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date: 24 July 2019

(p. 539) Index

(p. 539) Index

Note: Tables and figures are indicated by an italic t and f following the page number.

Aarts, J 365
Abbott, A 29, 188, 189–90, 191–2
Abbott, P A 360
Abramson, E L 366
absorptive capacity, and organizational change 63–4
Academic Health Science Networks (AHSNs) 279
Accenture Health 525, 528, 530
accountability 16–17, 19, 63, 481–2, 492–3
accountability deficit 379
accountability regimes 481, 489, 493
administrative accountability 485, 486t, 490
changes in 490–2
components of 377–8
concepts for health care 482–5, 486–7t
constitutional function of 487–8
context for structures of 482
democratic function of 488
diagonal accountability 489
direction of 488–9
formal/informal 482
functions of 487–8
horizontal accountability 488–9, 491
information asymmetry 483–4
judicial accountability 485–7t, 491
market accountability 485, 487t, 491
monitoring and sanctioning 491–2
new public management 378–9
new structures of 484–5
performance function of 488
performance measurement 378–9, 387, 488
political accountability 485, 486t
professional accountability 485, 486t, 491
public accountability 485, 486t
public-private partnerships 470
relationships between actors 482
from responsibility to accountability 482–3
selection and trust-based 482, 484
social accountability 491
top down/bottom up approaches to 493
vertical accountability 488
Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) (USA) 46–7, 49, 54–5, 61, 64
sub-types 60
Accountable Communities for Health (ACHs) (USA) 49, 56–7
Ackroyd, S 520
actor-network theory (ANT) 365
addiction treatment clinics 27–8
Affordable Care Act (2010) (USA) 46–7, 48, 49
Agarwal, R 353, 363
Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality (AHRQ) 146
Agich, G J 171
Agnew, J 418
Akron (Ohio, USA) 57
Aldrich, R 123
Alexander, J A 27
Alford, R R 4
Allen, D 195
alliance contracts 58–9
allied health professionals (AHPs) 193, 196
Allsop, J 196
Alvesson, M 94, 97, 98
Amburgey, T L 27
American Society of Bioethics and Humanities 177
(p. 540) Andresani, G 72
Angell, M 502, 503, 508
Annandale, E 189
appointed state 74–5
Aristotle 281
Arnold, R M 170
articulation theory 191
Ash, J S 362
Aucoin, P 531
Aulisio, M P 170
Australia 47
primary care organizations 53
public-private partnerships 461
Australian Productivity Commission 382–3
Avorn, J 502–3, 506, 508
Baines, S 366
Baritz, L 118
Barley, S 102
Barton, D 505
Bartunek, J 262, 272
Bate, S P 110, 260
Bath, P A 352
Battilana, J 33, 34
Beck, C T 155
Becker, H S 189
Beersma, B 237
Behn, R D 380, 382, 385, 386
Beil-Hilderbrand, M 127
Bejerot, E 406
Bennett, D 529
Benoit, C 190
Berg, M 362, 365
Berwick, D M 81, 142
Berwick Report (2013) 255
Best, A 285, 288
Better Care Fund (England) 47
Bevan, G 384, 401
Beyleveld, D 168–9
biomedical model of medicine 386
biotechnology sector 19
Bishop, S 127, 462, 472, 473
Black, A D 357
Blair, T 529
Blomgren, M 396, 397
Blumenthal, D 122
Bohmer, R M 216–17, 264
Boren, S A 144, 145
Borum, F 27
Boselie, P 117–18
boundaries, professional
Bourgeault, I 190, 193
Bours, G J J W 195
Bovens, M 378, 387, 483, 489
Bower, P 143
Braithwaite, J 337–8, 339
Brinkerhoff, D W & J M 461–2
Brock, D 191
Bromley, E 154, 158
Brotherton, C 261–2
Brown, L 262
Brown, T 423
Brownsword, R 168–9
Bruner, J S 315
Bryson, J M 220
Buchanan, D A 220–1
Buntin, M B 353
Burawoy, M 118, 120–1, 123, 124, 125, 131
business process re-engineering (BPR) 3
Buttigieg, S C 233
Byrkjeflot, H 85
Cambridge Health Network 529
Canada 47, 83
family medical groups 52–3, 57
integrated care organizations 57
public-private partnerships 461
Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement 279
Canadian Institutes of Health Research 279
Canback, S 521
cancer networks (England) 63
Car, J 353
care networks 446–8t
Care Quality Commission (CQC) (England) 377
Care UK 469
caring, and patient-centered care (PCC) 155, 157–8, 159
Carter, A J 232
(p. 541) Carter, N 380, 383, 384
Casciaro, T 33
Casey, D 238
Castel, P 34
Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) 145, 146
centralization, and concentration of care 423–5
CHAIN (Contact, Help, Advice and Information Network) (NHS) 270
Chandler, L 271
Chang, L-C 402
Child, J 111
Cho, S 365
Chochinov, H M 155
Chreim, S 36, 220, 221–2
Circle Partnership 468
Clarke, J 123, 126, 334
Clegg, S 118, 120
Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) (England) 46, 49, 51–2, 64, 444, 525
clinical communication 303, 308–9
clinical ethics support services (CESS) 12, 164–5, 180–1
authoritarian approach 170
case consultation 170
categories of 168–9
committee model 171
concerns over 176, 177
conflicting goals 169
Core Competencies 177–8
critics of ethics expertise 178–9
diversity of 174
educational function 169
ethics facilitation 170
ethics team model 171–2
evaluation of 173–6, 179–80
failure to thrive 176
functions of 169–71
goals of 168–9
hub and spoke model 173
individual ethicist model 171
institutionalization of 178
IntegratedEthics approach 172–3
interaction with clinicians 174–5
optimizing quality of 177–80
origins of 165–8
patient involvement 176
policy development function 169
professionalization 178
pure facilitation approach 170
standards of practice 177–8
systems approach 170–1
utilization by clinicians 175–6
clinical governance 79
clinical guidelines 31
clinical managers (CMs) 198–200, 201–2
patient safety and quality 334–5
clinical networks, and patient safety and quality 340–1
clinical practice, and situated learning 261–2
closure theory 189
Cochrane Effective Practice and Organization of Care (EPOC) group 294
Cochrane Reviews 2
Cockerham, W C 189
Coiera, E 362
Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC) 279
collective goods, health care's provision of 496
collective leadership
College of Paramedics 35
Collier, P M 386
Commissioning Support Units 525
