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date: 18 November 2019

(p. 499) Subject Index

(p. 499) Subject Index

A
Academic discourse, deaf-gain and, 217–18
Achievements of Deaf Pupils in Scotland project (ADPS), 428
Acoupedics, 22
Acoustic ecology, 381–85
Adaptive instruction, 60
Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP), ESEA/NCLB and, 35
Advanced bionics cochlear implant map, 392f
Advanced Forms level, SAEVD-R, 362
Age of acquisition
effects on outcome of sign language, 283–88
experimental studies of, 284–86
L1 exposure is delayed until adolescence, 286–88
variation in age of acquisition, 283–84
effects on outcome of spoken language, 282–83
Al-Sayyid Bedouin Sign Language (ABSL), 269–70. See also American Sign Language (ASL)
age of, 273
word order in, 275
Alternative and augmentative communication (AAC) aids, 174
American Annals of the Deaf, 25
American Association for Employment in Education (AAEE), 44
American Association of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AAIDD), 174
American Sign Language (ASL), 2, 19. See also Al-Sayyid Bedouin Sign Language (ABSL)
acquisition of, 321–23
in children with hearing loss, 294
deaf studies and, 211–12
media for development of proficiency in, 101–2
proficiency level of deaf adults grouped by, 288f
and visuospatial loop, 466–67
Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), 38
Attention–deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) clinic, 447
Auditory communication, in children with hearing loss, 293–94
Auditory deprivation, and differences in STM, 462–64
Auditory–guided speech development
assessing progress in, 370–71
indicators of, 369–70
Auditory neuropathy/dyssynchrony (AN/AD), 351, 352
Auditory processing disorder (APD), 429–30
Auditory verbal instruction, 21–22
Auditory–verbal therapy (AVT), 5, 22
Auditory–vocal spoken language, 18
Auditory–oral approach, in children with hearing loss, 294
Auditory–verbal approach, in children with hearing loss, 294
Autism spectrum disorders (ASD), 172
deaf students with, 176
Automated auditory brainstem response (AABR), 351
Automatic speech recognition, 95
B
Backward planning, 50
Basic canonical syllables, SAEVD-R, 362
Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF), 446–47
Belgian French Sign Language (BFSL), 162
Better-ear effect, 395
Bilateral cochlear implant users, 394–98
presumed benefits of listening with ears, 395–96
sequential bilateral implantation, 397–98
simultaneous bilateral implantation, 396–97
Bilingual–bicultural (Bi-Bi) education, 21
Bilingual communication, in children with hearing loss, 294
Binaural summation effect, 395
Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community, 221
Brain–behavior relations, 440–41
Brigance Comprehensive Inventory of Basic Skills-Revised, 48
British Sign Language (BSL), 19
acquisition of, 323–24
C
Canadian Working Group on Childhood Hearing (CWGCH), 245
Canonical babbling
SAEVD-R and, 362
vocalization differences in children with and without hearing loss, 365–67
Captioning, 93–96
classroom, 95–96
television, 93–94
Web media and videos, 94–95
Catell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) theory, 151–52
Center for ASL/English Bilingual Education and Research (CAEBER) program, 8
(p. 500) Central executive, working memory and, 460
CHARGE syndrome, 173, 178–79
CHD 7hd gene in, 178
diagnosis of, 179
CHD 7hd gene, 178
Child-Guided Strategies for Assessing Children Who Are Deafblind or Have Multiple Disabilities, 187
Classroom captioning, 95–96
Classroom curriculum design, 60
Classroom instruction, for deaf students, 61–68
adapted to learning style and cognitive profile, 65
classroom participation, 64
language of instruction, 63–64
opportunity to learn, 66
in regular and special education, comparison, 66–68
strategies, 64–65
teacher–student relationship and hearing status, 65–66
Classroom participation
academic outcomes and, 77
classroom instruction for deaf students, 64
of DHH children/students, 88
Classroom Participation Questionnaire (CPQ), 48, 88
Clerc’s system of instruction, 25
