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date: 18 August 2019

(p. xiii) List of Contributors

(p. xiii) List of Contributors

Darren T. Baker is a researcher interested in applying psychosocial principles to the study of gender relations, class, and leadership. He draws on psychoanalytical theory for epistemological, methodological, and ontological inspiration. His research focuses on finance and accounting as well as low-skilled service-sector occupations, and includes: first, gender and diversity in organizations; second, leadership and ethics, including capacities to care and responsibility at work; and third, social mobility and precarity in organizations and wider society. Darren holds an MA from the University of Oxford, where he conducted research on masculinities, and studied for his PhD at the School of Business and Management, King’s College London, where his research was funded by the ESRC and ACCA. Darren has taught at Queen Mary University and King’s College London, and is currently a Visiting Fellow at Cranfield University, School Management.



Matthew Bidwell is an associate professor in Wharton’s Management Department. His research examines new patterns in work and employment, focusing in particular on the causes and effects of more short-term, market-oriented employment relationships. He has conducted research on how firms balance internal mobility and hiring in staffing jobs and what the effects of those different strategies are. He has also studied the careers and management of highly skilled contractors. Before working at Wharton, he was an assistant professor at INSEAD. He received his PhD from the MIT Sloan School. He currently serves as a senior editor at Organization Science.



Ingmar Björkman is a professor of International Business and dean of Aalto University School of Business in Finland. His research interests focus on people issues in international organizations. His latest book is Global Challenge: International Human Resource Management (2017, Chicago Business Press), co-authored with Vladimir Pucik, Paul Evans, and Shad Morris.



Rocio Bonet is an associate professor of Human Resource Management at IE Business School. Her research interests lie at the intersection of labor economics and human resource management. One stream of her research focuses on the determinants of career advancement. She has explored how innovative work organizational practices that empower employees have affected promotions within organizations. Her ongoing research in the area of careers explores how prestigious affiliations are valued in the context of growing interorganizational mobility. Another stream of her research looks at the effects of new employment practices on firm-level outcomes. Her most recent research in this area focuses on how the use of contingent workers affects firm performance and (p. xiv) employee retention in organizations. Her work has been published in several international outlets. She received a PhD in Management from the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania.



Walter C. Borman received his PhD in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from the University of California (Berkeley). He was CEO and then chief scientist of Personnel Decisions Research Institutes until his retirement last year, and is a professor of Industrial-Organizational Psychology at the University of South Florida. He is a Fellow of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology. Borman has written more than 350 books, book chapters, journal articles, and conference papers. He has served on the editor boards of several journals in the I/O field, including the Journal of Applied Psychology, Personnel Psychology, and the International Journal of Selection and Assessment. He was editor of Human Performance, 2006–2014. Finally, he was the recipient of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology’s Distinguished Scientific Contributions Award for 2003; the M. Scott Myers Award for Applied Research in the Workplace for 2000, 2002, 2004, and 2010; and the American Psychological Foundation’s Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Application of Psychology in 2011.



Paul Boselie, PhD, MSc, is a professor and research director in the Utrecht School of Governance at Utrecht University, The Netherlands. His research traverses human resource management, institutionalism, strategic management, and industrial relations. He currently focuses on public-value creation, employer engagement, health care management, professional performance, and talent management. Paul’s teaching involves bachelor, master, PhD, and executive education. He is a member of the Editorial Board of the Journal of Management Studies and Human Resource Management Journal, and he is an associate editor of the International Journal of Human Resource Management. His 2010 and 2014 textbook, Strategic HRM—A Balanced Approach, is popular in bachelor and master programs.



John W. Boudreau, PhD, is a professor and research director at the University of Southern California’s Marshall School of Business and Centre for Effective Organizations. His more than 200 publications include such books as Lead the Work, with Ravin Jesuthasan and David Creelman (Wiley, 2015); Retooling HR (Harvard Business, 2010); Beyond HR, with Peter M. Ramstad (Harvard Business, 2007); and Short Introduction to Strategic Human Resources with Wayne Cascio (Cambridge University Press, 2012), as well as articles in the Journal of Applied Psychology, Personnel Psychology, Management Science, and the Journal of Vocational Behavior. He has received the Michael Losey Award from the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), the Academy of Management’s Organizational Behavior New Concept and Human Resource Scholarly Contribution Awards, and the Chairman’s Award from the International Association for Human Resources Information Management. He is a Fellow of the National Academy of Human Resources, the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, and the American Psychological Association.