communities of practice 14, 255–6, 258, 259, 273
adoption by health care sector 259–60
barriers to 260
definition 258
differences from teams/networks 258
diversity of initiatives 260
as emergent phenomena 265
establishment of 266
factors inhibiting success of 270–1
implementation of innovation 263–4
(p. 542)
individual factors affecting 271–2
knowledge sharing 258
learning culture 273
as managerial tool 265–7
mandated communities of practice 265–7
multi-disciplinary collaboration 260
nature of 258
patient safety and quality 340–1
power relations 272–3
professional development 263
setting goals and deliverables 267
structural factors affecting 271
support and integration of novices 262
sustainability of 266–7
translating knowledge into practice 264–5
trust 271
value of 267
virtual/online communities of practice 267–70
compassion
components of 240
patient-centered care 156–9
team working 242
Competing Values Framework (CVF) 107
complex adaptive systems (CADs) 339, 360–1
complex case managers 60
complexity theory 222
computerized clinical decision support (CDSS) system 357, 364
computerized documentation system (CDS) 363–4
computerized provider order entry (CPOE) system 357, 362
concentration of hospital care 423–5
Confederation of British Industry (CBI) 471
conflict theory 189
Conger, J A 214
congested state 74–5
Connecting for Health (NHS) 529, 530–1
Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research 289
constructivism 281
Consultancy One (UK) 532
Consultancy.uk 524
Contandriopoulos, D 288, 293
contract research organizations (CROs) 500–1
contractual mechanisms and organizational forms
alliance contracts 58–9
prime contractors 59–60
coordination of care, and health care networks 434
co-payment mechanisms 81, 82
co-production 18
Corbett, A 337
corporate communication 303, 311–12
health care marketing 311
management communication 311
public relations communication 311–12
reputation management 312, 314–15
corporatization 190
Craig, D 527–8, 529
Cresswell, K 365–6
Cresswell, T 417, 418, 425
critical discourse analysis 126–7
critical health care management (CHMS) 118, 131–3
beyond instrumentalism and performative intent 128
building from critical management studies 124–5
challenging structures of domination 130–1
communicating findings of 133
as distinctive domain of health care management 120–4
impact on health care management research 120
qualitative research 129
questioning the taken-for-granted 125–7
reconstructive-reflexivity approach 133
reflexivity 128–9
research output 119–20
critical management studies (CMS) 11, 124–5
challenging structures of domination 129–30
instrumentalism 128
performativity 128
power relations 125
qualitative research 129
questioning the taken-for-granted 125–7
reflexivity 128
(p. 543) Critical Management Studies Conference 118, 120
critical theory 6
Croft, C 199
Crompton, R 189, 190
Crosby, B C 220
Crown Commercial Services (CCS) 531–2
cultural change 3, 11, 113–14
barriers to 111
cultural diversity 112–13
factors enabling 109
first and second order change 109
hospital mergers 113
issues to be addressed by 110–11
management of 111–12f, 113
models of 109–10
narrative analysis of health policy reform 76–7
partnership working 112–13
possibility of 108
Currie, G 35, 36, 73, 85, 119, 126, 195–6, 199, 462, 472, 473
Cutler, T 375, 379
Czarniawska, B 316
Dansky, K H 357
Dany, F 118, 120
Dar, S 129
Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice 326
D'Aunno, T 27–8, 211
Davesne, A 82
David, R 521
Davies, H 97, 107, 291
Davies, S 129
Davis, J P 227
Davis, W 180
Dawson, J F 232, 233
Day, P 383, 384
De Coning, J 96
De George, R 505, 506–7
De Laat, M 267
Deal, T E 109
decision-making, challenges of 210
Delbridge, R 118, 121, 124, 125, 130, 131, 132, 133
Deloitte 525
Denis, J-L 210, 212, 213
Denmark 84
Department of Health (England) 377
Equity and Excellence (2010) 467
NHS Plan (2001) 466
Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) (USA) 172
de-professionalization 5, 30, 189, 190
developing countries
e-health 354
public-private partnerships 464
Devinney, T 519
Dewar, B 151
Dickinson, H 126
differentiation 50
organizational culture 101
DiMaggio, P 33
discourse and organization 313
communication as institutionalized organizational ideals 314–15
communication as organizing technologies 317–19
management of meaning 315–17
disruptive behavior, and patient safety and quality 336
Dixon-Woods, M 128, 331
Donabedian, A 17, 328, 407
Donaldson, L 331, 334
Doolin, B 83, 126
Doorewaard, H 365
Dopson, S 197
Doran, E 505
Dowton, S B 334
Du Gay, P 85
Dunn, M B 31
Eason, K 367
Edmondson, A C 216–17, 233, 247, 264
Egan, T 261, 262
e-health 16
complex adaptive systems 360–1
computerized clinical decision support system 357, 364
computerized documentation system 363–4
(p. 544)
computerized provider order entry system 357, 362
consumer-oriented tools 358–9
definition 352
developing countries 354
drivers of 354
electronic health records 61, 129, 306–7, 357–8
electronic medical records 356–7, 362
e-prescribing 357
expectations of 354
implementation as complex and emergent process 360–2
implementation of 353, 360, 367–8
information management and use 355–6
large-scale investment in 353
large-scale vs local implementation 366–7
limited impact of 353, 360
multi-level conceptualization of 355–6
Normalization Process Theory 364
optimism about 353
patient safety and quality 354
personal health records 359–60
picture archiving and communication systems 356–7
potential benefits 367
re-placement of care 421–3
socio-technical approach to implementation 364–6
telecare 422
unintended consequences of implementation of 362–3
as Utopian technology 421
work required in implementation of 363–4
Eisenhardt, K M 227
electronic health records (EHRs) 61, 129, 306–7, 357–8
patient-centered care 151
electronic medical records (EMRs) 356–7, 362
Elliott, C 502, 503, 507
Elshaug, A G 326
Elston, M A 189
embeddedness
