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date: 27 September 2020

(p. 596) (p. 597) Index

(p. 596) (p. 597) Index

A
absolute progression, 486, 570–573
abstract algebra, 248, 288, 356–362, 365, 515, 527–531, 550–551
acoustics, musical, 57–59, 65, 71, 167–182, 274, 323
Albert, Heinrich, 472, 474–475
analysis
empirical and theoretical approaches, 5, 65, 445, 497
incompleteness in, 531–532
melodic, 141–159
phrase and metrical structure in, 441–459, 464–472
post-tonal, 389–393, 497, 532
post-post-tonal, 542
reductive, 15–32, 402, 450, 457
role in music pedagogy, 13–33, 40
ancient Greek music theory, 142–150, 153–156, 183
antitonic, 556–564
Apfel, Ernst, 436n6
apparent consonance, 232, 580–581
in Louis, 11, 35–36
in Riemann, 83, 102, 104
in Schreyer, 19
Arabic-Persian music theory, 66–67, 89n25, 90n26, 183
Arntz, Michael, 3–4, 112
Auftaktigkeit, 417,579. See also phrase and metrical structure
augmented triad, 180, 383–385, 507n9
B
Babbitt, Milton, 516, 544n10
Bach, Johann Sebastian
Fugue in A minor from Well-Tempered Clavier, 18–19, 20–21
Two-Part Fugue in C minor, 15
Baldini, Guglielmo, 268
Balzano, Gerald, 323
Bass, Richard, 319n16, 410
Beethoven, Ludwig van, 219, 417–418, 440–459
Bagatelle op. 126/6, 469
Concerto for Piano in E-flat major “Emperor”, 402–404, 412
Concerto for Piano in G major, 327
Coriolan Overture, 225
Fidelio Overture, 425
Leonore Overture, 427
Quartet in B-flat major op. 130, 225, 498
Quartet in B-flat major op. 18/6, 220, 273–274
Sonata No. 1 in F major op. 2/1, 423
Sonata No. 5 in C minor op. 10/1, 425–426
Sonata No. 8 in C minor “Pathétique” op. 13, 273
Sonata No. 9 in E major op. 14/1, 423
Sonata No. 11 in B-flat major op. 22, 423
Sonata No. 12 in A-flat major op. 26, 271–274
Sonata No. 13 in E-flat major, op. 27/1, 429–430
Sonata No. 16 in G major op. 31/1, 434–435, 442–445, 447–448, 451–453
Sonata No. 17 in D minor “Tempest” op. 31/2, 446–447, 453–458
Sonata No. 18 in E-flat major op. 31/3, 423, 443–444, 446, 448–451, 453–455
Sonata No. 19 in G minor op. 49/1, 423
Sonata No. 21 in E major “Waldstein” op. 53,82, 498
Sonata No. 28 in A major op. 101, 110–111
Symphony No. 1 in C major, 205–213, 232
Symphony No. 5 in C minor, 27, 28–29, 30–31, 221
Belinfante, Ary, 7, 166, 169, 200–205, 216n16
Bent, Ian, 166
Berry, Paul, 418
Blasius, Leslie, 516
Brahms, Johannes, 463–464, 472, 476–478
“Auf dem Kirchhofe”, 476
Clarinet Trio, 222–239
Das Mädchen spricht (“Schwalbe, sag’ mir an”), 464, 469–471, 475–476, 480–481
Ein deutsches Requiem, 557–558
Four Serious Songs op. 121 “Denn es gehet”, 236–238
“Immer leiser wird mein Schlummer”,464–469, 475–480
Intermezzo op. 76/4, 259–262
Intermezzo op. 199/1, 225
“Wie bist du meine Königin”, 478
Bribitzer-Stull, Matthew, 547
Bürger, Gottfried August, 512–513, 532–533
Burney, Charles, 143–145
Burnham, Scott, 219, 418
Bußler, Ludwig, 197–198
(p. 598) C
Caccini, Giulio, 462–463, 474–475
Callender, Clifton, 551
Capellen, Georg, 2, 6, 166, 171
critique of dualism, 167–170, 173, 175
Caplin, William, 219, 418
Childs, Adrian, 551
Chinese music, 148–158
theory of, 148–150
“Tsi Tschong”, 150–151, 156–157
Chopin, Frederic
Ballade op. 38, 387–388
Nocturne op. 9/1, 253
Prelude op. 28 in E minor, 260
Prelude op. 28 in E major, 337–344
chromaticism, 36–39, 513–517, 522–523, 542
Brahmsian, 468, 476–477
cross-relations, 477
