published by Palgrave Macmillan.



Tyler Burge is Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at UCLA. He has authored many articles in philosophy of mind, philosophy of psychology, epistemology, philosophy of language, philosophy of logic, and history of philosophy. Two books of essays on his work with replies are Reflections and Replies: Essays on the Philosophy of Tyler Burge (2003) and Meaning, Basic Self-Knowledge, and Mind (2003). The first three of several projected volumes of his essays are Truth, Thought, Reason: Essays on Frege (2005), Foundations of Mind (2007), and Cognition Through Understanding (2013) (all Oxford University Press). In 2010 he published Origins of Objectivity (Oxford University Press). He is past president of the American Philosophical Association, Pacific Division, and (p. xiv) a current member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, British Academy, Institut International de Philosophie, and American Philosophical Society.



Stewart Candlish is Senior Honorary Research Fellow at The University of Western Australia, Editor of the Australasian Journal of Philosophy, and Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities. He is the author of The Russell/Bradley Dispute and Its Significance for Twentieth-Century Philosophy (2007) and wrote the chapters ‘British Idealism: Theoretical Philosophy’ in the Routledge Companion to Nineteenth-Century Philosophy (2010) and ‘Philosophy and the Tide of History: Bertrand Russell’s Role in the Rise of Analytic Philosophy’ in The Historical Turn in Analytic Philosophy (ed. Erich Reck, 2013). With Nic Damnjanovic, he has also contributed the chapters ‘The Tractatus and the Unity of the Proposition’ to Wittgenstein’s Early Philosophy (ed. José L. Zalabardo, Oxford University Press, 2012), and ‘The Identity Theory of Truth’ to The Oxford Handbook of Truth (ed. Michael Glanzberg, Oxford University Press, forthcoming).



Annalisa Coliva is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy. She is the author of Moore and Wittgenstein: Scepticism, Certainty and Common Sense (2010), as well as of several other books in Italian, such as Scetticismo. Dubbio, paradosso e conoscenza (2012) and I modi del relativismo (2009). She is the editor of Mind, Meaning and Knowledge: Themes from the Philosophy of Crispin Wright (Oxford University Press, 2012) and of The Self and Self-Knowledge (Oxford University Press, 2012). She is the Associate Director of COGITO Research Centre in Philosophy.



Sean Crawford is Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of Manchester. He has written articles on a variety of topics in the philosophy of mind and language and is the author of Aspects of Mind (2005) and the editor of Philosophy of Mind: Critical Concepts in Philosophy (2010).



Nic Damnjanovic is Honorary Research Fellow at The University of Western Australia (where he was formerly a tenured Assistant Professor) and a practising lawyer. He has previously held a visiting position at the University of Colorado, Boulder. His publications include articles and reviews on psychopathology and responsibility, truth, essentialism, and consciousness, in a range of collections and philosophy and law journals including Philosophical Quarterly and Erkenntnis. With Stewart Candlish, he has contributed the chapters ‘A Brief History of Truth’ to Handbook of the Philosophy of Science, vol. 5: Philosophy of Logic (ed. Dale Jacquette, 2007), and ‘The Myth of the Coherence Theory of Truth’ to Judgement and Truth in Early Analytic Philosophy and Phenomenology (ed. Mark Textor, 2013).



Jonathan Dancy is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Texas at Austin. Previously he taught in Britain, first at the University of Keele and then at the University of Reading. (p. xv) He has worked mainly in epistemology, moral philosophy, and the philosophy of action, and has a special interest in George Berkeley and in the history of twentieth-century ethics. His books include Moral Reasons (1993), Practical Reality (Oxford University Press, 2000), and Ethics Without Principles (Oxford University Press, 2004). He has published over 75 articles in academic journals and elsewhere.



Cora Diamond is University Professor and Kenan Professor of Philosophy Emerita at the University of Virginia. She is the author of The Realistic Spirit: Wittgenstein, Philosophy, and the Mind (1991) and the editor of Wittgenstein’s Lectures on the Foundations of Mathematics, Cambridge, 1939 (1976).



Julia Driver is Professor of Philosophy at Washington University in St. Louis. She received her Ph.D. at the Johns Hopkins University. Her main areas of research interest are normative ethics, moral psychology, moral agency, and the moral philosophy of David Hume. She has published three books, Uneasy Virtue (2001), Ethics: The Fundamentals (2006), and Consequentialism (2012), as well as articles in a variety of journals.



