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date: 25 February 2020

(p. xvi) List of Contributors

(p. xvi) List of Contributors

Gerard F. Anderson, Ph.D., is a professor of health policy and management, professor of international health, and professor of medicine at Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Anderson is currently conducting research on chronic conditions, comparative health care systems, health care payment reform, and technology diffusion. He has authored two books, published over 200 peer-reviewed articles, testified in Congress over forty times as an individual witness, and serves on multiple editorial committees. Prior to his arrival at Johns Hopkins, Dr. Anderson held various positions in the Office of the Secretary, US Department of Health and Human Services.



Laurence Baker is Professor of Health Research and Policy at Stanford University, and Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. His research includes extensive analysis of managed care and its effects on health care delivery, costs, and outcomes. He received his Ph. D. in Economics from Princeton University in 1994.



Michael Baker is a professor of economics and public policy at the University of Toronto and a research associate of the NBER. His recent research focuses on how public policies affect mothers' decisions to return to work after giving birth, and thereby their children's health and development.



Till Bärnighausen is Assistant Professor of Global Health at the Harvard School of Public Health and Senior Epidemiologist at the Africa Centre for Health and Population Studies, University of KwaZulu-Natal. He has published widely on health systems in developing countries, HIV epidemiology, and HIV services, systems and economics. Till is a medical specialist in Family Medicine. He holds doctoral degrees in International Health Economics (Harvard) and History of Medicine (Heidelberg), and master degrees in Financial Economics (SOAS) and Health Systems Management (LSH&TM).



Pedro Pita Barros is Professor of Economics at Universidade Nova de Lisboa. His research focuses on health economics and on regulation and competition policy. His work covers topics such as health expenditure determinants, waiting lists, and bargaining in health care, among others. He has served as Member of the Board of the Portuguese Energy Regulator.



Åke Blomqvist a native of Sweden, received his Ph.D. from Princeton in 1971. He was with UWO, Canada, until 2002 when he moved to the National University of Singapore. He is currently Professor in the China Center for Human Capital and Labor Economics Research, CUFE, Beijing, a post which he has held since 2009. His research (p. xvii) interests include international comparisons of health care systems and reform, most recently in China.



David E. Bloom is Clarence James Gamble Professor of Economics and Demography and Chair of the Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard School of Public Health. Bloom has worked in development, health, labor economics, and demography. His current research focuses on theoretical and empirical links among health, demography, and economic growth.



Karen Bloor is a senior research fellow in the Department of Health Sciences at the University of York. Her main research interests are in the economics of health policy, particularly relating to the medical workforce.



Kristian Bolin is Professor of Economics at Lund University. His research is mainly within health economics. He has performed both theoretical and empirical work, focusing on the areas of individual health and health-related behavior. He has also performed research applying health economics to other areas, for instance, economic micro-simulation.



John Brazier is a Professor of Health Economics at the School of Health and Related Research and the University of Sheffield. He has more than twenty years' experience of conducting economic evaluations for policy makers and has served as a member of the National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence Appraisal Committee.



James F. Burgess, Jr., Ph.D., is an associate editor at Health Economics and is on the editorial board of Health Services Research. He has appointments at the US Department of Veterans Affairs Center for Organization, Leadership, and Management Research, and as a Professor of Health Policy and Management at the Boston University School of Public Health.



Michael E. Chernew, Ph.D., is a professor of Health Care Policy in the Department of Health Care Policy at Harvard Medical School. He is a member the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (MedPAC), which is an independent agency established to advise the US Congress on issues affecting the Medicare program. He is also a member of the Congressional Budget Office's Panel of Health Advisors and Commonwealth Foundation's Commission on a High Performance Health Care System.



Jon B. Christianson, Ph.D., is the James A. Hamilton Chair in Health Policy and Management in the School of Public Health, University of Minnesota. His research interests include the effects of financial incentives in health care, insurance benefit design, and public reporting of provider performance.