extended/“second practice” tonality, 252–262, 263n3
key-displacement and, 373, 410
Louis and, 36–39
modal, 565–573
modulation and, 10–11, 344, 373
Riemann and, 361, 400–402, 509n23
Schenkerian theory and, 317, 517
Schubertian, 299–317, 488, 492
third progressions and, 85, 258, 401–414, 468, 476–477, 523–524, 534–536
Vaughan-Williamsian, 486, 564–573
Wagnerian, 256–258, 336, 415n9
Clark, Suzannah, 204, 270
Chua, Daniel, 498
coherence
in neo-Riemannian analysis, 272, 400, 485, 497–500, 542
in Nineteenth century music, 261–262
in Riemann, 352, 359, 362–366, 441, 450, 468, 485
incoherence and disunity, 488, 498–500, 506, 513–514, 517, 543n3
Tonnetz and, 324–325, 344–345, 348n48
Cohn, Richard, 241, 256, 266n30, 270, 300, 321n33, 351, 398n18, 492, 498, 546n31, 551, 558–560
combination tone, 75–76, 78, 172, 186
combinatoriality, 280–289, 356–362, 366
comma, syntonic, 81–82, 274, 280, 289n8, 324, 327
common tone relationships, 83, 300, 356, 406
and Tonvorstellung/- vertretung, 296–299, 581
in Riemann, 102–104, 296–297
Cone, Edward T., 439n35
consonance and dissonance
characteristic dissonance, 95, 97
in harmonic dualism, 83–85, 171–186, 383
in pre-Rameauvian music theory, 66–67
in Rameau, 327
triad and, 323–324, 517, 556
Cook, Robert, 486
D
Dahlhaus, Carl, 114, 204, 442, 420–421, 427, 434
critique of Riemannian function, 94, 101, 122–123, 364
d’Alembert, Jean-Baptiste, 71–73
Darwin, Charles, 146
degeneration, 363–364, 543n3
Dempster, Douglas, 241
Denny, Thomas, 301–304
diatonicism
relation with chromaticism, 253, 257–262, 361, 572
transposition in, 249–252, 264n13
Diergarten, Felix, 14, 30
diminished triad, 173–174
dissonant sonorities, 382–397
as simultaneous chords, 350, 383–386, 394–397
function and, 385–386
taxonomy of, 388, 396–397
transformations among, 386–393
dominant
in functional-logical form, 118–119, 130–131
in Hauptmann, 229–230
in neo-Riemannian theory, 300, 319n14, 554–564, 566
in Rameau, 72, 83
in Riemann, 84, 94, 98–102, 128, 430
secondary, 9–11, 38, 406, 509n31
Doppelklänge.See dissonant sonorities
Drobisch, Moriz Wilhelm, 61, 269, 275, 284–286
dualism.See harmonic dualism
dyads, 180, 197–198, 333
E
Ehrenfels, Christian von, 169
Ellis, Alexander, 146
Engebretsen, Nora, 327, 350
enharmonicism, 488–489, 543n3
in Riemann, 180, 271–274, 280–282, 287, 468
seams and snaps, 488, 505–506
Tonnetz and, 324
epistemology, 124–125, 135n50, 377n15, 516–517, 531
Ergo, Emil,
on contrapuntal harmony, 30–32
on dualism, 4–5
on modulation, 9–11
Erpf, Hermann, 39–40, 398n14
Euler, Leonhard, 269, 322–323
F
Federhofer, Hellmut, 240
Fétis, François-Joseph, 94–95, 195, 327, 543n3
(p. 599) Fichte, Johann Gottlieb, 100
figured bass, 68–70, 87, 230
Fisk, Charles, 500, 506n1
Fogliani, Ludovico, 67
Forkel, Johann Nikolaus, 144
Fortlage, Carl, 144, 152
Foucault, Michel, 68
Franck, César
Le Chasseur Maudit, 512–514, 518–542
Frege, Gottlob, 2, 112–131
concepts in, 120, 127–128
mathematical functions in, 114–119
on sense and meaning, 121–124
on thought and idea, 124–129
function theory.See harmonic function
fundamental bass theory, 6, 38, 71–73, 95–96, 297
fugue, 16, 18–19, 20–21, 111, 221
G
Gelbart, Matthew, 2
Gingerich, John, 299
Glarean, Heinrich, 68
Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von, 174, 473
Gollin, Edward, 270, 350
Grabner, Herrmann, 14, 40–41
