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date: 18 June 2019

(p. xiii) List of Illustrations

(p. xiii) List of Illustrations

The editors and publishers acknowledge the following sources of copyright material and are grateful for the permissions granted. While every effort has been made, it has not always been possible to identify the sources of all material used, nor to trace all copyright holders. If any omissions are brought to our notice, we will be happy to include the appropriate acknowledgements on reprinting.

  1. 6.1 Igor Stravinsky meets Éamon de Valera, 1 June 1963. Stravinsky was in Dublin to conduct a concert of his work. Courtesy of Irish Photographic Archive. 90

  2. 6.2 Arthur Shields armed with a loy in the 1932 production of J. M. Synge’s The Playboy of the Western World at the Abbey Theatre. Courtesy of the Abbey Theatre and James Hardiman Library, NUI Galway. 95

  3. 7.1 Time’s Pocket by Frank O’Connor (Abbey Theatre, 26 December 1938). Even when designed by the innovative Tanya Moiseiwitsch, the realist country kitchen set for plays such as this could have served equally well for numerous other Abbey plays of the period. Courtesy of Abbey Theatre Archive, James Hardiman Library, NUI Galway. 119

  4. 7.2 Killycreggs in Twilight by Lennox Robinson (Abbey Theatre, 19 April 1937). Set designer Tanya Moiseiwitsch tried to give the set a stylized touch, but there was little escaping the essentially realist aesthetic of the play. Courtesy of the Abbey Theatre and James Hardiman Library, NUI Galway. 119

  5. 8.1 Edmund Dulac’s design for the Guardian of the Well in W. B. Yeats’s At the Hawk’s Well. Published in Four Plays for Dancers by W. B. Yeats (London: Macmillan, 1921). 126

  6. 8.2 Denis Johnston’s The Old Lady Says ‘No!’ showing the Speaker (Micheál Mac Liammóir), the Flower-Seller (Meriel Moore), and the Statue of Grattan (Hilton Edwards). Photo from 1934 revival. Photograph by J. J. Mooney from Bulmer Hobson (ed.), The Gate Theatre Dublin (Dublin: Gate Theatre, 1934). 132

  7. 8.3 Presentational acting and direction in Hilton Edwards’s staging of an ensemble sequence from The Old Lady Says ‘No!’ in the 1934 revival by the Gate Theatre, Dublin. Photograph by J. J. Mooney from Bulmer Hobson (ed.), The Gate Theatre Dublin (Dublin: Gate Theatre, 1934). 135

  8. 8.4 The presentational setting: four designs by Micheál Mac Liammóir for the Gate Theatre’s staging of Ibsen’s Peer Gynt at the Peacock Theatre (14 October 1928). From Bulmer Hobson (ed.), The Gate Theatre Dublin (Dublin: Gate Theatre, 1934). 136 (p. xiv)

  9. 12.1 The continuing resonance of the background to O’Casey’s Dublin Trilogy can be measured in the events commemorating the Great Lockout of 1913 a hundred years later. This detail is from the Great Dublin Lockout Tapestry, designed by Robert Ballagh and Cathy Henderson for the 1913 Committee. Courtesy of SIPTU. 186

  10. 12.2 Poster for the first production of Seán O’Casey’s Red Roses for Me, in the Olympia Theatre, Dublin, 15 March 1943. Courtesy of Irish Theatre Archive, Dublin City Libraries. 195

  11. 13.1 Tanya Moiseiwitsch’s set designs for G. B. Shaw’s A Village Wooing (30 September 1935). Courtesy of the Abbey Theatre and James Hardiman Library, NUI Galway. 212

  12. 14.1 Micheál Mac Liammóir (left) and Hilton Edwards (right) strike a pose outside the doors of the Gate Theatre, on Dublin’s Parnell Square. Courtesy of the Gate Theatre and Library Special Collections, Northwestern University. 218

  13. 14.2 Steven Berkoff’s landmark 1988 production of Salomé (designed by Robert Ballagh) indicated a new direction in the Gate’s production of Wilde’s work. Photo: Tom Lawlor. Courtesy of the Gate Theatre. 228

  14. 15.1 Barry Fitzgerald as Captain Jack Boyle in Seán O’Casey’s Juno and the Paycock (3 March 1924). Courtesy of the Abbey Theatre and James Hardiman Library, NUI Galway. 242

  15. 15.2 F. J. McCormick as Joxer Daly in Juno and the Paycock (1924). Courtesy of the Abbey Theatre and James Hardiman Library, NUI Galway. 243

  16. 15.3 Eileen Crowe as Pegeen (right) in The Playboy of the Western World in New York 1932: with Barry Fitzgerald as Michael James (centre) and Arthur Shields (left) as Christy Mahon. Courtesy of James Hardiman Library, NUI Galway. 244

