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date: 22 November 2019

(p. 557) Subject Index

(p. 557) Subject Index

Introductory Note

References such as ‘178–9’ indicate (not necessarily continuous) discussion of a topic across a range of pages. Because the whole of this work is about ‘management’, use of this term (and certain others which occur throughout) as an entry point has been restricted. Please look under the appropriate detailed entries. Wherever possible in the case of topics with many references, these have either been divided into sub-topics or only the most significant discussions of the topic are listed.

AACSB (Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business) 4, 23, 32–3, 439–41, 443–4, 451
Abrahamsson, B. 165
academic rigour 5, 43, 450–451, 461
Academy of Management Learning and Education (AMLE) 420, 427, 445–7, 450
accountability 3, 32–3, 348, 371, 376, 454, 476
acquisitions 297, 301, 306, 310, 313, 391, 502
action learning 286
adaptability, cultural 490–492
agency 3, 103, 151, 249–50, 311–12, 406, 408–10, 512
organizational 10, 294
agents 13, 248, 250, 402, 465, 485, 523
change 11, 349, 351, 353, 355, 409, 518, 527
algorithmic trading 245–7, 249, 251
algorithms, computerized 9, 246–7
ALT (Authentic Leadership Theory) 10, 282
ambivalence 12, 119, 376, 400–401, 411, 518
American Production and Inventory Control Society (APICS) 59, 62–3
American Society of Mechanical Engineers, see ASME
APICS (American Production and Inventory Control Society) 59, 62–3
applied science 23, 25, 60, 70
appraisals 194, 258, 330, 463–4
appropriateness 133–4, 419
artefacts 9, 28, 238, 246, 249–50, 252, 473, 485
ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) 30
assessment 40, 209, 283–5, 357, 402–3
Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business, see AACSB
assumptions 138, 140, 294, 304, 313, 315, 423–4, 450–451
basic 8, 62–3, 146, 315, 450
craftsman 316–17
Australia 40, 348, 524
Authentic Leadership Theory, see ALT
autonomy 181, 184, 188, 191, 223–4, 373–5, 400, 410
behaviours 13–14, 108–9, 230, 277–9, 284, 345–6, 481–7, 489–92
individual 249, 481–2
leadership 225, 278, 284
managerial/leadership 10, 284, 325–6, 481–93
organizational 23, 40, 50, 53, 239, 358, 413, 438–9
relationship-oriented 278
biases, optimism 9, 154, 230–232
boundaries, organizational 14, 256, 267, 509, 530, 532
branding 104, 115, 117
bureaucracy 128, 130–131, 133, 135, 137–9, 377–8, 401–3, 522
mechanistic 392
new bureaucracies 375–8
study of 130, 132, 137
bureaucratic organizations 137, 158, 523–4
business climate 391–2
business education 4, 32, 149, 151–2, 156, 159, 163, 389; see also management education
business functions 5, 240, 439
business models 245, 263, 344
business morals 386–91
business schools 4–5, 13, 164, 166, 388, 437–56, 472, 474–6; see also management education
critiques of 446–7, 450–453
curricula 160, 166–7, 180, 237, 293, 438
business strategies 189, 405, 497
capabilities 296–7, 299–300, 306–10, 315, 356–7, 359–60, 504–5, 507
organizational 267–8, 356, 359
capital 13, 191, 465, 468, 499, 502–4, 506, 520
social 309, 453
symbolic 268
capitalism 160–161, 166, 191, 388, 412, 464, 475, 511
managerial 388, 466
welfare 44, 184–5
CDSR (Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews) 429, 432
CED (Committee on Economic Development) 390, 395
central powers 376–8
centralization 137–8, 189
CEOs (Chief Executive Officers) 83, 85, 92, 114, 117, 164, 310–311, 313
change agents 11, 349, 351, 353, 355, 409, 518, 527
change initiatives 11, 210, 346, 356
change leaders 11, 347, 349–52, 355–8
change management 11, 14, 61, 343–60, 409, 518, 521, 527
change leaders 11, 347, 349–52, 355–8
pace of change 352–5
post-crisis 11, 360
problem definition 343–6
processual perspectives 11, 350–352, 354, 358, 360
recipes 346–9
research agenda 358–60
strategies 11
change processes 11, 309, 348, 350, 352, 357, 360
chaos 146, 151, 334, 340
charisma 10, 131, 281, 283
