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date: 24 February 2020

(p. 719) Appendix: Index of Psychological Tests and Procedures

(p. 719) Appendix: Index of Psychological Tests and Procedures

Alcohol Use Inventory (AUI)

Alcohol Use Inventory (AUI)

Characteristics Assessed

The client's perceptions about four dimensions of alcohol use and abuse, including benefits derived from drinking; styles of drinking; consequences of drinking; and concerns associated with alcohol use.

John Horn, PhD., Kenneth W. Wanberg, PhD, and F. Mark Foster, MS.

The Alcohol Use Inventory (AUI) provides a basis for describing different ways in which individuals use alcohol, the benefits they derive from such use, the negative consequences associated with its use, and the degree of concern individuals express about the use of alcohol and its consequences.

Publisher:

  • Pearson Assessments
  • 5601 Green Valley Drive
  • Bloomington, MN 55437–1099
  • Sales: 800.227.7271
  • Support: 800.627.7271 ext. 3235
  • General Info: 877.242.6767
  • Call: 800.627–7271
  • Fax: 800.632.9011 or 952.681.3299
  • E-Mail: pearsonassessments@pearson.com

Alzheimers's Disease Assessment Scale

Alzheimers's Disease Assessment Scale

Characteristics Assessed

Cognitive functions including memory, language and praxis; noncognitive functions including mood state and behavioral changes.

Where Test Can Be Obtained

Dr. Richard C. Mohs, Affiliated with Eli Lily & Co.

Psychiatry Services (116A)

VA Medical Center

130 West Kingsbridge Road

Bronx, NY 10468

The test is not self-administered and usually takes about 45 min.

The administration cannot be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

Key Reference

Rosen, W. G., Mohs, R. C., & Davis, K. L. (1984). A new rating scale for Alzheimer's disease. American Journal of Psychiatry, 141, 1356–1364.

Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule-Revised

Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule-Revised

Characteristics Assessed

Assesses the severity of anxious syndromes and their accompanying mood states.

Publisher:

  • Graywind Publications
  • Executive Park Drive
  • 1535 Western Ave.
  • Albany, NY 12203
  • The test is not self-administered and usually takes about 3–3.5 hr.
  • The administration procedure cannot be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.
  • The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Key References

DiNardo, P. A., & Barlow, D. H. (1988). Anxiety disorders interview schedule-revised (ADIS-R). Albany, NY: Graywind.

DiNardo, P. A., O'Brien, G. T., Barlow, D. H., Waddell, M. T., & Blanchard, E. B. (1983). Reliability of DSM-III anxiety disorder categories using a new structured interview. Archives of General Psychiatry, 40, 1070–1074.

Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI)

Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI)

Characteristics Assessed

Assesses the negative consequences of the experience of anxiety.

The test is self-administered and usually takes about 10 min.

The administration procedure can be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

To Obtain the Test

IDS Publishing Corporation PO Box 389

Worthington, OH, 43085 614–885–2323

Email: sales@idspublishing.com

Key References

McNally, R. J. (2002). Anxiety sensitivity and panic disorder.Biological Psychiatry, 52, 938–994.

Reiss, S. (1997). Trait anxiety: It's not what you think it is. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 11, 201–214.

Reiss, S., Peterson, R. A., Gursky, D. M., & McNally, R. J. (1986). Anxiety sensitivity, anxiety frequency and the prediction of fearfulness. Behavior Research and Therapy, 24, 1–8.

Taylor, S., Koch, W. J., & Crokett, D. J. (1991). Anxiety sensitivity, trait anxiety, and the anxiety disorders. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 5, 293–311.

Basic Personality Inventory (BPI)

(p. 720) Basic Personality Inventory (BPI)

Characteristics Assessed

Dimensions of psychopathology (hypochondriasis, anxiety, depression, thinking disorder, etc.) divided into 11 clinical scales.

Publisher:

  • Sigma Assessment Systems, Inc.
  • PO Box 610984
  • Port Huron, MI 48061–0984
  • 1–800–265–1285
  • The test is self-administered and usually takes about 35–40 min.
  • The administration can be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.
  • The test is computer scorable and can be interpreted by computer.
  • The address of the official computer scoring and interpretation service is
  • Sigma Assessment Systems, Inc.
  • PO Box 610984
  • Port Huron, MI 48061–0984
  • 1–800–265–1285

Key Reference

Jackson, D. N. (1988, 1995, 1997). Basic Personality Inventory: BPI manual. MI: Sigma Assessment Systems, Inc.

Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI)

Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI)

Characteristics Assessed

Self-report measure of anxiety symptomatology.

Publisher:

  • Pearson Assessments
  • 5601 Green Valley Drive
  • Bloomington, MN 55437–1099
  • Sales: 800.227.7271
  • Support: 800.627.7271 ext. 3235
  • General Info: 877.242.6767
  • Call: 800.627–7271
  • Fax: 800.632.9011 or 952.681.3299
  • EMail: pearsonassessments@pearson.com

For More Information:

www.pearsonassessments.com/tests/aui.htm

The test is self-administered and usually takes about 10 min.

The administration can be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Key References

Beck, A. T., Epstein, N., Brown, G., & Steer, R. A. (1988). An inventory for measuring clinical anxiety: Psychometric properties. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 56, 893–897.

Eydrich, T., Dowdall, D., & Chambless, D. L. (1992). Reliability and validity of the Beck anxiety inventory. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 6, 55–61.

Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)

Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)

Characteristics Assessed

Depression.

Publisher:

  • Pearson Assessments
  • 5601 Green Valley Drive
  • Bloomington, MN 55437–1099
  • Sales: 800.227.7271
  • Support: 800.627.7271 ext. 3235
  • General Info: 877.242.6767
  • Call: 800.627–7271
  • Fax: 800.632.9011 or 952.681.3299
  • EMail: pearsonassessments@pearson.com

For More Information:

www.pearsonassessments.com/tests/aui.htm

The test is self-administered and usually takes about 10–15 min.

The administration can be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

The test is computer scorable and can (a brief narrative) be interpreted by computer.

Other Important Features

21 four-choice statements

Key References

Beck, A. T. (1987). Beck depression inventory: manual. San Antonio, TX: Psychological Corporation.

Beck, A. T., Ward, C. H., Mendelson, M., Mock, J., Erbaugh, J. (1961). An inventory for measuring depression. Archives of General Psychiatry, 4, 561–571.

Butcher Treatment Planning Inventory (BTPI)

Butcher Treatment Planning Inventory (BTPI)

Characteristics Assessed

The Butcher Treatment Planning Inventory (BTPI) was developed as a means of providing personality information on clients involved in personality information on clients involved in psychological intervention. It was derived on the basis of a combination of rational and empirical means. Through its construction, it was created to be behaviorally oriented and fundamentally, atheoretical in nature. The BTPI is intended to assess not only clients' psychological symptoms, but also those specific qualities that are likely to impede the psychological treatment process. The scale consists of 210 true/false items, each of whose content assigns it to one or more of the instrument's 14 scales. Four scales are included to assess the validity of the individual's self-report on the instrument: Inconsistent Responding (INC), the Overly Virtuous Self-Views (VIR), the Exaggerated Problem Presentation (EXA), and the Closed-Mindedness (CLM). There are five scales that assess treatment issues: There are five symptom scales: Depression (DEP) assessing proneness to low mood; Anxiety (ANX) measuring the experience of tension and nervousness; Anger-Out (A-O) assessing hostile attitudes and exhibiting of anger; Anger-In (A-I), measuring internalization of anger and self-blame; and Unusual Thinking (PSY) assessing strange or delusional beliefs and demonstrating of unusual behaviors.

Characteristics Assessed

Personality characteristics and process variables in treatment planning.

Publisher:

  • Multi-Health Systems Inc.
  • 908 Niagara Falls Blvd.
  • North Tonawanda, NY 14120–2060
  • 800–496–8324
  • Fax: 800–540–4484
  • Multi-Health Systems Inc. (MHS) 3770 Victoria Park Ave.
  • Toronto, ON M2H 3M6
  • 416–492–2627 (Ext. 330)
  • Fax: 416–492–3343

(p. 721) Further Information can also be Obtained at:

www.umn.edu/mmpi

Key References

Butcher, J. N. (2005). The Butcher treatment planning inventory (BTPI): Test manual and interpretive guide. Toronto, ON: Multi-Health Systems.

Butcher, J. N., Rouse, S. V., & Perry, J. N. (1998). Assessing resistance to psychological treatment. Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development, 31, 95–108.

Butcher, J. N., Rouse, S. V., & Perry, J. N. (2000). Empirical description of psychopathology in therapy clients: Correlates of the MMPI-2 scales. In J. N. Butcher (Ed.), Basic sources on the MMPI-2 (pp. 487–500). Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press.

Perry, J. N., & Butcher, J. N. (1999). Butcher treatment planning inventory (BTPI): An objective guide to treatment planning. In M. E. Maruish (Ed.), The use of psychological testing for treatment planning and outcomes assessment (2nd ed., pp. 1157–1171). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Clinician Administered PTSD Scales (CAPS)

Clinician Administered PTSD Scales (CAPS)

Characteristics Assessed

Assesses the severity and frequency of PTSD symptoms.

Where Test Can Be Obtained.

Dr. Dudley David Blake

Psychology Services (116B)

Boston VAMC

150 South Huntington Ave.

Boston, MA 02130

The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

For Further Information:

www.ntis.gov/pdf/programbrochure.pdf

Key Reference

Blake, D. D., Weathers, F. W., Nagy, L. M., Kaloupek, D. G., Klauminzer, G., Charney, D., & Keane, T. (1990). A clinician rating scale for assessing current and lifetime PTSD: The CAPS-1. The Behavior Therapist, 13, 137–188.

Clinical Frequencies Recording System (CFRS)

Clinical Frequencies Recording System (CFRS)

Characteristics Assessed

Low-frequency critical events and totally setting-dependent behavior of clients and staff in inpatient and residential treatment settings.

