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date: 19 October 2019

(p. 767) Bibliography

(p. 767) Bibliography

Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (ODNB)

Several contributors have referred to articles in the ODNB (checked according to the updated 2008 electronic version). Conventionally, authorship is not given for such articles, but we think authors should be given credit for the work they have done for the ODNB, and so we have listed them below.

  • ‘Astley, John’ (Charlotte Merton).

  • ‘Baldwin, William’ (John N. King).

  • ‘Barker, William’ (Kenneth R. Bartlett).

  • ‘Bryan, Sir Francis’ (Susan Brigden).

  • ‘Cavendish, George’ (A. S. G. Edwards).

  • ‘Cheke, Sir John’ (Alan Bryson).

  • ‘Churchyard, Thomas’ (Raphael Lyne).

  • ‘Copland, Robert’ (Mary C. Erler).

  • ‘Cromwell, Thomas’ (Howard Leithead).

  • ‘Day, John’ (Andrew Pettegree).

  • ‘Dudley, Robert, Earl of Leicester’ (Simon Adams).

  • ‘Dyer, Sir Edward’ (Steven W. May).

  • ‘Elyot, Thomas’ (Stanford E. Lehmberg).

  • ‘Foxe, John’ (Thomas S. Freeman).

  • ‘Fulwell, Ulpian’ (David Kathman).

  • ‘Howard, Henry, Earl of Surrey’ (Susan Brigden).

  • ‘Howell, Thomas’ (Cathy Shrank).

  • ‘Kinwelmersh, Francis’ (Gillian Austen).

  • ‘Latimer, Hugh’ (Susan Wabuda).

  • ‘Lupton, Thomas’ (G. K. Hunter).

  • ‘Mason, Sir John’ (P. R. N. Carter).

  • ‘More, Thomas’ (Seymour Baker House).

  • ‘Proctor, John’ (David Loades).

  • ‘Shute, John’ (Gerald Beasley).

  • ‘Smith, Sir Thomas’ (Ian W. Archer).

  • ‘Stanihurst, Richard’ (Colm Lennon).

  • (p. 768) ‘Thomas, William’ (Dakota L. Hamilton).

  • ‘Tottel, Richard’ (Anna Greening).

  • ‘Turbervile, George’ (Raphael Lyne).

  • ‘Udall, Nicholas’ (Matthew Steggle).

  • ‘Vaux, Thomas’ (Henry Woudhuysen).

  • ‘Wager, William’ (Peter Happe).

  • ‘Whithorne, Thomas’ (John Bennell).

  • ‘Wilson, Thomas’ (Susan Doran and Jonathan Woolfson).

  • ‘Wyatt, Sir Thomas (c. 1503–1542)’ (Colin Burrow).

  • ‘Wyatt, Sir Thomas (b. in or before 1521, d. 1554)’ (Ian W. Archer).

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———(2004), Literature and Politics in the English Reformation (Manchester: Manchester University Press).Find this resource:

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———(2007), ‘Staging the Reformation: Power and Theatricality in the Plays of William Wager’, in Peter Happé and Wim Hüsken (eds), Interludes and Early Modern Society: Studies in Power, Gender and Theatricality (Amsterdam: Rodopi), 353–78.Find this resource:

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———(1969), Caxton and his World (London: André Deutsch).Find this resource:

———(1973), Caxton's Own Prose (London: André Deutsch).Find this resource:

———(1989), ‘Manuscript to Print’, in Jeremy Griffiths and Derek Pearsall (eds), Book Production and Publishing in Britain 1375–1475 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), 403–32.Find this resource:

———(1991), William Caxton and English Literary Culture (London: Hambledon Press).Find this resource:

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———(forthcoming), ‘Edward VI's “speciall men”: Crown and Locality in Mid-Tudor England’, Historical Research, 82.Find this resource:

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———(2000b), ‘The Writings of Henry Parker, Lord Morley’, in Marie Axton and James P. Carley (eds), ‘Triumphs of English’: Henry Parker, Lord Morley, Translator to the Tudor Court (London: British Library), 27–68.Find this resource:

