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date: 18 June 2019

(p. xix) Notes on Contributors

(p. xix) Notes on Contributors

Nicholas Allen is Director of the Willson Center and Franklin Professor of English at the University of Georgia. He is the author of George Russell (Æ) and the New Ireland, 1905–30 (Four Courts Press, 2003) and Modernism, Ireland and Civil War (Cambridge University Press, 2009).



Lauren Arrington is Senior Lecturer at the Institute of Irish Studies, University of Liverpool. She is the author of W. B. Yeats, the Abbey Theatre, Censorship, and the Irish State: Adding the Half-Pence to the Pence (Oxford University Press, 2010) and Revolutionary Lives: Constance and Casimir Markievicz (Princeton University Press, 2016).



Julie Bates is Teaching Fellow at the School of English, Trinity College Dublin, where she completed her PhD. Her book, Beckett’s Art of Salvage, will be published in 2016 by Cambridge University Press.



Terence Brown is Fellow Emeritus of Trinity College Dublin, where he was formerly Professor of Anglo-Irish Literature. Among his many books are The Life of W. B. Yeats: A Critical Biography (Blackwell, 1999), Ireland: a Social and Cultural History 1922–2002 (Harper Perennial, 2004), and The Irish Times: 150 Years of Influence (Bloomsbury, 2015).



Mary Burke is Associate Professor of English at the University of Connecticut, Storrs. She is the author of ‘Tinkers’: Synge and the Cultural History of the Irish Traveller (Oxford University Press, 2009).



Richard Cave is Professor Emeritus of Drama and Theatre Arts, Royal Holloway, University of London. He has published extensively on Yeats’s dance plays (many of which he has both edited and staged professionally); on O’Casey, Johnston, and the Gate Theatre; on Wilde, Lady Gregory, Ninette de Valois, Beckett, Friel, and McGuinness; and on stage design for Irish plays. He is editor (with Ben Levitas) of Irish Theatre in England (Carysfort Press, 2007).



Lisa Coen obtained her PhD. at Trinity College Dublin with a dissertation on Abbey Theatre tours in the contemporary period. She is the founding co-director of the independent publisher Tramp Press.



Adrian Frazier is Emeritus Professor of English at NUI, Galway. He is the author of Behind the Scenes: Yeats, Horniman and the Struggle for the Abbey Theatre (University of California Press, 1990), George Moore 1852–1933 (Yale University Press, 2000), and Hollywood Irish (Lilliput Press, 2011).



Nicholas Grene is Emeritus Professor of English Literature at Trinity College Dublin. His books include The Politics of Irish Drama (Cambridge University Press, 1999), Yeats’s Poetic (p. xx) Codes (Oxford University Press, 2008), and Home on the Stage: Domestic Spaces in Modern Drama (Cambridge University Press, 2014).



John P. Harrington is Professor of English and Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Fordham University. He is the author of The Irish Play on the New York Stage, 1874–1976 (University Press of Kentucky, 1997) and the editor of Irish Theater in America (Syracuse University Press, 2009).



Eamonn Jordan is Senior Lecturer in Drama Studies in the School of English, Drama and Film at University College Dublin. He is the author of Dissident Dramaturgies: Contemporary Irish Theatre (Irish Academic Press, 2010) and From Leenane to LA: The Theatre and Cinema of Martin McDonagh (Irish Academic Press, 2014).



Brad Kent is Associate Professor in the Département des littératures, Université de Laval, Québec, and programme director of the Shaw Festival’s Shaw Symposium in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Canada. He is the editor of Bernard Shaw’s Mrs Warren’s Profession (Methuen Drama, 2012) and of Bernard Shaw in Context (Cambridge University Press, 2015).



José Lanters is Professor of English and co-director of the Center for Celtic Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. She is the author of Unauthorized Versions: Irish Menippean Satire, 1919–1952 (Catholic University of America Press, 2000) and The ‘Tinkers’ in Irish Literature: Unsettled Subjects and the Construction of Difference (Irish Academic Press, 2008).



Cathy Leeney is Lecturer in Drama Studies in the School of English, Drama and Film in University College Dublin. She is the author of Irish Women Playwrights, 1900–1939 (Peter Lang, 2010) and editor (with Anna McMullan) of The Theatre of Marina Carr (Carysfort Press, 2003).