Publisher:

  • Research Press
  • Dept. 27W
  • Main: 217–352–3273
  • PO Box 9177
  • Toll Free: 800–519–2707
  • Champaign, IL 61826
  • Fax: 217–352–1221
  • The test is computer scorable but cannot be interpreted by computer.

Other Important Features

A set of forms for completion by clinical staff as part of ongoing service delivery, specifically for a comprehensive social-learning program, but adaptable to other programs.

Functioning scores are derived across forms to provide weekly “rate-per-opportunity.”

Key Reference

Redfield, J. P. (1979). Clinical frequencies recording systems: Standardizing staff observations by event recording. Journal of Behavioral Assessment, 1, 211–219.

Cognitive Coping Strategy Inventory (CCSI)

Cognitive Coping Strategy Inventory (CCSI)

Characteristics Assessed

Various reactions for coping with pain.

Where Test Can Be Obtained

See Butler et al. 1989.

The test is self-administered and usually takes about 10–12 min.

The administration can be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Key Reference

Butler, R. W., Damarin, F. L., Beauliu, C., Schwebel, A. I., & Thorn, B. F. (1989). Assessing cognitive coping strategies for acute post-surgical pain. Psychological Assessment, 1, 41–45.

Columbia University Scale for Psychopathology

Columbia University Scale for Psychopathology

Characteristics Assessed

(Designed for Alzheimer patients): Delusions, hallucinations, illusion, behavioral disturbance (aggression, wandering away, restlessness, and confusion), vegetative symptoms of depression.

Where Test Can Be Obtained

Dr. D. P. Devarand

New York State Psychiatric Institute

722 West 168th Street

New York, NY 10032

The test is not self-administered and usually takes about 10–25min.

The test can be administered by a trained lay interviewer.

The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Other Important Features

This is a semistructured interview instrument that focuses on symptoms occurring during the past year.

Key Reference

Devarand, D. P., Miller, L., Richards, M. Marder, K., Bell, K., Mayeux, R., et al. (1992). The Columbia University Scale for Psychopathology in Alzheimer's disease. Archives of Neurology, 49, 371–376.

Comprehensive Assessment and Referral Evaluation (CARE)

Comprehensive Assessment and Referral Evaluation (CARE)

Characteristics Assessed

Psychiatric, medical, nutritional, economic, and social problems of the older person.

The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Other Important Features

Clinician rating scale

Key Reference

Gurland, B., Kuriansky, J., Sharpe, L., Simar, R., Stiller, P., & Birkett, P. (1977–1978). The Comprehensive Assessment and Referral Evaluation (CARE)—Rationale, development and reliability. International Journal of Aging and Human Development, 8, 9–42.

Computerized TSBC/SRIC Planned-Access Observational Information System

(p. 722) Computerized TSBC/SRIC Planned-Access Observational Information System

Characteristics Assessed

Incorporates all characteristics assessed by component direct observational coding (DOC) instruments—the Time-Sample Behavioral Checklist (TSBC) and the Staff-Resident Interaction Chronograph (SRIC)—as well as biographical data for ongoing assessment of functioning and effectiveness of clients, staff, and treatment programs in inpatient/residential facilities.

Publisher:

  • Research Press
  • Dept. 27W
  • Main: 217–352–3273
  • PO Box 9177
  • Toll Free: 800–519–2707
  • Champaign, IL 61826
  • Fax: 217–352–1221
  • The test is not self-administered.
  • The administration can be delegated to clerical or nursing staff (see below).
  • The test is computer scorable but cannot be interpreted by computer.
  • Paul (1994b) contains all computer programs and file-management procedures for retrieving and scoring standard reports on an ongoing basis.

Other Important Features

Uses full-time technician-level observers and clerical staff for data collection. An ongoing system, with integrated training materials and procedures for all levels of staff to support collection, monitoring, processing, retrieval, distribution, and interpretation of information on clients, staff, and treatment programs in mental hospitals and community facilities.

Key References

Paul, G. L. (Ed.) (1994a). Observational assessment instrumentation for service and research—The Computerized TSBC/SRIC Planned-Access Information System: Assessment in residential treatment settings (Part 4). Champaign, IL: Research Press.

Paul, G.L. (Ed.) (1994b). Observational assessment instrumentation for service and research—The TSBC/SRIC system implementation package: Assessment in residential treatment settings (Part 5). Champaign, IL: Research Press.

Constructive Thinking Inventory (CTI)

Constructive Thinking Inventory (CTI)

Characteristics Assessed

Six coping dimensions: emotional coping, behavioral coping, categorical thinking, superstitious thinking, naive optimism, and negative thinking.

Where Test Can Be Obtained

Dr. Seymour Epstein

Department of Psychology

University of Massachusetts

Amherst, MA 01003

For Further Information Contact:

sepstein@psych.umass.edu

The test is self-administered and usually takes about 15 min.

The administration can be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Key Reference

Epstein, S., & Meier, P. (1989). Constructive thinking: A broad coping variable with specific components. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 57, 332–350.

Cope Scale

Cope Scale

Characteristics Assessed

13 basic coping styles.

Where Test Can Be Obtained

Dr. Charles S. Carver

PO Box 248185

University of Miami

Coral Gables, FL 33124

Fax: 305–284–3402

For Further Information:

http://www.psy.miami.edu/faculty/ccarver/CCscales.html

The test is self-administered and usually takes about 15 min.

The administration can be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Key Reference

Carver, C. S., Scheier, M. F., & Weintraub, J. K. (1989). Assessing coping strategies: A theoretically based approach. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 56, 267–283.

Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS)

Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS)

Characteristics Assessed

Task-oriented coping style, emotion-oriented coping style, and avoidance-oriented coping style.

Publisher:

  • Multi-Health Systems Inc.
  • 908 Niagara Falls Blvd.
  • North Tonawanda, NY 14120–2060
  • 800–496–8324
  • Fax: 800–540–4484
  • The test is self-administered and usually takes about 10 min.
  • The administration can be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.
  • The test is computer scorable and can be interpreted by computer.
  • The address of the official computer scoring and interpretation service is
  • Multi-Health Systems Inc.
  • 908 Niagara Falls Blvd.
  • North Tonawanda, NY 14120–2060 800–496–8324
  • Fax: 800–540–4484
  • Multi-Health Systems Inc. (MHS)
  • 3770 Victoria Park Ave.
  • Toronto, ON M2H 3M6
  • 416–492–2627 (Ext. 330)
  • Fax: 416–492–3343

Other Important Features

Adult and adolescent versions of the CISS are available.

Key Reference

Endler, N. S., & Parker, J. D. A. (1990). Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS): Manual. Toronto, ON: Multi-Health Systems.

Coping Resources Inventory (CRI)

(p. 723) Coping Resources Inventory (CRI)

Characteristics Assessed

Five “personal resources” variables: cognitive resources, social resources, emotional resources, spiritual/philosophical resources, and physical resources.

Publisher:

  • Consulting Psychologist Press
  • 3803 E. Bayshore Road
  • Palo Alto, CA 94303–9608
  • 800–624–1765
  • Fax: 650–623–9273
  • Email: knw@cpp-db.com
  • Web: www.cpp-db.com
  • The test is self-administered and usually takes about 10 min.
  • The administration can be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.
  • The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Key Reference

Hamer, A. L., & Marting, M. S. (1988). Manual for the coping resources inventory. Palo Alto, CA: Consulting Psychologists Press.

Coping Strategy Indicator (CSI)

Coping Strategy Indicator (CSI)

Characteristics Assessed

Three basic coping reactions or strategies that may be used in a cross section of stressful situations (problem-solving coping, seeking social-support coping, and avoidance coping).

Where Test Can Be Obtained

Dr. James H. Amirkhan

Department of Psychology

California State University

Long Beach, CA 90840

INIST Diffusion S.A.

Service Clients/Customer Service

2, allée du parc de Brabois

F-54514 Vandoeuvre Cedex France

Tél: +33 (0) 3.83.50.46.64

Fax: +33 (0) 3.83.50.46.66

Email: infoclient@inist.fr

The test is self-administered and usually takes about 8–10 min.

The administration can be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Key Reference

Amirkhan, J. H. (1990). A factor analytically derived measure of coping: The coping strategy indicator. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 59, 1066–1074.

The Daily Hassles Scale

The Daily Hassles Scale

Characteristics Assessed

This “life event scale” focuses on day-to-day stressors people encounter that might result in difficulties in coping.

Publisher:

  • Mind Garden, Inc.
  • 1690 Woodside Road, Suite 202
  • Redwood City, CA 94061
  • Email: info@mindgarden.com
  • There is no computer scoring or interpretation available for the scale.

Other Important Features

Although primarily a research instrument, this scale might have clinical applications as well. The scale is a 117-item self-report questionnaire. All items represent frequently reported daily hassles.

Key Reference

Lazarus, R. S., & Folkman, S. (1989). Manual: Hassles and uplifts scale, research edition. Palo Alto, CA: Mind Garden.

Defense Style Questionnaire (DSQ)

Defense Style Questionnaire (DSQ)

Characteristics Assessed

Three defense mechanism clusters: mature defenses, immature defenses, and neurotic defenses.

Where Test Can Be Obtained

Included as an appendix in Vaillant, G. E. (1986). Empirical studies of ego mechanisms of defense. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Press.

The test is not self-administered and usually takes about 15 min.

The administration can be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Key References

Andrews, G., Singh, M., & Bond, M. (1993). The defense style questionnaire. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 181, 246–256.

Bond, M. (1986). An empirical study of defense styles. In G. E. Vaillant (Ed.), Empirical studies of ego mechanisms of defense (pp. 1–29). Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Press.

Dementia Rating Scale

Dementia Rating Scale

Characteristics Assessed

Attention, perseveration (both verbal and motor), drawing ability, verbal and nonverbal abstraction, and verbal and nonverbal short-term memory.