Karl Claxton is a professor in the Department of Economics and Related Studies and the Centre for Health Economics at the University of York. His research interests encompass the economic evaluation of health technologies and he serves as a member of the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence Appraisal Committee.



Douglas A. Conrad, Ph.D., is Professor of Health Services and Adjunct Professor of Business and Economics at the University of Washington, and Director of the Center for (p. xviii) Health Management Research (CHMR) of the Health Research and Educational Trust. He has an MHA (1973) from the University of Washington, and an MBA (1976) and Ph.D. (1978; Economics and Finance) from the Graduate School of Business of the University of Chicago.



David M. Cutler is the Otto Eckstein Professor of Applied Economics in the Department of Economics and Kennedy School of Government. Cutler's work in health economics and public economics has earned him significant academic and public acclaim. Cutler is the author of Your Money or Your Life: Strong Medicine for America's Health Care System, published by Oxford University Press. This book, and Professor Cutler's ideas, were the subject of a feature article in the New York Times Magazine, “The Quality Cure,” by Roger Lowenstein. Cutler is a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and a member of the Institute of Medicine.



Patricia M. Danzon, Ph.D., is Professor of Health Care Management at The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania. She received a B.A. from Oxford and a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Chicago. She has held faculty positions at Duke and the University of Chicago. Professor Danzon is a member of the Institute of Medicine and the National Academy of Social Insurance. She has published widely in scholarly journals on a broad range of subjects related to pharmaceuticals and health economics and consults widely for public and private organizations.



Michael Drummond, B.Sc., M.Com., D. Phil., is Professor of Health Economics and former Director of the Centre for Health Economics at the University of York. His research interest is the economic evaluation of health care treatments and programs, and he has undertaken evaluations in a wide range of medical fields. Drummond is the author of two major textbooks and more than 500 scientific papers. He has been President of the International Society of Technology Assessment in Health Care and of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research, and he is currently a member of the Guidelines Review Panels of the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) in the UK.



Jose-Luis Fernandez is Deputy Director at the Personal Social Services Research Unit, London School of Economics. A health and social care economist, Dr. Fernandez specializes in the analysis of funding systems, service productivities, and the interaction between health and social care. Other interests include the study of variability in local care services provision, and of equity and efficiency in the allocation of social services.



Julien Forder is Professor of the Economics of Social Policy and Deputy Director of Personal Social Services Research Unit at the University of Kent, a senior research fellow at the London School of Economics and a senior associate of the King's Fund. He is an economist and conducts research in social and health care.



Richard G. Frank, Ph.D., is the Margaret T. Morris Professor of Health Economics in the Department of Health Care Policy at Harvard Medical School. He is also a research (p. xix) associate with the National Bureau of Economic Research. Currently he is serving as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation in the US Department of Health and Human Services. In 1997, Frank was elected to the Institute of Medicine, and has been awarded the Georgescu-Roegen prize from the Southern Economic Association, the Carl A. Taube Award from the American Public Health Association, and the Emily Mumford Medal from Columbia University's Department of Psychiatry. He is Co-Editor of the Journal of Health Economics.



Bianca K. Frogner is an assistant professor in the Health Services Management and Leadership Department in the School of Public Health and Health Services at the George Washington University. She is a health economist with expertise in industrialized health systems, health labor force dynamics, and welfare economics.



Sherry Glied, Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management of Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine. She is the author of Chronic Condition (1998) and, with Richard Frank, Better But Not Well, Mental Health Policy in the US since 1950 (2006).



Susan Griffin is a Senior Research fellow at the Centre for Health Economics, University of York. Her research interests include decision-analytic models in cost-effectiveness analysis and value of information analysis. In 2008, Susan became a Research Council UK academic fellow in Health Economics and Public Health.



Jane Hall is the Director of the Centre for Health Economics Research and Evaluation, and Professor of Health Economics in the Faculty of Business, University of Technology Sydney, Australia. She is a fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia.