  17. 16.1 Poster for Paul Mercier, Sétanta, produced by Fibín (Abbey Theatre, 28 November 2011). Courtesy of Fibín. 265

  18. 16.2 Fíbin’s Stair na gCeilteach/History of the Celts, co-produced with Improbable Films (13 and 14 September 2013), used video-mapping to project images in a quarry in Camus, Connemara. Photo: Seán T. Ó Meallaigh. Courtesy of Fibín. 266

  19. 16.3 Poster for Gearóid Ó Cairealláin’s The Wheelchair Monologues, produced by Aisling Ghéar theatre company (7 March 2013). Courtesy of Aisling Ghéar. 267

  20. 18.1 Anna Manahan and Pat Nolan in The Rose Tattoo, Pike Theatre (12 May 1957). Photo: Derrick Michelson. Courtesy of Trinity College Dublin. 295

  21. 18.2 When Alan Simpson was arrested over the Pike Theatre’s production of The Rose Tattoo in 1957, the case provoked widespread public interest in Dublin, making headlines in newspapers across the city. Courtesy of Trinity College Dublin. 298

  22. 21.1 Donal McCann and Aideen O’Kelly as Brien and Elmina in Tea and Sex and Shakespeare (Abbey Theatre, 6 October 1976). Photo: Fergus Bourke. Courtesy of the Abbey Theatre and James Hardiman Library, NUI Galway. 346 (p. xv)

  23. 21.2 Scene from Talbot’s Box, with Stephen Brennan, John Molloy, Clive Geraghty, Ingrid Craigie, and Eileen Colgan (Abbey Theatre, 13 October 1977). Courtesy of the Abbey Theatre and James Hardiman Library, NUI Galway. 349

  24. 23.1 Still from The Far Side of Revenge (2012), film-maker Margo Harkin’s documentary tracing Teya Sepinuck’s ‘Theatre of Witness’ project (2012–14). Courtesy of Margo Harkin and Besom Productions. 383

  25. 25.1 Detail from Druid’s programme for the Galway première of Tom Murphy’s Bailegangaire (5 December 1985). Courtesy of Druid Theatre Company and James Hardiman Library, NUI Galway. 412

  26. 25.2 Flyer announcing Druid’s production of Tom Murphy’s Bailegangaire at London’s Donmar Warehouse (17 February 1986). Courtesy of Druid Theatre Company and James Hardiman Library, NUI Galway. 413

  27. 25.3 Flyer announcing Druid’s production of Tom Murphy’s Bailegangaire at Dublin’s Gaiety Theatre (12 May 1986). Photo: Amelia Stein. Courtesy of Druid Theatre Company and James Hardiman Library, NUI Galway. 414

  28. 25.4 Main promotional graphic for DruidMurphy, Irish tour 2013. Courtesy of Druid Theatre Company. 420

  29. 25.5 Brian Doherty as John Connor and the cast of Famine, performed as the concluding play in DruidMurphy (25 May 2012). Photo: Catherine Ashmore. Courtesy of Druid Theatre Company. 421

  30. 26.1 Interior of the 1904 Abbey Theatre, converted by Joseph Holloway from an early theatre, the Mechanics’ Institute. Digital reconstruction courtesy of Hugh Denard: http://blog.oldabbeytheatre.net/ 431

  31. 26.2 Noel Moffett’s original plans for the open-air theatre on Achill Island, 1941. Note specifications for materials found on the site: ‘grass sods on turf’, ‘sand on stone’, and gorse hedging to create an al fresco green room. Courtesy of Irish Architectural Archive. 433

  32. 26.3 Photograph of Noel Moffett’s open-air Achill Theatre, 1941. The house of Dermot Freyer, who sponsored the project, is visible in the background. Courtesy of Irish Architectural Archive. 434

  33. 26.4 The spectacularly curving auditorium of Robin Walker’s Cork Opera House (1965). Courtesy of Simon Walker. 437

  34. 26.5 J. Neil Downes’s never-realized plans for a new Lyric Theatre, on the Ridgeway Street site in Belfast (May 1967). Note the division of the auditorium, with a runway-like acting area between the two parts of the house. Courtesy of James Hardiman Library, NUI Galway. 438

  35. 26.6 Plans (never realized) for a new Abbey Theatre from 1994, drawn up by McCulloch–Mulvin Architects. The design placed an auditorium that echoed the 1904 Abbey in a contemporary shell. Courtesy McCulloch–Mulvin Architects and the Irish Architectural Archive. 440

  36. 27.1 Bronwen Casson, set and costume design for The Sanctuary Lamp by Tom Murphy (7 October 1975). Photo: Fergus Bourke. Courtesy of the Abbey Theatre and James Hardiman Library, NUI Galway. 450 (p. xvi)

  37. 27.2 Frank Conway, design for Shibari by Garry Duggan (Peacock, 4 October 2012). Courtesy of Frank Conway. 451