professionalization 35
as resource for change 34
emergent networks 441
emotional support, and patient-centered care (PCC) 153
empathy 156
employment practices, in public-private partnerships (PPPs) 473–5
Engelhardt, H T 166–7
England
context for organizational change 47
contractual mechanisms and organizational forms 58–60
health care reform 46
marketization 81–2
norms of health care 50
organizational change in health care 49, 51–4
patient and public involvement 82–3
Enthoven, A 523
Entwistle, V A 145, 146, 154
Epstein, R M 149
Espeland, W N 403
Etzioni, A 194
European Clinical Ethics Network 168
European Commission 421
European Federation of Management Consulting Associations (FEACO) 519
European Medicines Agency (EMA) 500
European Working Hours Directive 193
evidence-based health care 77
evidence-based medicine (EBM) 77, 127, 265
health care networks 435
extra-clinical communication 303, 309–10
Ezziane, Z 335
Fafard, P 285
Falkman, G 269, 271
family involvement, and patient-centered care (PCC) 151–3
Faulkner, D 111
fee-for-service (FFS) payment system 48
feminism 130
Ferlie, E 25, 26, 27, 72, 73, 75, 76, 119–20, 190, 272, 287
Field, J E 462
(p. 545) Fincham, R 521
Finn, R 127, 195–6
Fitzgerald, L 190, 335
Flynn, R 79
Food and Drug Administration (FDA) (USA) 500, 504
Ford, J 130, 131
Forsell, A 361
Fotaki, M 131, 190
Foucault, M 189, 191, 314
Fournier, V 125, 130
Fox, A 125, 127
Fox, E 177
France 81, 82
Francis Report (2013) 94, 146, 255, 327, 377, 387
Freidson, E 4, 30, 189, 190
Friberger, M 269, 271
Friedberg, E 34
front-line workers 10
resistance to change 36
Fry, A 271
Fujitsu 530
Fung-Kee-Fung, M 266, 270
FunTheory 427
Gabe, J 80, 189, 407
Gaebler, T 72, 73, 85
gaming, of performance measurement 401–2
Gao, G 363
Garud, R 33
Gates, B 530
GE Healthcare 524
general practitioners (GPs, England)
Clinical Commissioning Groups 51–2
GP Federations 52–3
Georgiou, A 356–7
Germann, K 34, 195
Germany 81, 84
Gerowitz, M 107
Gidman, P 462
Gieryn, T F 415, 416, 417–18, 425
Gilmartin, M J 211
Gittell, J H 194
Goffman, E 4, 189
Goh, J M 363
Golden-Biddle, K 34, 195
Goodin, R E 378
Goodrick, E 32, 195, 196
Gordijn, B 179
Government Performance and Results Act (USA) 385
GP Federations (England) 49, 52–3
Graham, I D 282
Grant, S 36
Greenfield, D 335
Greenhalgh, T 128–9, 293, 356, 361, 366
Greenwood, R 28
Greve, C 462
Grey, C 118, 120, 125, 130
Griffiths Report (1983) 84, 522
Gronn, P 217, 219
Hague, W 529
Haidet, P 261
Hains, I M 356–7
Hall, T 481
Hamilton, A 217
Hammerschmid, G 384–5
Hanlon, N T 423
Harber, B 481
Harding, N 119
Hardy, C 33
Harnessing Implementation 333, 334
Harrington, C 130
Harrison, S 79, 189, 386–7
Hasselbladh, H 406
Heald, D 394–5
Health and Social Care Act (2011) (England) 46, 49, 525
health care
professional institutional logic 496–7
professionalized nature of 28
as social institution 496–7
health care assistants (HCAs) 196–7, 203
growth in number of 196–7
tasks performed by 197
health care management
academic exploration of health policy developments 7–8
academic rigor and policy relevance 3–4
building international literature base 8–9
challenges facing 117, 354
critical domain 123–4
(p. 546)
critique of 2–3
disciplinary domains 121
health service research 2
impact of critical perspectives 120
managerial practice research 2, 3
need for more critical approach 118–20
professional domain 121–3
public and policy domains 123
research output 119–20
social science theory 4–6
typology of health care management studies 121, 122t
values and research 121
weaknesses of scholarship on 117–18, 124, 131
health care marketing 311
health care networks
artifact production 438, 445, 447
care networks 446–8t
characteristics of 448t
conceptual confusion 435–6
coordination of care 434
core process 436, 438
definition 436
effectiveness of structure 437
emergent networks 441
future research 452–3
governance of 440–3
hybrid networks 449–50
implementation deficits 442–3
integrated care networks 450–1
inter-organizational nature of health care 451
labor process theory 452
managed networks 441–2
mandated networks 442–3, 449
mandated program networks 443–6f, 448t
model of 438–9f
network links 438
as productive processes 451–3
reasons for proliferation of 452
roles of 434–5
structures 436–7
substance and structure 437–8
types of 439–40
wicked problems 434–5
health maintenance organizations (HMOs) 305
health policy
health management research 7–8
role of health care networks 434–5
Health Quality Improvement Partnership (HQIP) (England) 377
health service research (HSR) 1
critique of 2
Healy, D 502, 503
Heracleous, L 191
Herepath, A 128
Heron, P 197
Heskett, L 106
Hewitt, P 528
high performance organizations 11
Hindle, D 327
Hinings, C R 6, 28, 31, 36, 83, 113
Hobbs, J L 143–4, 145, 146
Hodge, G A 462
Hodge, M 528
Hodgson, R C 217, 218
Hollenbeck, J R 237
hollowed-out state 74, 75
Holmer, A F 504–5
Holmes, B 285, 288
homosexuals, marginalization of 131
Hood, C 72, 73, 378–9, 401
hospital acquired conditions (HACs) 147
Hospital Consumer Assessment of Health Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) 145, 146–7
Hughes, S D 194–5
human geography 18
Hupe, C 481
Hurschkorn, K 190
Huxham, C 220
hybrid clinical managers 198–200, 201–2
hybrid networks 449–50
integrated care networks 450–1
implementation science 264, 333–4
Independent Sector Treatment Centres (ISTCs) 19, 460, 465, 466–7, 468, 471–2
India, public-private partnerships (PPPs) 464
(p. 547) individualized care, and patient-centered care (PCC) 149–50
information, health care's intensive use of 352
information and communication technology (ICT)
application in health care 352
large-scale investment in 353
organizational health communication 306–7
virtual/online communities of practice 270
see also e-health
information management
consumer-oriented tools 358–9
e-health applications 355–6
electronic health records 357–8
electronic medical records 356–7