Peter S. Hussey is a policy researcher at the RAND Corporation. He holds a Ph.D. in Health Policy and Management from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Prior to joining RAND, Dr. Hussey worked in health policy at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development in Paris, France.



Tor Iversen is Professor of Health Economics at the University of Oslo, Norway. He is also Scientific Director of the Health Economics Research Program at the University of Oslo (HERO). His research interests include the role of economic incentives in health care and comparative health system research.



William Jack is Associate Professor of Economics at Georgetown University in Washington, DC. His research interests include applied microeconomic theory, empirical development, and public finance. He has worked at the IMF, the US Congress, the University of Maryland, the Australian National University, and Sydney University. He is a member of the UNAIDS/World Bank Economics Reference Group, and has taught at the African Economic Research Consortium in Nairobi, Kenya. He holds a D. Phil. and an M. Phil. in Economics from Oxford University, where he was a Rhodes Scholar; and a B.Sc. in Mathematics and Physics from the University of Western Australia.



(p. xx) Stephen Jan is a senior health economist at the George Institute for International Health, University of Sydney. His interests are health systems research and evaluation, institutionalist economics, equity and international and indigenous health issues.



Andrew M. Jones is Professor of Economics at the University of York, UK, where he is head of the Department of Economics and Related Studies. He is the Research Director of the Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) at the University of York and Visiting Professor at the University of Bergen. He is Joint Editor of Health Economics and of Health Economics Letters and serves on the editorial boards of Cuadernos Economicos de ICE and Population Health Metrics. He researches and publishes in the area of micro-econometrics and health economics, with emphasis on the determinants of health, the economics of addiction, and socioeconomic inequalities in health and health care.



Donald S. Kenkel is a professor in the Department of Policy Analysis and Management at Cornell University and a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. He received his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Chicago. His research focuses on the economics of health promotion and disease prevention.



Martin Knapp is Professor of Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Professor of Health Economics at King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry. He directs two research centers, and recently became inaugural Director of the new NIHR School for Social Care Research.



Ramanan Laxminarayan is Director and Senior Fellow Director at the Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics, and Policy, and a research scholar and lecturer at Princeton University. He has an Undergraduate Degree in Engineering from the Birla Institute of Technology and Science in Pilani, India; a Master's in Public Health (Epidemiology); and a Doctorate in Economics from the University of Washington. His research deals with the integration of epidemiological models of infectious diseases and drug resistance with economic analysis of public health problems. He has worked to improve understanding drug resistance as a problem of managing a shared global resource.



George Leckie, Ph.D., is a research associate at the Centre for Multilevel Modelling and an associate member of the Centre for Market and Public Organisation, Department of Economics at the University of Bristol (UK). Leckie's research interests surround the application of multilevel modelling in social research, especially health and education.



Adriana Lleras-Muney is an associate professor in the Economics Department at UCLA and a research associate of the NBER. She received her Ph.D. from Columbia University and was an assistant professor at Princeton University. Her research examines the relationships between socioeconomic status and health and the effect of disease on economic development.



Anup Malani is a professor of Law and the Aaron Director Research Scholar at the University of Chicago. He is also an editor of the Journal of Law and Economics, a faculty (p. xxi) research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research, a university fellow at Resources for the Future, and a senior fellow at the Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics, and Policy. He holds both a J.D. and Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Chicago. Malani's research focuses on health economics, law and economics, and corporate law and finance. His recent work in health economics has focused on infection control and the pharmaceutical industry.



Dustin May is pursuing a Doctorate of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.) at Nova Southeastern University. Previously, he served on the health care staff of the US Senate Finance Committee, the US House of Representatives Commerce Committee, and as a research assistant, Harvard Medical School, Department of Health Care Policy.



Alan Maynard is Professor of Health Economics in the Department of Health Sciences and Hull York Medical School at the University of York. His main research interests are in the economics of health policy with particular reference to workforce, competition and the pharmaceutical industry.