Co-enrollment classroom, instruction in, 67
Coalition of Organizations for Accessible Technology (COAT), 95
Cochlear implants/implantation, 227–29
in adults, 393
age of implantation affect reading ability, 133–34
in children, 393
and language acquisition, 334–36
and choice of communication mode, 233–34
components of, 391–92, 391f
criteria to assess candidacy for, 392–93
in deaf children, 6–7
and deaf students, 129–30
educational attainment and, 231–32
educational management and, 232–33
history of, 390–91
identity and, 203–4
impact on spoken language development, 326–27
implicit learning and language outcomes in deaf children with, 454
individual rates of language growth for children using, 338f
language, cognition, and reading of children functionally hard of hearing, 130–33
and localization and perception of distance, 399–401
outcomes of, 229–34
educational implications, 230–34
and EOI abilities, 441–42
parental concerns, 234
overview, 226–27
parental perspectives in, 227–29
decision-making process, 228–29
process of implantation, 229
recent studies on language outcomes for children using, 336–39
relations of cognition and reading in children with, 137–38
relations of language and reading in children with, 134–37
and speech perception performance, 393–99
bilateral cochlear implant users, 394–98
and hearing aid users, 398–99
unilateral adult cochlear implant, 393–94
for Usher syndrome, 180
views of young people with, 234–37
working of, 391–92
Cognitive ability
play and early, 408–14
play of young DHH children/students, 410–14
Cognitive development, EBP and measurement of, 303–4
Cognitive diversity, and deaf-gain, 216–18
redefining nature of language, 216–17
sign languages and academic discourse, 217–18
visual language/visual learning, 217
Colorado Home Intervention Program (CHIP), 3
Communication adaptations, 45
Communication approaches, of children with hearing loss, 293
auditory communication, 293–94
combining visual and auditory modalities, 295–96
comparative description of, 296–97
early efforts to use
objective and prescriptive procedures to select, 297–301
current efforts to provide unbiased representation, 298–99
monitoring efficacy of selection, 299–300
providing access to complete language model, 300–301
visual communication, 294–95
Communication mode, cochelear implants and choice, 233–34
Communication skills, in children who are hard-of-hearing, 379–81
development of language skills, 380–81
development of speech skills, 379–80
Communicative Development Inventory (CDI), 321
Conceptually Accurate Signed English (CASE), 294–95
Conditioned Assessment of Speech Production (CASP), 371
Conduct-Hyperactive-Attention Problem-Oppositional Scale (CHAOS), 447
Congenital rubella syndrome (CRS), 181
Consonant inventories, in young children with hearing loss, 367–69
Content instruction, 99–100
Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), 38–39
Council of Europe Disability Action Plan, 39
Creative diversity, and deaf-gain, 218–19
Creoles, 268
Critical period for language, 281
evidence for, 333–34
implications of, 289
Critical period learning, 282
Cued speech, 7
in children with hearing loss, 294
defined, 21
Cultural beliefs, and NHS programs in developing world, 353
Cultural diversity, and deaf-gain, 219–21
deaf collectivist culture and future of community, 221
international sign and signed languages, 220–21
transnational deaf community, 219–20
Cultural stigma, and NHS programs in developing world, 353
D
Deaf Acculturation Scale (DAS), 198
Deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) children/students, 2. See also Hard-of-hearing children
benefits of earlier intervention, 345–47
classroom participation, 88
communication and literacy for success of, 86
effective education for, 58
effective instruction in general education settings, 59–60
EHDI and, 31–32
general education classrooms (p. 501)
academic outcomes, 73–77
characteristics in, 73
social outcomes, 77–82
support needed to succeed in, 84–89
handheld technologies, 102–4
for communication, 102–3