große Cadenz, 99–101, 107, 496
group theory.See abstract algebra
Grove, George, 304–311
H
Halm, August, 13
Hanninen, Dora, 544n10
harmony
alteration of, 72–73, 84–86, 383, 385, 394–396, 555, 562, 570–571
Riemann tone relations as forms of, 102–103, 366–367
ambiguity and extravagance, 325, 328, 494, 499, 565, 572–573
chord and key, 324–329
counterpoint and, 27–32, 36–39, 68, 519–521, 565
PLR2, 300, 315
form and, 219–223
hierarchical levels of, 15–21, 517
intelligibility of, 80–81, 99, 101, 112, 127, 356–376, 515, 522, 532, 555. See also coherence
parenthetical, 20–32, 37
phrase and meter and, 420–426
qualia of, 247–248, 491, 499, 503–505, 553, 564
Schwebende, 325, 363–364
sensuous aspect of, 6, 360, 486, 552–553, 558–560, 570–572
sin and, 363, 495, 512–514
third stacking, 74, 249, 264n12, 551–552, 561
transformational accounts of, 102, 355–356
harmonic dualism, 5–6, 147, 165–166, 196–199, 579
analysis and, 196, 205–241
before Riemann, 171–178
critiques of, 4, 6, 199–205
present day, 195–197, 257–259
Riemann's contemporaries, 33–34, 167–169
defense of, 7–8, 168–191, 194–214, 265n22
development of, 73–83
dissonance and, 383, 385–386
fundamental bass and, 186–190
higher tertian chords in, 184–186, 383, 394–395
major-minor polarity, 7, 12, 69, 75, 78–80
mathematical means and, 198–199
melody and, 142, 152–153, 180
minor scale/triad and, 33–34, 83, 171–191, 580
mode of listening, 165–170, 195, 225, 238–241
monism and, 6, 12, 171, 188, 192n12, 199–214, 224, 236
musical form and, 218–241
pedagogy of, 190–191, 195
repertoire for, 239–240
residues of, 11–13
“soft” and “hard” forms, 196–199
symmetry in, 246–247, 251–262
voice-leading and, 253–262
harmonic function, 1–2, 92–112, 118–120, 123, 127, 579
as appearance/chord/object, 100–102, 118–119, 550, 552–553
as concept/idea/representation, 84–129
as disposition/behavior, 108–109
as intention, 500–502, 552–553
as mathematical function, 118
chord succession and, 107–109, 250–256, 364, 579
critiques of, 122–123, 265n23, 364
dissonance and, 97, 385–386
limits of, 236, 364, 566–567
meanings of, 92–93, 98–102, 111–112, 122
notation of, 7, 109–112, 130–131, 511n50. See also Klangschlüssel
phrase rhythm and, 424–426, 430–434, 442, 458
propagation of theory, 5, 12, 500
relation to scale degree, 122–123
taxonomies of, 9, 11–15, 109–112
tonality and, 109, 361, 365–366, 430, 443–444
harmonic ratios
arithmetic and harmonic division, 67, 74–75
consonance and dissonance, 172–173, 181–186
differentiation of adjacent pitches and, 81
in post-Rameauvian music theory, 74–77, 80–81, 269
in pre-Rameauvian music theory, 66–68, 70
prime factorization of, 80, 183–184, 278–279
Tonnetz and, 275–288
harmonic progression, 107–109, 247–250, 352
by fifth, 81, 360, 401
in Riemann, 367–368
by second, 371–375, 415n13, 570–571
by tritone, 361, 375–377, 404
in dualist systems, 81, 85, 225–226, 232, 352
in non-Classical music, 249
Rameau and, 73, 95–96
voice-leading efficiency and, 103–104, 253–262, 477
Harmonieschritte, 251, 351–376, 579–580
background of, 349–350, 358–359
dissonant configurations and, 382–386, 394–397
function and, 107–109, 202–204, 210–214, 352, 360
taxonomies of, 353–356, 366–376 See also tone relations
Harrison, Daniel, 101, 264n17, 343–344, 364, 486, 507n2
Hauptmann, Moritz, 66, 80–82, 86, 175, 182, 207, 274, 279, 363, 423, 543n3
