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date: 18 August 2019

(p. 557) Index

(p. 557) Index

Note: “(fig.)” relates to Figures and “(t)” relates to Tables.

abilities, natural 88
ability tests 541
Ability, Motivation, and Opportunity (AMO) framework 75–6, 422, 431–6
Academy Awards nominations as metric of performance 57
Accenture 311
advancement, drive for 100
advantage, cumulative 53
Aligning Business Strategy and Talent Development 348 (t)
Amazon 549, 552
America, United States of 7, 11, 23–4, 33–5, 44, 49, 205, 270, 284, 323–4, 400–5, 522–4, 541
US Army 101
US Department of Justice’s Community-Oriented Policing Services 540
US Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) 544
US Government Accountability Office 494
US medical firms 497
US-owned MNCs operating in China 445
American Accounting Association’s Committee on Human Resource Accounting 382
ANOVA 49, 68
Anytime Feedback program 549
Apple 239, 498
applicant tracking systems (ATS) 538–9, 551
Arab Gulf States 441
Argentina-based companies 448
Asia 405–7
assessment-center method 273
AT&T Management Progress Study 96, 273
ATS (applicant tracking systems) 538–9, 551
Australia 7, 400
Autotrader 547
baby boomers 239
Baker, Darren T. 19, 527
Balanced Scorecards and HR metrics 378
Bangalore 406
Bangladesh 400–6
Becker, Brian 5, 134, 299–305, 383
behavior
behavioral dimensions, specific 104
behavioral flexibility 99
behavioral skills 100
citizenship, increased by positive emotions 71
counterproductive 67, 58–9, 260
discriminatory 531
inclusive 530
proactive 67
work, counterproductive 71
work, effective 162
Bernoulli distribution of job performance 50
Best Actor Award 57
bias awareness training 531
Bidwell, Matthew 6–9, 15, 33, 117, 125, 128, 249, 254–7, 281–94, 303–4
big data analytics 277, 375, 387–9, 551
Big Five for talent identification 80
Big Five personality traits 73, 80, 539
Björkman, Ingmar 18, 461–73
Black Swan (book by Nassim Taleb) 43
Blink (book by Malcolm Gladwell) 274
Blueprint of Leadership Potential, the 11, 103 (fig.)
(p. 558) Bock, Laszlo 60
Boeck, Giverny De 13, 157, 169–90, 237, 242, 307, 310, 525
Bonet, Rocio 6–9, 14, 249–63, 328
Borman, Walter C. 11, 47, 67, 87–107
Boselie, Paul 4, 17, 77, 176, 420–36, 482–3
bossdom, entrenched 445
Boudreau, John W. 4–6, 18, 27–8, 36, 72, 115, 170, 195, 249, 261, 300, 304–5, 311, 362, 363 (t), 365, 386, 388, 494–514, 552
BPO/ITES sector, 449
brain circulation and knowledge flows 407
brain drain 443, 446
brain gain 454
brand equity 235
Brazil 440, 443–4, 454
BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India, and China) countries 444
Brin, Sergey 44
Briscoe, Forrest 6, 281, 284–5, 471 (t)
British Household Panel Survey 513
broken leg cues 270
Brooks, Margaret E. 14, 79, 256, 268–77, 329–30
Brownian motion within the labor market 284
business strategy and HR, conceptual links between 27
Business Week (magazine) 256
Caesar, Julius 50
California Psychological Inventory 91
Call typology 367
Call, Matthew L. 8, 26, 52, 54, 60, 322, 361–72
Canada 400, 404
candidates, best procedures for assessing 269
capacity risk 193
Capco 549
Cappelli model of talent acquisition 262
Cappelli, Peter 3–10, 23–36, 115, 118, 129, 134, 193–4, 201, 205, 236, 249, 554 (fig.), 254, 256, 21, 262, 281, 285, 291, 293, 299, 305–6, 318, 322, 334, 347–8, 361, 399, 461, 480–2, 522, 537–8
career dimensions 12, 76, 103 (fig.), 104
career drive 97 (t), 100
career ladder 283–5
career progress, cycle of 187
career satisfaction, effect of talent designation on 180
career support 159, 171 (t), 178, 260, 310
career-enhancing development practices 529–30
careers, boundaryless 115, 513
CareerXroads 249
Cascio, Wayne F. 3–19, 29, 115, 234, 249, 261, 302, 305, 311, 375–7, 380–3, 388, 399, 412, 464, 482, 494–514, 532, 539, 552–3
CAT (Computer Adaptive Testing) 356, 542–3
Center for Executive Succession (CES) 329
Central and Eastern European countries 441
CEO dismissal 322–3
CEO succession
Japanese 324
new tenure can result in numerous changes 326
performance outcomes linked to 326
planning, 318–19
predictors of 323
process 327–9, 333
questions regarding effectiveness and best practices 333
Chambers 482, 521–2
change management, embracing 100
change, drive for 100
changing-subjects model 72
changing-tasks model 72
Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) 233, 236, 483
chief human resource officers (CHROs) 329
civil rights 521–3
cloud-based social technology 501
Cochran, Thomas 28–9
cognitive ability 74, 98
cognitive and behavioral habits 119
cognitive complexity 98
cognitive processes 69, 74
cognitive skills 96
Cohen, Lisa 284
collaborating with teammates 154
Common Components across Current Models and Surveys of High Potential Indicators 97 (t)
Communist Party 406
competitive advantage 140–1, 145, 169, 193
complimentary resource bundles 137
computational modeling 276
computer-adaptive testing, see CAT
conceptual framework 401–10
conceptual thinking 98
Conference Board 30–4, 361
Confucian values 408
connections, key network 162
consumer demands 31
contests, crowdsource-based 511
Contradicting Theories of Information Flow and Performance 219 (fig.)