personal health records 359–60
see also e-health
information society, paradoxes of 404–5
innovation
public-private partnerships 471–2
team working 240–1
Institute for Healthcare Improvement (USA) 279
Million Lives Campaign 330
Institute of Consulting (UK) 519
Institute of Medicine
To Err is Human 142, 255
patient-centered care 142
institutional entrepreneurship 9–10, 33–4
institutional maintenance 34–5
institutional theory 27
institutional work 34
institutionalist perspective 6
institutionalization 9–10, 25, 26, 39
change in health care 27–8, 32–5, 37
clinical ethics support services 178
institutional logics 31–2, 496–7
integrated care networks 446–7, 450–1
integrated care organizations
Canada 57
England 53–4
Singapore 57
spreading leadership 220–2
United States 56–7
Integrated Delivery System (IDS) 60, 61
IntegratedEthics 172–3
integration 50
International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Associations (IFPMA) 504
International Monetary Fund (IMF) 460
inter-organizational networks
interprofessional collaboration
patient safety and quality 337–8
sharing leadership 215–17
team working 244–5
Isaccsson, A 234
Jacobs, J 425, 427
Jansen, G 195
Janssens, M 133
Jansson, A 234
Jaye, C 261, 262
Jenkins, M 261–2
Jermier, J 129
Jha, A K 147, 329
Joint Center for Bioethics (JCB) (University of Toronto) 173
Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organisations 167
Jones, C 31
Jonsen, A R 167
Karsten, H 361
Kearns, R A 423
Keegan, A 117–18
Kellog, K C 37
Kenis, P 436, 442, 449
Kennedy, A A 109
Kerosuo, H 191
Kessler, I 197
Kieser, A 521
King's Fund 527
Kipping, M 519, 523, 528, 531
Kirkpatrick, I 520, 527
Kitay, J 519
Kitchener, M 31, 113, 126, 128, 196
Klein, R 383, 384
Kluckhohn, C 96
knowledge
ecology of 282–3
in health care organizations 279–80
(p. 548)
nature of 280–1
types of 281
knowledge management 3
knowledge mobilization 14–15, 283, 296
actions and resources required for 291–2
audiences for 289–90
barriers to and facilitators of 294–5
connectivity 286
diversity of models and theories 288–9
external context 294
implementation science 264, 333–4
importance of context 293, 294, 295–6
internal context 293–4
knowledge brokers 290
leadership 290
linear approaches to 286–7
meaning of 280
multifaceted approaches 292
multiple contexts 295
narrative analysis of health policy reform 77
organizational dynamics 291
patient and public involvement 290–1
politics of knowledge use 285
power 290
relational approaches to 287–8
roles and responsibilities of actors 290–1
systems approaches to 288
types of knowledge use 284–5
knowledge sharing
Knowledge to Action framework 289
knowledge use 283
politics of 285
types of 284–5
Kool, T 424
Kotter, J 106
KPMG 525
Kreindler, S 129
Kroeber, A L 96
Kubr, M 519
La Puma, J 175
labor process theory 127, 452
Lange, David 74
Langley, A 210, 212, 213, 219, 225
Larson, M S 29
Lave, J 256–7, 258
Lavis, J N 290
Lawrence, T B 25, 33, 34
Le May, A 259–60, 264–5, 270, 281, 282
Leader Member Exchange (LMX) theory 242
leadership 13
challenges of 210–11
co-ordination 211
feminist perspective on 130
improving patient safety and quality 334–5
knowledge mobilization 290
Leader Member Exchange theory 242
multiple levels of 211
narrative analysis of health policy reform 76–7
patient-centered care 157
team working 241–2
lean management 211
lean production 3, 127
Learmonth, M 73, 119, 122, 125, 127
learning 14
from failures 255
learning culture, and communities of practice 273
Leca, B 126
Lee, H 131
legitimate peripheral participation, and situated learning 257–8
Leicht, K 191
Levay, C 406
Levin, B 295
Levinson, D J 217, 218
Li, L C 260, 267, 272
life-support decisions 166
Light, D W 31
Lilius, J M 156
Lindhom, A H 234
linguistic turn 317
Llewellyn, S 199
Local Improvement Finance Trust (LIFT) (England) 112–13
Lockett, A 33, 199
(p. 549) logics perspective
change in health care 30–2
health care institutions 496–7
pharmaceutical industry 507–8
Lomas, J 287
Lowe, T 375
Lown, B A 156
Lyubovnikova, J 193, 236
McCabe, C 527
McCann, L 34–5
McDonald, D 529, 531
McDonald, R 32, 126
McDonnell, A 196
MacEachen, E 126
Macfarlane, F 130
McGivern, G 78, 199
McKee, L 27, 76, 335
McKinsey 522, 523, 524, 525, 528–9, 531
McLaughlin, J 127
McLean, S A 176
McLoughlin, I 366
McNicol, S 331
McNulty, T 25, 26
MacRae, S 173
Magill, G 177
Magnet status (hospitals) 147 n2
Magnussen, J 245
Maguire, S 33
Mair, F S 361
Malhotra, N 25
managed networks 441–2
management
clinical managers 78, 198–200
cultural change 76–7
doctor-manager relationships 198, 245
general managers 78
knowledge mobilization 77
leadership 76–7
narrative analysis of health policy reform 75–8
of professionals 78–9
workforce development 77–8
management communication 311
Management Consultancies Association (MCA) 518, 521, 528
management consultancy 20, 517–18, 532–3
assessing outcomes of health sector involvement 530–1
controversy surrounding 517
definition 518–19
demand creation 527–8
evolution of role in health sector 522–3
expenditure in health systems 517, 523–4
expert models 519
future research 533–4
government/consulting firm relationships 528–30
growth in revenues 519–20
historical development of 519
industry structure 520
numbers employed in 520
as 'partners' in government 518, 528, 533
private finance initiative 527–8
procurement practices in NHS 531–2
reasons for growth in health sector 526–8
reasons for growth of 520–2
revolving door relationships 528–30
services provided in health sector 524–6
social learning models 519
think tank activities 525
unregulated nature of 519
managerial practice research 2
critique of 3
managerialism 30, 126
increased influence of 31
mandated networks 442–3, 449
Mannion, R 97, 107, 112
Marion, R 222, 223
market failure, and pharmaceutical industry 508
marketization 81–2, 497
narrative analysis of health policy reform 81–3
organizational health communication 305–6
Markham, C 520
Marshall, M 107