Thomas G. McGuire is Professor of Health Economics at Harvard Medical School. Two papers received “best paper of the year” awards for 2008, from Academy Health for work on physician-patient interaction and from the National Institute for Health Care Management for work on incentives in managed care plans. McGuire is a member of the Institute of Medicine, and an editor of the Journal of Health Economics.



Anne Mills is Professor of Health Economics and Policy, Head of the Faculty of Public Health and Policy, and Director of the Health Economics and Financing Programme at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. She has over 35 years' experience of health economics research in Africa and Asia.



Pau Olivella (Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1989) is Associate Professor at the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, CODE member, Barcelona GSE affiliated professor, and MOVE research fellow. He specializes in insurance and health economics. He has served as Associate Editor of the Spanish Economic Review and is currently Associate Editor of the Journal of Health Economics.



Jan Abel Olsen is Professor in Health Economics and Health Services Research at the University of Tromsø, Norway, and part-time Professor at the University of Oslo, Norway, and at Monash University, Australia. His research interests include health policy and international health issues.



Mark V. Pauly is Bendheim Professor in the Department of Health Care Management, Professor of Health Care Management, Insurance and Risk Management, and Business and Public Policy at the Wharton School, and Professor of Economics in the School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania. He currently serves on the national advisory committees for the NIH National Center for Research Resources, the National Academy of Sciences' Committee to Study the Veterinary Workforce, and the National Vaccine Advisory Commission, and is an active member of the (p. xxii) Institute of Medicine. Dr. Pauly is a co-editor-in-chief of the International Journal of Health Care Finance and Economics and an associate editor of the Journal of Risk and Uncertainty.



Carol Propper is Professor of Economics at Imperial College and Professor of the Economics of Public Policy at the University of Bristol. Her interests are in the economics of health care markets, in particular the effect of competition, incentives, targets, and pay on performance of hospitals.



Nigel Rice is Professor of Health Economics at the Centre for Health Economics, University of York. He directs the Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG), a research group focused on the use of quantitative methods to inform health and health care policy. Professor Rice is an editor of the Journal of Health Economics.



Donna Rowen is a research fellow at the School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR) at the University of Sheffield. Her main research interest is measuring and valuing health and quality of life with a particular focus on mapping between outcome measures and the methodology of developing condition-specific preference-based measures of health.



Erik Schokkaert is currently Research Director at CORE (Université Catholique de Louvain). He is Full Professor of Public Economics and Health Economics at the KULeuven. His main research topics are the modelling of different concepts of distributive justice and their application to health insurance and social security.



Frederik T. Schut is a professor of Health Economics at the Institute for Health Policy and Management (iBMG) at the Erasmus University Rotterdam. His research focuses on competition and regulation and the role of consumer behavior in health care and health insurance markets.



Anthony Scott is an ARC future fellow, and directs the Health Economics Research Program at the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research at the University of Melbourne. Professor Scott's research interests are in the economics of primary care, incentives and performance of health care providers, and health professionals' labor markets.



Mark Sculpher is Professor of Health Economics at the Centre for Health Economics, University of York, where he is Director of the Programme on Economic Evaluation and Health Technology Assessment. He has over 160 peer-reviewed publications and is a co-author of two major text books in the area. Sculpher has been a member of the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) Technology Appraisal Committee and currently sits on the NICE Public Health Interventions Advisory Committee. He chaired NICE's 2004 Task Group on methods guidance for economic evaluation. He is also a member of the Commissioning Board for the UK NHS Health Technology Assessment program and the UK Medical Research Council's Methodology Research Panel.



(p. xxiii) Louise Sheiner is a senior economist at the Federal Reserve Board of Governors. Her research covers topics such as the variation of health spending by age and by geographic region, and the effects of growth in health spending on individual and government budgets. She received her Ph.D. in Economics from Harvard University.