musical dialectics of, 203–204, 225–230, 233, 325, 336
tonal space in 81, 228–229
Helmholtz, Herrmann von, 33, 57–64, 80, 86, 144, 171
on chords, 82
on consonance and dissonance, 62–63, 78–79, 174–177, 277, 279
on tone representation, 60–61
on tone sensation, 78
Henried, Richard, 8
Herbart, Johann Friedrich, 268
Herder, Johann Gottfried, 146
hermeneutic edaphology, 515, 544n9
Herzogenberg, Elisabeth von, 477
hexatonicism, 413–414, 414n4, 491, 515, 560
hex-collection, 389–393, 398n18
hex-cycle, 401, 403–405, 410–412, 507n9, 547n43, 558
hex-pole, 391, 399n22, 492, 499
historicism in music theory, 65–86, 194–195, 214n2, 462–464, 472–475
Holtmeier, Ludwig, 1, 137n5
Hook, Julian, 507n5, 573
Hornbostel, Erich Moritz von, 141, 146
Hostinský, Ottokar, 323, 357
Hull, A. Eaglefield, 561
humor in music, 444, 448, 452–455
Hunt, Graham, 415n9
Hyer, Brian, 295, 300, 318n5, 323, 348n48, 353, 401, 511n55, 515, 552–553, 564, 570
hypermeter, 420–421
I
imagination of tone. See Tonvorstellung
interval, 80, 295–296
genera and, 66, 143–145, 150
transformational conception of, 198–199, 285, 386, 548–549
intonation and temperament, 177, 191n1, 270, 274–289, 322–323, 358
inversion.See symmetry
J
Jameson, Frederic, 56, 69
Journal of Music Theory, 498
K
Karg-Elert, Sigfrid, 8
Kayser, Hans, 8
Kirnberger, Johann, 74, 86, 326
Kirsch, Ernst, 114
Klang, 1, 73, 82–86, 363, 366, 382–386
conceived by Helmholtz, 82
conceived by Oettingen, 82–83, 176
defining, 90n29, 278, 507n5, 580
over and under-Klänge, 83, 92, 366–376
Klangschlüssel, 14–15, 19, 130, 200, 386, 580. See also harmonic function—notation of
Klangvertretung.See triad representation
Klumpenhouwer, Henry, 166, 353–354, 359, 364–365
Knecht, Justin Heinrich, 74
Kopp, David, 299, 300, 350, 355, 507n3
Krebs, Harald, 301–304
Krehl, Stephan, 7–8
Kretzschmar, August Ferdinand Hermann, 418, 472, 474–475
Krumhansl, Carol, 323–324, 328–329
Kuhlau, Friedrich,
Sonatina Op. 20/3, 425
Kurth, Ernst, 159, 169, 503, 553, 555, 560, 570, 572
and Riemann reception, 6, 11, 14, 39
(p. 601) L
Lerdahl, Fred, 270, 324–345, 414n4
Levi, Hermann, 478
Lewin, David, 123, 225, 285, 323, 353, 400, 516–517, 528, 544, 548–549, 552–553, 574n16
on Wagner, 256–258, 262–263
Lingg, Hermann, 466, 478
Liszt, Franz, 463–464
Consolation No. 1, 30
Piano Concerto in E-flat Major, 558
Valse impromptu 27, 29
Lockwood, Lewis, 441
Longuet-Higgens, Christopher, 322–323
Lotze, Rudolf Hermann, 62, 79, 85, 169, 174, 182
Louis, Rudolf, 2, 13, 32–39
“conceptual dissonance” of, 35–38
critique of Riemann, 32–34
intellectual background of, 33–34
“intermediate harmony” of, 36–37
scholarly aims of, 32–33
M
“major chordishness”, 247–248
Maler, Wilhelm, 40–41
Mannheim school, 449
Marx, Adolf Bernhard, 81–82, 327
mathematical function, 112–118, 130, 357–358. See also harmonic function
Matrix, The, 243n24, 274
Mayrberger, Carl, 30
Mayrhofer, Robert, 46n52, 197
McCorkle, Margit, 483n–28
Medieval music theory, 155
Mendelssohn, Felix
Song without Words op. 52/2, 19–21, 24–26
Mersenne, Marin, 71
Miller, Horace Alden, 561
minor triad, 33–34, 171–191
Hauptmann and, 80
Oettingen and, 77
Rameau and, 71–72, 172, 174
Riemann and, 83, 181–191
Zarlino and, 68, 171–172, 174, 180 See also harmonic dualism
minor scale
harmonic minor, 202, 267n43
natural minor, 143, 148, 152–158, 404
modulation, 326–327, 513, 543n3
expressive, 304–305, 316, 373
