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(p. xvi) Tables

(p. xvi) Tables

  1. 2.1 The changing characteristics of paradigms and theories: some stylized facts 49

  2. 2.2 Stock of outward foreign direct investment by major home countries and regions (billions of US dollars), 1967–2005 51

  3. 2.3 Stock of inbound foreign direct investment by major host countries and regions (billions of US dollars), 1967–2005 56

  4. 2.4 Selected indicators of FDI and international production, 1982–2005 58

  5. 3.1 Descriptive statistics 83

  6. 3.2 Estimates of equation (12). Dependent variable: log of bilateral imports. Sample period: 1980–2003 85

  7. 3.3 Data description 86

  8. 4.1 Two possible errors in strategic choice under uncertainty 100

  9. 4.2 Foreign entry strategy set encompassing research, deferment, and switching, assuming that it is always profitable to serve the market 105

  10. 4.3 Tabular representation of flows illustrated in Figure 4.6 111

  11. 4.4 Structure of location costs for the flows illustrated in Figure 4.1 (excluding sunk costs of marketing and distribution) 114

  12. 4.5 Dominant locational strategies 115

  13. 4.6 Alternative contractual arrangements for linking domestic R&D to foreign distribution 118

  14. 6.1 Classification of the top 500 MNEs 169

  15. 6.2 The top 25 home region‐based companies 170

  16. 6.3 Global MNEs 171

  17. 6.4 Sales and assets of the top 500, 2001–2005 172

  18. 6.5 Foreign and intra‐regional sales and assets of large firms, 2001–2005 173

  19. 6.6 Foreign and intra‐regional sales and assets of large firms by regional origin, 2001–2005 175

  20. 11.1 Core principles of multilateral aggrements, and perspectives of MNEs 273

  21. 11.2 Landmarks in the evolution of the multilateral regime for FDI 277

  22. (p. xvii)
  23. 11.3 Summary characteristics of major multilateral and regional investment agreements in effect in the early 2000s 278

  24. 11.4 Comparison of WTO and NAFTA coverages for Canada, Mexico, and the US 289

  25. 13.1 Environmental pressures for global integration and for local responsiveness 348

  26. 14.1 Examples of resources and capabilities at two levels of analysis 379

  27. 17.1 A mapping of the topics covered under the micro context 452

  28. 18.1 A measure of the relative importance of time 506

  29. 18.2 Several dimensions of culture 508

  30. 18.3 Dimensions of culture, a synthesis 510

  31. 18.4 Verbal negotiation tactics (the ‘what’ of communications) 514

  32. 18.5 Linguistic aspects of language and non‐verbal behaviors (‘how’ things are said) 517

  33. 18.6 ‘About us': Page menus of corporate websites 531

  34. 19.1 Environmental regulation–business linkages 539

  35. 21.1 Factors shaping MNE transfer pricing policies 594

  36. 21.2 Transfer pricing methods used by multinationals by type of transaction 608

  37. 21.3 Transfer pricing methods accepted in selected countries 609

  38. 22.1 Geographic distribution of Japanese outward FDI flows, 1980–2005 629

  39. 22.2 Overseas production ratios of Japanese, US, and German manufacturing industries 630

  40. 22.3 Export ratios of some of Japan's leading manufacturing firms 1981–1999 630

  41. 22.4 Country of origin of foreign direct investment into Japan 2005 640

  42. 22.5 Percentage distribution of world's total FDI stock by region, 1980–2005 641

  43. 23.1 The impact of China's changing business environment on modes of foreign business engagement with China 656

  44. 23.2 Emerging modes of business engagement between Chinese firms and international firms 679

  45. 26.1 Literature review: Political risk vs. country risk 753

  46. 26.2 Country risk rating agencies and methodologies 754

  47. 27.1 Common methodological problems in standard phases of comparative international research 775