for educational interventions with, 103–4
IDEA and, 34
interactive whiteboard for instructing, 97
learning strategies for, 86–87
mathematics instruction and learning of
achievement and performance, 157–60
factors in mathematics performance, 160–64
instruction, 160–65
overview, 156–57
play of young, 410–14
receiving specific services from itinerant teachers, 84t
responsibilities of itinerant teachers of, 82–84
self-advocacy, 87–88
social supports, 88–89
speech intelligibility of
educational implications and future research, 260–61
effects on attitude, 253–55
effects on social and emotional aspects, 255–58
relation with occupational competence, 258–60
tablet PC, 98–99
teacher preparation program, 42–45
Deaf children/students
cochlear implants for, 6–7, 129–30
educational placements for, 7–8
language development and joint attention in, 318–20
selected studies of ToM in, 416–21
sign language for, 6
spoken language for, 5–6
Deaf collectivist culture, 221
Deaf community sign language, 270–72
linguistic origins of, 271
social characteristics, 270–71
Deaf education
during 1900 to 1960, 27
from 1960 to present, 27–28
advancement in, 2
18th century, 23
basic research in, 8–10
Bi–Bi instruction and, 21
early identification and intervention in, 2–5
historical complexities in, 18–19
history of methods for, 21–22
issue of language modality in, 5
levels of effort to develop evidence base in, 117–18, 117t
manual communication in, 63
paradigm shifts in, 473–77
person-centered planning in, 50
promise of, 7–8
promise of language in, 5–7
response to intervention (RTI), 48
in 19th century Europe, 23–25
deaf teachers, 25
Germany, 23–24
International Convention of Milan, 24–25
Netherlands, 24
in United States, 25–27
deaf teachers, 26–27
growth of oral education, 26
Deaf-gain, 215–16
cognitive diversity and, 216–18
redefining nature of language, 216–17
sign languages and academic discourse, 217–18
visual language/visual learning, 217
creative diversity and, 218–19
cultural diversity and, 219–21
deaf collectivist culture and future of community, 221
international sign and signed languages, 220–21
transnational deaf community, 219–20
Deaf Identity Development Scale (DIDS), 198
Deaf space, 218–19
Deaf Studies
defined, 210–11
in late 20th century, 211–12
in 21st century, 212–15
existential threats, 213–15
lessons from history of normalization, 212–13
threat to deaf bodies, 214–15
Deaf Studies Digital Journal, 218
Deaf teachers
in 19th century Europe, 25
in United States, 26–27
Deaf walk, 221
Deaf writers
focussing on, 149–50
focussing on pedagogical context, 150–52
language-learning disabilities and, 149
product and process, 146–48
theoretical perspective, 145–46
Deafblindness, 177
assessment of students with congenital, 186–87
and intellectual disability, 177
intervention and educational curriculum for children with, 182–86
syndromic, 178–81
CHARGE syndrome, 178–79
congenital rubella syndrome, 181
Usher syndrome, 179–81
Deafness. See also Hearing loss
ASD and, 176
early identification, 241–48
impact on parents, 242–44
influence of, 246–48
overview, 241–42
timing of, 244–46
envisioning childhood, 246–48
etiology of, 173
intervention, communication, and sign development in persons with, 174–76
students with intellectual disabilities and, 173–76
visuospatial short-term memory span and, 165
Decision-making, in cochlear implants/implantation, 228–29
Design Copying (DC), 445
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 176
Diagnostic Early Intervention Program (DEIP), 298
Disability
ADA definition of, 38
international progress to protect people with, 38–39
Dyslexia, 428–30
Dyspraxia, 428–30
E
Early hearing detection and intervention (EHDI), 242
Early hearing detection and intervention (EHDI) programs, 31–32
Early sign language development, 320–24
acquisition of ASL, 321–23
acquisition of BSL, 323–24
Economic barriers, and NHS programs in developing world, 354–55
Edmark Reading Program, 120
Education for All Handicapped Children Act (EAHCA), 30
Educational attainment, and cochlear implants/implantation, 231–32