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(p. 774) Carlson, David R. (1992), ‘The “Grammarians’ War” 1519–21: Humanist Careerism in Early Tudor England, and Printing’, Modern History, 18: 157–81.Find this resource:

———(1998), ‘The Writings of Bernard André (c.1450-c.1522)’, RenSt, 12: 229–50.Find this resource:

———(2006), ‘A Theory of the Early English Printing Firm: Jobbing, Book Publishing, and the Problem of Productive Capacity in Caxton's Work’, in William Kuskin (ed.), Caxton's Trace: Studies in the History of English Printing (Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press), 35–68.Find this resource:

Carpenter, Sarah (1997), ‘The Sixteenth-Century Court Audience: Performers and Spectators’, METh, 19: 3–14.Find this resource:

Carson, Anne (1986), Eros the Bittersweet: An Essay (Princeton: Princeton University Press).Find this resource:

Cartwright, Kent (1999), Theatre and Humanism: English Drama in the Sixteenth Century (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).Find this resource:

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Chambers, E. K. (1923), The Elizabethan Stage, 4 vols (Oxford: Clarendon Press).Find this resource:

———(1969), English Pastorals (1895; repr. Freeport, NY: Books for Libraries).Find this resource:

Chambers, R. W. (1935), Thomas More (New York: Harcourt Brace).Find this resource:

Chandler, John (1993), John Leland's Itinerary: Travels in Tudor England (Stroud: Sutton).Find this resource:

Chaney, Edward (2000), The Evolution of the Grand Tour (London: Frank Cass).Find this resource:

Charlton, H. B. (1946), The Senecan Tradition in Renaissance Tragedy (1921;repr. Manchester: Manchester University Press).Find this resource:

Charlton, Kenneth (1987),‘“False Fonde Bookes, Ballades and Rimes”: An Aspect of Informal Education in Early Modern England’, History of Education Quarterly, 27: 449–71.Find this resource:

Chartier, Roger (1987), The Cultural Uses of Print in Early Modern France, trans. Lydia S. Cochrane (Princeton: Princeton University Press).Find this resource:

———(1989), ‘The Practical Impact of Writing’, in Chartier (ed.), A History of Private Life, iii: Passions of the Renaissance, trans. Arthur Goldhammer (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press), 111–59.Find this resource:

Christianson, Paul (1978), Reformers and Babylon: English Apocalyptic Visions from the Reformation to the Civil War (Toronto: University of Toronto Press).Find this resource:

———(1999), ‘The Rise of London's Book-Trade’, in Lotte Hellinga and J. B. Trapp (eds), The Cambridge History of the Book in Britain, iii: 1400–1557 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), 128–47.Find this resource:

Clanchy, Michael (1993), Memory to Written Record: England, 1066–1307, 2nd edn (Oxford: Blackwell).Find this resource:

Clark, Peter (1977), English Provincial Society from the Reformation to the Revolution: Religion, Politics and Society in Kent 1500–1640 (Hassocks: Harvester Press).Find this resource:

———Alan G. R. Smith, and Nicholas Tyacke (eds) (1979), The English Commonwealth 1547–1640: Essays in Politics and Society Presented to Joel Hurstfield (Leicester: Leicester University Press).Find this resource:

Clegg, Cyndia Susan (1997), Press Censorship in Elizabethan England (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).Find this resource:

Cockle, Maurice J. D. (1978), A Bibliography of Military Books up to 1642, 2nd edn (London: Holland Press).Find this resource:

Coiner, Nancy (1995), ‘Galathea and the Interplay of Voices in Skelton's Speke, Parrot’, in David G. Allen and Robert A. White (eds), Subjects on the World's Stage: Essays on British Literature of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance (Cranbury, NJ: Associated University Presses), 88–99.Find this resource:

(p. 775) Coldiron, Anne (2006), ‘Taking Advice from a Frenchwoman: Caxton, Pynson, and Christine de Pizan's Moral Proverbs’, in William Kuskin (ed.), Caxton's Trace: Studies in the History of English Printing (Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press), 127–66.Find this resource:

Cole, M. H. (1999), The Portable Queen: Elizabeth I and the Politics of Ceremony (Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press).Find this resource:

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