Juliet Floyd is Professor of Philosophy at Boston University. She has written articles on Kant, Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein, Quine, Rawls, Turing, and Gödel. She edited (with Sanford Shieh) Future Pasts: The Analytic Tradition in Twentieth-Century Philosophy (Oxford University Press, 2001; Oxford Scholarship Online, 2004). She is currently an editor in Twentieth-Century Philosophy for The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, an associate editor of the Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy, and on the Editorial Board of the series on the history of analytic philosophy published by Palgrave Macmillan.



Gottfried Gabriel is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Jena (Germany), since 2009 Professor Emeritus. He works in the areas of epistemology, logic, aesthetics, political iconography, and philosophy of language. His publications include the monographs: Definitionen und Interessen (1972), Fiktion und Wahrheit (1975), Zwischen Logik und Literatur. Erkenntnisformen von Dichtung, Philosophie und Wissenschaft (1991), Grundprobleme der Erkenntnistheorie (1993, 3rd edn. 2008), Logik und Rhetorik der Erkenntnis. Zum Verhältnis von wissenschaftlicher undästhetischer Weltauffassung (1997), Ästhetik und Rhetorik des Geldes (2002), Einführung in die Logik (2005, 3rd edn. 2007). He is co-editor of Frege’s Correspondence and Lectures on Logic. He is also editor of Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie, vols. 11–13 (2001–7).



Richard Gaskin is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Liverpool. He is author of Experience and the World’s Own Language: A Critique of John McDowell’s Empiricism (Oxford University Press, 2006), The Unity of the Proposition (Oxford University Press, 2008), and Language, Truth, and Literature: A Defence of Literary Humanism (Oxford University Press, 2013).



(p. xvi) Hans-Johann Glock is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Zurich (Switzerland), and Visiting Professor at the University of Reading (UK). He is the author of A Wittgenstein Dictionary (1996), Quine and Davidson on Language, Thought and Reality (2003), La mente de los animals (2009), and What is Analytic Philosophy? (2008). He has published numerous articles on the philosophy of mind, the philosophy of language, the history of analytic philosophy, and Wittgenstein. At present he is working on a book on animal minds and co-editing The Blackwell Companion to Wittgenstein.



Nicholas Griffin is Director of the Bertrand Russell Centre at McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, where he holds a Canada Research Chair in Philosophy. He has written widely on Russell, is the author of Russell’s Idealist Apprenticeship (Clarendon Press, 1991), and the general editor of The Collected Papers of Bertrand Russell.



P. M. S. Hacker is Emeritus Research Fellow at St John’s College, Oxford. He is author of Insight and Illusion (Clarendon Press, 1972, 2nd revised edn. 1986), of the four-volume Analytical Commentary on the Philosophical Investigations, the first two volumes co-authored with G. P. Baker, of Wittgenstein’s Place in Twentieth-Century Analytic Philosophy (1996), and of Wittgenstein: Connections and Controversies (Oxford University Press, 2001). He has written extensively on philosophy and the neurosciences, most recently Philosophical Foundations of Neuroscience (2003) and History of Cognitive Neuroscience (2008) co-authored with M. R. Bennett. He is currently writing a three-volume work on human nature, the first volume of which, Human Nature: The Categorial Framework, was published in 2007. The sequel, The Intellectual Powers: A Study of Human Nature, is to be published in 2013. A further volume of his essays, Wittgenstein: Comparisons and Context, is also to be published in 2013 (Oxford University Press).



Gary Hatfield is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Pennsylvania. He is the author of The Natural and the Normative: Theories of Spatial Perception from Kant to Helmholtz (1990), Descartes and the Meditations (2003), and Perception and Cognition: Essays in the Philosophy of Psychology (Clarendon Press, 2009); co-editor (with Sarah Allred) of Visual Experience: Sensation, Cognition, and Constancy (Oxford University Press, 2012), and translator of Kant’s Prolegomena to Any Future Metaphysics (2004).



Richard G. Heck Jr. is Romeo Elton Professor of Natural Theology at Brown University. He is the author of two books: Frege’s Theorem (Oxford University Press, 2011) and Reading Frege’s Grundgesetze (Oxford University Press, 2012). He is also Associate Editor for Philosophy of Mathematics for Thought, a member of the Editorial Board of the Journal of Philosophical Logic, Philosopher’s Imprint, and Philosophia Mathematica, and of the Advisory Board of the Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy.