(p. xv) Margaret E. Brooks is an associate professor in the Management Department at Bowling Green State University. She earned her PhD in Industrial-Organizational Psychology in 2004, from Bowling Green State University. She is a member of the Academy of Management, the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, and the Society for Judgment and Decision Making. Her research focuses on applying behavioral decision research to solve organizational problems. She is interested in how decision making affects the organizational staffing process—including recruitment, attraction to the organization, job choice, and employee selection. She also is interested in employee well-being issues related to meaningful work and women’s employment. Her work has been published in top journals in the field, including the Journal of Applied Psychology and the Journal of Management.



Peter Cappelli is the George W. Taylor Professor of Management at The Wharton School and Director of Wharton’s Center for Human Resources. He is also a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, MA. He served as senior advisor to the Kingdom of Bahrain for Employment Policy from 2003 to 2005, and since 2007 has been a Distinguished Scholar of the Ministry of Manpower for Singapore. He has degrees in industrial relations from Cornell University and in labor economics from Oxford, where he was a Fulbright Scholar. He has been a guest scholar at the Brookings Institution, a German Marshall Fund Fellow, and a faculty member at MIT, the University of Illinois, and the University of California at Berkeley. He was a staff member on the US Secretary of Labor’s Commission on Workforce Quality and Labor Market Efficiency from 1988 to 1990, co-director of the US Department of Education’s National Center on the Educational Quality of the Workforce, and a member of the Executive Committee of the US Department of Education’s National Center on Post-Secondary Improvement at Stanford University. He was recently named by HR Magazine as one of the top five most influential management thinkers and by NPR as one of the fifty influencers in the field of aging, and has been elected a fellow of the National Academy of Human Resources.



Wayne F. Cascio holds the Robert H. Reynolds Distinguished Chair in Global Leadership at the University of Colorado, Denver. He has published 28 books and more than 185 articles and book chapters. A former president of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, chair of the Society for Human Resource Management Foundation, and member of the Academy of Management’s Board of Governors, he is an editor of the Journal of International Business Studies and a former senior editor of the Journal of World Business. He received the SHRM’s Losey Award for Human Resources Research in 2010, SIOP’s Distinguished Scientific Contributions award in 2013, and the Georges Petitpas Lifetime Achievement Award from the World Federation of People Management Associations in 2016.



David G. Collings is a professor of human resource management at Dublin City University Business School where he leads the HR Directors’ Roundtable and is a joint director of the Leadership and Talent Institute. From 2014–2017 he has been named as (p. xvi) one of the most influential thinkers in the field of human resources by HR Magazine. He has published numerous papers in leading international journals and seven books. He sits on a number of editorial boards, including the Academy of Management Review, Journal of Management, and Journal of Management Studies. He is a deputy editor at the Journal of World Business and a former editor of Human Resource Management Journal.



Fang Lee Cooke, PhD, University of Manchester, UK, is a distinguished professor of Human Resource Management (HRM) and Asia Studies at Monash Business School, Monash University. Her research interests are in the area of employment relations, gender studies, diversity management, strategic HRM, knowledge management and innovation, outsourcing, Chinese outward FDI and HRM, employment of Chinese migrants, and HRM in the care sector. Fang is the author of the following books: HRM, Work and Employment in China; Competition, Strategy, and Management in China; and Human Resource Management in China: New Trends and Practices. Fang has also published more than 140 journal articles and book chapters. She is an associate editor of Human Resource Management, International Journal of Human Resource Management, Gender, Work, and Organization, and Asian Business and Management; senior editor of Asia Pacific Journal of Management; and co-editor-in-chief of Asia Pacific Journal of Human Resources. Fang’s recent research projects consider Chinese firms in Africa and their employment/HRM practices and labor relations; employee resilience, HRM practices, and engagement in the finance sector in the Asian region; and HRM in the care sector.



Ormonde R. Cragun is a PhD student of Organizational Behavior and Human Resources at the Darla Moore School of Business School at the University of South Carolina. He received his Masters of Organizational Behavior from Brigham Young University and Bachelor of Arts in Personnel and Human Resource Management from Utah State University. Before entering academia, Ormonde was the vice president of Organizational Effectiveness at Conservice. Before Conservice, he spent the majority of his career at Bell Helicopter Textron, where he served in various human resources and continuous improvement roles, including director of HR Strategy, senior HR business partner, director of Continuous Improvement, and Six Sigma Master Black Belt. Ormonde’s research interests include executive succession, executive personality, compensation, human capital, and strategic human resources.