Cooke, Fang Lee 17, 194, 399, 401, 407, 440–57, 468
core employees 258, 362
corporate capacity in talent management 453
corporate hiring process 253
Corporate Leadership Council 96, 348
corporate mindset 449
corporate social responsibility 443
corporate strategy and leadership 409
corporate talent-acquisition process 254
Council for Foreign Relations 404
counterproductive work behavior (CWB) 67, 58–9, 260
Cragun, Ormonde R. 12, 15, 134–46, 221, 318–34
critical roles, concept of 362
crowdsourced work 501, 506
C-Suite jobs 321
cultural fit, values, and behavioral norms 102
culture
internalized, and cognitive habits can improve performance 119
national 407
preferred technologies differ depending on 205
Cummings and Haas 201
customer loyalty 216
Darden Restaurants Inc. 544
data dictionaries 388
data limitations 390
data sources and analytic methods, emergence of new 381
data visualization 389
data-system barriers 390
Day, David V. 16, 271, 274, 331, 343–58, 428, 523
decision science 388
Definitions of Talent and Related Concepts 363 (t)
Deloitte 311, 445–6, 546, 549
demographics and mobility 405–6
Denmark 403
Depression, Great 29–30
development opportunities 105
diaspora and returnees 406–7
diaspora effect 406, 409
diaspora mobility 400
diasporic networks 406
Diathesis Stress Model 91
Different Reference Points for Determinism versus Error-As-Inevitable 276 (fig.)
Differentiated Workforce model 241
discriminatory behaviors 531
distributive justice 176, 180, 308
diversity management 521–56
diversity management, paradigms and approaches overtime 523–4
Doing Business Index (World Bank) 404
Dokko, Gina 12, 33, 78, 115–29, 263, 287, 292, 304, 346
Dries, Nicky 7, 13, 24, 75–81, 157, 169–95, 198, 205, 236, 242–5, 307–11, 344, 349, 427, 429, 434, 468, 470, 471 (t), 482–3, 522, 525, 530
Eastern Europe 407
economic concepts of efficiency 384
economic globalization 440
Economist (magazine) 399–400, 406
(p. 560) educational institutions 403–4
educational leadership 409
Edwards, Martin R. 14, 119, 233–46, 332, 480–1, 488, 508 (t)
efficiency, economic concepts of 384
efficient performance 119
effort expenditure and performance on the task, link between 80
Ehrnrooth, Mats 461–73
80-20 Rule 53
Einstein, Albert 538
eLance.com 552
e-Lancing 494, 552
e-Learning 545–6
e-mail holidays 222
emerging economies, talent management in 440–60
emerging markets 440
emotional stability 96
emotions, positive, increase organizational citizenship behavior 71
employees
ability, motivation, and opportunity of 134, see also Ability, Motivation, and Opportunity (AMO) framework
advantaged 532
and “talent” 235–7
and talent management 233–48
assessment 79–80
asymmetric effects of hiring and losing 116
attitudes toward their work or job 175
awareness and interpretation of talent status 181–3, 186
boomerang 128
borrowing 497–8, 501–2
Chinese 446, 463
classification of 301
core 16, 258, 260, 364, 372
elite, see stars
employer branding 234–5
external hiring, benefits of 290
fear of failing to meet expectations a major source of stress 178
highly qualified 482, 484
HiPo 34
how human capital, social capital, identity and cognition relate to performance 129
ideal 529
identification for a HiPo development program 530
identifying and developing 87
internal staffing, benefits of 286
mislabeling 370
motivating 79–81
negative relationship between official talent status and work engagement 175
nonstandard 18
pressure to conform to standards and ideals of the employing organization 182
preventing negative reactions among those not considered talent 181
privileged 531
public-sector, dissatisfied with their organization’s talent-management program 176
quality 156
reactions to talent designations 169–92
reactions to talent-management practices among 170
retention 203
satisfaction, importance of 203
segments 242
skilled 198
star, see stars
stress of living up to expectations and fear of failure 182
suggestion systems 139
trained 201
white-collar 25
employer obligations, perceived 186, 190
employer-branding segmentation and differentiation of the workforce employment experience 237–40
employment lifecycle 500
employment security 115
employment, post-WWII models of 24–5
energy 96, 100
entrenched bossdom 445
environments, simple-task 138
Equal Employment Opportunity and Uniform Guidelines for Selection Procedures 391
equity theory 170–80
(p. 561) e-Recruitment 538–40
Ericsson, Anders 53
Ernst and Young 443–4
e-Selection arena 541
ethnic minorities 528
European Commission 479
European Union laws 525
Example Talent Pools with Performance Expectations 349 (t)
executive assessment as art, not a science 270–2
executive search firms 255
expertise, technical 199
external hiring 291
external labor markets 284
external sourcing, integrated theories of 290
external status, concept of 367
external training 139
Facebook 539
face-to-face (FtF) and technology-based training 202
face-to-face (FtF) teams 199
factor markets, role of 136–7
false self, developing 182
family history 269
Festing, Marion 18, 307, 478–89, 528, 534
Fifth Pillar (High Education and Training) 405
financial crisis (of 2008) 440
financial incentives 80
financial markets, influence of 31
Financial Times 261
Fink, Alexis A. 16, 375–91
firms
boundaries 123
firm-specific skills 287
performance 120
survival 120
footballers, professional, WPVP of 71
Fortune (magazine) 256–7
fostering talent analytics within organizations 376
Fourth Pillar (Health and Primary Education) 405
France 405
freelance platforms and crowdsourced work 501–7, 511–13
freelancing
and crowdsourced work 506–7
ecosystem 495
free agents 494
freeLancer.com 552
platforms 501–7
Frequency of Articles Addressing Combinations of Nonstandard Work and Talent Lifecycle Elements 503 (t)
Fruytier, Ben 4, 77, 420, 424, 428, 482–3
FtF technology, see face-to-face
Fullerton Longitudinal Study 93