Where Test Can Be Obtained

Dr. Steven Mattis

Department of Neurology

Weill Medical College of Cornell University

Bronx, NY 10475

The test is not self-administered and usually takes about 10–15 min with normal elderly patients, 30–45 min with dementia patients.

The administration cannot be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

Key References

Coblentz, J. M., Mattis, S., Zingesser, L. H., Kasoff, S. S., Wisniewski, H. H., & Katzman, R. (1973). Pre-senile dementia: Clinical aspects and evaluations of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics. Archives of Neurology, 29, 299–308.

Montgomery, K. M. (1982). A normative study of neuropsychological test performance of a normal elderly sample (Unpublished master's thesis). University of Victoria, BC, Canada.

Diagnostic Interview For Narcissism

Diagnostic Interview For Narcissism

Characteristics Assessed

Narcissistic personality disorder.

Where Test Can Be Obtained

Dr. John Gunderson

(p. 724) McLean Hospital

115 Mill Street

Belmont, MA 02178

The test is not self-administered and usually takes about 1–3 hr.

The administration cannot be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Other Important Features

Semistructured interview

Key Reference

Gunderson, J. G., Ronningstam, E., & Bodkin, A. (1990). The diagnostic interview for narcissistic patients. Archives of General Psychiatry, 47, 676–680.

Diagnostic Interview For Personality Disorders

Diagnostic Interview For Personality Disorders

Characteristics Assessed

Personality disorders.

Where Test Can Be Obtained

Dr. John Gunderson McLean Hospital

115 Mill Street

Belmont, MA 02178

The test is not self-administered and usually takes about 1–3 hr.

The administration cannot be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Other Important Features

Semistructured interview

Key Reference

Zanarini, M., Frankenburg, F. R., Chauncey, D. L., & Gunderson, J. G. (1987). The diagnostic interview for personality disorders: Inter-rater and test-retest reliability. Comprehensive Psychiatry, 28, 467–480.

Dimensional Assessment of Personality Pathology—Basic Questionnaire

Dimensional Assessment of Personality Pathology—Basic Questionnaire

Characteristics Assessed

Maladaptive personality traits.

Where Test Can Be Obtained

Dr. John W. Livesley

Department of Psychiatry

University of British Columbia

2255 Wesbrook Mall

Vancouver, BC V6T 2A1 Canada

The test is not self-administered and usually takes about 45 min.

The administration cannot be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

The test is computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Key Reference

Schroeder, M. L., Wormworth, J. A., & Livesley, W. J. (1992). Dimensions of personality disorder and their relationship to the Big Five dimensions of personality. Psychological Assessment, 4, 47–53.

Early Memories Procedure

Early Memories Procedure

Characteristics Assessed

Contents: Five spontaneous early memories; the clearest or most important memory in lifetime; 15 directed memories (some early, some lifetime), including most traumatic memories. Assesses: Major unresolved issue currently in process.

Publisher:

  • Dr. Arnold R. Bruhn
  • 4400 E West Hwy.
  • Bethesda, MD 20814–4524
  • Website: www.arbruhn.com/home.html
  • The test is self-administered and usually takes about 5 min for psychologists.
  • The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Other Important Features

Assesses clinically relevant aspects of autobiographical memory. Functions as a “hub” technique for other “spare” procedures, such as Memories of Spouse procedure.

Key References

Bruhn, A. R. (1990). Earliest childhood memories: Theory and application to clinical practice. New York: Praeger.

Bruhn, A. R. (1992a). The early memories procedure: A projective test of autobiographical memory, Part 1. Journal of Personality Assessment, 58, 1–15.

Bruhn, A. R. (1992b). The early memories procedure: A projective test of autobiographical memory, Part 2. Journal of Personality Assessment, 58, 326–346.

Fear Survey Schedule—III (FSS-III)

Fear Survey Schedule—III (FSS-III)

Characteristics Assessed

Self-report inventory of fears common among phobics.

EdITS/EDUCATIONALAND INDUSTRIALTESTING SERVICE

PO 7234, SAN DIEGO, CA 92167

619–222–1666, 800–416–1666

Fax: 619–226–1666

Email: customerservice@edits.net

http://www.edits.net/pdfs/FSS.pdf

The test is self-administered and usually takes about 20 min.

The administration can be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Key References

Wolpe, J., & Lang, P. J. (1974). A fear survey schedule for use in behavior therapy. Behavior Research and Therapy, 2, 27–30.

Arrindell, W. A., & van der Ende, J. (1986). Further evidence for cross-sample invariance of phobic factors: Psychiatric inpatient ratings on the Fear Survey Schedule. Behavior Research and Therapy, 24, 289–297.

Functional Assessment Inventory (FAI)

Functional Assessment Inventory (FAI)

Characteristics Assessed

Functional information in five domains—social resources, economic resources, mental health, physical health, and ADL status.

(p. 725) The test is not self-administered and usually takes about 30 min.

Key References

Carl, R., Pfeiffer, E., Keller, D. M., Burke, H., & Samis, H. V. (1983). An evaluation of the validity of the functional assessment inventory. Journal of the American Geriatric Society, 31, 606–612.

Pfeiffer, E., Johnson, T., & Chiofolo, R. (1981). Functional assessment of elderly subjects in four service settings. Journal of the American Geriatric Society, 10, 433–437.

General Temperament Survey (GTS)

General Temperament Survey (GTS)

Characteristics Assessed

Three broad dimensions of temperament: negative affectivity, positive affectivity, and disinhibition.

Publisher:

  • Available as part of the Schedule for Nonadaptive and Adaptive
  • Personality (SNAP)
  • University of Minnesota Press
  • 2037 University Avenue SE
  • Minneapolis, MN 55455
  • Where Test Can Be Obtained
  • Dr. L.A. Clark & Dr. D. Watson (unlisted)
  • Department of Psychology
  • Seashore Hall University of Iowa
  • Iowa City, IA 52242–11407
  • The test is self-administered and usually takes about 20 min.
  • The administration cannot be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.
  • The test is computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Other Important Features

May be available through University of Minnesota Press in the future.

Key References

Watson, D., & Clark, L. A. (1993). Behavioral disinhibition versus constraint: A dispositional perspective. In D. M. Wegner & J. W. Pennebaker (Eds.), Handbook of mental control (pp. 506–527). New York: Prentice-Hall.

Watson, D., & Clark, L. A. (1992). On traits and temperament: General and specific factors of emotional experience and their relations to the Five-Factor Model. Journal of Personality, 60, 443–476.

Geriatric Depression Scale

Geriatric Depression Scale

Characteristics Assessed

Measures depression in the elderly.

Where Test Can Be Obtained

Dr. T. L. Brink

1044 Sylvan Doctor

San Carlos, CA 94070

or

Dr. Jerome Yesavage

VA Medical Center

3801 Miranda Avenue

Mail Code 151-Y

Palo Alto, CA 94304

The test (both oral and written format) is self-administered and is about 30 items long.

The administration can be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

Other Important Features

Translation available in Spanish and French.

Key Reference

Yesavage, J. A., Brink, T. L., Rose, T. L., & Leirer, V. O. (1983). Development and validation of a geriatric depression screening scale: A preliminary report. Journal of Psychiatric Research, 17, 37–49.

Geriatric Mental Status Interview

Geriatric Mental Status Interview

Characteristics Assessed

Contains almost 500 items considered relevant for assessing psychopathology in a geriatric psychiatric population.

The test is not self-administered and usually takes an average of 1.5 hr.

The administration cannot be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

Other Important Features

Semistructured interview guide—1500 items.

Key Reference

Gurland, B., Copeland, J., Sharpe, L., & Kelleher, M. (1976). The geriatric mental status interview (GMS). International Journal of Aging and Human Development, 7, 303–311.

Halifax Mental Status Scale

Halifax Mental Status Scale

Characteristics Assessed

Orientation, memory for a single phrase, concentration, comprehension of commands, naming objects manual praxis, visual constructional ability.

Where Test Can Be Obtained

Dr. John Fisk

Neuropsychology Service

Department of Psychology

Camp Hill Medical Center

Halifax, NS B3H 362

The test is not self-administered and usually takes less than 15 min.

The administration cannot be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

Key Reference

Fisk, J. D., Braha, R. E., & Walker, A. (1991). The Halifax mental status scale: Development of a new test of mental status for used with elderly clients. Psychological Assessment: A Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 3, 162–167.

Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS)

Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS)

Characteristics Assessed

A clinician-administered scale designed to measure the severity of anxiety symptoms. Originally designed for use with patients diagnosed with anxiety neuroses.

The test is not self-administered and usually takes about 30 min.

(p. 726) The administration cannot be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Key References

Hamilton, M. (1959). The assessment of anxiety states by rating. British Journal of Medical Psychology, 32, 50–55.

Maier, W., Buller, R., Philipp, M., & Heuser, I. (1988). The Hamilton anxiety scale: Reliability, validity and sensitivity to change in anxiety and depressive disorders. Journal of Affective Disorders, 14, 61–68.

Hare Psychopathy Checklist-Revised

Hare Psychopathy Checklist-Revised

Characteristics Assessed

Rating scale for the assessment of psychopathy in male forensic populations. It yields dimensional scores concerning behavior and inferred personality traits.

Publisher:

  • Multi-Health Systems Inc.
  • 908 Niagara Falls Blvd.
  • North Tonawanda, NY 14120–2060
  • 800–496–8324
  • Fax: 800–540–4484
  • Multi-Health Systems Inc. (MHS)
  • 3770 Victoria Park Ave.
  • Toronto, ON M2H 3M6
  • 416–492–2627 (Ext. 330)
  • Fax: 416–492–3343
  • The test is not self-administered and usually takes about 2 hr.
  • The administration cannot be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.
  • The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Other Important Features

Clinical interview and review of collateral information necessary; can also be used to classify and diagnose individuals for research and clinical purposes.