David V. Day is a professor of Psychology and Eggert Chair in Leadership at Claremont McKenna College (USA), where he also holds the position of academic director of the Kravis Leadership Institute. Previous academic appointments include the University of Western Australia, Singapore Management University, Penn State University, and Louisiana State University. His research focuses primarily on issues related to leader and leadership development in organizational contexts. Day is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association, the Association for Psychological Science, the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, and the International Association of Applied Psychology.



(p. xvii) Giverny De Boeck is a doctoral researcher at the Research Centre for Organisation Studies, KU Leuven, Belgium. Her interests include human development and meaningful work. Central to her research are questions concerning employee experiences of (not) realizing potential at work. She is also an affiliated researcher at Vlerick Business School, cooperating with Professor De Stobbeleir on employee-proactivity behavior.



Gina Dokko is an associate professor at the University of California, Davis. Her research focuses on the consequences of job mobility and careers for individuals and organizations, including effects on innovation, learning, performance, and social capital. Her research has been published in the Strategic Management Journal, Research Policy, Organization Science, Organization Studies, and the Academy of Management Journal. She sits on the editorial review boards of the Strategic Management Journal and Organization Science. Professor Dokko holds a PhD in Management from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, an MS of Industrial Administration from Carnegie Mellon GSIA, and a BS of Economics from the Wharton School. Before her doctoral studies, she held various positions in marketing and strategy at firms such as 3M and American Express.



Nicky Dries is a research professor at KU Leuven (Belgium). She has been a visiting scholar at University of Tilburg, Wirtschaftsuniversität, Vienna; Reykjavik University; IESE Barcelona; and BI Oslo, and a Fulbright scholar at Boston University. Nicky’s primary research interests are employee talent, potential, and success. Nicky is an active member of the two largest cross-cultural projects within the field of career studies: 5C (Consortium for the Cross-Cultural Study of Contemporary Careers) and the Career Adaptability/Life Design Project.



Martin R. Edwards is a reader in HRM and Organisational Psychology at King’s College London—School of Management and Business. Martin has a background in organizational psychology, HRM, and industrial relations. He holds degrees in Social Psychology (BSc, Kent) and Industrial Relations and Personnel Management (MSc, London School of Economics), and a PhD in Organizational Psychology (King’s College London). Martin has published in internationally renowned HR journals (Human Resource Management, Human Resource Management Journal, Human Relations, European Journal of Work and Organisational Psychology, and International Journal of Management Reviews) and is the co-author/co-editor of two highly successful HR books (Predictive HR Analytics: Mastering the HR Metric, 2016; Human Resource Management in Transition, 2013). Martin has worked for a number of years as an HR consultant and provides HR analytic training to HR teams. Martin’s academic interests include organizational identification, social and multiple identities in organizations, employee/employer branding, employee responses to M&A activities, and the application of advanced analytic techniques to HR data.



Mats Ehrnrooth, PhD, is an associate professor at Hanken School of Economics, Finland. His research focuses on HRM, leadership, and organizational behavior from (p. xviii) international, indigenous, cross-cultural, and various methodological perspectives. He has published in several prestigious academic journals including the Journal of Management Studies, Strategic Management Journal, Journal of International Business Studies, Journal of World Business, Organization Studies, Human Resource Management, and International Journal of Human Resource Management.



Marion Festing is a professor of Human Resource Management and Intercultural Leadership at the Berlin campus of ESCP Europe. Furthermore, she is the Business School’s Academic Director of the Talent Management Institute. In her research, she focuses on topics such as international HRM strategies and approaches, with special emphasis on emerging countries, female careers, global talent management, and global performance and reward management. Her most recent book is International Human Resource Management: Managing People in a Multinational Context (7th edn., Cengage, forthcoming), which she wrote as part of a tricontinental team, together with Peter J. Dowling (Australia) and Allen D. Engle (USA).



Alexis A. Fink, PhD, is currently general manager, Talent Intelligence Analytics at Intel. Her organization provides original organizational effectiveness research, HR analytics, talent marketplace analytics, HR systems and tools, and consulting on talent solutions and strategic workforce planning. Before Intel, Alexis spent seven years at Microsoft, where her roles included director of Talent Management Infrastructure. Her career has been characterized by an integrative approach to HR, including developing and implementing competency systems and integrated talent-management systems. Her background also includes work in large-scale organizational transformation. Alexis earned her PhD in Industrial/Organizational Psychology and is a Fellow of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (SIOP). In addition to practicing and leading in organizations, she continues to teach, is a frequent SIOP contributor, and is an occasional author and journal editor.