functional integration 139
Gallardo-Gallardo, Eva 3–8, 24–7, 77–9, 189, 244, 300, 305, 310, 420, 426–7, 434, 482, 522, 530
Gaussian distribution of job performance 47, 57
gender 102, 528, 531
gendered metaphors used in everyday organizational discourse 531
gender-specific preferences 528
stereotypes 528
General Electric (GE) 4, 29, 31, 33, 285, 301, 346, 469, 539, 549
general mental ability (GMA) 51, 270
generation X/Y 239
generational divide, global 407, 414
genetic factors related to leadership potential 53, 78, 90
geographical mobility and individual-difference variables 102
Germany 400–5, 487
Get Rid of the Performance Review! (book by Samuel Culbert and Lawrence Rout) 549
Gladwell, Malcolm 53, 274, 301
Global Competitiveness Index (GCI) of the WEF 403
global generational divide 407, 414
global integration versus local responsiveness 463–6
global labor markets 407
global performance management (GPM) systems 528
(p. 562) Global Talent Competitiveness (GTCI) 403–5, 428
Global Talent Index 405
global talent management (GTM) 401
globalization
economic 440
impact on strategies of organizations 204
GMA 52–3, 271, 274
goal assignments, specific 80
Goldman Sachs 311
Golem effect 184
good-employer model 433–5
Google 60, 498
governmental policies, programs, and activities to attract talent 400–3
graphology 255
great-person theory 50–1
Grote, Dick 301
GTCI and the Global Talent Index 412
GTM as an interdisciplinary field 401
GTM in multinational corporations (MNCs), framework of 401
guanxi 444
Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) 447
guru.com 552
halo effect and horn effect 527
Hamori, Monika 6, 9, 14, 33, 249–63, 304, 327–8
hangover effect 72
Harfliger, Stefan 8
Harsch, Katharina 18, 478–89
Harvard model 434
Hausknecht, John P. 10, 16, 120, 322, 331, 361–73, 484
Haveman, Heather 284
headhunters 257
Heidrick and Struggles (company) 399, 405
hierarchies, social, and professional communities 157
high performers 308, 362
high potentials (HiPos) 88, 243, 362, 462, 466, 469, 522, 530
Highhouse, Scott 14, 79, 235, 268–77, 330, 383
Highly Skilled Migrant Program 404
honeymoon effect 72
horn effect 527
HRsmart/Deltek 548
Huawei 408
human capital 116–28
accumulation 139
barriers to easy transfer of 118
differences between generic and firm-specific 304
investments in 300
loss of 120–2
needs 32
pipelines and flows 144
portable 123
resource complementarities 134–49
social capital, and identity and cognition, interactions between 128
specific 118
theory (HCT) 135, 412
human resources (HR)
accounting 382
activity 234
and business strategy, conceptual links between 27
architecture 240, 300
Architecture model 238
decision making 300, 383
lifecycle 502
Management Review 7
metrics 375–95
optimal HR architecture for management of all employees 299
policies 299–301
practices 299, 306, 309
role of the HR function 466–8
Scorecards 375
sophistication 388
systems 59, 240, 300
value chain 421
human resources management (HRM)
and institutional theory 434
and talent management in SMEs, research on, 480–1
and talent management networks 18
architectural theory of 25
context sensitivity, relevance of 435
differentiation and talent-management principles 431
(p. 563) differentiation of HRM policies and practices 433
distinction between talent management and HRM 442
distinctive HRM challenges 481
effectiveness of alternative HRM practices 262
formalized HRM practices and talent retention 450
function as an organizational actor 467
general HRM practices across countries within MNCs 464
global HRM information system 469
HRM-performance linkages 455
in the emerging-economies context 442
in the public sector 420–6, 429, 433, 435–6
integration of the AMO theory in 434
international HRM research 463
notion that talent management a part of HRM 25
outside hiring, as dominant issue in HRM 23
scholars 432
talent-management strategy as part of strategic HRM 449
human resources metrics
and talent analytics 375–90
and talent analytics work together 387–8
balanced Scorecards 378–80
benchmarking 377–8
current practical and theoretical approaches 376–83
effectiveness 385
efficiency 384
evolving decision science 388–9
fostering talent analytics 388–90
impact 386
research-based approaches 380–3
talent analytics 386–8
types of metrics 383–6
Huselid, Mark 5, 134, 299–305, 383
IBM, developed partnership with Apple 498
I-Deals 60
identity
cognition 122–5
issues 116
multiple independent identities can be held at same time 123
pressure to conform to standards and ideals of the employing organization 182
struggles 170, 182
transitions 124
IfM Bonn 479
IKEA 408
Illustrative Example of Potential Outcomes of Talent Management at Different Levels 471 (t)
ILM model 424, 432–3
ILO 483
IMD World Talent Report 405
immigration policies 404
Indeed.com 538
individual differences, psychological research on 344
individual performance
at work 26, 66, 74–5, 117
three-level model of 74–5
individuals
build mental models about way work should be done and what constitutes good performance 122
developing, core part of talent management 100
identify with multiple targets at once 123
identities include aspects of self-definition, beliefs and values, and behaviors 122
in the talent pool 195
internalize organization’s norms, values, and cognitive conventions 119
move up into higher-level jobs along well-structured job ladders 282
performance generated by human and social capital 117
Indonesia 400, 440, 450
industry dynamism 327
infantilization 526
information asymmetries 289
information flow, optimizing 224
information overload 215–29
INSEAD/Human Capital 404
insightfulness 98
(p. 564) Institute of International Education 404
institutional theory 434
institutions, educational 403–4
Integrated Model of Public Administration and Public Management Insights and HRM Theory 422 (fig.)