charismatic leadership 280
Chief Executive Officers, see CEOs
China 191, 440, 491, 499–500, 502, 506
choices 302, 305, 310, 312, 314, 339–40, 345, 352
endogenous 302–3
CIM (Computer-Integrated Manufacturing) 66
circularity 466–7
clients 95, 220, 230, 316–17, 519, 522, 525, 529–31
closed systems 44, 128, 130
Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) 429, 432
codetermination 45, 49, 149, 160, 163–4, 166
coercion 11, 169, 344, 368, 380
power as 369
cognition 51, 150, 256–7, 259, 370, 411, 484–6, 489
situated 484–6
cognitive processes 13, 263, 483–6, 492
coherence 131, 138, 150, 154, 159, 166, 262, 304
collective bargaining 184–6, 192, 468
Committee on Economic Development (CED) 390, 395
communication, with external stakeholder audiences 265–6
communication technologies 233–4, 446
communications management 225
competence 115, 119–20, 286, 474
competencies 8, 10, 179–80, 194, 233, 284–5, 452
competency frameworks 356–7
(p. 559) competitors 114, 117, 222, 300, 306, 523, 525, 529
complex firms 298–9, 308, 311–12
complex organizations 111, 316, 387
complexity 62, 134, 239, 293, 298–9, 306, 311–12, 489–90
Computer-Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) 66
computerization 9, 237–8, 246–7, 249, 252, 525
computerized algorithms 9, 246–7
computers 91, 240–241, 247, 251, 507, 525
conceptualization 10, 136, 151, 220, 226, 260, 325–6, 381
configuration approaches 321
conflict 162, 210, 234, 317, 392–3, 511, 513–14, 530
constructive 162
management 392, 481
consensus 193, 296, 309, 314, 380, 388, 422–3, 426
consent 20, 28, 351, 377, 380
constructive conflict 162
consultancy/consulting 14, 23, 30, 118–19, 278, 344, 393, 518–33
active clients 530–531
ambivalent historical relationship with management 524–8
and management as different 520–522
and management as equivalent 520
and management as same and different 523–4
managerial use of 529–31
passive clients 530
relationship with management 519–20
consultants
external 401, 523–4, 528
internal 519, 526
management 11, 14, 85, 344, 348, 518, 522, 525
consumers 113, 117, 161, 167, 206, 211, 466, 473
contestation 14, 368, 498, 512–13
political 512–13
context 481–5, 487–93
cultural 21, 120, 482–4, 510, 513
cultural and institutional 483, 486
dynamic nature 486–9
foreign 487–8, 490, 493
organizational 28, 311, 320, 344, 391, 413, 482–6, 490
role 13–14, 483, 489, 493
situational 483–4, 486–7, 489
contextual variables 13, 192, 482, 493
contingencies 138–9, 152, 309, 314, 411, 470
Contingency Model of Leadership 10, 279
contingency models 348–50
contingency theory 8, 10, 66, 71, 127–8, 132, 134, 136–41
continuity 131, 146, 299, 310, 317–18, 337, 344, 349
control 105–7, 129–30, 132–4, 190–193, 304–6, 372, 376–80, 505
lateral 376–7
managerial 401, 507
neo-normative 7, 50, 112–14, 374
normative 112, 114, 120
organizational 111
systems 135, 304, 308
cooperation 20, 31, 129, 315–16, 374, 378, 382, 404
coordination 129, 133, 162, 164, 299, 307, 310, 316
core processes of management 162
corporate culturalism 11, 373–5
corporate cultures 43, 111, 370, 387–8
corporate morality 393–4
corporate morals 12, 386–97
contents of 387–8, 391, 395–6
flavours 391–7
corporate social responsibility (CSR) 117, 163, 390, 452
cosmopolitans 521–3
costs 62, 187, 189, 205–7, 224–7, 230–232, 345, 502–3
management 224
craftsman assumptions 316–17
craftsmanship 305, 315–16
as agency assumption 315–17
and strategy 317–18
craftsmen 47, 315–19
credentials 393, 442, 475
cross-cultural collaboration 107
cues 258–9, 388, 454, 492
cultural adaptability 490–492
(p. 560) cultural analysis 107–8, 112, 121
cultural change 107, 121, 242, 343
cultural contexts 21, 120, 482–4, 510, 513
cultural differences 14, 491, 493, 506
cultural distance 490–491
cultural processes 107, 268
cultural toolkits 122, 410
cultural trajectory 21–2, 27–8, 33
culturalism, corporate 11, 373–5
culture 28, 193, 256–7, 263–5, 267, 481–3, 487–9, 491–3
corporate 43, 111, 370, 387–8