(p. xvii) David Hyder studied philosophy and computer science at Yale, after which he worked for several years as a software developer on Wall Street. He took his Ph.D. from the University of Toronto in 1997 with Ian Hacking and Alasdair Urquhart. From 1997–2000 he was Lorenz Krüger Fellow at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, 2000–2004 Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the Universität Konstanz, 2004–present Assistant, then Associate Professor at the University of Ottawa. He is the author of The Mechanics of Meaning (2002) and The Determinate World (2009), and co-editor with Hans-Jörg Rheinberger of Science and the Life-World (2010). He is now writing a book on Kant’s theory of time.



Peter Hylton was educated at King’s College, Cambridge, and at Harvard University. He is Professor of Philosophy and Distinguished Professor at the University of Illinois, Chicago. He is the author of Russell, Idealism, and the Emergence of Analytic Philosophy (Oxford University Press, 1990), of Quine (2007), and of numerous essays, chiefly on the history of analytic philosophy, some of which are collected in Propositions, Functions, and Analysis (Oxford University Press, 2005).



Andrew Jorgensen was educated at the University of Waikato and Temple University. He works on the history of analytic philosophy, especially the work of Alexius Meinong, and the philosophy of language, including Robert Brandom’s inferentialist approach to meaning and arguments for scepticism about meaning. He was an Irish Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow and an Aporo Research Fellow in the School of Philosophy, University College Dublin.



Mark Eli Kalderon is Professor of Philosophy at University College London. He is the author of Moral Fictionalism (Oxford University Press, 2005) and editor of Fictionalism in Metaphysics (Oxford University Press, 2005). He is former editor of the Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society and has served on the Editorial Board for Mind.



Michael Kremer is Mary R. Morton Professor of Philosophy and in the College at the University of Chicago. His articles include ‘Kripke and the Logic of Truth’ (1988), ‘The Argument of “On Denoting”’ (1994), ‘Contextualism and Holism in the Early Wittgenstein’ (1997), ‘The Purpose of Tractarian Nonsense’ (2001), and ‘Sense and Reference: The Origins and Development of the Distinction’ (2010). He serves on the Editorial Boards of the Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic and Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.



Peter Lamarque is Professor of Philosophy at the University of York. His books include Truth, Fiction, and Literature, with Stein Haugom Olsen (Clarendon Press, 1994), Fictional Points of View (1996), The Philosophy of Literature (2009), and Work and Object: (p. xviii) Explorations in the Metaphysics of Art (Oxford University Press, 2010). He was editor of the British Journal of Aesthetics from 1995–2008.



Bernard Linsky is a Professor of Philosophy at the University of Alberta, Canada. He is the author of Russell’s Metaphysical Logic (1999) and The Evolution of Principia Mathematica: Russell’s Manuscripts and Notes for the Second Edition (2011), and editor with Guido Imaguire of On Denoting 1905–2005 (2005). He is a member of the Editorial Board of Russell: The Journal of Bertrand Russell Studies.



Robert May is Distinguished Professor of Philosophy and Linguistics at the University of California, Davis. He is the author of Logical Form: Its Structure and Derivation, and with Robert Fiengo of Anaphora and Identity and De Lingua Belief. He is well known for his work in the syntax and semantics of natural language, especially on natural language quantification, and has written extensively on Frege, along with other topics in philosophy of language and philosophy of logic.



Alex Miller is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Otago. He is author of Philosophy of Language (2nd edn., 2007) and Contemporary Metaethics: An Introduction (2nd edn., 2013). He is co-editor (with Crispin Wright) of Rule Following and Meaning (2002) and editor of Logic, Language and Mathematics: Essays for Crispin Wright (Oxford University Press, forthcoming).



Cheryl Misak is Professor of Philosophy and Vice-President and Provost at the University of Toronto. She is the author of The American Pragmatists (Oxford University Press, 2013), Truth, Politics, Morality (2000), and Truth and the End of Inquiry (Oxford University Press, 1991). She is currently working on a book titled Cambridge Pragmatism on the influence of Peirce and James on Ramsey and Wittgenstein.



Jaroslav Peregrin is Research Professor of Logic at the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic and Professor of Philosophy at the University of Hradec Králové, Czech Republic. Aside from books in Czech he is the author of Doing Worlds with Words (1995), Meaning and Structure (2001), and a number of articles in books and journals, including Journal of Philosophical Logic, Erkenntnis, Studia Logica, and Synthèse.