relationship to secondary dominants and, 9–11
monotonality.See tonality—monotonality
Mooney, Michael Kevin, 508n16
Moser, Hans Joachim, 8
Motte, Diether de la, 299
Mozart, Wolfgang Amadeus,
Piano Sonata in G major KV. 283, 433
String Quartet in C major “Dissonance” KV. 465, 15, 17–18
Munich School, 2
Murphy, Scott, 336, 575
musical form, 166, 218–241
musical logic, 128, 229, 365, 450–451, 458–459, 496, 499
in Riemann, 99–101, 219
relation to mathematical logic, 113, 125–126, 130–131
musical motion, 78, 100, 129, 247, 250, 277, 279, 285–286, 353–355, 366, 533, 548–553
musical universals, 5, 140–141, 145, 148–149, 497
musico-passeriformal topoi, 449
musicology, comparative, 2, 140–148
N
National Socialism, 13, 41
Naumann, Carl Ernst, 269–270
Nebenklänge, 104–106
neo-Riemannian theory, 485–486
analysis and, 365, 400–401, 487–506, 542, 565–573
coherence in, 344, 365–366, 497–500, 515, 531–532
diversity of, 485, 510n33
harmonic function and, 127, 138n123, 492, 496, 517, 570
harmonic indeterminacy and, 325, 351, 400–402, 488, 564
New Musicology and, 240–241, 485, 498–500, 510n43
origins of, 497–498, 561
paleo-Riemannian theory and, 486, 488–489, 497, 500–504, 514–515
tensions of, 485, 492, 499–500, 550–553, 574n16
transformation theory and, 351–352, 515–517, 548–553
transformations of, 295–296, 300, 350, 351–360, 364–366, 414n1
Twentieth century music and, 389–393, 564–573
Neue Zeitschrift für Musik, 167, 200
“New Empiricism”, 13, 33
Nolan, Catherine, 358
nonatonic collection, 486, 554–555
non-Western musics, 140–159
O
octatonic collection, 321n31, 389, 400, 413, 414n4, 528
octave equivalence, 66, 69, 180, 183–185, 246–248, 278
(p. 602) Oettingen, Arthur von, 60, 76–79, 82, 86, 152–153, 166, 171, 174–177, 218, 359
harmonic progression and, 349, 363
tonal space in, 82, 274–278, 280, 322–323, 357
organicism, 220–221, 240
overtones and overtone series, 78, 171–181, 188–189, 275–276
arithmetic division, 67
multiplication tones, 76–77, 175–178, 275–276
Rameau and, 70, 73–74
P
Pearce, Trevor, 135n50
Peirce, Charles Sanders, 101
pentatonic collection, 413
Riemann and, 142–158, 163n51
tonicity and, 150–152, 156–158
Perischetti, Vincent, 562
phrase and metrical structure, 5, 99–100, 154, 219, 417–418, 419–435, 440–459
accent, cadential, 418, 432–435
accent, durational, 427–430
accent, tonal, 430–432
downbeats and upbeats, 417–418, 420, 441–445, 458, 472
melodic imitation and, 426–427, 433–434
notated and expressed meter, 420, 422, 431, 434–435, 472
period structure and, 442–443, 445–447, 450, 457–458
text setting and, 462–480
Phrygian mode, 565–568
physiology, 57–60, 65, 78–79, 83, 147, 165
plagal drift, 335–336, 559
Plutarch, 143–145
Pythagoras, 66, 144
Q
Quinn, Ian, 264n14
R
Rameau, Jean-Philippe, 70–71, 86, 95–96, 146, 149, 248–250, 555
double emploi, 504
fundamental bass theory of, 71–73, 188
minor triad and, 71–72, 171
Ravel, Maurice
Tombeau de Couperin “Forlane”, 390–393
reductionism, 92, 102, 109
Reed, John, 316, 321n34
reformism in German music theory, 8, 13, 40–41, 43n15, 55, 170
Rehding, Alexander, 2, 55–56, 94–95, 100, 127, 166, 195, 215n5, 397n3, 494–495, 497–498
rhetorical ventriloquism, 552, 574n16
Riemann, Hugo
Brahms and, 222, 242n21, 363, 418, 463–464, 472–474, 477, 482n13
composer, as, 242n23
contributions to practical music theory, 8–13
East Asian musics and, 148–152, 154–158