and managerial behaviour 481–2
organizational 7, 9, 103–7, 114, 120–122, 261, 265, 267–8
in organizations 103–23
culture management 103–4, 106, 111–13, 120–121
possible return to 112–14
data 9, 67–8, 194–5, 237–43, 247, 251–2, 295–8, 430–432
management 237, 240–241, 251
processing, see DP
decentralization 85–6, 89, 335, 509
decision processes 304–5, 317
decision rules 71–3
Decision-Making Model 10, 278–9
decision-making processes 241, 452
defamiliarization 7, 120–123
delivery 211, 214, 226, 230
model 225, 230, 232
democracy 49, 98, 161–3, 165, 167–8, 360
workplace 6, 41, 45, 50, 52; see also codetermination
demographics 88, 94, 234
dependencies 11, 338, 367, 531–2
deregulation of financial markets 243–5
descriptions, thick 104, 120–121, 299
deskilling 22, 47–8
differentiation 73, 136–7, 139, 401, 509
disciplinary power 29, 51–2
disciplinary procedures 468
discretion 131
managerial 485
disparity, organizational 14, 497
disruptive innovation 344–5
distance, cultural 490–491
distribution 25, 45, 63–4, 192, 225, 241, 367, 504–5
division of labour, international 14, 503–4
doctors 51, 427–8
dominant actors 498–9, 531
domination 5, 11, 28–9, 107, 169, 368, 370, 400–401
power as 370
DP (data processing) 237, 240–242, 504
dual identities 338, 527–8
duality, institutional 510–511
ecology, organizational 1, 146
economics 245, 248, 250, 252, 293, 295–6, 439, 453–4
education 445, 451, 453
education
business 4, 32, 149, 151–2, 156, 159, 163, 389
economics 445, 451, 453
management, see management education
reform 30–33
edX 442
effective leadership 261, 277–80, 283–5
effective management 230, 277
effectiveness 4, 10, 86, 188–9, 193, 204–5, 207, 268
efficiency 23, 25, 28, 32, 205, 209, 211, 235
national 24–5, 371
EFMD (European Foundation for Management Development) 438–9
elites 22, 45, 50, 114, 167–8, 520, 523
managerial 51, 379, 403
elitist management systems 6, 45
emotions 45, 51, 105–6, 150, 280, 331–2, 370, 373
empirical objects 147, 151–2, 157
employment 47, 86, 160, 179, 184–5, 192, 318, 393–4
(p. 561) relationships 184, 186, 430
security 180–181
empowerment 115, 188, 334, 377, 509
endogeneity 301–3
end-users 210–212
engagement 13, 98, 122, 207, 347–8, 359, 454, 531
entrepreneurs 112, 265, 267, 329, 466
environmental changes 300–301, 505
environmental demands 10, 138, 294, 305, 309
environmental enactment 9, 263–4
environmental uncertainty 133–4, 136, 138, 187
equilibrium, punctuated 228, 352
ethics 5, 10, 12, 394–6, 419, 422, 426, 445; see also morality
normative 388, 396
ethnocentricity 508–9
European Foundation for Management Development (EFMD) 438–9
everyday life 115, 147, 405, 475, 482
everyday management 10, 277, 325
evidence-based management 12, 419–33
medicalizing management 429–33
paradigm shift 420–423
as profession 426–9
as science 423–6
evidence-based medicine 419, 422, 425, 427
evidence-based practice (EBP) 420–421
evolutionary model 501
execution-based project management model 9, 223
exit interviews 429–32
expansion 112, 117, 164, 184, 317, 437, 472, 475
expatriates 490–491, 513
expert knowledge 14, 500, 505
expertise 189–90, 376–8, 474–5, 519, 521–2, 524, 527, 532
specialist 356–7, 521
technical 20, 241, 389
experts 26, 153–4, 163, 357, 425, 472, 476, 521–3
external consultants 401, 523–4, 528
externalized management 523, 525
facilitation 14, 344, 356, 518–20, 523, 526
fads 7, 90, 93, 95, 99
FDI (foreign direct investment) 500, 503
feasibility 226–7
finance 31–2, 210, 237–41, 243, 245–7, 249–50, 439, 441
sociology of 9, 238, 246, 248–50, 252
financial crisis 159–60, 163–5, 239, 244, 247, 249, 344, 437
financial market technology, see FinTech
financial markets 187, 190–191, 238–9, 243–52, 352
computerization 246–7, 249
deregulation 243–5
models of financial trading 246–8
sociology of finance 9, 238, 246, 248–50, 252
financial technology 245, 248–50
financial trading 238–9, 243, 245–7, 249–50, 252
financialization 9, 186–7, 190–191, 195, 238–9, 243–5, 252, 379