Monika Hamori is a professor of Human Resource Management at IE Business School in Madrid, Spain. Her research interests include managerial and executive career paths and career success. Her articles have been published in Human Resource Management, Organization Science, the Academy of Management Annals, the Academy of Management Perspectives, the Harvard Business Review, and the MIT Sloan Management Review, among others. She received her PhD from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.



Katharina Harsch is a research assistant and PhD student at the Chair of Human Resource Management and Intercultural Leadership and an affiliated researcher at the Talent Management Institute, situated at ESCP Europe’s Berlin campus. Her main research focus centers on talent management from different angles, concentrating on various working environments.



John P. Hausknecht is an associate professor of Human Resource Studies at Cornell University. He earned his PhD in 2003 from Penn State University, with a major (p. xix) in Industrial/Organizational Psychology and minor in Management. Professor Hausknecht’s research addresses employee turnover and related staffing issues, and has appeared in the Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Applied Psychology, and Personnel Psychology. He currently serves on the editorial boards of the Academy of Management Journal and the Journal of Applied Psychology, and is an associate editor at Personnel Psychology. He is a member of the Academy of Management, the American Psychological Association, the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, and the Society for Human Resource Management.



Scott Highhouse is a professor and Ohio Eminent Scholar in the Department of Psychology, Bowling Green State University. Scott is the founding editor of the journal Personnel Assessment and Decisions. He has been named a Fellow of the American Psychological Association, the Association for Psychological Science, and the Society for Industrial-Organizational Psychology. Scott formerly worked in organizational development at Anheuser Busch Companies in St. Louis, Missouri. His primary areas of expertise are assessment/selection for employment, and human judgment/decision making. His work has been featured in the popular press, including the Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, Fortune, The Guardian, and The Boston Globe.



Winnie Jiang is a doctoral student of Organizations and Management at Yale University. Her current research focuses on understanding individuals’ experiences as they move across organizational and/or occupational boundaries, as well as the individual- and organizational-level antecedents and consequences of their movement. She also studies how individuals, especially those from marginalized groups, negotiate challenges in their work life and construct meaning from their work and careers, the findings of which provide helpful implications to organizations. To answer these research questions, she employs both qualitative and quantitative methodologies in unique social contexts. Before entering the doctoral program, Winnie received a BA of Economics and Psychology from Agnes Scott College in Atlanta, Georgia.



Rebecca R. Kehoe is an assistant professor of Human Resource Management at Rutgers University. Rebecca conducts research examining the interplay of human capital, social capital, and organizational context in the facilitation of innovation and competitive advantage in organizations. Against this backdrop, she maintains two active streams of research. In one, she studies how the characteristics, behaviors, and deployment of star performers influence the opportunities and performance enjoyed by stars’ colleagues and broader organizations. In another, she studies the roles of alternative HR systems, collaborative exchange, and internal and external knowledge stocks and flows in supporting superior unit and organizational performance. Rebecca’s research has appeared in the Strategic Management Journal, Journal of Management, ILR Review, and Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management. She serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Management, Personnel Psychology, and the International Journal of Human Resource Management.



(p. xx) Elisabeth K. Kelan is a professor of Leadership at Cranfield School of Management, where she also directs the Global Centre for Gender and Leadership. Before this appointment, she held positions at King’s College London and London Business School. She completed her PhD at the London School of Economics and Political Science. She is author of two books, as well as various peer-reviewed journal articles. During 2014–2015, she was a British Academy Midcareer Fellow and she explored the role of men as middle managers for gender equality. Her research centers on diversity and inclusion in organizations, with a specific focus on gender and generations.



JR Keller is an assistant professor of Human Resource Studies in the ILR School at Cornell University. His research focuses on how firms combine internal and external hiring to meet their human capital needs, as well as the various ways individuals build careers within and across organizations. He has explored the factors that lead firms to hire externally versus promote from within, supply chain approaches to talent management, the use of nonstandard work arrangements, and talent management more generally. His work has appeared in the Academy of Management Journal, Academy of Management Review, Industrial & Labor Relations Review, Annual Review of Organizational Psychology, and Organizational Behavior. Before pursuing a PhD, Keller had two careers—the first as a financial analyst and the second as a career consultant. He earned his PhD in Management from the Wharton School of Business and holds a Masters in Adult Education from Indiana University and undergraduate degrees in Finance and Computer Applications from the University of Notre Dame.