intelligence and personality 78, 98
interdisciplinary work groups 139
internal and external labor markets, talent flows in 282
internal labor market (ILM) model 423
internal models of career ladders and vacancy chains 284
internal training 139
internalization of organizational practices, notion of 464
internalized culture and cognitive habits can improve performance 119
International Journal of Human Resource Management 7, 485
International Labor Organization 404
International Monetary Fund 427
Internet-based social-networking sites such as LinkedIn 35
Internet-browsing patterns 539
interpersonal skills 96
Interpublic Group of Companies, Inc. 548
interviews, myth of interview as pivotal 274–5
interviews, psychological 268
interviews, structured and semistructured 269, 527
intra-firm networks, importance on performance of any single individual 26
IQ tests 51, 183
IQ, heritability estimates of 91
IRT-based scoring rubrics 543
Isaksson and Bellagh 512
IT hub, Indian 406
IT outsourcing 449
item-response theory-based (IRT) scoring 542
Japan 323–4, 405, 444
Jiang, Winnie 12, 59, 115–29, 141, 143, 147, 304, 323, 346, 448
job advertisements 252
job boards 252–3
job demands 183
Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) model 71, 183
job descriptions 285
Job Diagnostic Survey of Hackman and Oldham 513
job insecurity 183
job ladder 115, 282–3
job mobility, consequences of 117
job performance and cognitive ability tests 272
job performance in context 117, 272
job rotations, planned 139
job satisfaction 180, 512
job security 249, 513
job seekers 252–3
jobs, strategic 27–8, 33
JobVite 539
Jordan, Michael 44
Journal of World Business 7
judgment 98
Julius Caesar 50
justice, distributive 176, 180, 308
justice, procedural 176, 180
Kehoe, Rebecca R. 8, 12, 50, 54, 153–66, 301, 303, 332, 349, 361, 363 (t), 366–72
Kelan, Elisabeth K. 19, 521–32
Kenexa/IBM 548
Key Principles Guiding Talent-Development Practice 352 (t)
Khilji, Shaista E. 399–415, 428, 442, 446, 464
knowledge access benefits 156
knowledge flows 407, 409–10
knowledge gap 170
knowledge sharing 412
knowledge spillovers 162, 409, 412
knowledge transfer 120
knowledge, career track specific 102
knowledge, skill, ability, and other characteristics, see KSAOs
Korea 446
(p. 565) Kroc, Ray 44
Krogh, Georg von 8
Kroska, Sydney 8, 11, 43–61, 301, 303
KSAOs
characteristics 135–7, 325
collective human capital resources emerge from 137
composition 137–41, 325, 327, 331
KSAs 45, 54–5
Labor Market Intermediaries 251 (fig.)
labor markets
balancing internal and external 286–92
global 407
managing talent flows through internal and external 281–98
mitigating the costs of internal 290–1
mobility in external 283–4
mobility in internal 282–3
understanding processes in internal and external 282–6
Lamastra, Cristina 8
Latitude and e-Lancing 552
leaders
critical role of 195
ideal leader 529
identification of common characteristics 87, 96, 105
leadership
behavior 91–6
capabilities 100
complexity of 104–6
early adult predictors of later 94
educational 409
effectiveness 87, 104–5
emergence strongly influenced by the situational context 96
environment 95
inclusive-leadership training 530–1
Institute of Singapore/Adecco 405
potential 11, 53, 78, 87–114
propensity to lead 100
skills 94, 100–1
learner control 546–7
learning agility 99
learning and knowledge sharing 409
Levels of Succession 320 (t)
linear on-the-fly testing (LOFT) 542–4
LinkedIn 35, 253–4, 285, 494, 539
losing people, silver lining in 127–8
machine learning 389
Mäkelä, Kristiina 18, 461–72
Malaysia 403, 440, 445, 450
management assessment, myths about 269–75
Management Progress Study, AT&T 96, 273
management
purpose of talent 143
straight talk about selecting for 268–80
managers, status-aware 178
managing talent across organizations 115–33
managing, and empowering people 100
MANPLAN 31
Manpower Commission 29
Manpower Planning for High Talent Personnel 31
market deregulation 31
market position 118
Marriott International 543
masculine preferences 528
Matthew Effect, the 53
Maynard, Travis 13, 193–208
McKinsey & Company 124, 223, 302, 399, 482, 522
meaning of talent 236
Mechanical Turk (mturk.com) 552
Mellahi, Kamel 3–19, 25, 27, 34, 66, 75, 77, 80–1, 134, 142, 144, 169–70, 187, 189, 193–5, 198–205, 238–41, 250, 300–7, 312, 347–8, 363 (t), 364, 372, 399, 433, 455, 461, 471 (t), 482, 487, 522
mental flexibility 99
mentoring of team members 154
meritocracy in organizations, myth of 531–2
meritocracy, myth of 524–7
Meyers, Maria Christina 13, 75–8, 157, 169–90, 237, 242, 301, 307, 310, 344, 349, 482, 525
Microsoft 311
microworkers.com 552
military cadets 94
military training simulations 545
(p. 566) millennials/generation Y 239
Minbashian, Amirali 11, 66–82, 346
Minnesota Twins Studies 90
mismatch between employees’ perceived talent status and organization-assigned talent status 178
Miyamoto, Shigeru 44
MNCs 441, 444
outcomes of talent management in 468–71
mobile talent 116–20, 128
mobility
demographics 405–6
opportunities 261
Monster.com 285, 538
Monte Carlo studies 57
MOOCs (massively open online courses) 546
Morris, Shad 8, 13, 153, 158, 215–25, 271, 302, 363 (t), 366–7, 465, 468
motivation variables 69, 100
Motorola India MDB 449
MTM (macro talent management)
conceptual framework of 401
functions and processes 408–10
future research suggestions for 410–12
importance of 406
macro environment 401–8
macro implications and country effects of 407
model 411
outcomes 410
multinational corporations, talent management in 461–77
Multisource Assessment 353 (fig.)