FinTech (financial market technology) 245–6, 248, 252
fit approaches 308–9
followers 10, 21–2, 24, 44, 276–7, 279–83, 285, 287
and leaders 10, 276, 279–80, 283, 285, 287
force-field diagrams 466
Fordism 113, 180, 184, 187, 371–2
foreign direct investment, see FDI
foremen 327
formal structures 28, 117, 130, 151
fragmentation 293–8, 303–5, 313, 319–21, 327–9, 337, 461, 468
intellectual 10, 293, 305
freedom 49, 51, 53, 84, 98, 112, 466, 470
front-line managers 337, 507
functional managers 190, 229
functional rationality 405–6
game playing, micro-political 513–14
GCCs (Global commodity chains) 504–5, 513
gender 120, 287, 332
general managers 295, 327, 329–30
general systems theory 8, 128, 130, 132
generalizability 320, 451
Germany 4, 163–4, 166, 183, 186, 191, 193, 504
Global commodity chains, see GCCs
(p. 562) global financial crisis (GFC) 159–60, 163–5, 437
global managers, role 14, 492–3
global value chains (GVCs) 504
global work 483–4, 488
globalization 8, 180, 186–7, 190–191, 195, 319, 335, 498–9
GMAT (Graduate Management Admissions Test) 440
Google 11, 113, 346, 371, 373–4
government 50, 53, 185, 192, 213–14, 239, 243–5, 421
Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT) 440
grandiosity 114–18, 120, 463
grievances 179, 194, 370, 392–3, 468
group performance 278, 286
growth 2–4, 9, 13, 194, 238, 244–5, 307–8, 438
GVCs (global value chains) 504
habits 28, 30–31, 108–9, 167, 248, 327, 408
Harvard Business School (HBS) 4, 6, 32, 41, 43–4, 65, 396, 442
Hawthorne studies 6, 39–44, 46–7, 372
headquarters 299, 376, 489–90, 498, 500, 505, 507–9
healthcare management 419–20, 431
hegemonic ideology 6, 20–22, 33
cultural trajectory 27–8
scientific management as 21–3
hegemony 21–2, 27, 33
cultural 28
heterogeneity 65, 133–4, 430
HFT (high frequency trading) 9, 246–52
HFT strategies 247, 249–51
hierarchy 113, 130, 380, 388, 390, 423, 425–6, 522
managerial 307, 332
organizational 195, 380
high commitment models 8, 179–83, 186–7, 190–191, 193–5
high frequency trading, see HFT
historical models 6, 8, 11, 17–69
historical research 469, 471–2
Hoshin Kanri 96–9
human relations 14, 39–53, 129, 185, 277, 466, 498, 524
historical myth 45–50
infrastructure 11, 372–3
problematization of received wisdom 43–5
human resources management 7–8, 50–53, 179–82, 187–8, 190–193, 420, 519–20, 527
analytics and future 193–5
globalization and financialization 190–191
history 183–6
institutional isomorphism 186–7
national systems 191–3
normative models 180–182
and performance debate 182–3
human rights 163, 166
hybrid organizations 136
ideal types 64, 137–8, 147–8, 158, 211, 522
identity regulation 109, 111–12
identity work 14, 109–10, 513
ideologies 1–2, 14, 19–21, 109, 111, 245, 332, 421
hegemonic 6, 20–22, 27, 33
IMF (International Monetary Fund) 499–500
immersion 7, 120–121, 123
incoherence 13, 379, 462, 464, 466
India 4, 95, 189, 191, 499, 502, 505–6
industrial psychologists 27, 43, 49
industrial relations 26, 161, 192, 468, 471, 511
industrial revolution 2–3, 24, 277, 465
industrial sociology 327, 469
inequality 331, 471, 476
informal curriculum 13, 454
information 9, 194, 237–43, 245–7, 251–2, 329, 448, 492–3
processing 485, 487, 489, 491–2
systems 61, 64, 307, 314, 441
technology 9, 147, 219, 237–43, 245–6, 249, 251, 335
infrastructures 219, 252, 368, 370–371, 374
organizational 371
of power 11, 368, 370–371
taylorist 371
innovation 8–9, 145, 153, 181, 262–3, 306, 308, 320
disruptive 344–5
sustaining 262, 344–5
Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) 346–7
institutional context 190, 268, 483–4, 486, 498
institutional duality 510–511
institutional entrepreneurs 409–10
institutional environment 486, 491, 506
institutional isomorphism 8, 179, 186–7
institutional theory 12, 66, 69, 71, 139–40, 402, 408, 410
institutionalism 14, 408–9, 510, 512
integration 64, 66, 89, 136, 162, 226–7, 296–7, 304–5
management 224
theoretical 306, 319
total 84–5, 88–9
intellectual fragmentation 10, 293, 305