Educational curriculum, for children with deafblindness, 182–86
(p. 502) Educational management, and cochlear implants/implantation, 232–33
Effective education, for DHH children/students, 58
Eisenberg sentence perception task, 451
Elementary and Secondary Education Act/No Child Left Behind Act (ESEA/NCLB), 35–37
differentiated accountability program, 36–37
Elementary school settings, hard-of-hearing children and, 383–85
Emerging sign language
deaf community sign language, 270–72
social characteristics, 270–71
functions of, 274–75
language interference from spoken language, 275
linguistic complexity in, 277
overview, 267–69
relation of characteristics of community with features of, 277–78
theoretical significance of, 276–78
use of space in, 275–76
variables in, 272–76
characteristics of sign language communities, 272–74
properties of language, 274–76
village sign language, 269–70
word order in, 275
Emotional stability, and Usher syndrome, 180–81
Ethnic identity, 200–203
Evidence-based practices (EBP), 44, 301–2
document developmental outcomes, 302–8
development of functional auditory skills, 305–7
measuring cognitive development, 303–4
semantic development, 304–5
speech development, 307–8
syntax development, 305
setting high expectations, 301–2
Executive function, 443–44
BRIEF, LEAF, and CHAOS rating scales of, 446–47
Executive functioning, 430–32
Executive-organizational-integrative (EOI) abilities
in cochlear implant outcomes, 441–42
Expansion level, SAEVD-R, 362
Expressive language modes, description of, 297f
F
Fingertip Tapping (FTT), 445
Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE), 33
French Sign Language (LSF), 271
Friendship, DHH children/students and, 80–81
Fully resonant nuclei, SAEVD-R, 362
Functional Assessment of Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing, 48
Functional Auditory Performance Indicators (FAPI), 307
hierarchy of auditory skills in, 306t
Functional auditory skills development, EBP and, 305–7
collecting evidence, 306–7
impact of hearing loss, 306
listening conditions affects, 307t
G
Gallaudet Research Institute (GRI), 72
Gallaudet sign dialect, 26
Gallaudet University program, 8
General education classrooms, for DHH children/students
academic outcomes, 73–77
Academic Competence score for, 75
factors contributing to, 76–77
characteristics in, 73
social outcomes, 77–82
factors contributing to, 81–82
friendship among peers, 80–81
social acceptance, 79–80
social interaction and social competence, 78–79
teachers support in, 82–89
responsibilities of itinerant teachers, 82–84
support needed to succeed, 84–89
Genetics, and identity, 204–5
H
Handheld technologies, for DHH children/students, 102–4
for communication, 102–3
for educational interventions with, 103–4
Hard-of-hearing children. See also Deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) children/students
in absence of definition, 378
acoustic ecology and hearing accessibility, 381–85
in early childhood, 382–83
elementary school settings, 383–85
secondary and postsecondary settings, 385
communication skills of, 379–81
development of language skills, 380–81
development of speech skills, 379–80
identity of, 385–86
impact of early identification, 386
when definition provided, 378–79
Head shadow effect, 395
Health Related Quality of Life (HRQL) instruments, 230
Hearing accessibility, 381–85
in early childhood, 382–83
elementary school settings, 383–85
secondary and postsecondary settings, 385
Hearing aid users, cochlear implants and, 398–99
Hearing aids, identity and, 203
Hearing loss. See also Deafness
children with and without
vocalization differences in, 365–69
vocalization similarities in, 365
impact on speech development, 307–8
impact on functional auditory skills development, 306
incidence and prevalence in developing world, 347–48
semantic development and impact of, 304
syntax development and impact of, 305
Hearing test, child, 2–3
Home sign, 268, 287
I
Iconicity, 174
Identity
defined, 195
ethnic dimension, 200–203
of hard-of-hearing children, 199–200, 385–86
importance of, 195–96