Key Reference

Hare, R. D., Hart, S. D., & Harpur, T. J. (1991). Psychopathy and the DSM-IV criteria for antisocial personality disorder. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 100, 391–398.

Hopelessness Scale

Hopelessness Scale

Characteristics Assessed

Hopelessness.

Publisher:

  • Pearson Assessments
  • 5601 Green Valley Drive
  • Bloomington, MN 55437–1099
  • Sales: 800.227.7271
  • Support: 800.627.7271 ext. 3235
  • General Info: 877.242.6767
  • Call: 800.627–7271
  • Fax: 800.632.9011 or 952.681.3299
  • EMail: pearsonassessments@pearson.com

For More Information:

www.pearsonassessments.com/tests/aui.htm

The test is not self-administered but is based on self-report. It usually takes a few minutes.

The administration cannot be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

Key References

Beck, A. T., Weissman, A., Lester, D., & Trexler, L. (1974). The measurement of pessimism: The hopelessness scale. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 42, 861–865.

Beck, A. T., Steer, R. A., Kovacs, M., & Garrison, B. (1985). Hopelessness and eventual suicide: A ten year prospective study of patients hospitalized with suicide ideation. American Journal of Psychiatry, 142, 559–563.

Individualism-Collectivism (INDCOL) Scale

Individualism-Collectivism (INDCOL) Scale

Characteristics Assessed

Degree of individualism-collectivism (set of feelings, beliefs, behavioral intentions, and behaviors related to solidarity and concern for others).

Where Test Can Be Obtained

Dr. C. Harry Hui

Department of Psychology

University of Hong Kong

Pokfulam Road

Hong Kong

The test is self-administered and usually takes about 15–30 min.

The administration cannot be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Key References

Hui, C. H. (1988). Measurement of individualism-collectivism. Journal of Research in Personality, 22, 17–36.

Robert, C., Lee, W. C., & Chan, K.-Y. (2006). An empirical analysis of measurement equivalence with the INDCOL measure of individualism and collectivism: Implications for valid cross-cultural inference. Personnel Psychology, 59(1), 65–99.

Interviewer-Rated Defense Mechanism Scales

Interviewer-Rated Defense Mechanism Scales

Characteristics Assessed

12 basic defense mechanisms.

Where Test Can Be Obtained

Dr. Alan Jacobson

Joslin Diabetes Center

1 Joslin Place

Boston, MA 02215

The test is not self-administered and takes several hours (depending on the type of clinical material used).

The administration cannot be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

The test is not computer-scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Other Important Features

The Jacobson et al. measure is an observer-rated defense mechanism measure developed for use with adolescent population.

Key Reference

Jacobson, A. M., Beardslee, W., Hauser, S. T., Noam, G. G., Powers, S. I., Houlihan, J., et al. (1986). Evaluating ego defense mechanisms using clinical interviews: An empirical study of adolescent diabetic and psychiatric patients. Journal of Adolescence, 9, 303–319.

Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (IIP)

(p. 727) Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (IIP)

Characteristics Assessed

This self-report inventory provides information about interpersonal problems based on the circumplex interpersonal model of Timothy Leary. It is a 117-item scale that usually takes about half an hour to administer.

Publisher:

  • Pearson Assessments
  • 5601 Green Valley Drive Bloomington, MN 55437–1099
  • Sales: 800.227.7271
  • Support: 800.627.7271 ext. 3235
  • General Info: 877.242.6767
  • Call: 800.627–7271
  • Fax: 800.632.9011 or 952.681.3299
  • EMail: pearsonassessments@pearson.com

Key Reference

Horowitz, L. M. (1996). The study of interpersonal problems: A Leary legacy. Journal of Personality Assessment, 66, 283–300.

Life Experiences Survey (LES)

Life Experiences Survey (LES)

Characteristics Assessed

This survey was constructed from the theoretical perspective that subjective ratings of life changes are critical in determining the impact of life events. The survey includes 47 specified items and 3 items that the subject completes.

Publisher:

Sarason, Johnson, & Siegel (1978)

It takes approximately 10 min to complete the LES.

The survey is not computer scorable or interpretable.

Key Reference

Sarason, I. B., Johnson, J. H., & Siegel, J. M. (1978). Assessing the impact of life changes: Development of the life experiences survey. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 46, 932–946.

Loss of Face Measure

Loss of Face Measure

Characteristics Assessed

Areas in which face-threatening concerns are salient.

Where Test Can Be Obtained

Dr. Nolan Zane

Graduate School of Education

University of California, Santa Barbara

Santa Barbara, CA 93106

The test is not self-administered and takes about 10 min.

The administration can be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Key Reference

Zane, N. W. S. (1991). An empirical examination of Loss of Face among Asian Americans. Paper presented at the 99th annual convention of the American Psychological Association, San Francisco, CA, August 1991.

The M Test

The M Test

Characteristics Assessed

Malingering of schizophrenia.

Where Test Can Be Obtained

**Dr. Rex Beaber

Dr. Rex Beaber

Division of Family Medicine

1875 Century Park East, Suite 700

Room BH-134 CHS

Los Angeles, CA 90067

UCLA Medical Center

Los Angeles, CA 90024

The test is self-administered and takes about 10 min.

The administration cannot be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Key References

Beaber, R., Marston, A., Michelli, J., & Mills, M. (1985). A brief test for measuring malingering in schizophrenic individuals. American Journal of Psychiatry, 142, 1478–1481.

Gillias, J., Rogus, R., & Bagby, M. (1991). Validity of the M Test. Journal of Personality Assessment, 57, 130–140.

Maudsley Obsessional-Compulsive Inventory (MOCI)

Maudsley Obsessional-Compulsive Inventory (MOCI)

Characteristics Assessed

Self-report measure to assess the existence and extent of different obsessive compulsive complaints.

Where Test Can Be Obtained

Dr. R. J. Hodgson

Addition Research Unit

Institute of Psychiatry, 101

Denmark Hill, London

SE5 9AF England

The test is self-administered and takes about 10–15 min.

The administration can be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Key References

Hodgson, R. J., & Rachman, S. (1977). Obsessional-compulsive complaints. Behavior Therapy, 15, 389–395.

Sternberger, L. G., & Burns, G. L. (1990). Compulsive activity checklist and the Maudsley obsessional-compulsive inventory: Psychometric properties of two measures of obsessive-com-pulsive disorder. Behavior Therapy, 21, 117–127.

Marital Satisfaction Inventory-Revised

Marital Satisfaction Inventory-Revised

Characteristics Assessed

This 150-item inventory assesses the extent to which the respondent considers his or her marriage to be satisfactory. The inventory is used with premarital couples as well as married couples. The scale contains two validity scales and 10 specific scales measuring relationship satisfaction.

Publisher:

  • Western Psychological Services
  • 12031 Wilshire Boulevard Los Angeles, CA 90025
  • Los Angeles, CA 90025

(p. 728) Key Reference

Snyder, D. R., & Aikman, G. G. (1999). The marital satisfaction inventory-revised. In M. E. Maruish (Ed.), Use of psychological tests for treatment planning and outcomes assessment (pp. 1173–1210). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Memories of Spouse

Memories of Spouse

Characteristics Assessed

Contents: 15 spontaneous memories of spouse, beginning with first meeting, and several directed memories. Assesses: Problem areas in relationship. Provides an overview of the marriage, beginning with first meeting.

Publisher:

  • Arnold R. Bruhn
  • The Topaz House
  • 4400 E. West Highway #28
  • Bethesda, MD 20814
  • The test is self-administered and takes about 5 min for psychologists.
  • The administration can be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.
  • The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Key Reference

Bruhn, A. R., & Feigenbaum, K. (1993). The interpretation of autobiographical memories (Unpublished manuscript).

Miller Behavioral Style Scale (MBSS)

Miller Behavioral Style Scale (MBSS)

Characteristics Assessed

Two basic coping styles: information distractors (blunters) and information seekers (monitors).

Where Test Can Be Obtained

Dr. Suzanne M. Miller

Department of Psychology, Weiss Hall

Temple University

113th and Columbia Streets

Philadelphia, PA 19122

The test is self-administered and takes about 10–15 min.

The administration can be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Key References

Miller, S. M. (1987). Monitoring and blunting: Validation of a questionnaire to assess styles of information seeking under threat. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 52, 345–353.

Miller, S. M., Brody, D. S., & Summerton, S. (1988). Styles of coping with threat: Implications for health. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 54, 142–148.

Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST)

Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST)

Characteristics Assessed

This instrument provides a quantifiable assessment of alcohol use problems. The inventory is a 25-item measure that is administered by an interviewer.

Publisher:

  • Melvin Selzer
  • 6967 Paseo Laredo
  • LaJolla, CA 92037

Key Reference

Selzer, M. L. (1971). The Michigan alcoholism screening test: The quest for a new diagnostic instrument. American Journal of Psychiatry, 127, 1653–1658.

Million Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III)

Million Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III)

Characteristics Assessed

A measure of 22 personality disorders and clinical syndromes for adults undergoing psychological or psychiatric assessment or treatment.

Publisher:

  • Pearson Assessments
  • 5601 Green Valley Drive
  • Bloomington, MN 55437–1099
  • The test is self-administered and takes about 45–60 min.
  • The administration can be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.
  • The test is computer scorable and is interpreted by computer.
  • The address of the official computer scoring and interpretation service is:
  • Pearson Assessments
  • 5601 Green Valley Drive
  • Bloomington, MN 55437–1099

Key References

Craig, R. J. (Ed.) (1993). The million clinical multiaxial inventory: A clinical research information synthesis. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.

Choca, J., Shanty, L., & Van Denberg, E. (1991). Interpretive guide to the million multiaxial inventory. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Millon, T. (Ed). (1997). The million inventories: Clinical and personality assessment. New York: Guilford Press.