interconnectedness 306–8
interdependence 128–9, 133, 167, 529
pooled 133
interdependency management 233
internal consultants 519, 526
internal organization 132, 497
internal processes 139–41
internal systems 134–5, 352
international division of labour 14, 503–4
international management 14, 107, 483, 493, 497–514
global context 498–9, 505
institutionalist approaches 510–511
international division of labour and dispersal of production 503–5
motives for internationalization 501–3
offshore outsourcing 505–6
organizing MNCs 506–10
political issues and power relations within MNCs 512–13
understanding MNCs 499–501
International Monetary Fund, see IMF
internationalization 14, 501–3
motives for 501–3
internet 237–8, 245
intertemporal linkages 294, 300, 306, 308–10
interviews 46, 95–8, 119, 121, 284, 327, 330, 430–431
intra-organizational management 213
intuition 72–3, 82, 309, 319
inventory 59–60, 64, 67
investors 243–5, 301–2, 500
iron cage 12, 150, 402, 411
isomorphic pressures 189–91
isomorphism, institutional 8, 179, 186–7
IT artefacts 9, 238, 246, 249–50
Japan 4, 7, 93, 96–8, 185, 499–500, 504, 506
Japanese contexts 7, 81, 85, 96
Japanese management styles 96, 98, 104–6
Japanese manufacturing 62, 71, 201
JIT (Just-in-Time) 62, 66–7, 69
Just-in-Time, see JIT
kanbans 67
knowledge 5–6, 9–10, 152–4, 224–5, 237–43, 251, 470–472, 530–531
expert 14, 500, 505
management 235, 238, 242–52, 519
rule-of-thumb 25, 29
social 426
work 9, 33, 115, 238, 315, 522–3
workers 22, 471, 522
labour 160–162, 165, 401, 403–4, 407, 468, 499, 503–5
markets 75, 161, 192, 442
language 28, 94–5, 140, 147, 149, 257, 260–261, 264
games 8, 147–9, 154, 158, 264
lateral control 376–7
layered interpretation 104, 120–121, 123
(p. 564) leaders 10, 22, 26, 114–16, 131, 257, 261–2, 276–87
assessing, selecting, and developing 283–6
charisma 280
effective 277–8, 283–5
and followers 10, 276, 279–80, 283, 285, 287
selection 284, 287
transformational 281–2
leadership 10, 106–7, 260–261, 276–88, 347–8, 355, 438–9, 452
assessing, selecting, and developing leaders 283–6
behaviours 225, 278, 284
capacity 281–2, 285–6
contemporary theories 279–83
definitions, distinctions and early theories 276–9
development 285, 444
effective 261, 277–80, 283–5
future of management and leadership studies 286–8
organizational 167, 287
roles 261, 283, 330, 355
study of 283, 287–8
traits 277–8
transformational 106, 280–282
lean implementation 207–10
lean initiatives 188, 210
lean principles/production 8, 64, 73, 180–181, 187–8, 193, 200–201, 204–14
definition 206–8
in public services 208–13
lean thinking 204–6
learning processes 242, 300, 449
legitimacy 52, 116, 131, 265–6, 377, 379, 382, 426
social 187, 191–2, 372
liaison 328
liberalism, neo-economic 161, 165
life cycles 93, 220–221, 226, 228, 233, 510
linkages 302, 307, 313, 315
intertemporal 294, 300, 306, 308–9
LMX Theory 280, 286
McKinsey & Co 347–8, 521, 525
MAMM (management-as-medicine-motif) 12, 420, 423, 426–7, 433
management, see also Introductory Note
as academic discipline 461–77
as practice of power 367–82
management accounting 75, 194
Management by Objectives, see MbO
management consultants 11, 14, 85, 344, 348, 518, 522, 525; see also consultancy/consulting
management education 2, 4–5, 13, 90, 241–2, 251, 437–56, 526
academic literature 445–53
course demand 440–441
critiques of business schools 446–7, 450, 453
definition 438–9
financial pressures 439–40
forces for change 439–43
formative studies on 443–5
future research 449–50, 453–5
online teaching and learning 446–9
student characteristics 440
and technology 441–2
management functions 82, 130, 183, 240–241, 403
management information systems, see MIS
management of meaning 9, 11, 21, 106, 256–69
future research directions 266–7
internal and external 260–261
as managerial v organizational capability 267–8
organizational and strategic change 262
Management of Projects (MoP) 9, 223, 225–7, 230; see also project management