narcissism 371
Narin and Breitzman 44
National Association of Professional Employer Associations 496
National Basketball Association 118
national culture 407–8
natural abilities 88
nature–nurture debates 50, 344
navigating ambiguity 98
negative spillover effects 260
Nerkar and Paruchuri 157
networks
affiliatory nature of 215
diasporic 406
difference between random and affiliatory 218
intra-firm, importance on performance of any single individual 26
key connections 162
structure and load 219
neuroimaging 276
new public management (NPM) 421
NGOs 403–5, 409
niche picking 91
Nigeria 405, 485
Nobel Laureates 53
Non-monotonic Versus Monotonic Interactions of Leadership Style and Task Structure 271 (fig.)
nonstandard workers, definition and types of 496–7
North Atlantic Treaty Organization 427
NPM 424, 432, 435
Nyberg, Anthony J. 8, 15, 26, 52, 54, 60, 134, 144, 301, 318–34, 361, 363 (t), 365, 371
O’Boyle, Ernest H. 8, 11, 43–61, 159, 301, 303, 363 (t), 369–70
O’Connor, Patricia M. G. 343–58
O’Shea, Patrick Gavan 19, 537–53
OAR 274
oDesk.com 552
offboarding processes 128
Office of Secret Services (OSS) assessment program 273
off-shoring, global destination of 406
Oldroyd, James 8, 13, 153, 158, 215–24, 363 (t), 366–7
onboarding 125–7
online gaming applications 540
online job boards 252
online marketplaces 552
online simulations 541
online testing 541
on-the-job training 223, 291
openness to feedback 99
Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) 399, 404, 478–80
organization, commitment to the 100
organization, effects of information overload for the 220
organizational
boundaries 120
citizenship behavior (OCB) 67, 260, 204
equilibrium, March and Simon’s classic theory of 364–5
identity, concept of 234
influence 217
Man model of the 1950s 30–2
model of talent management 30–1
performance and HR practices, causal link between 383
practices, internalization of, notion of 464
structure 118
talent 170
organizations
contextual factors in 105
cultural fit or organizational fit as emerging issue 102
dominant models that describe mobility within 282
focus individuals who fit the company’s values and norms 102
impact of political skill in 200
managing talent across 115–33
myth of meritocracy in 532
pivotal roles within 195
why they choose nonstandard workers 497–8
organizing/planning skills 96
Orkut, Facebook, and LinkedIn 454
OstWestfalenLippe Marketing GmbH 487
Outliers (book by Malcolm Gladwell) 53
outsourcing 502, 506
over privilege 531
overinvestment 323
overlaying the concept of pivotal roles 197
oversupply of workers 194
Overview of Discussion Points and Questions for Talent Management in Public Sector Contexts 430 (t)
Overview of Empirical Studies Investigating Employee Reactions to Talent Identification 171 (t)
ownership variations in talent management 453
Oxford Economics 399, 403
Page, Larry 44
Pakistan 400–6
paper-and-pencil versus computer-administered assessments 541
paradox theory 434
Pareto or power distribution 303
paternalism 445
Pathways from Genes to Leadership model 91
pay dispersion and pay secrecy 187
PD@GE 549
Pennsylvania, University of, School of Education 546
pensions 115
PepsiCo 99
performance
Academy Awards nominations as metric of 57
affective states may influence 71
efficient 119
feedback 80
in context 117
individual, portability of 115–33, 128–9
individual, three-level model of 74–5
management processes, microinequalities in 528
outcomes linked to CEO succession 326
reviews, annual 80
record 101–2
superior individual, often moderated by the job occupied 26
task characteristics can influence 71
within-person variability in 66–86
performance-management system 243
performance-related pay 139
personal growth 99
personality tests 527, 541
personality traits, Big Five 73, 80, 539
personality variables and interpersonal skills 98–9
(p. 568) personalizing talent development 356
personnel psychology 25
Pfeffer, Jeffrey 118, 242, 288, 301–3, 310, 321, 370–1, 496
phenomenon commonly called “a lift out” 119
Philippines 440, 450
Philips (company) 120, 124, 498
pivotal positions 199
pivotal roles 195
Ployhart, Robert E. 12, 134–46, 322, 330–1, 542
podcasts 545–6
Population Reference Bureau 405
portability of individual performance 115–33, 128–9
Portability of Performance at Organizational Entry and Exit 126 (t)
post-WWII models of employment 24–5
potential
as inherent individual capability, concept of 90
defining 88–9
for leadership 87–114
high, definitions of 88
identification of 89
in organizations 89–90
prediction of 90–8
prediction of, childhood and adolescent studies 92–3
prediction of, early adult and early career studies 93–6
prediction of, genetic studies 90–1
prediction of, midcareer studies from practice 96–7
Power Law Overlaying a Normal Distribution 46 (fig.)