Luigi Siciliani is a reader at the Department of Economics and Related Studies and is affiliated to the Centre for Health Economics at the University of York. His research includes the design of incentive schemes with altruistic providers, the role of quality competition in healthcare markets, and waiting times.



Jody Sindelar, Ph.D., is Professor and Chair of the Division of Health Policy at Yale's School of Public Health and is appointed to the National Bureau of Economics Research. She was President of the American Society of Health Economics and serves on several editorial boards. Her primary research area is the economics of substance abuse.



Peter C. Smith is Professor of Health Policy at the Imperial College Business School and co-director of the Centre for Health Policy. He is a mathematics graduate from the University of Oxford, and was formerly Director of the Centre for Health Economics at the University of York. He has published widely on the financing and performance of health systems, and has a special interest in the links between research evidence and policy. He has worked with and advised many ministries and international agencies, including the World Health Organization, the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, the European Commission, and the OECD.



Mark Stabile is Director of the School of Public Policy and Governance and Associate Professor of Economics and Public Policy at the Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto. He is also a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, Cambridge, Massachusetts, and a fellow at the Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis, Italy.



Andrew Street is a professor of Health Economics; Director of the Health Policy team in the Centre for Health Economics; and an editor of the Journal of Health Economics. Andrew's research covers measurement of health system productivity, evaluation of activity based funding mechanisms, and analysis of organizational efficiency.



Jack E. Triplett has been with the Brookings Institution since 1997, currently as nonresident Senior Fellow. Before joining Brookings, he was Chief Economist at the US Bureau of Economic Analysis; Associate Commissioner for Research and Evaluation at the Bureau of Labor Statistics; and Assistant Director for Price Monitoring, US Council on Wage and Price Stability. He has a Ph.D. from the University of California (Berkeley) and has published widely on productivity analysis and price index and national accounts measurement. He is a member of the American Economic Association's Committee on Economic Statistics and he has advised government statistical agencies and international organizations.



(p. xxiv) Carolyn Hughes Tuohy, FRSC, is Professor Emeritus of Political Science and Senior Fellow in the School of Public Policy and Governance, University of Toronto. Her publications include Accidental Logics: The Dynamics of Change in the Health Care Arena in the United States, Britain and Canada (Oxford University Press, 1999).



Wynand P. M. M. van de Ven is Professor of Health Insurance at the Erasmus University Rotterdam. His teaching and research focus on managed competition in health care. He has experience as a governor and adviser in health care. He is one of the founding fathers of the European Risk Adjustment Network.



Carine Van de Voorde is Researcher at the Department of Economics at the Catholic University of Leuven and senior economist at the Belgian Health Care Knowledge Centre. Her main research interests are in health insurance with a focus on risk adjustment of health plans and financial access to health services.



Eddy van Doorslaer, Ph.D., is a professor of Health Economics at the Department of Applied Economics of the Erasmus School of Economics and at the Department of Health Policy and Management of the Erasmus University Rotterdam. He is also an Associate Editor of the journals Health Economics and Journal of Health Economics.



Tom Van Ourti has been Assistant Professor at the Erasmus University in Rotterdam since 2006. His main research interest is the measurement of inequalities in health and health care.



Tom Vogl is a Ph. D. Candidate in Economics at Harvard University and a doctoral fellow of the Multidisciplinary Program on Inequality and Social Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School.



Simon Walker is a member of the Team for Economic Evaluation and Health Technology Assessment in the Centre for Health Economics, University of York. He joined in October 2006 after completing an M.Sc. in Health Economics at York. He had previously graduated from Clare College, Cambridge, with a B.A. in Economics.



Peter Zweifel is a professor of economics at the Socioeconomic Institute, University of Zurich. From 2001 to 2008, he was Co-editor-in-chief (with Mark Pauly, Wharton School) of the International Journal of Health Care Finance and Economics. His main research interests are health economics, insurance economics, energy economics, and regulation, topics on which he has published widely.