management power 368, 374, 381
management practice 7, 10–11, 13–14, 81–2, 85, 91, 325–40, 467–8
ethnographic stream 331–4
functionalist stream 326–31
gender 332
management as work practice 330–331
managerial identity 334
middle management behaviour 331
morality of management 333–4
(p. 565) nature of managerial work 328–9
networking 328, 333, 356
rationality of work fragmentation 329–30
recent research 334–40
research 326–40
in small companies and in public health care 337–8
stability and change 335–7
theses of managerial work 338–40
unofficial aspects of managerial work 331–2
variation in managerial work 327–8
management theory 53, 75, 98, 105, 195, 202–3, 461, 464
management-as-medicine-motif, see MAMM
managerial behaviour 10, 284, 325–6, 481–93
and context of global work 483–4
cultural and institutional context 483, 486
and culture 481–2
dynamic nature of context 487–9
organizational context 486
physical setting 487
situational context 486–7
socio-dynamics 487
and structural position 487, 490–491
theoretical implications and future research agenda 489–92
managerial capitalism 388, 466
managerial hierarchy 307, 332
managerial identity 334
managerial work 115, 327–40, 452
theses of 338–40
unofficial aspects 331–2
variation in 327–8
managerialism 149, 332, 391, 528
managerialization 462, 468, 475–6
manipulation 11, 28, 169, 245, 344, 368
power as 369
manufacturing 60, 62–6, 94–5, 149, 184, 200, 213, 379–80
strategy 62–3, 66–7, 73
marketing 5, 25, 30, 66–7, 75, 240–241, 439, 441
material properties 249–50, 252
Materials Requirements Planning, see MRP
mathematical models 59–60, 74
matrix structures 145, 229
MBAs (Master’s degree in Business Administration) 4–5, 237, 241, 437–8, 440, 442, 452–4, 521–2
students 50, 201–2, 446
MbO (Management by Objectives) 7, 81–99
American view 85–92
Japanese view 96–9
outcome 85–99
setting of objectives 82–4
total integration 84–5
UK view 92–6
meaning
concept 257–60
construction/creation 259, 269, 488–9
shared 107, 118, 159, 260–261, 264, 386, 514
meaning-making 103, 105, 107, 123, 257–67, 492
mechanistic bureaucracy 392
medicalization 12–13, 429–33
medicine 5, 12, 344, 422–8, 433, 474
evidence-based 419, 422, 425, 427
mental revolution 20, 27, 31, 51
mergers 63, 191, 297, 301, 306, 310, 313
metaethics 388, 396
metaphors 108, 128, 344, 412, 469
root 103–5, 122
micro-political game playing 513–14
middle management 90, 331
middle managers 310, 331, 334–5, 337, 344, 507, 524
MIS (management information systems) 9, 61, 237–52
and financialization 243
mismanagement 223, 358
misrepresentation, strategic 231–2
Mitbestimmung 163
MNCs (multinational corporations) 14, 497–514, 524
home and host country embeddedness 510–511
organization 506–10
political issues and power relations within 512–13
understanding 499–501
(p. 566) models 7–12, 59–61, 182–3, 189–90, 207, 246–9, 346–7, 419–20
contingency 348–50
delivery 225, 230, 232
high commitment 8, 179–83, 186–7, 190–191, 193, 195
mathematical 59–60, 74
normative 180–182, 188–9
Ulrich 187, 189–90
modern organizations 154, 219, 229, 234, 402, 406, 462
Modernity 12, 154, 400–413, 469
institutions and managers 408–11
management in pursuit of progress 402–4
reassessment of management in postmodern world 404–8
reflexive 411–13
MOOCs 442, 448
moral infrastructure 371
moral silence 388, 394
morality 12, 121, 168, 333, 386–97, 412, 453
corporate 393–4
of management 333–4
organizational 391, 395
morals 12, 28, 386–8, 391, 394–7, 470
business 386–8, 391
corporate 12, 386–97
motivation 50, 277, 280–281, 286, 373, 449
MRP (Materials Requirements Planning) 7, 61–3, 66, 74
multinational corporations, see MNCs
multiple stakeholders 266, 301–2, 318, 320
myths 104, 119, 154, 261, 265, 406–7
Nasdaq 246–7
national efficiency 24–5, 371
natural order 50, 403–4
Nazism 407–8
neo-bureaucracies 11, 375–7, 526–8
neo-economic liberalism 161, 165
neo-normative control 7, 50, 112–14, 374
Netherlands 192–3, 500