Martin, G 127, 195–6, 331, 424
Martin, J 101–2
Martinussen, P E 245
Mathiassen, L 365
Mattarelli, E 272
(p. 550) Mattila, J 156
Mead, N 143
medial emergency teams (METS) 330
Medicaid 81
medical discourse 309
medical tourism 419
Medicare 48, 54, 81, 146–7
medicines policymaking organizations, and pharmaceutical industry 500
Merck 504
Merse, E 196
micro-surgery 26
Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust 327, 377, 387
Mikesell, L 154, 158
Million Lives Campaign 330
Mills, A E 180
Mintzberg, H 4
Monitor 377, 523, 525, 528, 529
Montgomery, K 191, 192, 193
Moon, G 423
Moreno, J D 169
Morris, T 25
Moynihan, D P 385, 386
multi-disciplinary teams, and sharing leadership 215–17
multi-level research 38–9
Mulvale, G 193
Murphy, K 285
Musselin, C 72
Muzio, D 191, 520
narrative analysis of health policy reform 72–3, 83–5
cultural change 76–7
institutional context 83–4
knowledge mobilization 77
leadership 76–7
management 75–8
markets 81–3
organizational health communication 316–17
performance measurement 78–81
political-economic context of reform 74–5
professional culture and power 84
themes of policy reform 73–4
workforce development 77–8
National Center for Ethics in Health Care (USA) 172
National Clinical Audits (NCA) (England) 377
National Health and Medical Research Council (Australia) 279
National Health Service (NHS)
assessing outcomes of management consultants' involvement 530–1
clinical governance 79
economic pressures on 46
Equity and Excellence (2010) 467
evolution of role of management consultants 522–3
expenditure on management consultants 517, 523–4
Five Year Forward View 47, 53
government/consulting firm relationships 528–30
GP Federations 52–3
integrated care organizations 53–4
Leadership Academy 525–6
limited management capacity 527
marketization 81–2
networked governance 82
NHS Plan (2001) 466
performance measurement 376–7
procurement of management consultancy services 531–2
public-private partnerships 466–7
reasons for growth of management consultancy 526–8
reorganizations of 527
resistance to change 84–5
services provided by management consultants 524–6
star rating system 401–2
National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) (England) 377
National Programme for IT (NPfIT) (England) 366
neighborhoods 417
re-placing care 425–8
Nembhard, J M 233, 264, 272
neoliberalism 73, 74
neo-Marxism 128
(p. 551) networked governance 74, 379, 416
aims of 82
public-private partnerships 462
'never events' 80
new public management (NPM) 4, 10, 11, 72, 74, 75, 82, 83, 84, 85, 117, 190, 306, 378–9, 395–6
New Right 73, 74
New Zealand 47, 74, 83
district health boards 53
Newman, J 123
Niazkhani, Z 357
Nicolini, D 37
Nikolova, N 519
Nilsson, A 365
no research, development only (NRDO) companies 501
Nolan, M 151
Noordegraaf, M 190–1
Nordic countries 84
accountability forms 490
Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital 467–8
Normalization Process Theory (NPT) 364
Norway 84
Nuffield Trust 388
Nurse Practitioners (NPs), role blurring 195–6
nurses
interactions with doctors 194–5
role blurring 194–5
specialist nurses and role blurring 195–6
Nursing and Midwifery Council 196, 197
nursing profession 130–1
Nutley, S 291
Oldenhof, L 191
Oliver, A 191, 192
O'Mahoney, J 520
Ootes, S T C 426
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) 72, 375, 460
organization studies/theory 5
Organizational Behavior in Health Care Conference (OBHC) 120, 132
organizational change in health care
adaptability 63–4
American context 47–8
coercive pressures for 49
conditions for emergence of new organizational forms 46–7
contractual mechanisms and organizational forms 58–60
differentiation 50
drivers of 45, 46
embeddedness 34
England 49, 51–4
English context 47
form-function alignment 57–8
functions following form 45–6, 64–5
governance structure 63
influence of institutional actors 32–5
institutional approach to 27–8
institutional entrepreneurship 33–4
institutional logics 31–2
institutional maintenance 34–5
institutional work 34
institutionalization 37
integrated approach to 37–8
integration 50
limited effects 26
logics perspective 30–2
mimetic pressures for 49
multi-level research 38–9
normative pressures for 49–50
norms of health care 50
organizational form and innovation 60–1
power dynamics 25–6, 28, 32, 37, 38
professional resistance 25, 30
professionalization 33–4, 37
rapid adoption 26
relationship between form and function 48–51, 62f, 63–4
themes of policy reform 73–4
United States 49, 54–7
work practices 35–7
organizational climate 100–1
(p. 552) organizational culture 11, 93, 113
artifacts 100
assumptions 100
as attribute 98, 99
beliefs and values 100
contributions to organizational life 97
definitional difficulties 95–6
definitions 96–7
differentiation perspective 101
as emergent property 108
epistemological and ontological considerations 98–9
evidence for link with performance 106–8
fragmentation perspective 101
functions of 98
health care performance 104–6
health care quality and safety 93–4
integration perspective 101
layered components 99–100
measuring and assessing 103–4
metaphorical underpinnings of 97–8
organizational climate 100–1
origins and development of term 94–5
patient safety and quality 338
as root metaphor 98, 99
sub-cultures 102–3
organizational field 27
organizational health communication 15, 302–3, 319–20
clinical communication 303, 308–9
communication as organizing technologies 317–19
communicative turn in health care organizations 304–5
corporate communication 303, 311–12
differences from health communication 307–8
discursive perspective 303, 312–13
doctor-patient communication 308–9
drivers of 305–7
extra-clinical communication 303, 309–10
health communication 319–20
institutionalized organizational ideals 314–15
internal communication 310
inter-professional communication 309
management of meaning 315–17
marketization 305–6
medical discourse 309