Shaista E. Khilji is a professor of Human and Organizational Learning & International Affairs at the George Washington University (GW), and founding editor-in-chief of the South Asian Journal of Business Studies. Dr. Khilji’s most recent work focuses on social inequalities within organizations and conceptualizing macro global talent management. She has published her work in many tier 1 academic journals and presented more than one hundred papers at international conferences. She has won many awards, including the Best Reviewer and Best Service Achievement Awards from the Academy of Management, the Best Paper Award from Academy of International Business, GW’s Service Excellence Award in the Collaborative Group category for hosting the Clinton Global Initiative University at GW, and the VALOR Award for cross-disciplinary work. She has served as a consultant to many public and private sector organizations, including working on President Obama’s initiative to develop transparent culture in the US government.



Sydney Kroska is an undergraduate student at the University of Iowa in the Tippie College of Business. She is currently studying Management and Psychology. Her research interests include star performance, organizational behavior, and psychological flexibility. She currently is the president of Tippie Senate and Computer Comfort, an organization designed to help seniors to successfully navigate an increasingly technologically driven world and is an active member of Alpha Kappa Psi Business Fraternity. She plans to attend graduate school in Organizational Behavior.



(p. xxi) Kristiina Mäkelä, PhD, is a professor of International Business at Aalto University School of Business in Helsinki. Her research focuses on people-related issues in multinational corporations, including those concerning HRM practices, the HR function, knowledge, social capital, and interpersonal interaction. Her work has appeared in more than twenty-five international peer-reviewed journals and books, including the Journal of International Business Studies, Journal of Management Studies, Human Resource Management, Journal of World Business, International Business Review, Journal of Managerial Psychology, and International Journal of Human Resource Management, among others. Before entering academia, she worked for more than ten years at Procter & Gamble, the world-leading consumer-goods multinational.



M. Travis Maynard, PhD, is an associate professor within the Department of Management at Colorado State University. He has conducted extensive research in the area of organizational team effectiveness, with primary interests centering on the role that team context has on team interactions and outcomes. In particular, some of his research has focused on the impact that interacting through virtual means has on team processes and performance. Beyond his work on virtual teams, Maynard also has conducted several research projects examining teamwork within healthcare settings. As a result of this line of research, he and his colleagues have seen dramatic increases in the teamwork skills of the healthcare providers they have work with, which has translated into substantial improvements in patient outcomes. Maynard’s experiences with teams within the healthcare industry has led him to become increasingly interested in team adaptation, resilience, and teamwork in extreme contexts, which has led to numerous current projects on these topics.



Kamel Mellahi is a professor of strategic management at Warwick Business School where he teaches and researches in the areas of international business and strategic management. His research interests straddle international strategies of emerging markets multinationals, corporate social responsibility, and talent management. He has published eight books and over eighty scholarly articles in top-tier journals, such as the Journal of International Business Studies, Journal of Management, Journal of Management Studies, and Strategic Management Journal. He serves as a senior editor for the Journal of World Business and Consulting and an editor for the British Journal of Management.



Maria Christina Meyers is an assistant professor at the Department of Human Resource Studies of Tilburg University, The Netherlands. Her research interests include positive psychology in the contexts of organizations, employee strengths and talents, employee well-being, talent management, and field experiments. Part of her research is conducted in close collaboration with Dutch organizations. Christina has published her research in international journals such as Human Resource Management Review, the Journal of World Business, Human Resource Management, the Journal of Counseling Psychology, and the European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology.



(p. xxii) Amirali Minbashian is an associate professor of Organisational Behaviour in the School of Management at UNSW Business School, UNSW Sydney. His research focuses on the effects of personality and individual differences, emotions, motivation and time-varying factors (such as experience and aging) on performance at work. He has published research on these topics in a range of applied psychology and management journals, including Journal of Applied Psychology, Organizational Research Methods, Leadership Quarterly, Journal of Vocational Behavior, Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, and Applied Psychology: An International Review.



Shad Morris, PhD, Cornell University, is the Georgia White Fellow and associate professor of Management at the Marriott School, Brigham Young University. Professor Morris conducts research on building global innovation capabilities through talent. In particular, he explores empirical problems related to how companies can more effectively invest in employee competencies and social networks to create firm value. He has published in outlets such as the Academy of Management Review, Journal of International Business Studies, Strategic Management Journal, Journal of Operations Management, and Harvard Business Review. Before becoming an academic, he worked for the World Bank, Management Systems International, and Alcoa.