prediction of potential 90–8
procedural justice 308
productivity risk 194
professional communities and social hierarchies 157
professional footballers, WPVP of 71
promotion “tournaments” 283
promotion ladders 289–90
psychoanalysis 182
Psychological Bulletin 47
psychological contract breech and violation 308
psychological contract theory 170, 178, 181, 184–5
psychological interviews 268
psychological research on individual differences 344
psychological resources 141
psychological tests 268–9
psychological, social, and economic ties, erosion of 115
psychology, childhood and adolescent 92
psychometric testing 527
public sector 176, 420–39
characteristics and developments 422–6
defining talent management in the 426–9
motives to work in the 424–6
organizations, characteristics of 423–4
Puente, Kerrin E. 19, 537–53
quality circles 139
RBT 141
recruitment versus training 142
Reflektive 549
relationships
cooperative 127
triangular 250
relevant social capital, concept of 366
Remote Proctor NOW (RPNow) 542
Representative Theories or Research Frameworks Applied to Independent Contractors, Outsourcers, and Temporary-Help Agencies 508 (t)
research agendas 451–6
Research Frameworks Applied to Freelance Platforms and Crowdsourcing 510 (t)
Research Questions—Acquiring Talent 545 (t)
Research Questions—Developing Talent 548 (t)
Research Questions—Evaluating Talent 550 (t)
Research Questions—Identifying Talent 540 (t)
research
focus on practices that impact human capital 304
into star performers 56–60
(p. 569) linking social capital to performance 217
linking stars, social capital, and information overload 216
on CEO succession 291
on HR accounting 382
on self-fulfilling prophecies or Pygmalion effects 183
on social media sites is in its infancy 253
on strategic HR management (SHRM) 383
sought to understand better how to develop a VT talent pool 207
resource complementarities 141–5
resource-allocation processes 69
resource-based theory 511
resource-based theory (RBT) 135, 511
resource-based view (RBV) 5, 25, 49, 169, 238, 241, 302, 304, 310, 412
responsibility, delegation of 139
return-on-development investments (RODI) 354
reward systems 204
rewards, individual-level 139
Rich-Media Simulations 540–1
risks, associated with efficiency 384
risks, courage to take 100
risks, productivity 194
role ambiguity 183
role-composition model of team performance 27
role-play simulations 268
Rosen’s development of superstar theory 44
Rosikiewicz, Blythe L. 12, 153–66, 332, 349
Russia 408, 440–5
Sanchez, Diana 193–208
scapegoating 322–3
Schäfer, Lynn 18, 478–89
Schepker, Donald J. “DJ” 15, 318–34
Schuler, Randall S. 4, 6, 17, 193–205, 399–415, 428, 463–4, 469, 471 (t), 482, 487, 522
Scullion, Hugh 4, 18, 24, 195–7, 205, 361, 401, 409–14, 426, 441, 444, 447, 451–6, 461, 467, 478–89
search consultants 255
search firms 262
Sears Holding Corporation (SHC) 273, 550
selection and training practices, effective 145
self-acceptance 94
self-efficacy 70, 94
self-esteem 94
self-fulfilling prophecies 183, 242
self-monitoring 94
self-regulatory resources 81
Semmelweis reflex 52
Seventh Pillar (Labor Market Efficiency) 405
SHRM research, potential of 311
SHRM’s Competency Model 547
Siemens partnership with Walt Disney Corporation 498
signaling theory 170, 179–80, 183, 307
Silicon Valley 60, 487
SilkRoad 548
Silzer, Rob F. 11, 75–6, 80, 82, 87–107, 169, 181, 271, 347–8, 357
Simon, Herbert 219
Simonton’s nature–nurture model 344–5
simple-task environments 138
Simulated Normal Distribution Truncated at +1 Standard Deviation and an Observed Star Distribution of Academics 48 (fig.)
Simulated Star Connections 218 (fig.)
Singapore 34–5, 403, 450
situational judgment tests (SJTs) 541
situational triggers 73
skills
acquisition 72
interpersonal 96
technical/functional 102
Skillsoft 249
Skype 547
Smale, Adam 18, 173 (t), 177–8, 181, 187, 461–72
smartphone-based assessment 541
SMEs
challenges for talent management in 484–5
crucial economic role of 479
human resource management in 480–1
importance of talent management in 483
opportunities for talent management in 485–7
relevance and particularities 479–80
social and professional networking websites 253–61
(p. 570) social capital 116, 120–2, 126, 128, 224
and star employees, link between 215
can prove detrimental to star employees 224
enables stars to leverage their structural position 217
identity and cognition not typically what organizations consider when hiring talent 122
information side effects of 217–20
role in the portability of performance 121
social capital at organizational exit 121–2
social connections 116
social exchange theory 170, 179, 183, 189
social hierarchies and professional communities 157
social media sites may present advantages in talent-sourcing process 253
social media websites 253–61
social or human capital, portable 123
Social Recruitment 539
social technology, cloud-based 501
social-exchange theory (SET) 309
socialization practices, or “onboarding” 125–6
Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) 377, 539, 547
socioeconomic inequality 532
software development and technology 60
South Africa 440, 443
South Asia 412, 406
South Carolina, University of 329
South Korea 403
Space Invaders (book by Nirwal Puwar) 526
Spain 405
sponsorship for team members 154
Square Root Transformed Sales Estimates for the Average Performer and High Performer 68 (fig.)