Mini-Mental State (MMS)

Mini-Mental State (MMS)

Characteristics Assessed

Orientation; memory; attention; ability to name, follow verbal and written commands, and constructional ability.

Where Test Can Be Obtained

Dr. Marshal F. Folstein

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science

Johns Hopkins Hospital

Baltimore, MD 21205

The test is not self-administered and usually takes about 5–10 min.

The administration cannot be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Key References

Folstein, M. F., Folstein, S. E., & McHugh, P. (1975). “Mini-mental state”: A practical method for grading the cognitive state of patients for the clinician. Journal of Psychiatric Research, 12, 189–198.

Anthony, J. C., LeResche, L., Niaz, W., Von Korff, M. R., & Folstein, M. F. (1982). Limits of the mini-mental state as a screening test for dementia and delirium among hospital patients. Psychological Medicine, 12, 397–408.

The Multicenter-Panic Anxiety Scale (MC-PAS)

(p. 729) The Multicenter-Panic Anxiety Scale (MC-PAS)

Characteristics Assessed

Clinician-rated composite symptom rating scale for panic disorder.

Where Test Can Be Obtained

Dr. Katherine Shear

Anxiety Disorders Clinic

Western Pyschiatric Institute & Clinic

3811 O'Hara Street

Pittsburgh, PA 15213

The test is not self-administered and usually takes about 20 min.

The administration cannot be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Key Reference

Shear, M. K., Brown, T. A., Barlow, D. H., Money, R., Sholomskas, D. E., Woods, S. W., Gorman, J. M., & Papp, L. A. (1997). Multicenter collaborative panic disorder severity scale. American Journal of Psychiatry, 154(11), 1571–1575.

The Multidimensional Function Assessment Questionnaire (OARS)

The Multidimensional Function Assessment Questionnaire (OARS)

Characteristics Assessed

Individual functioning—provides functional information in five domains of social resources, economic resources, mental health, physical health, and ADL status.

Older Americans Resources and Services Programs

Duke University Center for Study of Aging and Human Development

Durham, NC 27710

The test is not self-administered and usually takes about 45 min–1 hr.

The administration cannot be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

The test is (computer-assigned ratings available in key reference) computer scorable but cannot be interpreted by computer.

Key Reference

Duke University Center for the Study of Aging. (1978). Multidimensional functional assessment: The OARS methodology (2nd ed.) Durham, NC: Duke University

Multilevel Assessment Instrument (MAI)

Multilevel Assessment Instrument (MAI)

Characteristics Assessed

Health, activities of daily living, cognition, time use, social interaction, psychological well-being (personal adjustment—moral and psychiatric symptoms), and perceived quality of life (perceived environment—housing quality, neighborhood quality, and personal security).

Where Test Can Be Obtained

**Jana M. Mosley, PhD, MPH, MSN

**Dr. M. Powell Lawton (deceased January 2001)

Philadelphia Geriatric Center

301 Old York Road

Philadelphia, PA 19141

The test is not self-administered and usually takes about 50 min (15–60 min).

The administration cannot be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

The test is computer scorable but cannot be interpreted by computer.

Other Important Features

Interview format

Key References

Lawton, M. P., Kleban, M. H., & Moss, M. (1980). The Philadelphia geriatric center multilevel assessment instrument. Final report to the National Institute of Aging. Philadelphia, Philadelphia Geriatric Center, Philadelphia, PA.

Lawton, M. P., Moss, M., Fulcomer, M., & Kleban, M. (1982). A research and service oriented multilevel assessment instrument. Journal of Gerontology, 37, 91–99.

Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI-2)

Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI-2)

Characteristics Assessed

The MMPI-2 is a revised version of the original MMPI and was published in 1989. A broad range of personality characteristics and clinical symptoms are addressed by the MMPI-2, for example, anxiety and somatization disorders, antisocial patterns, mood disorders, thought disorder, relationship problems, and potential problems with alcohol and drug abuse. There are eight validity measures available to aid in the detection of invalidating conditions. The traditional empirically based MMPI Clinical Scales are continuous with MMPI-2, and a number of new content and special scales to detect alcohol and drug abuse and marital problems have been published.

Publisher:

  • University of Minnesota Press
  • University of Minnesota
  • 2037 University Avenue SE
  • Minneapolis, MN 55455–3082
  • Where Test Can Be Obtained
  • Pearson Assessments
  • 5601 Green Valley Drive
  • Bloomington, MN 55437–1099
  • Sales: 800–227–7271
  • Support: 800–627–7271 (Ext. 3235)
  • General info: 877–242–6767
  • Call: 800–627–7271
  • Fax: 800–632–9011 or 952–681–3299
  • Email: pearsonassessments@pearson.com
  • Information on the MMPI-2 can be obtained at www.umn.edu/mmpi
  • The test is self-administered and usually takes about 1.5 hr.
  • The administration can be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.
  • The test is computer scorable and can be interpreted by computer.
  • The address of the official computer scoring and interpretation service is provided by Pearson Assessments
  • 5601 Green Valley Drive
  • Bloomington, MN 55437–1099
  • Sales: 800–227–7271
  • Support: 800–627–7271 (Ext. 3235)
  • General info: 877–242–6767
  • Call: 800–627–7271
  • Fax: 800–632–9011 or 952–681–3299
  • Email: pearsonassessments@pearson.com

(p. 730) Key References

Butcher, J. N., Cabiya, J., Lucio, E. M., & Garrido, M. (2007). Assessing Hispanic clients using the MMPI-2 and MMPI-A. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Butcher, J. N., Dahlstrom, W. G., Graham, J. R., Tellegen, A., & Kaemmer, B. (2001). MMPI-2 (Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2): Manual for administration and scoring (Rev. ed.). Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press.

Butcher, J. N., & Williams, C. L. (2000). Essentials of MMPI-2 and MMPI-A interpretation (2nd ed.). Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press.

Graham, J. R. (2000). MMPI-2: Assessing personality and psychopathology (3rd ed.). New York: Oxford University Press.

Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI-A)

Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI-A)

Characteristics Assessed

The MMPI-A is a revised version of the original MMPI for adolescents and was published in 1992. A broad range of personality characteristics, clinical symptoms, and adolescent behavioral problems are addressed by the MMPI-A, for example, anxiety and somatization disorders, conduct problems, mood disorders, thought disorder, and potential problems with alcohol and drug abuse. There are seven validity measures available to aid the detection of invalidating conditions. The traditional empirically based MMPI clinical scales are continuous with MMPI-A, and a number of new content scales have been developed to address adolescent problems. Special scales to detect alcohol and drug abuse have been published.

Publisher:

  • University of Minnesota Press
  • University of Minnesota
  • 2037 University Avenue SE
  • Minneapolis, MN 55455–3082
  • Where Test Can Be Obtained
  • Pearson Assessments
  • 5605 Green Circle Drive
  • Minnetonka, MN 55437–1099
  • The test is self-administered and usually takes about 1 hr.
  • The administration can be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.
  • The test is computer scorable and can be interpreted by computer.
  • The address of the official computer scoring and interpretation service is
  • Pearson Assessments
  • 5605 Green Circle Drive
  • Minnetonka, MN 55437–1099
  • Information on the MMPI-A can be obtained at: www.umn.edu/mmpi

Key References

Butcher, J. N., Cabiya, J., Lucio, E. M., & Garrido, M. (2007). Assessing Hispanic clients using the MMPI-2 and MMPI-A. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Butcher, J. N., & Williams, C. L. (2000). Essentials of MMPI-2 and MMPI-A interpretation (2nd ed.). Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press.

Butcher, J. N., Williams, C. L., Graham, J. R., Archer, R., Tellegen, A., Ben-Porath, Y. S., et al. (1992). MMPI-A (Minnesota Multiphasic Persoality Inventory for Adolescents): Manual for administration and scoring. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press.

Neo Personality Inventory-Revised (NEO PI-R)

Neo Personality Inventory-Revised (NEO PI-R)

Characteristics Assessed

Five major dimensions of personality: neuroticism, extraversion, openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness.

Publisher:

  • Psychological Assessment Resources, Inc.
  • PO Box 998
  • Odessa, FL 33556
  • The test is self-administered and usually takes about 30–40 min.
  • The administration can be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.
  • The test is computer scorable and can be interpreted by computer.
  • The address of the official computer scoring and interpretation service is
  • Psychological Assessment Resources, Inc.
  • PO Box 998
  • Odessa, FL 33556

Other Important Features

Test has three forms: Form S for self-reports, Form R for observer ratings, and a shortened version of Form S, the NEO FFI.

Key References

Costa, P., & McRae, R. (1990). Personality disorders and the Five-Factor Model of personality. Journal of Personality Disorders, 4, 362–371.

Costa, P., & McRae, R. (1992). Normal personality assessment in clinical practice. Psychological Assessment, 4, 5–13, 20–22.

Neurobehavioral Rating Scale

Neurobehavioral Rating Scale

Characteristics Assessed

Behavioral, emotional, and cognitive sequelae of head injury.

Where Test Can Be Obtained

**Dr. Harvey Levin

Former Address:

University of Maryland Baltimore

Division of Neurosurgery

Division of Neurological Surgery

D73

22 S. Greene Street Room S12D09B

University of Texas Medical Branch

Baltimore, MD 21201

Galveston, TX 77555–0641

Fax: 410–328–0756

Phone: 410–328–0938

The test is not self-administered and usually takes about 10 min.

The administration cannot be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

The test computer scorable but cannot be interpreted by computer.

Other Important Features

Clinician ratings using 27 7-point scales.

Key References

Levin, H. S., High, W. M., Goethe, K. E., Sisson, R. A., Overall, J. E., Rhoades, H. M., et al. (1987). The Neurobehavioral Rating Scale: Assessment of the behavioral sequelae of head injury by the clinician. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry, 50, 183–193.

Grant, I., & Alves, W. (1987). Psychiatric and psychosocial disturbances in head injury. In H. S. Levin, J. Grafman, & (p. 731) H. M. Eisenberg (Eds.), Neurobehavioral recovery from head injury, 232–261. New York: Oxford University Press.