Anthony J. Nyberg is a Moore Research Fellow at the Darla Moore School of Business at the University of South Carolina. Nyberg’s research focuses on strategic human capital resources, with emphases on performance, compensation, employee movement, and executive succession. His work has been published in the Academy of Management Journal, Academy of Management Review, Journal of Applied Psychology, and Journal of Management, among others. He is an associate editor for the Academy of Management Journal, and has served on numerous editorial boards. Anthony has received teaching and research awards including the Early Career Achievement Award, best dissertation, and best published manuscript from the Human Resources Division of the Academy of Management. He received his doctorate from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Before that, he served for nine years as the managing partner for an international financial services firm based in Northern California.



Ernest H. O’Boyle earned his doctorate in 2010 from Virginia Commonwealth University. He is currently an associate professor of management and organizations in the Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa. His research interests include star performance, counterproductive work behavior, research methods, and ethical issues surrounding publication practices. He has more than thirty peer-reviewed journal publications in such outlets as the Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Management, Organizational Research Methods, and Personnel Psychology. His work has been featured in the Wall Street Journal, Inc. Magazine, Bloomberg Businessweek, National Public Radio’s Morning Edition, and the NYT bestselling book Work Rules! He is the recipient of the Academy of Management Early Career Awards for the Research Methods Division and Human Resources (p. xxiii) Division. O’Boyle sits on the editorial boards of Personnel Psychology and Journal of Applied Psychology, and is an associate editor at Journal of Management.



Patricia M. G. O’Connor is Chief Learning Officer at YPO and a global talent-management executive with recognized expertise in leadership development, succession planning, and cultural alignment. From 2008 to 2016, she served as general manager, Leadership Development & Talent Management at Wesfarmers, Ltd, an Australian conglomerate with 225,000 employees. Her primary responsibility was the development and deployment of high-return talent practices focused on the organization’s top 275 executives. Before this appointment, Patricia worked for the Center for Creative Leadership (CCL). She served thirteen years with the CCL, progressing through a number of management, consulting, and research roles, culminating as research director in their Singapore office. Patricia holds an MBA in Management & Organization Behavior from the City University of New York and a Bachelor of Science degree in Human Resources from the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana. She is a published author and has addressed corporate, academic, and student audiences through speaking engagements across the globe.



Patrick Gavan O’Shea is the director of Private Sector Talent Management at Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO), and lives in Louisville, Kentucky. Before joining HumRRO in 2006, Gavan was a senior research scientist at American Institutes for Research (AIR) in Washington, DC. His work has involved leadership assessment using 360-degree feedback, rich-media simulations, and assessment centers; job analysis and competency modeling; and employee selection, promotion, and development for jobs within the energy, aviation, and US law enforcement and intelligence communities. Gavan is also a certified coach and an adjunct professor within Villanova University’s Department of Human Resource Development. Earlier in his career, he worked at a market research firm and with Volunteers in Service to America (VISTA). He received his PhD in Industrial-Organizational Psychology from Virginia Tech and his MS in General-Experimental Psychology from Villanova University.



James Oldroyd, PhD, Northwestern University, is the Ford/Richard Cook Fellow and Associate Professor of Strategy at the Marriott School, Brigham Young University. He has taught at SKK-GSB in Seoul, South Korea, and The Ohio State University. His research explores the intersection of stars, networks, and knowledge flows. He has published in outlets such as the Academy of Management Review, Organization Science, and Harvard Business Review. He teaches courses on strategy, strategy implementation, international business, and negotiations to undergraduates, MBAs, and executives.



Robert E. Ployhart is the Bank of America Professor of Business Administration and Chair of the management department at the University of South Carolina’s Darla Moore School of Business. His PhD is in Industrial and Organizational Psychology from Michigan State University (1999). His research focuses on human capital, staffing, personnel selection, recruitment, staffing-related legal issues, and (p. xxiv) applied statistical models such as structural equation modeling, multilevel modeling (HLM/RCM), and longitudinal modeling. His most recent research focuses on the intersection of psychology with organizational strategy. He has served as an associate editor for the Journal of Applied Psychology and Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, and on the editorial boards of six scientific journals. He has received many scholarly awards, and is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association, the Association for Psychological Science, and the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology.



Kerrin E. Puente is a research scientist in the Personnel Selection and Development program at Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) located in Alexandria, Virginia. Her work involves job analysis and competency modeling; selection and promotion; and managing and analyzing data to support a number of human capital solutions for public sector, private sector, and non-profit organizations. She is experienced in developing a variety of behavior-based assessments, including rich-media simulations, situational judgment tests, structured interviews, and assessment center exercises. Before joining HumRRO in 2014, Kerrin was an organizational effectiveness consultant at the Home Depot (in Atlanta, Georgia), where she supported the design and execution of large-scale talent-management solutions in a fast-paced retail environment. She received her PhD in Industrial-Organizational Psychology from the University of Georgia.