organizational consequences 312
organizational reform 305
patient-centered care 150–1, 306
stakeholders 320
technological change 306–7
organizational innovation 10
organizational processes and practices 14–17
Osborne, D 72, 73, 85, 190
Ottawa Model of Research Use 289
Ouchi, W G 106
Oudshoorn, N 422
Ovreteit, J 189
Ovsieko, P 113
PA Consulting 524, 525
Palier, B 82
paramedics 34–5
Parmelli, E 108
Parsons, T 189
patient activation and engagement (PAE) 60, 61
patient experience of care delivery 146–8
patient involvement 82–3
clinical ethics support services 176
patient safety 15–16, 325
patient safety and care quality 325
appropriateness of care 326–7
champions of 336
clinical leadership 334–5
clinical networks 340–1
communities of practice 340–1
difficulties in measuring 398–9
disruptive behavior 336
distributed leadership 335
e-health 354
engaging clinicians in improving 339–40
hierarchies of harm 329
implementation science 333–4
individual diligence 336–7
(in)efficacy of public quality reporting 400–1
inter-professional care 337–8
long-term nature of problem 342–3
misuse of service 326
models for improvement 333
(p. 553)
opinion leaders 336
organizational culture 93–4
organizational culture/climate 338
reports and inquiries into 327
resilient health care 341–2
restructuring 338
role of patients and families 343–4
slow progress in improving 330–1, 342
strategies for improving 331, 332–3t
system deficits 327
systems complexity 339
systems improvement 337
systems perspective on 329–30, 342
systems-level campaign approach to 330
teamwork 335–6
transparency 396
underuse/overuse of service 326
variations in care 326
World Health Organization agenda for action and research 328t, 329
patient-centered care (PCC) 12, 141, 158–9
barriers to 157
behaviors producing 144
care provider's needs 154, 157
caring 155, 159
communication 150–1, 306
compassion 156–7, 159
compassion practices 156–7
definitions 142, 144, 145, 151
emotional support 153
enablers of 144
global interest in 141
individualized care 149–50
information and communication technology 158
involving families and significant others 151–3
lack of improvement in patient experience 142
leadership 157
literature reviews of concept 143–6
meaning of 141–2
patient experience measures 148
patient feedback 157
patient perspective 143–4, 149–53
patient preferences 149–50
patient-care provider relationship 143, 144, 145, 154–5
physical environment 158
principles 144
problems with service model 154–5
relationship with outcomes 144–5
tension with value 146
therapeutic alliance 143
therapeutic relationship 142, 145–6, 151, 153, 154–5
work environments for caring and compassion 157–8
Patient-Centered Medical Homes (PCMHs) (USA) 49, 55–6
Pawson, R 293
payment systems
England 47
United States 48
Pearce, C L 214
Peck, E 462
performance in health care, and organizational culture 104–8
performance management 16
definition 375
new public management 378–9
performance measurement 375, 376, 384–7
performance measurement 16
accountability 378–9, 387, 488
assumptions behind 383
choice of measures 383
clash of performance cultures 386, 387
control 380–1
deficit of 377, 388
difficulties in measuring quality of care 398–9
gaming the system 401–2
individual performance 382
(in)efficacy of public quality reporting 400–1
logic of escalation 404
mixed-model of local and national targets 389
narrative analysis of health policy reform 79–81
new public management 378–9
objects of 381–4, 388
organizational performance 382
(p. 554)
outcome measures 399
overload of 376–7, 379, 381, 383–4, 388
paradox of 375–6
performance management 375, 376, 384–7
policy performance 381–2
power of standard-setters 380–1, 382
problems with 375–6, 382–3, 400–1
process measures 399
professional perspective on 387
public policy perspective 387
purpose of 380–1, 382, 388
responses to 403–4
symbolic use of 381
use of 384–5
see also transparency
performative turn 317
Perry, J 472
personal health records (PHRs) 359–60
Peters, T J 8, 95, 106
Pettigrew, A 27, 76
Pfeffer, J 38
pharmaceutical industry 19–20
addressing ambivalence towards 510–11
ambivalence towards 506–9
balancing, and attitudes towards 509
challenges facing 498
compartmentalization, and attitudes towards 508–9
conflicting/competing logics 507–8
contract research organizations 500–1
controversy over 501
criticism of 501–4, 508
decoupling, and attitudes towards 509
intersubjective ambivalence 507
managing ambivalence towards 508–9
market failure 508
medicines policymaking organizations 500
moral ambivalence 506–7
no research, development only (NRDO) companies 501
organizations supported by 499–500
origins and development of 498–9
profitability of 499
socio-political ambivalence 506
support for 504–5
uncertainty about 505–6
venture capital organizations 501
pharmacists 32
Physician-Hospital Organization (PHO) model (USA) 63
physicians
jurisdictional claims 29
professionalization 28–9
Picker Institute 144, 151, 153
picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) 356–7
Pisano, G P 216–17, 264
place, and health care governance 415, 425–30
characteristics of place 417–18
concentration and re-placement of hospital care 423–5
conceptualization of place 417–19
distinction from space 418
e-health and care re-placement 421–3
empirical cases of care re-placement 420–1
in governance literature 416–17
in health care literature 415–16
neighborhoods, and re-placing care 417, 425–8
place-makers 419, 420
place-shaping 419
politics of place 418
re-placing care 419–20, 428
symbolic and political use of place 429
unintended consequences of re-placement 428–9
work required for re-placements 429
plural leadership 13, 211–12
benefits of 225
challenges for development of 227
changes implied by 225
conceptualizations of 212–13
conditions required for 226
distributed leadership 213, 335
forms of 212–13, 214f, 225
implementation of 226–7
increased academic interest in 212