Neuropsychology Behavior and Affect Profile

Neuropsychology Behavior and Affect Profile

Characteristics Assessed

Indifference, mania, depression, behavioral inappropriateness, and communication problems (pragnosia).

Where Test Can Be Obtained:

Dr. Linda Nelson

UCLA/Semel Institute

760 Westwood Plaza, Rm. C8–749

Los Angeles, CA 90095.

The test is not self-administered.

The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Other Important Features

The instrument consists of 106 statements and five scales, and has self-and other-rater versions.

Key Reference

Nelson, L. D., Satz, P., Mitushina, M., Van Gorp, W., Cicchetti, D., Lewis, R., & Van Lancker, D. (1989). Development and validation of the neuropsychology behavior and affect profile. Psychological Assessment, 1, 225–272.

Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ)

Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ)

Characteristics Assessed

Brief self-report measure of trait worry.

Where Test Can Be Obtained

Dr. Thomas D. Borkovec

Penn State University

417 Bruce Moore Bldg.

University Park, PA 16802

The test is self-administered and usually takes about 10 min.

The administration can be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Key References

Meyer, T. J., Miller, M. L., Metzger, M., & Borkovec, T. D. (1990). Development and validation of the Penn state worry questionnaire. Behavior Research and Therapy, 28, 487–495.

Brown, T. A., Antony, M. M., & Barlow, D. H. (1992). Psychometric properties of the Penn state worry questionnaire: In a clinical anxiety disorders sample. Behavior Research and Therapy, 30, 33–37.

Personality Adjective Checklist (PACL)

Personality Adjective Checklist (PACL)

Characteristics Assessed

Assesses personality traits as conceptualized by Theodore Millon using a 153-word adjective checklist.

Publisher:

  • 21st Century Assessment
  • PO Box 608
  • South Pasadena, CA 91031–0608
  • The test is self-administered and usually takes about 15 min.
  • The administration can be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

Other Important Features

Easy to use; short; inexpensive

Key References

Strack, S. (1987). Development and validation of an adjective checklist to assess the millon personality types in a normal population. Journal of Personality Assessment, 51, 572–587.

Strack, S. (1991). Manual for the personality adjective checklist (PACL) (Rev. ed.). South Pasadena, CA: Stephen Strack.

Personality Assessment Form

Personality Assessment Form

Characteristics Assessed

Personality disorders.

Where Test Can Be Obtained

Dr. Paul Pilkonis

Western Psychiatric Institute & Clinic

3811 O'Hara Street

Pittsburgh, PA 15213

The test is self-administered and usually takes about 1–2 hr.

The administration cannot be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Other Important Features:

Unstructured to semistructured interview.

Key Reference

Pilkonis, P. A., Heape, C. L., Ruddy, J., & Serrano, P. (1991). Validity in the diagnosis of personality disorders: The use of the LEAD standard. Psychological Assessment, 3, 46–54.

Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI)

Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI)

Characteristics Assessed

Dimensions of psychopathology (e.g., somatic complaints, anxiety, paranoia, alcohol problems, stress, warmth, etc.) divided into 11 clinical scales, five treatment scales, and two interpersonal scales.

Publisher:

  • Psychological Assessment Resources, Inc. (PAR)
  • PO Box 998
  • Odessa, FL 33556
  • The test is self-administered and usually takes about 45–55 min.
  • The administration can be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.
  • The test is computer scorable and can be interpreted by computer.
  • The address of the official computer scoring and interpretation service is
  • Psychological Assessment Resources, Inc. (PAR)
  • PO Box 998
  • Odessa, FL 33556

Key Reference

Morey, L. C. (1991). The personality assessment inventory: Professional manual. Odessa, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources.

Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire-4

Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire-4

Characteristics Assessed

Personality disorders.

Where Test Can Be Obtained

Dr. Steve Hyler

(p. 732) New York State Psychiatric Institute

722 West 168th Street

New York, NY 10032

The test is self-administered and usually takes about 30 min.

The administration can be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

The test is computer scorable but cannot be interpreted by computer.

Publisher:

  • Dr. A. W. Loranger
  • New York Hospital CMC
  • White Plains, NY 10605
  • The test is not self-administered and usually takes about 1–4 hr.
  • The administration cannot be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.
  • The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Other Important Features

Semistructured interview

Key Reference

Loranger, A. W., Susman, V. L., Oldham, J. M., & Russakoff, L. M. (1987). The personality disorder examination: A preliminary report. Journal of Personality Disorders, 1, 1–13.

Personality Interview Questions-II

Personality Interview Questions-II

Characteristics Assessed

Personality disorders.

Where Test Can Be Obtained

Dr. Thomas A. Widiger

Department of Psychology

College of Arts and Sciences

University of Kentucky

115 Kastle Hall

Lexington, KY 40506–0044

The test is not self-administered and usually takes about 1–3 hr.

The administration cannot be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Other Important Features

Semistructured interview

Key References

Widiger, T. A., Frances, A. J., & Trull, T. J. (1989). Personality disorders. In R. Craig (Ed.), Clinical and diagnostic interviewing (pp. 221–236). Northvale, NJ: Jason Aronson.

Widiger, T. A., Freiman, K., & Bailey, B. (1990). Convergent and discriminate validity of personality disorder prototypic acts. Psychological Assessment, 2, 107–113.

Psychological Test Battery to Detect Faked Insanity

Psychological Test Battery to Detect Faked Insanity

Characteristics Assessed

Detection of simulated insanity. Where Test Can Be Obtained

**Dr. David Schretlen (unlisted)

Department of Psychiatry

Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

Meyers 218

600 North Wolfe Street

Baltimore, MD 21205

The test is self-administered and usually takes about 15 min.

The administration can be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Key References

Schretlen, D., Wilkins, S., Van Gort, W., & Bobholz, J. (1992). Cross-validation of a psychological test battery to detect faked insanity. Psychological Assessment, 4, 77–83.

Schretlen, D., & Arkowitz, H. (1990). A psychological test battery to detect prison inmates who fake insanity or mental retardation. Behavioral Sciences and the Law, 8, 75–84.

PTSD Symptom Scale (PSS)

PTSD Symptom Scale (PSS)

Characteristics Assessed

Self-report measure of the major symptom areas of PTSD including re-experiencing, avoidance and numbing, and hyperarousal.

Where Test Can Be Obtained

Dr. Edna Foa

Medical College of Pennsylvania at EPPI

3535 Market Street, 6th floor

Philadelphia, PA 19104

The test is self-administered and usually takes about 15 min.

The administration can be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Key Reference

Foa, E. B., Riggs, D. S., Dancu, C. V., & Rothbaum, B. O. (1993). Reliability and validity of a brief instrument for assessing posttraumatic stress disorder. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 6, 459–473.

Revised Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines

Revised Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines

Characteristics Assessed

Borderline personality disorder.

Where Test Can Be Obtained

Dr. John Gunderson

McLean Hospital

115 Mill Street

Belmont, MD 02478

The test is not self-administered and usually takes about 1–3 hr.

The administration cannot be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Other Important Features

Semistructured interview

Key Reference

Zanarini, M. C., Gunderson, J. G., Frankenburg, F. R., & Chauncey, D. L. (1989). The revised diagnostic interview for borderlines: Discrimination of BPD from other Axis-II disorders. Journal of Personality Disorders, 3, 10–18.

(p. 733) Where Test Can Be Obtained

Dr. Gary W. Small

UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute

760 Westwood Plaza

Los Angeles, CA 90024

The test is not self-administered and usually takes less than 1 hr.

The administration cannot be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

Other Important Features

Semistructured interview

Key References

Hachinski, V. C., Iliff, L. D., Phil, M., Zihka, E., Duboulay, G. H., McAllister, V. L., et al. (1975). Cerebral blood flow in dementia. Archives of Neurology, 32, 632–637.

Small, G. W. (1985). Revised ischemic score for diagnosing multi-infarct dementia. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 46, 514–517.

Romantic Relationship Procedure

Romantic Relationship Procedure

Characteristics Assessed

Contents: Four longest-lasting or most important romantic relationships—three memories of each relationship. Assesses: Problem areas and unresolved issues in romantic relationships.

Publisher:

  • Dr. Arnold R. Bruhn
  • 4400 E. West Highway
  • Bethesda, MD 20814
  • The test is self-administered and usually takes about 5 min for psychologists.
  • The administration can be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.
  • The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Key Reference

Bruhn, A. R., & Feigenbaum, K. (1993). The interpretation of autobiographical memories. (Self-published). 7910 Woodmont Avenue #1300, Bethesda, MD 20814.

Rorschach

Rorschach

Characteristics Assessed

A perceptual-associative-judgmental task that infers certain current psychological states and traits; personality characteristics related to cognitive and perceptual functioning.

Publisher:

  • Hans Huber
  • Langgasstrasse 76
  • POB CH-3000
  • Bern 9 Switzerland
  • The test is not self-administered and usually takes about 45 min–1 hr.
  • The administration procedures cannot be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.
  • The test is not computer scorable but can be interpreted by computer.
  • The address of the official computer interpretation service is RSP-2, RIAP-2
  • Rorschach Workshops
  • 2149 Riceville Road
  • Asheville, NC 28805

Other Important Features

Extensive norms now available for various nonpatient and clinical populations if Comprehensive System used for scoring an interpretation.

Key References

Exner, J. (1993). The Rorschach: A comprehensive system (3rd ed., Vols. 1 & 2). New York: John Wiley & Sons.

Lerner, P. (1991). Psychoanalytic theory and the Rorschach. Hillsdale, NJ: Analytic Press.

Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia-Lifetime Version (SADS-LA)

Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia-Lifetime Version (SADS-LA)

Characteristics Assessed

The SADS-LA provides a comprehensive assessment of anxiety and related disorders across lifetime.