Blythe L. Rosikiewicz is a doctoral candidate in Management at the LeBow College of Business, Drexel University. Her research interests include interpersonal competition in the workplace, status and power dynamics, and the dark side of leadership.



Diana Sanchez is currently pursuing her PhD in Industrial-Organizational Psychology from Colorado State University. She obtained her MS in Industrial-Organizational Psychology from the University of Baltimore in 2010 and has a BS in Psychology from Portland State University. Her research expertise focuses on technology innovation and implementation, specifically looking at how organizations can integrate technological solutions to help manage their human capital. Her research primarily includes virtual teams, training simulations, and online assessment. Her applied experience includes over four years of work as a human capital consultant in Industrial-Organizational Psychology and over seven years of experience working in human resource management. Sanchez has previously worked for organizations such as John Hopkins University and Personnel Decisions Research Institute.



Lynn Schäfer heads the Talent Management Institute at ESCP Europe, Berlin campus. Her research interests include human resource management and talent management. Former research projects have focused on talent management in Germany, for instance gender inclusion and diversity elements in talent-management practices in the German media industry, and talent management in medium-sized companies.



Donald J. “DJ” Schepker is an assistant professor of Strategic Management in the Darla Moore School of Business at the University of South Carolina and a faculty member in (p. xxv) the Center for Executive Succession. His research has appeared in outlets such as the Journal of Management, Corporate Reputation Review, and Managerial and Decision Economics and focuses on corporate governance, executive succession and turnover, and top management-team and board-level decision making. He received his PhD from the University of Kansas and his BS from Babson College. Before entering academia, he worked for the advisory practice of PricewaterhouseCoopers, assisting clients in business process engineering, fraud identification, and dispute resolution.



Randall S. Schuler is Distinguished Professor of Strategic International Human Resource Management and Strategic Human Resource Management, past director of the Masters in HRM Program, and founder and past director of the Center for Global Strategic Human Resource Management in the Department of Human Resource Management. He is also on the faculty of Luzern University Business School as a Visiting Scholar. His interests include managing talent, innovation and human resource management, global human resource management, strategic human resource management, the human resource management function in organizations, and the interface of business strategy and human resource management. He has authored or edited more than fifty books. In addition, he has contributed more than seventy chapters to books and has published over 150 articles in professional journals and academic proceedings. He is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association, the British Academy of Management, the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, and the Academy of Management. Currently he is co-editing a Global HRM series for Routledge, with P. Sparrow and S. E. Jackson. It is composed of more than twenty-five books and involves more than 400 authors from around the world.



Hugh Scullion is a professor in International Human Resource Management in Hull University Business School. He has published in leading journals including the Academy of Management Journal, Journal of World Business, Human Resource Management Journal, and Human Resource Management Review. He is a co-author of recent books on Global Talent Management (Routledge, 2010), Strategic Talent Management: Contemporary Issues in International Context (CUP, 2014), and Global Staffing (Routledge, 2008). His current research interests include global talent management, SMEs, and the emerging markets.



Robert F. Silzer is managing director of HR Assessment and Development Inc., and doctoral faculty in Industrial-Organizational Psychology at Baruch/Graduate Center, City University of New York. He received his PhD in Industrial/Organizational and Counseling Psychology from the University of Minnesota and has served as a corporate senior director and as president of a major Industrial/Organizational psychology consulting firm. He has consulted with 150 organizations and thousands of leaders and executives. Rob was awarded the 2015 Distinguished Professional Contributions Award from the Society of Industrial and Organizational Psychology and the 2016 International Award for Excellence in Consultation from the Society of Consulting Psychology, a division of the American Psychological Association. He is a Fellow of the American (p. xxvi) Psychological Association, the Association for Psychological Science, the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology and the Society for Consulting Psychology (a division of the American Psychological Association). He has taught graduate psychology courses at New York University, City University of New York and City University of New York - Singapore. He has served on numerous journal editorial boards and as president and officer in several professional psychology associations. He is widely published, including books on Strategy-Driven Talent Management, The 21st Century Executive, and Individual Psychological Assessment. He enjoys global adventure travel and lives in Greenwich Village, Manhattan, New York City.



Adam Smale is a professor in the Department of Management and head of the Human Resource Management research group at the University of Vaasa in Finland. His research interests focus on talent management, HRM, careers, and knowledge transfer in multinational corporations. He has published a teaching case on global talent management and more than twenty scientific articles in journals such as the Journal of International Business Studies, Human Resource Management, Journal of World Business, International Business Review, and International Journal of Human Resource Management. He is the HR Ambassador for Finland in the Academy of Management HR Division and the Finnish representative in both CRANET and the Cross-Cultural Collaboration on Contemporary Careers (5C).