technology, science and, 203–5
cochlear implant, 203–4
genetics, 204–5
hearing aids, 203
theoretical conceptualization of, 197–99
Implicit learning
group differences in, 451–53
(p. 503)
and language outcomes in deaf children with cochlear implants, 454
and sentence perception, 453–54
of sequential patterns, 447–54
Individualized Education Program (IEP)
backward planning and, 50
ESEA/NCLB and, 36
IDEA and, 33–34
Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP), 31
Individually tailored test batteries vs. protocol-based assessment, 434
Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), 32–35
ADA and, 38
aids and services to children, 34
children placement in, 34–35
evaluation of children and, 33
Infant and Toddler Program of, 33
measurable goals for children, 33–34
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and, 37–38
Infant and Toddler Program, of IDEA, 33
Infant-Toddler Meaningful Auditory Integration Scale (IT-MAIS), 393
Inhibition processes, in speech perception, 443–44
Instruction
adaptive, 60
correlates of good reading, 120–22
to DHH students by interactive whiteboard, 97
effective
general education settings and, 59–60
orientation and, 59
and mathematics performance of DHH children/students, 164–65
in special education, 60–61
strategies for, 60
Instructional practice
approach to problem, 117–18
levels of evidence and relation to reading in, 115–17
reading curriculum, 118–20
with evidence for hearing and DHH children/students, 118–19
with growing evidence for DHH children/students, 119–20
Intellectual disability
deaf students with, 173–76
deafblindness and, 177
intervention, communication, and sign development in persons with, 174–76
Interactive whiteboards, 96–97
International Convention of Milan, 24–25
International Sign (IS), 220–21
Israeli Sign Language, 271–72
Itinerant teachers
competencies needed by, 83t
percentage of DHH children/students receiving specific services from, 84t
responsibilities of, 82–84
teacher preparation program and, 46t
J
Joint attention
and early language, 317–18
in deaf children/students, 318–20
timing of identification of deafness and, 245–46
K
Knoors principles, in special education, 60–61
L
La Langue des Signes de Quebecois (LSQ), 19
Language acquisition, 331–33
of ASL, 321–23
of BSL, 323–24
cochlear implants in children and, 334–36
Language development
early sign, 320–24
acquisition of ASL, 321–23
acquisition of BSL, 323–24
laying foundations for, 317–20
joint attention and early language, 317–18
joint attention in deaf children, 318–20
Language development in, deaf children, 318f–20
Language Learning, effects of early experience on later, 286f
Language mixing principle, 61
Language proficiency, DHH children/students, 86
Learning disabilities
achievement-potential discrepancy in, 433–34
assessment issues in, 432–33
definitions of, 426–27
dyslexia, dyspraxia, and APD, 428–30
etiology and prevalence of, 427–28
future research directions for, 435
historical context, 425–26
memory, executive functioning, problem-solving, and sequencing, 430–32
norm-referenced IQ tests for, 433–34
protocol-based assessments vs. individually tailored test batteries, 434
research in, 428
response to intervention, 434–35
Learning Executive and Attention Functioning scale (LEAF), 447
Least Restrictive Environment (LRE), 33
Linguistic complexity, in emerging sign language, 277
Linguistic short-term memory span
differences in, 461–64
articulation rate and differences in, 461–62, 462f
auditory deprivation and differences in, 462–64
consequences of differences in, 464
predictor of working memory, 467–68
Loneliness and Social Dissatisfaction Questionnaire, 255
M
Manual alphabets, defined, 20
Manual communication, in deaf education, 63
Manually Coded English (MCE), 295
Marginal babbling, 362
Mathematics instruction and learning, of DHH children/students
achievement and performance, 157–60
problem solving, 158–60
factors in mathematics performance, 160–65
instruction, 164–65
language, 161–64
number knowledge and processing, 160–61
overview, 156–57
teacher preparation and, 165