Ben Levitas is Reader in the Department of Theatre and Performance at Goldsmiths, University of London. He is the author of The Theatre of Nation: Irish Drama and Cultural Nationalism 1890–1916 (Clarendon Press, 2002) and the editor (with David Holdeman) of W. B. Yeats in Context (Cambridge University Press, 2010).



Helen Heusner Lojek is Professor Emeritus of English and formerly Associate Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Boise State University, Idaho. She is the author of Contexts for Frank McGuinness’s Drama (Catholic University of America Press, 2004) and The Spaces of Irish Drama (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011), and the editor of The Theatre of Frank McGuinness: Stages of Mutability (Carysfort Press, 2002).



Patrick Lonergan is Professor of Drama and Theatre Studies at the National University of Ireland, Galway. He is the author of Theatre and Globalisation: Irish Drama in the Celtic Tiger Era (Palgrave Macmillan, 2009), The Theatre and Films of Martin McDonagh (Methuen Drama, 2012), and Theatre and Social Media (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015).



Christina Hunt Mahony is a Research Fellow in the School of English, Trinity College Dublin, and a former director of the Graduate Center for Irish Studies at Catholic University of America, Washington, DC. She is the author of Contemporary Irish Literature: Transforming Tradition (St Martin’s Press, 1998) and the editor of Out of History: Essays on the Writings of Sebastian Barry (Carysfort Press, 2006) (p. xxi)



P. J. Mathews is a Senior Lecturer in the School of English, Drama and Film at University College Dublin. He is the author of Revival (Cork University Press, 2003), editor of the Cambridge Companion to J. M. Synge (Cambridge University Press, 2009), and co-editor (with Declan Kiberd) of Handbook of the Irish Revival (Abbey Theatre Press, 2015).



Michael McAteer is Associate Professor of English at Pázmány Péter Catholic University, Budapest. He is the author of Standish O’Grady, Æ, Yeats (Irish Academic Press, 2002) and Yeats and European Drama (Cambridge University Press, 2010).



Rónán McDonald is Professor of Modern Literature at the University of New South Wales. His books include the Cambridge Introduction to Beckett (Cambridge University Press, 2006) and The Death of the Critic (Bloomsbury, 2007), and he is the editor of The Values of Literary Studies: Critical Institutions, Scholarly Agendas (Cambridge University Press, 2015).



Victor Merriman is Professor of Critical Performance Studies at Edge Hill University, Lancashire. He is the author of Because We Are Poor: Irish Theatre in the 1990s (Carysfort Press, 2011).



James Moran is Professor of Modern English Literature and Drama at the University of Nottingham. His books include The Theatre of D. H. Lawrence (2015), Staging the Easter Rising (2005), and (as co-editor with Neal Alexander) Regional Modernisms (2013).



Chris Morash is Seamus Heaney Professor of Irish Writing at Trinity College Dublin. He is the author of A History of Irish Theatre, 1601–2000 (Cambridge University Press, 2002), A History of the Media in Ireland (Cambridge University Press, 2009), and (with Shaun Richards) Mapping Irish Theatre: Theories of Space and Place (Cambridge University Press, 2014).



Christopher Murray is Associate Professor Emeritus of Drama and Theatre History in the School of English, Drama and Film at University College Dublin. He is the author of Twentieth Century Irish Drama: Mirror up to Nation (Manchester University Press, 1997), Seán O’Casey: Writer at Work (Gill and Macmillan, 2004), and The Theatre of Brian Friel: Tradition and Modernity (Bloomsbury, 2014).



Brian Ó Conchubhair is Associate Professor of Irish Language and Literature at the University of Notre Dame and currently President of the American Conference for Irish Studies (2015–17). He is the author of Fin de Siècle na Gaeilge: Darwin, An Athbheochan agus Smaointeoireacht na hEorpa (CIC, 2009).



Mark Phelan is Lecturer in Drama at Queen’s University Belfast. He is the editor of Tim Loane, The Comedy of Terrors: Caught Red-Handed and To Be Sure (Lagan Press, 2008).



Lionel Pilkington is Personal Professor of English, National University of Ireland, Galway. He is the author of Theatre and the State in 20th Century Ireland: Cultivating the People (Routledge, 2001) and of Theatre and Ireland (Palgrave, 2010).



