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date: 18 April 2021

(p. xi) List of Figures and Tables

(p. xi) List of Figures and Tables

(p. xii) Tables

  1. 2.1 Middle Persian phonemes (adapted from Durkin-Meisterernst 2014: 114ff.) 20

  2. 2.2 The early two-case system of Middle Persian 22

  3. 2.3 Manichaean Middle Persian endings of the present (after Durkin-Meisterernst 2014: 232ff.) 24

  4. 2.4 Middle Persian past tenses (PP = past participle) 25

  5. 2.5 New Persian documents in different scripts (with abbreviations) 29

  6. 2.6 Dialectal and chronological classification of ENP documents 30

  7. 2.7 Phonological system of literary Contemporary New Persian 33

  8. 2.8 Phonological system of Early and Classical New Persian 34

  9. 3.1 Modern Persian’s word order typology 64

  10. 3.2 Old Persian’s word order typology 66

  11. 3.3 Middle Persian (Pahlavi) word order typology 70

  12. 4.1 Consonants of Early New Persian 92

  13. 4.2 Consonants of Standard Modern Persian 93

  14. 4.3 VOT (ms) of voiceless plosives in initial and intervocalic positions 96

  15. 4.4 Average VOT (ms) of voiced plosives in initial and intervocalic positions 97

  16. 4.5 VOT values for Persian affricates (ms) 99

  17. 4.6 Duration (ms) of Persian vowels 105

  18. 5.1 Feature chart of Persian 23 consonants 119

  19. 5.2 Feature chart of Persian six vowels 119

  20. 9.1 Telicity in Persian complex predicates 267

  21. 10.1 Persian pronouns 280

  22. 10.2 Basic possessive paradigms 281

  23. 10.3 Cardinal numbers 284

  24. 10.4 Verbal endings in Persian 289

  25. 10.5 Basic paradigms for the verb bordan ‘to take’ 290

  26. 10.6 Aspects, moods, and tenses: bordan ‘to take’ 291

  27. 13.1 Percentage of final stop deletion in Persian by style 335

  28. 13.2 Percentage of final stop deletion in Tehran Persian by gender, age, and style 337

  29. 13.3 Percentage of final stop deletion by education and style in Tehran Persian 340

  30. 13.4 Percentage of vowel harmony in casual speech of Persian speakers by education and gender 340

  31. 13.5 Percentage of /u/ realization in the speech of Persian speakers in Tehran by age and style 341

  32. (p. xiii) 13.6 Percentage of /u/ realization of Persian speakers in Tehran and Ghazvin by style 342

  33. 13.7 Social status of Persian during the last several centuries 344

  34. 15.1 Differences between written and spoken forms of Persian (Tehrani dialcet) 373

  35. 17.1 Examples of stimuli: Experiment 2a 420

  36. 17.2 Priming of nominal constituent in non-head/word-initial position 420

  37. 17.3 Examples of stimuli: Experiment 2b 421

  38. 17.4 Priming of head/word-final position 421

  39. 18.1 Clinical linguistic batteries for assessing acquired language impairments in Iranian brain-damaged patients 438

  40. 18.2 Neurolinguistic studies on monolingual and bilingual Persian-speaking brain-damaged patients 442

  41. 18.3 Mean scores, SDs of subtests, and AQ of Persian aphasic and epileptic patients 450

  42. 18.4 fMRI studies in Persian 455

  43. 19.1 Plural morpheme example in attached, detached, and separated forms in the Persian writing system 467

  44. 19.2 Complex tokens consisting of two distinct but attached lexical categories 468

  45. 19.3 Examples of Persian light verb constructions 471

  46. 19.4 Examples of separable affixes in Afghan Persian (Dari) text 473

(p. xiv)