networking 328, 333, 356
networks 11, 248, 250, 258, 330, 332, 338, 504
new bureaucracies 375–8
new technologies 234, 240, 242, 335, 337, 343–4, 380–381, 449–50
normative control 112, 114, 120
normative models 180–182, 188–9
norms 28, 30, 191–3, 234, 265, 267, 408–9, 486
n-step recipes 346
objectives 1, 7, 81–91, 93–5, 97, 99, 146–7, 429; see also MbO
organizational 81, 338, 379
objects
empirical 147, 151–2, 157
legitimate 150, 475
one best way 24, 134, 136, 139, 404
online teaching and learning 446–9
open systems 127, 131, 134–8, 140
theory/models 7–8, 127, 132–3, 139–40, 444–5
operational processes 46, 206, 301
operations management 7–8, 57–75, 200–214, 423
definition 57–8
emergence 59–61
incidencen of terms 58
public services 204–6, 213
relation between theory and practice 69–71
research publication profile 201–4
rise of theory 68
operations research 22, 58, 60, 71, 83, 88
operative work 117–18
optimism bias 9, 154, 230–232
organization charts 130, 166, 390
organization studies 49, 105, 148, 151, 156, 158, 421
organization theory (OT) 103, 127–41, 147, 167
organizational activities 9, 107, 243, 263, 266, 335, 368
organizational analysis 105, 109, 112, 137
organizational behaviour 23, 40, 50, 53, 239, 358, 413, 438–9
organizational boundaries 14, 256, 267, 509, 530, 532
organizational capability 267–8, 356, 359
organizational change 11, 107, 135, 343, 346, 350, 352, 359–60
(p. 567) organizational context 28, 311, 320, 344, 391, 413, 482–6, 490
organizational culture 7, 9, 103–4, 106–7, 114, 120–122, 261, 267–8
culture toolkit and identity formation 108–11
fall 105–7
possible return 107–8
rise 104–5
and societal culture 268–9
organizational design 127, 130, 134, 136–9, 155, 189, 469
organizational ecology 1, 146
organizational forms 22, 131, 138, 148, 368, 370, 374, 392
organizational goals 39, 52, 131, 181, 220, 389
organizational life 103–5, 107, 110, 122–3, 195, 250, 258, 264
organizational objectives 81, 338, 379
organizational politics 332, 367
organizational power 352, 370, 373, 380
organizational researchers 157, 230, 268
organizational strategies 182, 220, 257, 262, 393, 467
organizational systems 22, 128–9, 140, 226
organizations
bureaucratic 137, 158, 523–4
contemporary 11, 110, 118, 120, 151, 370, 375, 382
international 498, 504, 512
modern 154, 219, 229, 234, 402, 406, 462
studying culture in 103–23
organizing principles 1, 22, 149, 158, 166, 168
outputs 30, 45, 132–3, 219, 371, 444–5, 465
outsourcing, offshore 505–6
owner-managers 334, 337
paradigm shifts 6, 345, 391, 419–20, 502
participation 51–3, 92, 158–66, 340, 344, 348–9, 379
path dependence 8, 11, 179, 183, 313, 360
perceptions 28, 86, 264–5, 283, 285, 343, 351, 370
performance 82–6, 179–80, 194–5, 280–282, 307–8, 312–13, 317–18, 346–7
expectations 301–2, 307, 310
goals 92, 302, 353
group 278, 286
management 129, 181, 194, 202, 354, 360
and strategic management 301–3
performativity 33, 149, 248, 250
personnel function 180, 184–6
personnel management, see human resources management
philosophy 20–21, 23, 25–7, 40, 86–7, 153, 156–8, 161
planning 7, 24–6, 30–31, 62, 129, 224–5, 230, 304
fallacy 231–2
processes 231, 304
strategic 71, 304, 306
pooled interdependence 133
population ecology 139–40
positivism 13, 422–5, 433
post-bureaucracies 10, 146, 151, 335, 368, 375
post-crisis change management 11, 360
post-disciplinarity 13, 463, 468–74
power 11, 155, 160–162, 167–9, 229–30, 276–7, 470–472, 511–13
central v peripheral 375–80
as coercion 369
consent and resistance in new bureaucracies 377–8
dimensions of 11, 369–70
as domination 370
elite 389, 392
future developments 380–381
inequities 160–161
infrastructures of 11, 368, 370–371
management as practice of 367–82
as manipulation 369
organizational 352, 370, 373, 380
relationships 276, 338, 367, 369, 375
servants of 49, 51
as subjectification 370
theories of 369–70
prejudices 8, 28, 71, 146–7, 473
problematization 7, 120–123, 157
(p. 568) problem-solving 6, 206, 209, 452, 455