staffing agencies 262
stage-based model of performance 73
stars
and information overload 215–31
and knowledge-sharing benefits 157
and negative behaviors 58–9
and social capital 216–17
as boundary spanners 155–7
assigning as mentors 223
benefits of social capital for 216–17
best ways to compensate 59–60
central network positions enable them to influence norms and practices within teams 157
concept of 362
dark stars 58
decision-making latitude of 223
decreasing stars’ information load 221–2
deteriorating performance of 220
differences in influences of 158–9
direct threats to uniqueness posed by redundant resources 161
distribution of 45–50
effects of information overload on 218–20
effects of the team context on 154
effects on teams and colleagues 154–9
environmental factors affecting 53–6
exceptional individual productivity of 162
feeling of being “entitled” to special treatment 181
focusing on star skill sets 162
have exponentially higher levels of social capital 220
how are they different? 366–7
how information overload creates significant challenges for star employees 215–24
how rare is exceptional performance? 369–70
increase in information flow as by-product of stardom 218
increasing stars’ information processing and sharing capabilities 222–4
influence on knowledge transfer 158
influence on team norms and practices 157
influences on colleagues’ careers 158
internal attributes of 51–3
interpersonal influences in teams 154, 157–9
lifespan of 372
likely drivers of star turnover 368–9
likely to be central in organizational networks 217
likely to become bottlenecks in the organization 220
(p. 571) likely to have exponentially higher levels of social capital than peers 215–17
literature 163
low cooperation of 371
managing stars’ social capital 220–4
maximizing benefits and minimizing costs of star’s presence in a team 164
may benefit capabilities and performance of colleagues 162
may not perceive workforce-differentiation practices in same way as non-stars 311
mobility between organizations, consequences of 165
modeling work behaviors of 157
more visible within the firm 215
multiple, dynamics associated with 165
multiple, may engage in disruptive status competitions 161
narcissism of 371
occupying boundary spanning and gatekeeping roles 156
over-dependence on 165
potential negative effects and characteristics of 154, 371
production 55
prototypical star industries 60
recruiting 116, 162
research agenda into 56–60
sensitive to psychological contract fulfillment 178
star performers 43–65, 116, 156, 162
stars that shimmer and stars that shine 215–24
status spillover 155
surrounding with required support resources 162
team influences on 165
what frameworks help us understand star performers? 366–70
what is a star? 43–5, 50–6
status quo, influencing, inspiring, challenging 100
status spillover effect 155
status-aware managers 178
stereotypes 528
straight talk about selecting for upper management 268–80
strategic ambiguity 185
strategic complementarities, definition of 135–6
Strategic Core Theory 159
strategic HR functions 234
strategic jobs 27–8, 33
strategic reasoning 98
strategic shift 322–3
strategic talent management 66, 75, 238, 245, 250, 440
strategic thinking 98
stress
and fear of failing to meet expectations 178
resistance to 96
Sturman, Michael C. 16, 66, 67, 72, 284, 375–91
subject-based talent-segmented employment experience 243
SuccessFactors 548
succession planning (CEOs) 318–42
Suggested Research Questions, Levels of Analysis, and Research Designs 188 (t)
Sumelius, Jennie 18, 461–72
Summary of Implementation, Internalization, and Integration Issues in the Context of
Talent Management in MNCs 465 (t)
supervisor support 186
supervisor talent status, perceived 186
suzhi 444
Sweden 403
Sweetland 413
Swift, Taylor 45
Switzerland 403
tactical problem solving 98
Taiwan 403, 450
Taleb, Nassim 43
talent
acquiring 249–67, 541–5
and diversity management 521–36
and teams 153–68
and turnover 361–74
are talented employees more likely to quit? 364–6
attraction 484
attraction and development at the macro level 446–7
(p. 572) battle for 428
conceptualization of 77–9
cross-border flow of 400
deal, the 181, 189
definition of 77, 426–8
departure 127
development 343–58, 545–8
diverse social groups of 453
effects of state-led programs 454
equality versus differentiation 431
evaluating 548–51
governmental policies, programs, and activities to attract 400–3
heightened expectations of 178
how it is defined and measured 362–4
identifying 538–41
increasingly mobile 115
integrating 521–56
intermediaries 249–67
label 183
lifecycle 144, 498–506
Lifecycle and Objectives 499 (fig.)
losing 125
losses, counterbalancing 129
machine 469
managing across organizations 115–33
obligations, perceptions of 177
on demand 262
or not 169–92
poaching 116
pools 89, 306, 348
preventing negative reactions among employees not considered talent 181
programs, effects of state-led 454
recruitment and selection 527–9
retention 484–5
segmentation on 240–4
shortages 443–4
sought by employers and talent shortages 443–4
status and work engagement 175
talent analytics 375–95
what are the drawbacks of trying to retain top talent? 370–1
what talent desire 443
talent analytics 375–95
and HR metrics, bridge between 383
defining 375
functions as a decision science 387
HR metrics and 375–95
talent and diversity management 521–36
talent designation 169–92, 182–7, 309–10
potential costs of 178–9
talent development 343, 357
talent flows, managing through internal and external labor markets 281–98
talent intermediaries 249–67
and careers 263
in talent acquisition 249–63
online job boards and social media sites 252–61
talent management
agenda for research in public sectors 433–5
and changing technology 537–56
and employer branding 233–48
as important aspect of organizational success 193
challenges to, in emerging economies 445–6
conceptual history of 24–8
corporate capacity in 453
defining 4–10, 134, 169, 194
developed into most important term in human resources 23
developing individuals as core part of 100
early attempts at 28–30
employer branding and 233–48
exclusionary paradigm to 522–3
existing research on 442–5
forgotten but critical tool of 318–42
future of 34–7
historical context of 23–40
history of 28–34
how technology is changing 537–56
importance for organizational success 194
in emerging economies 440–60
in Global Context: A Conceptual Framework of Macro Talent Management 402 (fig.)