Erich H. Reck is Professor of Philosophy at the University of California at Riverside, USA. He is the author of a number of articles on early analytic philosophy, the history and philosophy of logic, and the philosophy of mathematics. He is also the editor, or co-editor, of From Frege to Wittgenstein: Perspectives on Early Analytic Philosophy (Oxford University Press, 2002), Frege’s Lectures on Logic: Carnap’s Student Notes, 1910–1914 (with Steve Awodey, 2004), Gottlob Frege: Critical Assessments of Leading Philosophers (with Michael Beaney, 4 vols., 2005), and The Historical Turn in Analytic Philosophy (2013).



(p. xix) Sanford Shieh is Associate Professor of Philosophy at Wesleyan University. He specializes in philosophy of logic, metaphysics, and the history of analytic philosophy. He has written on the anti-realist critiques of classical logic, Frege on definitions, and is co-editor, with Juliet Floyd, of Future Pasts: The Analytic Tradition in Twentieth-Century Philosophy (Oxford University Press, 2001).



Peter Simons FBA holds the Chair of Moral Philosophy (1837) at Trinity College Dublin. Prior to that he held posts at Bolton, Salzburg, and Leeds. His main research areas in philosophy are metaphysics and ontology, the philosophy of logic; and in its history, the philosophy and logic of Austria and Poland as well as early analytic philosophy. He is the author of Parts (1987, 2000), Philosophy and Logic in Central Europe from Bolzano to Tarski (1992), and over 200 articles.



John Skorupski is Professor of Moral Philosophy at the University of St Andrews. His main interests are in moral and political philosophy, metaethics, epistemology, and the history of nineteenth- and twentieth-century philosophy. He is the author of English-Language Philosophy 1750–1945 (Oxford University Press, 1993); his most recent book is The Domain of Reasons (Oxford University Press, 2010).



David Woodruff Smith is Professor of Philosophy at the University of California, Irvine. He has written on various theories and historical figures in phenomenology, philosophy of mind, and philosophy of language. He is the author of Husserl (2007, 2nd edn., 2013) and Mind World (2004), and co-editor (with Amie L. Thomasson) of Phenomenology and Philosophy of Mind (2005).



Jamie Tappenden is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Michigan. He has written on the logic of vagueness and the liar paradox, negation, and most recently on historical and philosophical issues arising out of research practices in mathematics. In his writings on the history of analytic philosophy he has worked to illuminate the ways that some of the characteristic dimensions of early analytic philosophy arose from problems arising in concurrent mathematical and scientific research.



Mark Textor is Professor of Philosophy at King’s College London. He is the author of Bolzanos Propositionalismus (1996), Über Sinn und Bedeutung von Eigennamen (2005), and Frege on Sense and Reference (2010). He has edited several collections, among them Bolzano and Analytic Philosophy (together with W. Künne and M. Siebel, Grazer Philosophische Studien 53 (1997)), The Austrian Contribution to Analytic Philosophy (2006), and Judgement and Truth in Early Analytic Philosophy and Phenomenology (2013). He is currently the editor of the Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy.



Charles Travis received his doctorate from UCLA in 1967. Since then he has taught at various universities in the USA, Canada, The Netherlands, and the UK. The last three (p. xx) of these are the University of Stirling, Northwestern University, and King’s College London. His first efforts were in philosophy of language. He has gone on to work on problems of thought, perception, and knowledge, and on the interpretation of Frege and of Wittgenstein. He is currently working on a book on Frege. He now lives in Portugal, but spends part of the year teaching at King’s College.



Thomas Uebel is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Manchester, England. He is the author of Overcoming Logical Positivism from Within (1992), Vernunftkritik und Wissenschaft (2000), and Empiricism at the Crossroads (2007); co-author (with N. Cartwright, J. Cat, and K. Fleck) of Otto Neurath: Philosophy Between Science and Politics (1996); editor of Rediscovering the Forgotten Vienna Circle (1991); co-editor of, amongst others, Otto Neurath: Economic Writings 1904–1945 (with R. S. Cohen, 2004), Wiener Kreis: Texte zur wissenschaftlichen Weltauffassung (with M. Stoeltzner, 2005) and The Cambridge Companion to Logical Empiricism (with A. Richardson, 2007).



Jonathan Wolff is Professor of Philosophy and Dean of Arts and Humanities at University College London. His recent books include Disadvantage (with Avner de-Shalit, Oxford University Press 2007), Ethics and Public Policy (2011), and The Human Right to Health (2012). He is the editor of G. A. Cohen, Lectures in the History of Moral and Political Philosophy (2013).