Mathematics performance, of DHH children/students, 160–65
instruction and, 164–65
language and, 161–64
number knowledge and processing and, 160–61
Meaningful Auditory Integration Scale (MAIS), 393
Measures of Academic Progress (MAP), 120
Media, for development of proficiency in sign language, 101–2
Memory, 430–32
Mills vs. Board of Education, 32
(p. 504) Minimal hearing impairment (MHI), 130
Minnesota Child Development Inventory, 246
More knowledgeable other (MKO), 121
Multiple disabilities, etiology of, 173
N
National Action Plan for Mathematics Education Reform for the Deaf (NAPMERD), 156, 157
National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM), 156
National Cued Speech Association, 7
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 173
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), 439
National Technical Institute for the Deaf (NTID), 62
Neo-oralism, 27
Neurocognitive approach, to individual differences in outcomes
brain-behavior relations, 440–41
domain-general cognitive factors, 441
EOI abilities in cochlear implant outcomes, 441–42
theoretical and clinical implications, 454–55
Neurocognitive measures, 444–47
BRIEF, LEAF, and CHAOS rating scales of executive function, 446–47
Design Copying, 445
NEPSY Fingertip Tapping, 445
Stroop Color Word Test, 445–46
Neuropsychological battery (NEPSY), 445
New York Institution for the Instruction of the Deaf and Dumb, 25
Newborn hearing screening program (NHSP), 242
in developing world, 348–55
availability and quality of subsequent intervention, 353–54
cultural beliefs and stigma, 353
delivery platform, 350
economic barriers, 354–55
loss to follow-up, 352–53
specificity of screening, 351–52
targeted vs. UNHS program, 348–50
Nicaraguan Sign Language, 271
Nonword repetition, 442–43
scores, 443t
Norm-referenced IQ test, for learning disabilities, 433–34
O
Occupational competence, speech intelligibility and, 258–60
Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), 178
Oral education, growth in United States, 26
Oral–aural instruction, 21
Organizational-integration processes, 443–44
Orientation, effective instruction and, 59
Otoacoustic emission (OAE), 351–52
Out-of-class learning, 100–101
P
Parent’s Evaluation of Aural/Oral Performance of Children (PEACH), 305
Paris National Institute for the Deaf, 25
Peabody Individual Achievement Test, 131
Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT), 336, 336f, 451
Pedagogical shifts, writing and, 148–49
Pendred syndrome, 173
Pennsylvania Association for Retarded Children (PARC) vs. Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, 32
Person-centered planning, 50
Phonation, SAEVD-R and control of, 362
Phonological awareness, 113–14
Phonological decomposition, 442–43
Phonological loop, working memory and, 459
Pidgin Signed English (PSE), 294
Pidgins, 268
Play
and early cognitive ability, 408–14
of young DHH children/students, 410–14
Play Assessment Questionnaire (PAQ), 410
Precanonical vocalization, 365
Prelinguistic utterances, guidelines for classifying children, 371t
Prelinguistic vocalizations, prosodic aspects of, 369
Problem solving, 430–32
mathematics performance of DHH children/students and, 158–60
relative difficulty, 158–59
solution strategies, 159–60
Processing strategy, cochlear implants and, 391–92
Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies (PATHS) curriculum, 120
Promoting Learning through Active Integration curriculum (PLAI), 185
Protocol-based assessments vs. individually tailored test batteries, 434
Psychological Assessment Resources (PAR), 446
Q
Quality of life, and cochlear implants/implantation, 230
Quasi-resonant nuclei, SAEVD-R, 362
R
Reading curriculum, and instructional practice, 118–20
with evidence for hearing and DHH children/students, 118–19
with growing evidence for DHH children/students, 119–20
Reading development
challenges in school years, 111–13
segments of populations with different needs, 112–13
early skills and relation to later, 113–15
Real-time speech-to-text service, 95
Receptive language modes, description of, 296f