in Indian business process outsourcing (BPO)/ITES sector 449
in multinational corporations 461–77
(p. 573) in practice, history of 28–34
in small- and medium-sized enterprises 478–93
in SMEs 483–8
in the global context 399–419
in the public sector 420–39
in UK health care 431
initiative 244
integrated solutions 551–2
linking with employee and business outcomes 455–6
macro national aspect of 399
micropractices of inequality in 527–9
notion of being simply part of human resources management 25
of nonstandard employees 494–520
organizational man model of 30–1
outcomes of 428–32
ownership variations in 453
perceived fairness of 176
practices 79–81, 134, 144, 242, 428–9, 463
practices, influencing commitment and motivation versus performance 432–3
practices, techniques, and environments and their effects 448–51
programs 241
prospects of, in emerging economies 451–6
PSM, and performance, link between 434
relevance of 482–3
research 142–5, 224
role of stakeholders 447–8, 453–4
role of technology in 454
solutions 221
Some Related Questions for Research and Practice 456 (t)
strategic, defining 238, 250, 440
term coined by McKinsey & Company 23
under uncertainty 31–4
what is beneficial to roles, practices, and techniques 447–51
with a hyper-aging society 406
talent-on-demand 262
talent-perception incongruence 170, 178
talent-pool strategy 306
talent-sourcing process, advantages of social media sites in 253
Tarique and Schuler framework, the 401
tasks
characteristics 71
performance 67
structure 72
task-level motivators 80
teams
and talent 153–68
composition 194
dynamics 197
environment, characteristics of the 154
essential throughout the organization 332
influences on stars 165
members, mentoring and sponsorship of 154
mentoring and sponsorship for team members 154
teammates, collaborating with 154
virtual 193–214
technical expertise 199
technical/functional skills 102
technology 118, 194
temporary-help service firms (THS) 258
10,000-hour rule 53
Thailand 323–4, 440, 450
Thatcher, Sherry 8, 26, 52, 54, 60, 322, 361–72
Thin slicing 274–5
thinking, conceptual 98
thought leaders 223
Thousand Talents Plan “1000 Talents” Plan 447
Three Types of Attachment and Types of Nonstandard Work that Describe Each One 496 (t)
three-level model of WPVP 75–9
THS companies 258–62
Thunnissen, Marian 4–7, 17, 77, 174 (t), 176, 179–81, 420–36, 482–3
Tier1 Plan 404
time famine 220
training
access to 183
internal 139
versus recruitment 142
VT members 202
transaction-cost economics 497
transition costs 127
triggers, situational 73
(p. 574) TripAdvisor 386
turnover and talent 361–74
Twelfth Pillar (R&D Innovation) 405
Twitter 539
Tzabbar, Daniel 12, 153–66, 332, 349, 363 (t), 368, 372
understanding the effect of intermediaries on organizational outcomes 263–3
unequal systems that structure the workplace 531
unions, attacks on the powers of 526
United Kingdom 34–5, 400, 403
Border Agency 404
National Health Service 429
United Nations 406, 427
USA 7, 11, 23–4, 33–5, 44, 49, 205, 270, 284, 323–4, 400–5, 522–4, 541
US Army 101
US Department of Justice’s Community-Oriented Policing Services 540
US Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) 544
US Government Accountability Office 494
US medical firms 497
US-owned MNCs operating in China 445
vacancy chains 284
value creation 161
Vandenabeele, model by 433–5
Vartiainen, Matti 13, 193–208
Vietnam 440
virtual communities 546–8
virtual leadership-development programs 548
Virtual Ride Along 540
Virtual Role Play (VRP) 544
virtual teams (VTs) 193–214
composition 199
cultural diversity of 200, 205
dynamics and performance 198
effect of members’ cultural backgrounds 207
FtF and technology-based training components 202
importance that OCB can have within 208
leadership position 197
literature (virtual teams) 197–8
members have higher levels of openness to experience 200
members often work across cultural boundaries 202
members who have a more collectivistic rather than individualistic orientation 199
presence of subgroups within 198
research projects 198–9
rewards within 203–4
training programs 202
Virtual Team Talent-Management Framework 196 (t)
vodcasts 545–6
volatile environments 319–21
VRIN 56
Vroom 70
VRP 547
Waggl 549
Wall Street analysts 350, 354–6
war for talent 23, 26, 59, 88, 193, 233, 300, 521
War for Talent (book) 23, 26
war on talent 522
WEF, Global Competitiveness Index (GCI) of the 403–4, 408
Welch, Jack 4, 301
WhatWorks® Award 546–7
Why is Performance Management Broken? (journal) 549
within-person variability in performance, see WPVP
work
behaviors, counterproductive 71
behaviors, effective 162
central part of most people’s identity 122
comparing research on traditional versus less traditional nonstandard work 506–513
crowdsourced 506
groups, interdisciplinary 139
Workday 548
(p. 575) workers, temporary 257, 513
Workforce 2000 report 523
workforce
differentiation 299–317
planning, decline in overall 32
strategy 300
World Bank Group 224, 427
World Competitiveness Center 399
World Economic Forum (WEF) 399, 403
World Talent Report of the IMD 403–4
World War I 29, 33
World War II 29, 33
Wozniak, Steve 44
WPVP 66–86
determinants of 69–75
evidence for 67–9
implications for talent management 75–81
three-level model of 75–9
Wright, Patrick M. 15, 134, 142–3, 188, 221, 223, 304, 311, 318–34, 421, 464, 465 (t), 549
X-factors 52
Yelp! 386
YouScience’s Latitude career planning and assessment system 552
YUM 408
Zhejiang province, China 448