individual dimension of leadership 226
pooling leadership 217–18
pooling leadership in co-management of clinical programs 218–19
(p. 555)
producing leadership 222
producing leadership in determining strategic direction 222–4
relevance in health care organizations 211
shared leadership 211, 212
sharing leadership 214–15
sharing leadership in interprofessional collaboration 215–17
spreading leadership 219–20
spreading leadership in integrated care 220–2
Pollitt, C 18, 85, 126, 404, 416, 419, 481
Pollock, A 123, 132
Pols, J 363, 421–2
Polzer, J 126
pooled leadership 13, 217–18
appropriateness of 217
co-management of clinical programs 218–19
constellations 217
fragility of 218
Pope, C 364
population based medicine 32
Porter, M E 3
positivism 281
post-new public management 74
poststructuralism 130
Potsma, J 191
Powell, W W 33
power 25
professionalization 29
Power, M 79, 395
power dynamics 25–6
change in health care 25–6, 28, 32, 37, 38
institutional agents of change or resistance 32–5
institutional work 34
managers and physicians 31–2
professional groups 29
professionalization 29, 33
work practices 36
power relations
communities of practice 272–3
critical management studies 125
practice perspective 14
practice theory 159
Pratchett, L 472
President's Commission for the Study of Ethical Problems 167
Price, R H 27–8
prime contractors 59–60
prime provider model 60
private finance initiative (PFI) 19, 459, 461, 463, 523
management consultancy 527–8
Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital 467–8
University College Hospital (London) 468
privatization 190
process perspective 14
producing leadership 222
adaptive leadership 223–4
administrative leadership 224
enabling leadership 224
producing strategic direction 222–4
professional autonomy 12, 31, 189, 202, 405–6
professional boundaries 29–30, 191–2
clinical managers 198–200
definition 191
doctor-manager relationships 198
doctor-nurse interactions 194–5
fluidity in workplace 192
health care assistants 196–7
jurisdictional claims 29, 191–2, 202–3
limited evidence for role blurring 197–8
professional interactions 193
role blurring 201
role merging 201–2
'silos' of communication 194
specialist nurses and role blurring 195–6
workplace assimilation 192
professional dominance 4, 7, 13, 189, 202
professional interactions 193, 200, 203
clinical managers 198–200
doctor-manager relationships 198, 245
doctors, nurses and allied health professionals 196
doctors and nurses 194–5
health care assistants 196–7
limited evidence for role blurring 197–8
patient safety and quality 337–8
role blurring 193–4, 201
role merging 198, 201–2
(p. 556)
specialist nurses and role blurring 195–6
team working 193–4
Professional Standards Authority for Health and Social Care (England) 377
professionalization 9–10, 25, 26, 28–30, 39
change in health care 33–4, 37
clinical ethics support services 178
competing logics of managerialism and market 30–2
embeddedness 35
functionalist view 28–9
managerial control of professionals 78–9
power dynamics 29, 33
power view of 29
professional institutional logic 496–7
resistance to change 25, 30
workforce development 77–8
professions
characteristics of 188–9
contemporary perspectives on 190–1
power-based perspective 189
structural-functionalist perspective 189
symbolic interactionist perspective 189
transparency 404–6
program networks 443–6f, 448t
proletarianization 190
Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services (PARIHS) 289, 293, 333, 334
Provan, K 436, 442, 449
public health campaigns 307–8
public involvement 82–3
public quality reporting 393
gaming the system 401–2
(in)efficacy of 400–1
measurement difficulties 398–9
willful blindness 402
public relations communication 311–12
public-private partnerships (PPPs) 18–19, 459–60, 475
accountability 470
broad application of term 462
Care UK 469
characteristics of 461–2
Circle Partnership 468
controversy over 463–4
cultural differences 472–3
developed countries 464–5
developing countries 464
future research 475–6
governance challenges 469–71
growth and development of 461
in health care 464–7
innovation 471–2
managing employment 473–5
National Health Service 466–7
networked governance 462
Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital 467–8
policy history 460–1
rationales for 461
typologies of 462–3
University College Hospital (London) 468
Virgin Care 469
purchaser-provider split 522–3
Putter, K 191
PwC 525
quality improvement (QI) 80–1
Quinlan, Karen 166–7
Rademakers, J 424
Ranmuthugala, G 260, 267
rapid response systems (RSS) 330
Rasmussen, L M 179, 180
Rathert, C 144, 145
Reagan, R 74
Reay, T 6, 31, 32, 34, 36, 83, 113, 195, 196
Reed, M 190
Reedy, P 127
reflexivity 128–9
team working 243
Reinventing Government 72, 75
re-placement of care
reputation management 312, 314–15
(p. 557) research-based knowledge 279, 280
categorizations of 281–2
place in ecology of knowledge 282–3
politics of use of 285
questions on nature of 282
types of knowledge use 284–5
resilient health care 341–2
restructuring 338
Richter, A 232
Robert, G 260
Robinson, J H 143
role blurring 13, 193–4, 201
doctor-nurse interactions 194–5
health care assistants 196–7
limited evidence for 197–8
specialist nursing roles 195–6
role merging 198, 201–2
Romzek, B S 481
Roodbol, P 195
Rosen, J 156
Rosenthal, L 357
Rouleau, L 210
Rowley, E 267
Royal College of Nursing (RCN) 524, 531
Russell, J 270
Sahlin, K 396, 397
St Bartholomew's Hospital (London) 423
Saint-Martin, D 527, 528, 530, 531
Saks, M 196
Salas, E 335
Sambrook, S 129
Sanner, T 357
Santoro, M 501, 505, 506, 510
Sauder, M 403
Sax Institute 279
Schein, E H 96, 100
Schillemans, T 378, 387, 488
Schneiderman, L J 175
Schofield, J 122
Scholl, I 144
Schultz, R 189
science and technology studies 317, 421
Scientific-Bureaucratic Medicine 79
Scofield, G R 179
Scott, T 106–7, 244
Scott, W R 25, 30, 33, 74
Sergi, V 212, 213
Shalit, R 179