Reciprocal teaching, 61
Reflexive vocalizations, SAEVD-R, 361–62
Response to intervention (RTI), 48
Reynell Developmental Language Scales-Second Revision (RDLS), 413
Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), 62
Rochester Method, 28
(p. 505) S
Screening Instrument for Targeting Educational Risk Teacher Rating (SIFTER), 75, 232
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, 37–38
Seeing Essential English (SEE I), 28
Self-advocacy, in DHH children/students, 87–88
Semantic development, EBP and, 304–5
collecting evidence, 304–5
impact of hearing loss, 304
Sense of Coherence Scale, 255
Sequencing, 430–32
Sequential bilateral implantation, 397–98
Short Periods of Prelinguistic Input (SPPI) approach, 372
Short-term memory (STM), 458
working memory and, 459–60
Sign language. See also Spoken language
age of acquisition effects on outcome of, 283–88
experimental studies of, 284–86
L1 exposure is delayed until adolescence, 286–88
variation in age of acquisition, 283–84
for deaf children, 6
deaf-gain and, 217–18, 220–21
Deaf Studies and threat to, 213–14
defined, 19
and mathematics, 162–264
media for development of proficiency in, 101–2
skill and reading development, 288–89
Sign language communities, characteristics of, 271
age of language, 273
distribution of deaf people in community, 273–74
exposure to other sign languages, 274
size of community, 272–73
social status of deaf people, 274
Sign language literature, 219
Sign Language of the Netherlands (SLN), 174–75
Sign-supported speech (SSS), 295
Sign systems, defined, 20
Signing Exact English (SEE II), 28
Signing Naturally, 101
Signing Science dictionary, 101
Silent Reading Fluency Test (SRFT), 120
Simultaneous bilateral implantation, 396–97
Simultaneous communication, 295–96
defined, 20
SMART Board, 97
SOAR-High Distance Learning Program, 99
Social acceptance, of DHH children/students, 79–80
Social competence, academic outcomes of DHH children/students and, 78–79
Social-emotional functioning, speech intelligibility and, 255–58
Social interaction, academic outcomes of DHH children/students and, 78–79
Social Skills Rating System (SSRS), 75
Spatial numerical association of response codes (SNARC), 160
Special education
instruction in, 60–61
Knoors principles in, 60–61
lack of output thinking and, 58
spread effect and, 252–53
Specific language impairment, 131
Speech development, at prelinguistic level, 371–72
Speech development, EBP and, 307–8
collecting evidence, 308
impact of hearing loss, 307–8
Speech in Noise Test (SPIN), 450
Speech intelligibility, of DHH children/students
educational implications and future research, 260–61
effects on attitude, 253–55
perceived personal qualities, 254–55
effects on social and emotional aspects, 255–58
relation with occupational competence, 258–60
Speech perception, inhibition processes in, 443–44
Speech perception performance, cochlear implant and, 393–99
bilateral cochlear implant users, 394–98
presumed benefits of listening with ears, 395–96
sequential bilateral implantation, 397–98
simultaneous bilateral implantation, 396–97
and hearing aid users, 398–99
unilateral adult cochlear implant, 393–94
Speech sampling, 370–71
analyzing elicited speech samples, 371
Spoken language. See also Sign language
age of acquisition effects on outcome of, 282–83
for deaf children, 5–6
development of, 325–28
communication choices for parents, 327–28
impact of cochlear implants, 326–27
newborn hearing screening, 325–26
language interference from, 275
Spread effect, 252
listener’s experience and, 252
regular and special education and, 252–53
Stanford Achievement Test Series, 48
Stark Assessment of Early Vocal Development-Revised (SAEVD-R), 361
level of vocal development and, 361–63
Stimulating listening, at prelinguistic level, 371–72
Stroop Color Word Test (SCWT), 445–46
Student production of captions, 102
Subject-object-verb (SOV) order, 275
Syllabic consonants, 368
Syllable complexity, in children with and without hearing loss, 365–67
Syndromic deafblindness, 178–81
CHARGE syndrome, 178–79
diagnosis of, 179
