Show Summary Details

Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD HANDBOOKS ONLINE (www.oxfordhandbooks.com). © Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a title in Oxford Handbooks Online for personal use (for details see Privacy Policy and Legal Notice).

date: 14 November 2019

(p. vii) Contributors

(p. vii) Contributors

Harold F. (Hal) Bass (Ph.D., Vanderbilt University) is Professor of Political Science and Dean of the School of Social Sciences at Ouachita Baptist University in Arkadelphia, Arkansas. His primary scholarly interest has been presidential party leadership. He is the author of numerous journal articles and book chapters addressing the presidency and political parties.



Marie A. Eisenstein (Ph.D., Purdue University) is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Indiana University Northwest in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs. Her research focuses on the intersection of religion and political tolerance, and includes articles in Political Behavior and the Interdisciplinary Journal of Research on Religion. She is also the author of Religion and the Politics of Tolerance (2008).



Gregory Fortelny is a Ph.D. student in government at Georgetown University. He holds an undergraduate degree in both psychology and philosophy from the California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. His other research interests include political psychology, lobbying, and campaign finance.



James G. Gimpel (Ph.D., University Chicago) is Professor of Government at the University of Maryland, where he has been on the faculty since 1992. His interests lie in the areas of political behavior, political socialization, and the political geography of American politics. He currently serves as editor of American Politics Research.



James L. Guth (Ph.D., Harvard University) is William R. Kenan, Jr., Professor of Political Science at Furman University. He is the coauthor or coeditor of several books, and his work has appeared in numerous scholarly journals and edited volumes.



Allen Hertzke (Ph.D., University of Wisconsin) is Presidential Professor of Political Science and Director of Religious Studies at the University of Oklahoma. He is the author of Representing God in Washington (1988), an award-winning analysis of religious lobbies; Echoes of Discontent (1992), an account of church-rooted populist movements; and coauthor of Religion and Politics in America (2004), a comprehensive text now in its third edition. His latest book is titled Freeing God's Children: The Unlikely Alliance for Global Human Rights (2004).



Ted G. Jelen (Ph.D., The Ohio State University) is Professor of Political Science at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. He has published extensively in the areas of public opinion, church–state relations, and the politics of such social issues as abortion and same-sex marriage. He is currently the coeditor of the journal Politics and Religion.



Lyman A. Kellstedt (Ph.D., University of Illinois) is Professor of Political Science (emeritus) at Wheaton College, Illinois. He has authored or coauthored numerous articles, book chapters, and books in the field of religion and politics, including Religion and the Culture Wars (1996) and The Bully Pulpit (1997). He is currently working on a series of articles on religion and political behavior.



Douglas L. Koopman (Ph.D., Catholic University of America) is Professor of Political Science at Calvin College. He is the author or coauthor of three books—Of Little Faith: The Politics of George W. Bush's Faith-Based Initiatives (2004), Serving the Claims of Justice: The Thoughts of Paul B. Henry (2001), and Hostile Takeover: The House Republican Party, 1980–1995 (1996)—and has written extensively on Congress, social policy, and religious faith and American politics.



Geoffrey C. Layman (Ph.D., Indiana University) is Associate Professor of Government and Politics at the University of Maryland, College Park. He is the author of The Great Divide: Religious and Cultural Conflict in American Party Politics (2001) and has published numerous journal articles on party politics, electoral behavior, public opinion, and religion and politics.



David C. Leege (Ph.D., Indiana University) is Professor of Government and International Studies (emeritus). He is coauthor of The Politics of Cultural Differences: Social Change and Voter Mobilization Strategies in the Post-New Deal Period (2002) and coeditor of Rediscovering the Religious Factor in American Politics (1993). Leege has chaired the Board of Overseers of the American National Election Studies, and he is associated with the development of many of its current measures of religiosity.



Michael Lienesch (Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley) is Professor of Political Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research focuses on religion and American political thought, and much of his recent work has been on contemporary Christian conservatism. His most recent book is In the Beginning: Fundamentalism, the Scopes Trial, and the Making of the Antievolution Movement (2007).



John Michael McTague is a graduate student in the Department of Government and Politics at the University of Maryland, College Park. In addition to an interest in the role of religion in American politics, he has coauthored articles on the role of geography in shaping electoral competition in American statewide elections that (p. ix) were published in State Politics & Policy Quarterly and Political Geography. He is currently working on a dissertation that investigates the political behavior of the white working class.



Mark A. Noll (Ph.D., Vanderbilt University) is the Francis A. McAnaney Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Among his books are The Civil War as a Theological Crisis (2006) and God and Race in American Politics: A Short History (2008).