Ondřej Pilný is Associate Professor of English and Director of the Centre for Irish Studies at Charles University, Prague. He is the author of Irony and Identity in Modern Irish Drama (Litteraria Pragensia, 2006) and of The Grotesque in Contemporary Drama: Off Limits (Palgrave Macmillan, forthcoming 2016), and the editor (with Gerald Power) of Ireland and the Czech Lands: Contacts and Comparisons in History and Culture (Peter Lang, 2014). (p. xxii)



Emilie Pine is Lecturer in the School of English, Drama and Film in University College Dublin, Director of the Irish Memory Studies Network, and Assistant Editor of the Irish University Review. She is the author of The Politics of Irish Memory: Performing Remembrance in Contemporary Irish Culture (Palgrave Macmillan, 2010).



Paige Reynolds is a Professor in the Department of English at the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts. She is the author of Modernism, Drama, and the Audience for Irish Spectacle (Cambridge University Press, 2007), and the editor of an Eire-Ireland special issue on material culture (2011) and of Modernist Afterlives in Irish Literature and Culture (Anthem Press, forthcoming).



Shaun Richards is Professorial Research Fellow at the Centre for Irish Studies, St Mary’s University Twickenham, London. He is the author (with David Cairns) of Writing Ireland: Colonialism, Nationalism and Culture (Manchester University Press, 1988) and (with Chris Morash) of Mapping Irish Theatre: Theories of Space and Place (Cambridge University Press, 2014), and the editor of the Cambridge Companion to Twentieth-Century Irish Drama (Cambridge University Press, 2004).



Marilynn Richtarik is Professor of English at Georgia State University. She is the author of Acting Between the Lines: The Field Day Theatre Company and Irish Cultural Politics 1980-1984 (Oxford University Press, 1994) and Stewart Parker: A Life (Oxford University Press, 2012).



Anthony Roche is Professor in the School of English, Drama and Film in University College Dublin. He is the author of Brian Friel: Theatre and Politics (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011), Synge and the Making of Modern Irish Drama (Carysfort Press, 2013), and The Irish Dramatic Revival 1899–1939 (Bloomsbury, 2015).



Melissa Sihra is Assistant Professor of Drama at Trinity College Dublin. She is the editor of Women in Irish Drama: A Century of Authorship and Representation (Palgrave Macmillan, 2007) and (with Paul Murphy) of The Dreaming Body: Contemporary Irish Theatre (Gerrards Cross: Colin Smythe, 2009).



Brian Singleton is the Samuel Beckett Professor of Drama and Theatre at Trinity College Dublin and a past president of the International Federation for Theatre Research. His most recent book is Masculinities and the Contemporary Irish Theatre (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011, revised with a new preface, 2015).



Shelley Troupe, formerly a theatre administrator, teaches at Maynooth University and the National University of Ireland, Galway, where she completed her PhD on Druid’s relationship with Tom Murphy in the 1980s. She is currently writing a monograph called Druid and Murphy: Archaeology of a Relationship.



Clare Wallace is Associate Professor of English at Charles University, Prague. She is the author of Suspect Cultures: Narrative, Identity and Citation in 1990s New Drama (Litteraria Pragensia, 2006) and of The Theatre of David Greig (Bloomsbury, 2013), and the editor of Stewart Parker, Television Plays (Litteraria Pragensia, 2008).



Ian R. Walsh is Lecturer in Drama, Theatre and Performance at NUI, Galway. He is the author of Experimental Irish Theatre: After W. B. Yeats (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012) and the co-editor (with Mary Caulfield) of The Theatre of Enda Walsh (Carysfort Press, 2015). (p. xxiii)



Eibhear Walshe is Senior Lecturer in English at University College Cork. He is the author of Oscar’s Shadow: Wilde, Homosexuality and Modern Ireland (Cork University Press, 2011), A Different Story: The Fictions of Colm Tóibín (Irish Academic Press, 2013), and the novel The Diary of Mary Travers (Somerville Press, 2014).



Stephen Watt is Provost Professor at Indiana University, Bloomington. His books include Joyce, O’Casey, and the Irish Popular Theatre (Syracuse University Press, 1991), Beckett and Contemporary Irish Writing (Cambridge University Press, 2009), and ‘Something Dreadful and Grand’: American Literature and the Irish–Jewish Unconscious (Oxford University Press, 2015).



(p. xxiv)