Where Test Can Be Obtained

Dr. Abby J. Fyer

Anxiety Disorders Clinics

New York State Psychiatric Institute

722 West 168th Street

New York, NY 10032

The test is not self-administered and usually takes about 3.5 hr.

The administration cannot be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Key References

Fyer, A. J., Mannuzza, S., Martin, L. Y., Gallops, M. S., et al. (1989). Reliability of anxiety assessment: II. Symptom agreement. Archives of General Psychiatry, 46, 1102–1110.

Mannuzza, S., Fyer, A. J., Martin, L. Y., Gallops, M. S., et al. (1989). Reliability of anxiety assessment: I. Diagnostic agreement. Archives of General Psychiatry, 46, 1093–11101.

Schedule for Nonadaptive and Adaptive Personality (SNAP)

Schedule for Nonadaptive and Adaptive Personality (SNAP)

Characteristics Assessed

12 primary traits (e.g., aggression, dependency) and three broad temperaments (e.g., negative affectivity) that are relevant to personality disorder. Also contains 6 validity indices and 13 DSM-II-R Axis II PD diagnostic scales.

Publisher:

  • University of Minnesota Press
  • 2037 University Avenue SE
  • Minneapolis, MN 55455
  • The test is self-administered and usually takes about 1 hr.
  • The administration can be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.
  • The test is computer scorable but cannot, at the present time, be interpreted by computer.

Other Important Features

Supplement for scoring the DSM-IV Axis II personality disorders will be available in the future; adolescent version is being tested.

Key References

Clark, L. A., McEwen, J. L., Collard, L. M., & Hickok, L. G. (1993). Symptoms and traits of personality disorder: Two new methods for this assessment. Psychological Assessment, 5, 81–91.

Clark, L. A., Vorhies, L., & McEwen, J. L. (1994). Personality disorder symptomatology from the five-factor perspective. In (p. 734) P. T. Costa, Jr., & T. Widiger (Eds.), Personality disorders and the Five-Factor Model of personality (pp. 95–116). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

The Short-Care

The Short-Care

Characteristics Assessed

Depression, dementia, and disability in elderly persons.

Where Test Can Be Obtained

Dr. Barry Gurland

Columbia University Geriatrics & Gerontology/Stroud Center

100 Haven Avenue, Tower I III-297

New York, NY 10032

The test is not self-administered and usually takes about 30 min per session.

The administration cannot be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

Other Important Features

Semistructured interview

Key Reference

Gurland, B., Golden, R. R., Teresi, J., & Challop, J. (1984). The SHORT-CARE: An efficient instrument for the assessment of depression, dementia and disability. Journal of Gerontology, 39, 166–169.

Social Interaction Anxiety Scale (SIAS)

Social Interaction Anxiety Scale (SIAS)

Characteristics Assessed

Measures cognitive, affective, and behavioral reactions to a variety of situations involving social interactions.

Where Test Can Be Obtained

Dr. Richard G. Heimberg

Center for Stress and Anxiety Disorders

1535 Western Avenue

Albany, NY 12203

The test is self-administered and usually takes about 10 min.

The administration can be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Key Reference

Heimberg, R. G., Mueller, G. P., Holt, C. S., & Hope, D. A. (1992). Assessment of anxiety in social interaction and being observed by others: The social interaction anxiety scale and the social phobia scale. Behavior Therapy, 23, 53–73.

The Staff-Resident Interaction Chronograph (SRIC)

The Staff-Resident Interaction Chronograph (SRIC)

Characteristics Assessed

The nature, amount, content, and interactions provided to clients by staff inpatient and residential settings (including context).

Publisher:

  • Research Press
  • Dept. 26W
  • Main: 217–352–3273
  • PO Box 9177
  • Toll Free: 800–519–2707
  • Champaign, IL 61826
  • Fax: 217–352–1221
  • The test is not self-administered and usually takes 10 min of direct observational samples.
  • The administration can be delegated to full-time technician-level observers for data collection.
  • The test is computer scorable but cannot be interpreted by computer.
  • The address of the official computer scoring and of the official computer scoring and interpretation service is
  • Research Press
  • PO Box 9177
  • Champagne, IL 61826

Other Important Features

Key references provide videotape observer training materials and procedures and a summary of all technical development, reliability and validity evidence, and generalizability/feasibility data on 679 staff (aide-level to doctoral-level), 35 treatment programs (psychodynamic through biological) in adult treatment units (8–120 biological) in adult treatment units (8–120 beds) covering mentally retarded, alcohol/substance abuse, and mentally ill populations in mental hospitals and community facilities.

Key References

Paul, G. L. (1988). Observational assessment instrumentation for service and research—The Staff-Resident Interaction Chronograph: Assessment in residential treatment settings (Part 3). Champaign, IL: Research Press.

Paul, G. L. (1994). Observational assessment instrumentation for service and research—The TSBC/SRIC system implementation package: Assessment in residential treatment settings (Pt. 5). Champaign, IL. Research Press.

State-Trait Anger Scale (STAS)

State-Trait Anger Scale (STAS)

Characteristics Assessed

The STAS is a true-false inventory to measure both trait anger and state anger in a manner analogous to the trait-state anxiety measures published by Spielberger. The inventory measures the intensity of anger and the manner of expression.

Publisher:

  • Psychological Assessment Resources (PAR)
  • PO Box 998
  • Odessa, FL 33556

Key Reference

Spielberger, C. C., Johnson, E. H., Russell, S. F., Crane, R. J., Jacobs, G. A., & Worden, T. J. (1985). The experience and expression of anger: Construction and validation of an anger expression scale. In M. A. Chesney & R. H. Rosenman (Eds.), Anger and hostility in cardiovascular and behavioral disorders (pp. 5–30). New York: Hemisphere.

State-trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI)

State-trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI)

Characteristics Assessed

State form: Measure of state anxiety; sensitive to changes in transitory anxiety.

Trait form: Measure of relatively stable individual differences in anxiety proneness.

Publisher:

  • Consulting Psychological Press
  • 3803 East Bayshore Road
  • Palo Alto, CA 94303
  • (p. 735) The test is not self-administered and usually takes 20 min.
  • The administration can be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.
  • The test is computer scorable but cannot be interpreted by computer.

Key Reference

Spielberger, C. D. (1983). Manual for the state-trait anxiety inventory (Form Y). Palo Alto, CA: Consulting Psychological Press.

Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV

Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV

Characteristics Assessed

Structured clinical interview designed to assess DSM-IV diagnosable conditions.

Publisher:

  • American Psychiatric Press
  • 750 First Street NE
  • Washington, DC 20002–4242
  • The test is not self-administered and usually takes about 3 hr.
  • The administration cannot be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.
  • The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Key References

American Psychiatric Association. (1994). The diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (4th ed.). Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Press.

Spitzer, R. L., & Williams, J. B. (1988). Revised diagnostic criteria and a new structured interview for diagnosing anxiety disorders. Journal of Psychiatric Research, 22, 55–85.

Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders

Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders

Characteristics Assessed

Personality disorders.

Publisher:

  • American Psychiatric Press
  • 750 First Street NE
  • Washington, DC 20002–4242
  • The test is not self-administered and usually takes about 1–3 hr.
  • The administration cannot be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.
  • The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Other Important Features

Semistructured interview

Key References

American Psychiatric Association. (1994). The diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (4th ed.). Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Press.

Spitzer, R. L., Williams, J. B. W., Gibbon, M., & First, M. B., (1972). The structured clinical interview for DSM-III-R (SCID): I. History, rationale, and description. Archives of General Psychiatry, 49, 624–629.

Structured Inventory of Malingered Symptomatology (SIMS)

Structured Inventory of Malingered Symptomatology (SIMS)

Characteristics Assessed

This 75-item true-false inventory was designed to detect malingering in forensic samples. It addresses faking of neurologic as well as mental health symptoms.

Publisher:

See Smith & Burger 1997

Key Reference

Smith, G. P., & Burger, G. K. (1997). Detection of malingering: Validation of the Structured Inventory of Malingered Symptomatology (SIMS). Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law, 23, 183–189.

Structured Interview of Reported Symptoms (SIRS)

Structured Interview of Reported Symptoms (SIRS)

Characteristics Assessed

Malingering and deception.

Publisher:

  • PAR, Inc.
  • PO Box 998
  • 16204 N. Florida Avenue
  • Odessa, FL 33556
  • Lutz, FL 33549
  • The test is not self-administered and usually takes about 30–60 min.
  • The administration cannot be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.
  • The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Key References

Roger, R. (1997). Clinical assessment of malingering and deception (2nd ed.). New York: Guilford Press.

Rogers, R., Gillis, R., & Bagby, R. (1990). The SIRS as a measure of malingering: A validation study with a correctional sample. Behavioral Science and the Law, 8, 85–92.

Rogers, R., Gillis, R., Bagby, R.,& Moneiro, E. (1991). Detection of malingering on the SIRS: A study of coached and uncoached malingerers. Psychological Assessment, 3, 673–677.

Structured Interview Schedules for Clients and Significant Others (SISCSO)

Structured Interview Schedules for Clients and Significant Others (SISCSO)

Characteristics Assessed

Present and historical level of functioning, psychiatric symptomotology, role functioning, and expectations of adult mental patients at entry, predischarge, and follow-up for inpatient-residential facilities.

Publisher:

  • Research Press
  • PO Box 9177
  • Champagne, IL 61826
  • The test is not self-administered and usually takes abut 2 hr each.
  • The administration cannot be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.
  • Selected instruments derived from the interview responses can be computer-scored; users must write their own programs. Test cannot be interpreted by computer.

Other Important Features

A set of six structured interview protocols originally used with severely disabled chronic mental patients; Paul & Mariotto (1986) provides details and recommendations for expansion as a generic set for adult populations.