shared leadership 13, 211, 212
appropriateness of 215
definition of 214–15
in interprofessional collaboration 215–17
team working 238, 241
vertical leaders 214–15, 216
shareholder value 126, 130
Short, S 123
Shortell, S M 27
Shouten, M E 237
Sinclair, A 493
Singapore 47
Agency for Integrated Care 57
situated learning 14, 259, 273
adoption by health care sector 259
clinical practice 261–2
conflict 257
legitimate peripheral participation 257–8
medical education 261–2
nature of 256–7
socialization of health care professionals 261–3
Skelcher, C 74–5, 470
Smircich, L 76
Smit, E 96
Smith, L 78
Smith, S A 147
Smith, W J 179
Snelgrove, S 194–5
social constructionism 190
social identity theory 129
social network analysis (SNA) 437
social science theory, and health management research 4–6
Society of Thoracic Surgeons National Database 403
sociology of the professions 5–6, 26, 28–9, 30, 77, 188–91
South Tees Hospital NHS Foundation Trust 525
Spain, public-private partnerships (PPPs) 465
spatial perspective 18, 415
spreading leadership 219–20
implementation of integrated care 220–2
(p. 558) status quo 6, 10, 25, 26
Steinkamp, N L 179
Steyaert, C 133
Stimac, V 384–5
Stones, R 361
Stossel, T 505
Street, R L 149
structural-functionalism 189
structuration theory 361
Sturdy, A 191
Suddaby, R 34, 191
Sullivan, H 126
Sutton, R I 27–8
Sweden, public-private partnerships (PPPs) 465
Swinglehurst, D 361
Switzerland 84
symbolic interactionism 189
sympathy 156
systems improvement, and patient safety and quality 337
Tagliaventi, M R 272
Talbot, C 380
Tapper, E B 166
Taylor, J 385
team working 13–14, 127, 231–2, 248
authority differentiation 238
benefits for individual team members 232–3, 236
challenges issues for 244–8
characteristics of team tasks 239
characteristics of teams 235, 236
clarity over task and objectives 239
compassion 242
complexity of health care 232
confusion over 235–6
criteria for 236
cross-boundary team working 247–8
dangers of pseudo teams 236–7
definition 235
difficulties of working in multiple teams 246
diverse teams 245–6
doctor-manager relationships 245
effective 234
ensuring high quality of 239–43
impact on patient care and outcomes 233–4
interpersonal conflict 240
interprofessional collaboration 244–5
leadership 241–2
medical errors 233
member roles and interactions 240
necessity for 231
organizational level outcomes 234
participative safety 247
patient mortality 234, 237
patient safety and quality 335–6
poor quality of 231
professional interactions 193–4
quality improvement and innovation 240–1
quality of team functioning 233
reflexivity 243
shared leadership 238, 241
size of teams 235
skill differentiation 237
status hierarchies 233, 245
task accomplishment 234–5
team based health care organizations 243–4
team communities 244
teaming skills 247
temporal stability 237–8
variations in 237–8
technological change, and communication 306–7
Teel, K 166
Teisberg, E O 3
telecare 422
temporal stability, and home team concept 246–7
ten Have, H A M J 179
ten Hoeve, Y 195
Tereskerz, P 180
Thatcher, M 74
Their, S 122
Thompson, D 357
Tilley, N 293
transparency 16–17
accountancy 397
demand for 48, 393
difficulties in measuring quality of care 398–9
as disciplinary technology 395
(p. 559)
disclosure game 80
drivers of 395–6
dynamic effects of 403–4
future research 406–7
gaming the system 401–2
health professionals 404–6
(in)efficacy of public quality reporting 400–1
market-driven 396
meaning of 394–5
as new governing logic 396–7, 398
new public management 395–6
nominal and effective 394–5
public quality reporting 393, 398–9
quality of care 396
regulation 397
scrutiny 397
technologies of 397f, 398
upwards and downwards 395
willful blindness 402
Trayner, B 267
Traynor, M 130–1
trust, and communities of practice 271
Tsoukas, H 404–5
Tulsky, J A 177
Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment 165
Uhl-Bien, M 222, 223
United Kingdom
health care system 81
marketization 81–2
private finance initiative 461
public-private partnerships 466–7
United Kingdom Clinical Ethics Network (UKCEN) 168
United States
context for organizational change 47–8
health care reform 46–7
health care system 81
management consultancy 517, 524, 526
norms of health care 50
organizational change in health care 49, 54–7
organizational form and innovation 60–1
performance measurement 80
University College Hospital (London) 468
Value Based Purchasing (VBP) 146–7
values and research 121
Van de Walle, S 384–5
Van der Post, W 96
Van Dooren, W 489
Van Gemert-Pijnen, J E 360
Van Maanen, J 102
Van Riel, C B M 311
Vangen, S 220
venture capital organizations, and pharmaceutical industry 501
Veterans' Health Administration 81, 336, 402, 404
Vioxx 504
Virgin Care 469
virtual/online communities of practice 267–70
Vuokko, R 361
Waks, C 406
Wallace, S 168–9
Walshe, K 78
Walter, I 291
Ward, V 294
Waring, J 36, 127, 128, 462, 472, 473
Waterman, R H 8, 95, 106
Watt, I S 145, 146, 154
Weber, M 30
Weech-Maldonado, R 147
Weiner, B J 147
Weiss, C H 284
Wenger, E 256–7, 258, 267
Wennberg, J 326
West, M 193, 232, 233, 235
West Dorset Clinical Commissioning Group 525
West Middlesex hospital 528
Westbrook, J I 356–7
Whitehead, J M 176
wicked issues 77
wicked problems, and health care networks 434–5
Wicks, D 194
(p. 560) Wilkins, A L 106
Willems, D 363
Willems, T 489
willful blindness 402
Williams, B E 36
Williamson, L 180
Wilson, D 384
Wilson, R 366
Wingfield, M 472
Wise, L 472
Woods, S 235
work practices 10
change in health care 35–7
institutional context 36
power dynamics 36
workforce development, narrative analysis of health policy reform 77–8
World Bank 72, 460
World Health Organization (WHO)
patient safety 328t
program networks 443
World Alliance for Patient Safety 328–9
Wright, C 519
Wye, L 531, 532
Wyrwich, M D 144, 145
Youngner, S J 170
Yudkin, J S 424
Zaleznik, A 217, 218
Zilber, T B 37–8
Zuiderent-Jerak, T 424
Zwarenstein, M 196
Zwi, A 123
Zwijenberg, N C 195