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date: 13 June 2021

(p. xiv) Figures

(p. xiv) Figures

  1. 3.1 World value of exports, outward FDI stock, and outward FDI flow, 1980–2005 73

  2. 3.2 World volume of exports and real GDP, 1980–2006 73

  3. 4.1 Diagrammatic solution of the entry strategy under uncertainty 98

  4. 4.2 Strategy for information gathering 100

  5. 4.3 Comparison of decision trees with and without research 102

  6. 4.4 Decision tree for integrated research/waiting/switching problem 104

  7. 4.5 Diagrammatic solution of an entry problem encompassing research, deferment, and switching 107

  8. 4.6 Schematic representation of a simple international business system 109

  9. 6.1 A classification of the international economics perspectives on location advantage 147

  10. 6.2 New perspectivesonlocation advantages 152

  11. 6.3 The sustainability of sticky places 159

  12. 6.4 Firm‐ (or business‐) level sources of international competitive advantage 162

  13. 6.5 The distinction between foreign, regional, and home sales, 2001–2005 173

  14. 6.6 The distinction between foreign, regional, and home assets, 2001–2005 174

  15. 9.1 The consistency between MNE and home and host government goals 232

  16. 9.2 Institutional determinants of MNE–government interactions 233

  17. 9.3 MNE's strategic approachtogovernment policy 236

  18. 9.1A Examples of Figure 9.1 238

  19. 9.2A Examples of Figure 9.2 243

  20. 9.3A Examples of Figure 9.3 274

  21. 11.1 Number of regional agreements 275

  22. 11.2 Overview and illustrative implications for business strategy of the WTO regime 291

  23. 12.1 The strategic analysis process 309

  24. 12.2 International generic strategies: Integration and responsiveness 311

  25. 13.1 Evolutionary model of MNE organization (a) 344

  26. (p. xv)
  27. 13.2 Evolutionary model of MNE organization (b) 345

  28. 13.3 Evolutionary model of the 1980s: the transnational 350

  29. 13.4 Bartlett and Ghoshal's models of MNE organization 352

  30. 14.1 Streams of MNE research 369

  31. 15.1 Types of strategic alliances 390

  32. 18.1 Global similarity to US compensation plans 527

  33. 19.1 A managerial perspective on compliance with international environmental policies 541

  34. 19.2 The development of ‘green’ firm‐specific advantages 549

  35. 19.3 Impact of home vs. host government environmental regulations 551

  36. 21.1 The arm's length standard 601

  37. 21.2 Acceptable transfer pricing methods 603

  38. 23.1 Rise in China's external trade, 1978–2006 650

  39. 25.1 Constant hazard rates and yetaliability of newness 723

  40. 26.1 Political risk in international business: sources and type 744

  41. 26.2 Political risk in international business: measures and analysis 747

  42. 27.1 Multiple levels of comparative international research 770

  43. 27.2 Explaining the relative performance of collaborative multinational research projects 788