  38. 27.3 Robert Ballagh, model for design of The Importance of Being Earnest (Gate Theatre, 23 July 1987). Photo: Tom Lawlor. Courtesy of the Gate Theatre. 455

  39. 28.1 Cyril Cusack in Dion Boucicault’s The Shaughraun (Abbey Theatre, 31 January 1967). Courtesy of the Abbey Theatre and National Library of Ireland. 461

  40. 28.2 Siobhán McKenna as the Maid in G. B. Shaw’s Saint Joan (Gate Theatre, 18 November 1954). Photo: Cecil Beaton. Courtesy of the Cecil Beaton Studio Archive at Sotheby’s. 467

  41. 28.3 Donal McCann as Frank Hardy in the Abbey production of Brian Friel’s Faith Healer (Abbey Theatre, 28 August 1980; the play premièred in New York in 1979). Photo: Fergus Bourke. Courtesy of the Abbey Theatre. 471

  42. 28.4 Donal McCann as Captain Boyle in Seán O’Casey’s Juno and the Paycock (Gate Theatre, 15 July 1986). Photo: Tom Lawlor. Courtesy of the Gate Theatre. 472

  43. 28.5 Marie Mullen as Mary and Siobhán McKenna as Mommo in Tom Murphy’s Bailegangaire (Druid, 15 December 1985). Photo: Amelia Stein. 474

  44. 28.6 Marie Mullen as Mary in J. M. Synge’s The Tinker’s Wedding, DruidSynge (29 June 2005). Photo: Keith Pattison. Courtesy of Druid Theatre Company. 476

  45. 29.1 Michael Colgan standing in front of the billboard for the Beckett Festival, 1991. Photo: Tom Lawlor. Courtesy of the Gate Theatre. 487

  46. 29.2 Telecom Éireann advertisement, the Beckett Festival, the Gate Theatre, 1–20 October 1990; festival programme, edited by Mary Dowey (Dublin: Gate Theatre, 1990). Courtesy of Eircom. 488

  47. 29.3 Maureen Potter in Rockaby by Samuel Beckett at the Beckett Festival, the Gate Theatre, 1–20 October 1990. Photo: Tom Lawlor. Courtesy of the Gate Theatre. 490

  48. 29.4 Publicity photograph of Barry McGovern as Vladimir in Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett; Beckett Festival, the Gate Theatre, 1–20 October 1990. Photo: Tom Lawlor. Courtesy of the Gate Theatre. 491

  49. 30.1 Rosaleen Linehan as Maela in Frank McGuinness, Carthaginians (Abbey Theatre, 26 September 1988). Courtesy of the Abbey Theatre and James Hardiman Library, NUI Galway. 502

  50. 31.1 Bríd Brennan, Catherine Byrne, Bríd Ní Neachtain, and Frances Tomelty in a scene from Dancing at Lughnasa (Abbey Theatre, 24 April 1990). Courtesy of the Abbey Theatre and James Hardiman Library, NUI Galway. 516

  51. 34.1 Sorcha Kenny in ANU Productions, Laundry (25 September 2011). Photo: Pat Redmond. Courtesy of ANU Productions. 572

  52. 35.1 Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett, directed by Christopher McElroen (Artistic Director, Paul Chan) (Gentilly, New Orleans, 9 November 2007). From left to right: T. Ryder Smith as Pozzo, J. Kyle Manzay as Estragon, Wendell Pierce as Vladimir, and Mark McLaughlin as Lucky. Photo: Frank Aymami. Courtesy of Frank Aymami Photography. 589 (p. xvii)

  53. 36.1 Seán McGinley and Stephen Rea in Ages of the Moon, by Sam Shepard. Directed by Jimmy Fay (Atlantic Theater Company at the Linda Gross Theater, New York, 27 October 2010). Photo: Ari Mintz. Courtesy of the Atlantic Theater Company. 604

  54. 37.1 Jamie Vartan, model set design, Misterman by Enda Walsh (Lyttleton Theatre, 18 April 2012). Courtesy of the set and costume designer Jamie Vartan. 612

  55. 39.1 Poster for 1953 An Tóstal Festival pageant. Courtesy of James Hardiman Library, NUI Galway. 642

  56. 39.2 Poster for 1956 An Tóstal festival pageant. Courtesy of James Hardiman Library, NUI Galway. 643

  57. 40.1 Janet McTeer as Nora in Frank McGuiness’s version of Ibsen’s A Doll’s House (Playhouse Theatre, London 1996). Courtesy of Victoria and Albert Museum. 661

  58. 40.2 Thomas Kilroy’s version of Chekhov’s The Seagull, directed by Max Stafford-Clark (Royal Court Theatre, 8 April 1981). Courtesy of Victoria and Albert Museum. 663

(p. xviii)