(p. 736) Key Reference

Paul, G. L.,& Mariotto, M. J. (1986). Potential utility of the sources and methods: A comprehensive paradigm. In G. L. Paul (Ed.), Principles and methods to support cost-effective quality operations: Assessment in residential treatment settings (Part 1). Champaign, IL: Research Press.

The Suicide Intent Scale

The Suicide Intent Scale

Characteristics Assessed

Suicide risk.

Publisher:

  • The Charles Press Publishers, Inc.
  • Bowie, MD 20715
  • The test is not self-administered, but is based on self-report and usually takes a few minutes. The administration cannot be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

Key References

Beck, A. T., Schuyler, D., & Herman, I. (1974). Development of suicidal intent scales. In A. T. Beck, H. L. P. Resnick, & D. J. Lettieri (Eds.), The prediction of suicide (pp. 45–56). Oxford: Charles Press Publishers.

Beck, R. W., Morris, J. B., & Beck, A. T. (1974). Cross validation of the suicide intent scale. Psychological Reports, 34, 445–446.

The Suicide Risk Assessment Scale

The Suicide Risk Assessment Scale

Characteristics Assessed

Suicide risk.

Publisher:

  • American Journal of Psychiatry
  • American Psychiatric Association
  • 1400 K Street, NW
  • Washington, DC 20005
  • The test is not self-administered but is based on patient self-report. It takes about 30 min. The administration cannot be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

Other Important Features

This is one of the very few tests for estimating suicide risk with empirically weighted items.

Key Reference

Motto, J. A. (1989). Problems in suicidal risk assessment. In D. Jacobs & H. N. Brown (Eds.), Suicide: Understanding and responding: Harvard Medical School perspectives (pp. 129–142). Madison, CT: International Universities Press, Inc.

Suinn-Lew Asian Self-identity and Acculturation Scale (SL-ASIA)

Suinn-Lew Asian Self-identity and Acculturation Scale (SL-ASIA)

Characteristics Assessed

Level of acculturation among Asian-Americans.

Where Test Can Be Obtained

Dr. Richard M. Suinn

Department of Psychology

Colorado State University

Fort Collins, CO 80523

The test is self-administered and usually takes about 10–15 min.

The administration can be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Key References

Suinn, R. M., Ahuna, C., & Khoo, G. (1992). The Suinn-Lew Asian self-identity acculturation scale: Concurrent and factorial validation. Educational and Psychological Measurement, 52, 1–6.

Suinn, R. M., Rikard-Figueroa, K., Lew, S., & Virgil, P. (1987). The Suinn-Lew Asian self-identity acculturation scale: An initial report. Educational and Psychological Measurement, 47, 401–407.

Symptom Checklist-90-Revised

Symptom Checklist-90-Revised

Characteristics Assessed

Somatization, obsessive behavior, interpersonal sensitivity, depression, anxiety, hostility, phobic anxiety, paranoid ideation, and psychoticism.

Publisher:

  • Pearson Assessments
  • 5601 Green Valley Drive
  • Bloomington, MN 55437–1099
  • The test is self-administered and usually takes about 15 min.
  • The administration can be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.
  • The test is computer scorable and can be interpreted by computer.
  • The address of the official computer scoring and interpretation service is
  • Pearson Assessments
  • 5601 Green Valley Drive
  • Bloomington, MN 55437–1099

Other Important Features

Norms available for non-patient adults and adolescents as well as psychiatric inpatients and outpatients.

Key Reference

Derogatis, L. R. (1977). SCL-R administration, scoring, and procedures manual. Baltimore, MD: Clinical Psychometrics Research Unit, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Temas (Tell-Me-A-Story) Thematic Apperception Test

Temas (Tell-Me-A-Story) Thematic Apperception Test

Characteristics Assessed

Personality/psychopathology in Hispanics, Blacks, and Whites.

Publisher:

  • Technical Manual
  • Western Psychological Services
  • 12031 Wilshire Blvd.
  • Los Angles, CA 90025
  • The test is not self-administered and usually takes a variable amount of time.
  • The administration cannot be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.
  • The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Key Reference

Constantino, G., Malgady, R. G., & Rogler, L. H. (1988). TEMAS (Tell-Me-A-Story) manual. Los Angeles: Western Psychological Services. Williams, R. L. (1972). Themes concerning blacks. St. Louis, MO: Williams & Associates.

Themes Concerning Blacks (TCB)

(p. 737) Themes Concerning Blacks (TCB)

Characteristics Assessed

Personality/psychopathology in Blacks.

Publisher:

  • Williams & Associates
  • Department of Psychology
  • Washington University St. Louis, MO
  • The test is not self-administered and usually takes a variable amount of time.
  • The administration cannot be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.
  • The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Key References

Williams, R. L. (1972). Themes concerning blacks. St. Louis, MO: Williams & Associates.

Williams, R. L., & Johnson, R. C. (1981). Progress in developing Afrocentric measuring instruments. Journal of Non-White Concerns, 9, 3–18.

The Time-Sample Behavioral Checklist (TSBC)

The Time-Sample Behavioral Checklist (TSBC)

Characteristics Assessed

Assets, deficits, and excesses in functioning of clients in inpatient and residential settings (including context); how and where clients and staff spend their time.

Publisher:

  • Research Press
  • PO Box 9177
  • Champagne, IL 61826
  • The test is not self-administered and usually takes 1 hr for direct observational time samples.
  • The administration can be delegated to full-time technician-level observers for data collection.
  • The test is computer scorable but cannot be interpreted by computer.

Other Important Features

Key references provide videotape observer training materials and procedures and a summary of all technical development, reliability and validity evidence, and normative data (n = 1205) for adult populations (ages 18–99) in mental hospitals and community facilities (covering mentally retarded, alcohol/substance abuse, acute and chronic mentally ill in all diagnostic categories).

Key References

Paul, G. L. (1987a). Observational assessment instrumentation for service and research—The Time-Sample Behavioral Checklist: Assessment in residential treatment settings (Part 2). Champaign, IL: Research Press.

Paul, G. L. (1987b). Observational assessment instrumentation for service and research—The TSBC/SRIC system implementation package: Assessment in residential treatment settings (Part 5). Champaign, IL: Research Press.

Tweak Test

Tweak Test

Characteristics Assessed

The TWEAK test is a 5-item self-report measure that is usually administered in a clinician interview. The acronym TWEAK is made up from the names of the five items in the test. This measure is designed to assess heavy past or current drinking.

Publisher:

  • Copies of the TWEAK may be obtained by writing at
  • **Dr. Marcia Russell (formerly)
  • Research Institute of Addiction
  • 1021 Main Street
  • Buffalo, NY 14203–1016

Key Reference

Chan, A. W. K., Pristach, E. A., Welte, J. W., & Russell, M. (1993). Use of the TWEAK test in screening for alcoholism in heavy drinking populations. Alcohol Clinical Experience Research, 17, 1188–1192.

Washington Psychosocial Seizure Inventory (WPSI)

Washington Psychosocial Seizure Inventory (WPSI)

Characteristics Assessed

Emotional and interpersonal adjustment and psychosocial functioning. (Also family background, financial status, medical management, intelligence.)

Where Test Can Be Obtained

Dr. Carl B. Dodrill

Epilepsy Center ZA-50

325 Ninth Avenue

Harborview Hospital

Seattle, WA 98104

The test is self-administered.

The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Key Reference

Dodrill, C. B., Batzel, L. W., Queissel, H. R., & Temkin, N. R. (1980). An objective method for the assessment of psychological and social problems among epileptics. Epilepsia, 21, 123–135.

Ways of Coping Questionnaire (WCQ)

Ways of Coping Questionnaire (WCQ)

Characteristics Assessed

Eight basic coping reactions or strategies that may be used in a cross section of stressful situations.

Publisher:

  • Consulting Psychologists Press
  • 3803 E. Bayshore Road
  • Palo Alto, CA 94303–9608
  • The test is self-administered and usually takes about 10–12 min.
  • The administration can be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.
  • The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Key References

Folkman, S., & Lazarus, R. S. (1988). Manual for the ways of coping questionnaire. Palo Alto, CA: Consulting Psychologists Press.

Folkman, S., Lazarus, R. S., Dunkel-Schetter, C., DeLongis, A., & Gruen, R. (1986). The dynamics of a stressful encounter. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 50, 992–1003.

Wisconsin Personality Disorders Inventory

(p. 738) Wisconsin Personality Disorders Inventory

Characteristics Assessed

Personality disorders.

Where Test Can Be Obtained

Dr. Marjorie Klein

Department of Psychiatry

University of Wisconsin Medical School

1300 University Ave.

Madison, WI 53706

The test is self-administered and usually takes about 1 hr.

The administration can be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

The test is computer scorable but cannot be interpreted by computer.

Key Reference

Klein, M. H., Benjamin, L. S., Rosenfeld, R., Treece, L., Husted, J., & Greist, J. H. (1993). The wisconsin personality disorders inventory: I. Development, reliability, and validity. Journal of Personality Disorders, 7 (4), 285–303.

Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS)

Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS)

Characteristics Assessed

Clinician-rated measure of the severity of symptoms of obsessive compulsive disorder.

Contains separate subscales for obsessions and compulsions.

Where Test Can Be Obtained

Wayne K. Goodman

Department of Psychiatry

Yale University School of Medicine

The Connecticut Mental Health Center

34 Park Street

New Haven, CT 06508

The test is not self-administered and usually takes about 20 min.

The administration cannot be delegated to clerical or nursing staff.

The test is not computer scorable and cannot be interpreted by computer.

Key References

Goodman, W., Price, L. H., Rasmussen, S. A., Mazure, C., et al. (1989a). The Yale-Brown obsessive compulsive scale: I. Development, use, and reliability. Archives of General Psychiatry, 46, 1006–1011.

Goodman, W., Price, L. H., Rasmussen, S. A., Mazure, C., et al. (1989b). The Yale-Brown obsessive compulsive scale: II. Validity. Archives of General Psychiatry, 46, 1012–1016.