congenital rubella syndrome, 181
Usher syndrome, 179–81
emotional stability and, 180–81
medical considerations and therapies for, 180
Syntax development, EBP and, 305
T
Tablet PC, 97–99
(p. 506) Teacher preparation, 42
adult-to-adult relationships and, 46–47
common practices of effective teachers, 42
communication adaptations in, 45
coursework and experiences to prepare future itinerant teachers, 46t
for DHH children/students, 42–45
evidence-based practices (EBP), 44
framework for determining individual needs and curriculum focus, 51f
issues affecting, 42–46
cultural identity and, 44
educational difficulties, 43
lack of programs, 45
process of licensing teachers, 43
shortage of teachers, 44–45
and mathematics instruction and learning, 165
recommendations for, 45–52
positions offered to graduates after preparation program, 46–47
reconceptualization of deaf education, 45
reconceptualize service delivery options, 47–50
using, integrating, and sharing technology, 50–52
Technical signs, media support acquisition of, 101–2
Television captioning, 93–94
Test of Early Mathematics Ability (TEMA-3), 157
Test of Written Language (TOWL-3), 151
The Case Against Perfection, 222
The first steps of a deafblind child towards language, 182
Theory of mind (ToM), 415–16
in deaf children, selected studies, 416–21
false/diverse belief, 415–16
foundations of, 415
Total Communication, 296
defined, 19–20
Transnational deaf community, 219–20
Treatment and Education of Autistic and Related Communication Handicapped Children (TEACCH), 176
Twinschool program, 67
U
Unilateral adult cochlear implant, 393–94
United Kingdom’s Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act (HFEA), 215
Universal Design for Learning (UDL), 51–52
Universal newborn hedaring screening (UNHS), 2, 241
timing of identification of deafness and, 244–46
vs. targeted, in developing world, 348–50
Usher syndrome, 173, 179–81
emotional stability and, 180–81
medical considerations and therapies for, 180
V
van Dijk Approach to Assessing Children Who Are Deafblind or Have Multiple Disabilities, 187
van Dijk curriculum, 182–86
building blocks of, 183–85
calendar system, 185
co-active movement, 183–84
imitation, 184
objects of reference, 185
resonance, 183
symbols, 184–85
principles of, 182–83
validity of, 185–86
Video captioning, 94–95
Village sign languages, 269–70
language interference from spoken language, 275
vocabulary comparison in, 270
Visual communication, in children with hearing loss, 294–95
Visual implicit sequence learning task, 450–51
Visual language, 217
Visual learning, 217
Visual-motor sign language, 18
Visuospatial short-term memory span, differences in, 464–67
ASL and visuospatial loop, 466–67
deaf signers and enhanced, 464–65
temporal order, deafness, and visual modality, 465
Vocal development
in children with hearing loss, 365–70
levels of, 361–63, 370t
developmental sequence of, 363–64
typical patterns of, 361–65
Vocalization
amount of, 364–65
differences in children with and without hearing loss, 365–69
similarities in children with and without hearing loss, 365
Volta Review, 26
Volubility, 364–65
Vowel inventories, in young children with hearing loss, 367–69
W
Web-based instruction, 99–101
content instruction, 99–100
participation in out-of-class learning, 100–101
for student research, 101
Web media captioning, 94–95
WebQuests, 52
Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISCIII), 131
What Works Clearinghouse (WWC), 118
Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome, 173
Woodcock-Johnson III Test of Achievement, 48
Word order, in emerging sign language, 275
Working memory (WM), 458
architecture across deaf and hearing, 460–61
architecture of multicomponent, 459f
and caveats about deaf population studied, 468–69
central executive and, 460
linguistic short-term memory span as predictor of, 467–68
new advances in research and predictions of, 468
phonological loop and, 460
and short-term memory, 459–60
Written language, 144–45
Z
Zone of proximal development (ZPD), 121 (p. 507) (p. 508) (p. 509) (p. 510)