process improvements 188, 210, 234
process issues 10, 294, 312, 320
process mapping 207, 209
process theories 305, 321, 350, 352, 358
processual perspectives 11, 350–352, 354, 358, 360
procurement 226–7
procurement management 225
product markets 192, 306–7
production, see also manufacturing
management 58–63
planning 61, 66
processes 23, 49, 60, 75, 83, 264, 504
productivity 41–2, 52, 65, 83, 180, 187–8, 277, 285
profit accumulation 48–9
profitability 50, 302, 308, 318
project delivery 221, 226–7, 230–231
project life cycles 221, 223, 228–9, 234
project management 9, 118, 219–35, 356, 519, 522, 528, 531
body of knowledge 224–5
challenges 227–9
managers of multiple projects 232–3
paradigm 225–7
planning and optimism bias 230–232
responsibility and authority 229–30
skills 9, 222, 530
virtual project teams 9, 233–4
project success 223, 229, 234
project teams 220, 222, 225, 228–9, 233–4, 314, 393, 530
project-based work 9, 219–20, 222, 235
projects 119, 155, 219–34, 314, 316–17, 518–19, 529, 531–2
life cycles 93, 220–221, 226, 228, 233, 510
ubiquity 219–24
psychology 40, 50, 53, 277–8, 293, 296, 424, 426
public sector 90, 92, 94, 164, 187, 200, 203–5, 213
public services 8, 200–201, 203–8, 210–214, 466
fitness for purpose of lean principles 212–13
implementation of lean principles 208–12
operations management 204–6, 213
punctuated equilibrium 228, 352
QESs (quasi-experimental studies) 429, 431
quality 62, 205–6, 220, 226–7, 280, 316–17, 430, 443–4
management 62, 96, 200, 225
revolution 62
standards 315–16
quasi-experimental studies, see QESs
randomized controlled trials (RCTs) 422, 429–31
rapid improvement events, see RIEs
rational actors 409–10
rationality, functional 405–6
rationalization 24, 116, 152, 401–2, 406–7
RCTs (randomized controlled trials) 422, 429–31
realism 423–4
recession 205, 358–9
recipes 116, 165, 346, 348–9, 351, 358–9
reductionism 13, 425–7, 429, 432–3
regiocentricity 509
reification 147, 149–50, 153–6
reliability 115, 234, 284–5
reorganization 31, 343, 525
reputation 41, 257, 266–8, 300, 345, 393, 445
research agendas 158, 256, 266, 320, 358–60, 489
research approaches 202, 313, 332
research designs 296–8, 303, 320
resource holders 257, 264–5
resource-based view (RBV) 63, 68–9, 314, 505
responsibility 3, 53, 224–5, 227–30, 233–4, 375–6, 378–9, 407
responsiveness, local 507, 509
RIEs (rapid improvement events) 208–9
right to manage 48–9
rights 49, 51, 118, 163, 165–6, 168, 419
rigidity 106, 402–3
risk 223, 225–7, 244, 356, 358, 411, 506, 508
management 225
risk ratios (RR) 430
role models 14, 281, 348, 354, 519, 527
RR (risk ratios) 430
rule-of-thumb knowledge 25, 29
rules 130–131, 192, 335, 372, 379–80, 408–9, 411, 486
managerial 380, 404
rules-in-use 388, 394
samples, large 298–9, 302, 310, 327
scheduled meetings 336–8
schedules 220–221, 339, 468
science of management 7, 59, 71, 74, 461
scientific management 19–33, 41, 44, 180, 183–4, 188, 403–4, 524–5
cultural trajectory of a hegemonic ideology 27–8
educational reform 30–33
as hegemonic ideology 21–3
loci of diffusion 29–33
methods and principles 25–7
philosophy 23–5
workplace reform 29–30
scope management 224
self-control 7, 81–99
self-efficacy 449, 453
self-esteem 114–15
self-fulfilment 52–3
self-management 53, 356
self-presentation 103–4
self-understanding 400
senior management 208, 224, 354, 508
senior managers 116, 119, 240, 518, 529
sensegiving 258, 262
sensemaking 107, 258, 261, 263, 484
servants of power 49, 51
service delivery 191–2, 195, 209
service delivery processes 209, 498, 504
service management 66, 204, 214
service processes 65–6, 208, 211, 213
service quality 104, 204
service users 205, 207–8, 210–212
shared meanings 107, 118, 159, 260–261, 264, 386, 514
shared understandings 295, 386, 397
shareholder value 160, 395
shareholders 187, 189, 191, 243, 318, 338, 390, 450–451
single-project managers 233
situated cognitions 484–6
perspective of 13, 481, 483, 493