Michael C. Sturman is a professor of Management and the Kenneth and Marjorie Blanchard Professor of Human Resources at Cornell University’s School of Hotel Administration. There, he teaches undergraduate, graduate, and executive education courses on Human Resource Management and Compensation. His current research focuses on the prediction of individual job performance over time and the influence of compensation systems. He has published research articles in journals such as the Journal of Applied Psychology, Academy of Management Journal, Personnel Psychology, and Journal of Management, as well as hospitality-focused and practitioner-oriented papers in Compensation and Benefits Review, Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, International Journal of Hospitality Management, Lodging Magazine, Lodging HR, and the American Compensation Association Journal. Michael holds a PhD, MS, and BS from Cornell University’s School of Industrial and Labor Relations, and is a senior professional of Human Resources, as certified by the Society for Human Resource Management.



Jennie Sumelius is an associate professor in the Department of Management at the University of Vaasa. She received her PhD from the Hanken School of Economics in Helsinki, and has been a visiting scholar at Uppsala University and the University of Melbourne. Her research focuses on people management issues in multinational corporations, including talent management, the HR function, identification, and employee perceptions. Her work has been published in the Journal of International Business Studies, Journal of Management Studies, Human Resource Management, and Journal of World Business, among others.



(p. xxvii) Marian Thunnissen, PhD, has more than twenty years of experience as a researcher and consultant in the field of Human Resource Management (HRM). Since 2016, she has worked as a professor at Fontys University of Applied Sciences in Eindhoven, The Netherlands. Her main research concentrates on talent management, employability, and HRM, with a particular interest in talent-management issues in public sector organizations and (Dutch) higher education institutes. Her work has been published in the International Journal of HRM, Human Resource Management Review, and Employee Relations, among others. Thunnissen wants to make a positive contribution to knowledge transfer between scholars in the academic fields of HRM and talent management and practitioners. She is an associate editor of the Dutch Journal of HRM.



Daniel Tzabbar is an associate professor of Strategy, at LeBow College of Business, Drexel University. He received his PhD from Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto. His research focuses on creating and testing organizational and strategic theories related to the mechanisms that facilitate learning and technological change. His work highlights the micromechanisms associated with human capital as a key driver of these transformations. By integrating human capital theory with knowledge-based view and power theories, his research provides a theoretical and empirical meeting ground for economists, organizational theorists, and strategic human capital scholars. His work has been published in premier outlets such as the Academy of Management Journal, Strategic Management Journal, Organization Science, and Journal of Management, where he also serves as an editorial review board member.



Matti Vartiainen is a professor of Work and Organizational Psychology at the Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, Aalto University School of Science. He is a mentoring professor in the Virtual and Mobile Work Research Unit (http://www.vmwork.net/). With his research teams, he is studying organizational innovations, digital work, leadership, and well-being in new ways of working, mobile and multilocational distributed teams and organizations, reward systems, knowledge and competence building, and e-learning systems. He has edited and authored the following books, among others: Mobile Virtual Work: A New Paradigm? (2006, with J. H. Erik Andriessen and M. Vartiainen, eds., Springer); Distributed and Mobile WorkPlaces, People and Technology (2007, with Marko Kakonen, Satu Koivisto, Petri Mannonen, Mika P. Nieminen, Virpa Ruohomäki, and Anni Vartola, Otatieto); and Reward ManagementFacts and Trends in Europe (2008, with C. Antoni, X. Baeten, N. Hakonen, and H. Thierry, H., eds., Pabst Science Publishers).



Patrick M. Wright is Thomas C. Vandiver Bicentennial Chair in the Darla Moore School of Business at the University of South Carolina and director of the Center for Executive Succession. He teaches and conducts research in the area of Strategic Human Resource Management. He has published more than sixty research articles in journals and more than twenty chapters in books and edited volumes, and has co-authored two textbooks and two books on HR practice. He is the editor-in-chief for the Journal of (p. xxviii) Management. He currently serves as a member on the board of directors for the Society for Human Resource Management and the National Academy of Human Resources (NAHR) and is a former board member of HRPS, SHRM Foundation, and World at Work. He has been named by HRM Magazine as one of the twenty “Most Influential Thought Leaders in HR” and has won SHRM’s Michael R. Losey Award for Human Resource Research.