Elizabeth A. Oldmixon (Ph.D., University of Florida) is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of North Texas. Her research investigates the effects of religion on legislative policy making. Oldmixon is the author of Uncompromising Positions: God, Sex, and the U.S. House of Representatives (2005). She served as an APSA Congressional Fellow (2001–2002) and has chaired the APSA section on religion and politics.



Laura R. Olson (Ph.D., University of Wisconsin) is Professor of Political Science at Clemson University. She is the author, coauthor, or coeditor of nine books, including Religious Interests in Community Conflict: Beyond the Culture Wars (2007) and Women with a Mission: Religion, Gender, and the Politics of Women Clergy (2005).



Shanna Pearson-Merkowitz is a Ph.D. student in government at the University of Maryland. Her interests are in the areas of political behavior, elections, political socialization, and ethnic minority politics. Her work has appeared in several political science journals, including State Politics and Policy Quarterly, the American Journal of Political Science, and the Journal of Politics.



Mark J. Rozell (Ph.D., University of Virginia) is Professor of Public Policy at George Mason University. He is coauthor of Power and Prudence: The Presidency of George H. W. Bush (2004); Executive Privilege: Presidential Power, Secrecy, and Accountability (2002); as well as the author of numerous studies on the intersection of religion and politics.



Corwin E. Smidt (Ph.D., University of Iowa) is the Paul B. Henry Professor of Political Science and Director of the Henry Institute for the Study of Christianity and Politics at Calvin College. He is coauthor and editor of Evangelicalism: The Next Generation (2002); Religion as Social Capital: Producing the Common Good (2003); and Pews, Prayers, and Participation: The Role of Religion in Fostering Civic Responsibility (2008).



Robert P. Swierenga (Ph.D., University of Iowa) is Professor of History (emeritus) at Kent State University and A. C. Van Raalte Research Professor at the A. C. Van Raalte Institute of Hope College. He is the author of a number of books, including (p. x) Faith and Family: Dutch Immigration and Settlement in the United States, 1820–1920 (2000) and Dutch Chicago: A History of Hollanders in the Windy City (2005).



C. Danielle Vinson (Ph.D., Duke University) is Associate Professor of Political Science at Furman University. She is the author of the book Local Media Coverage of Congress and Its Members (2003) and has authored or coauthored articles on media and the courts, and campaign finance. She has also done research on communication in political campaigns and communication in Congress.



Paul J. Wahlbeck (Ph.D., Washington University; J.D., University of Illinois) is Professor of Political Science at George Washington University. He offers classes in judicial politics and research methods. His research explores legal change and argumentation, strategic interaction among justices, and institutional development. He is coauthor of Crafting Law on the Supreme Court: The Collegial Game (2000). His work has appeared in several journals, including the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics, and Political Research Quarterly.



Kenneth D. Wald (Ph.D., Washington University, St. Louis) is Distinguished Professor of Political Science at the University of Florida. A specialist on religion in American politics, his most recent books include Religion and Politics in the United States (5th ed., 2006) and The Politics of Cultural Differences: Social Change and Voter Mobilization Strategies in the Post-New Deal Period (2002). Wald has held Fulbright fellowships to Israel and Germany, as well as visiting appointments at Harvard, the University of Haifa, and the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow (Scotland).



Peter W. Wielhouwer (Ph.D., University of Georgia) is Associate Professor of Political Science at Western Michigan University, and has taught at Spelman College and Regent University, where he directed the graduate program in campaign management and the university's nonpartisan Center for Grassroots Politics. His research has appeared in American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics, American Politics Research, and Social Science Quarterly, and in recent edited volumes on campaigns and elections and African American representation.



Clyde Wilcox (Ph.D., The Ohio State University) is Professor of Government at Georgetown University. He is author and coauthor of several books related to religion and politics, including God's Warriors: The Christian Right in the Twentieth Century (1992), Public Attitudes on Church and State (1995), and Second Coming: The New Christian Right in Virginia Politics (1996). In addition to religion and politics, he writes on gender politics, campaign finance, interest groups, and science fiction and politics.



J. Matthew Wilson (Ph.D., Duke University) is Associate Professor of Political Science at Southern Methodist University, where he has taught since 1999. Wilson's research, which has appeared in a range of top scholarly journals, focuses on public opinion, elections, representation, and religion and politics, both in the United States and abroad. He is editor of From Pews to Polling Places: Faith and Politics in the American Religious Mosaic (2007).



(p. xii)