Frege and, 112–114
German musical canon and, 147, 440–441, 446, 472, 510n34
harmonic function and, 92–112, 118–120, 127–131, 361, 366, 430, 443–444
Harmonieschritte and, 107–109, 349–350, 351–356, 360–376
history of music theory, on, 62, 65–86, 171–175, 183
immediate influence of, 4–8, 240
intellectual sources of, 101–102, 143–147
melodic analysis in, 140–141, 150–153, 158–159, 426–427, 446
minor scale/triad, origins of, 82–83, 153–155, 167–169, 249–250
musical form and, 218–233, 238–241
non-Western repertoires and, 140–159
normativity in, 148, 365–366, 383, 397n3, 464, 474, 496–498
notational systems of, 109–112, 149, 442
pedagogy and, 169, 187–191, 296–297
personality and rhetorical style of, 3–5, 144–147, 168–170
phrasing and metrical structure and, 99–100, 154, 219, 417–418, 419–435, 440–459, 462–479, 579
posthumous reception of, 3–41, 43n23, 419, 473
psychological justification for dualism, 181–191
science and technology and, 56–59, 65, 140–141, 497
tone relations of, 102–109, 351–366, 552
tone representation and, 61–64, 178–179
Tonnetz and, 271–289
undertones, argument for, 76–78, 165, 182–183
Riemann, Hugo, writings of
Beethovens sämtliche Klavier-Solosonaten, 111, 440–459
“Degeneration und Regeneration in der Musik”, 363
Elemente der musikalischen Ästhetik, 170
Elementar-Schulbuch der Harmonielehre, 433
Fokloristische Tonalitätsstudien, 140–159
(p. 603) background of, 141–148
evaluation of, 158–159
Geschichte der Musiktheorie, 142, 170, 188
Große Kompositionslehre, 220–221, 273–274, 428
Grundriß der Kompositionslehre, 422–424, 430–433
Handbuch der Harmonielehre, 4, 32, 94, 107–108, 424–425, 489, 495
Handbuch der Musikgeschichte, 144, 364, 463, 473–475
Die Hülfsmittel der Modulationslehre, 278, 349, 358, 360
“Ideen zu einer ‘Lehre von den Tonvorstellungen’”, 128, 286–288, 294–296, 412
Katechismus der Musikwissenschaft, 170, 186, 220–222
“Metric Freedoms in Brahms’ Songs”, 462–473
background of, 473–479
Musikalische Dynamik und Agogik, 427–428, 431
“Musikalische Logik”, 99–101, 107
Musikalische Syntaxis, 61, 86, 71, 180, 186, 349, 360–363, 489, 493
Musiklexikon, 4–5, 93, 94–95, 105, 221, 401
function in, 99
tonal space in, 272, 280–287, 323
“Die Natur der Harmonik” 2, 55–86, 98–99, 127–128, 279
background of, 55–65
Neue Schule der Melodik, 32
“Die Neugesetaltung der Harmonielehre”, 242
“Das Problem des harmonischen Dualismus”, 166, 167–191, 201–202
background of, 167–170
Skizze einer neuen Methode der Harmonielehre, 86, 107, 271–274, 349
Schematisirung der Dissonanzen” in,382–386, 393–397
Systematik der Harmonieschritte” in, 350, 353–359, 362–376
Systematische Modulationslehre, 218, 417, 493–494
“Über das musikalische Hören”, 277–278, 280–281
Vademecum der Phrasierung, 422–424, 428, 433–435
Vereinfachte Harmonielehre, 495
function in, 92–94, 96–97, 99, 102, 112–113, 127, 204, 364
Harmonieschritte in, 107–108
Richter, Ernst Friedrich, 4, 9–10
Rings, Steven, 486, 517
Rousseau, Jean-Jacques, 146
Roussier, Abbé Pierre-Joseph, 149
Royal Research Institute for Musicology, 140
Rummenhöller, Peter, 101–102, 241n2
S
Santa, Matthew, 553–555, 560–563
Sauveur, Joseph, 71, 172
scale degree theory, 1, 123, 495–497, 509n30, 564
Scandinavian musics, 152–153
Scheinkonsonanzen. See apparent consonance
Schenker, Heinrich, 159, 326–327, 493
imagination of tone of, 303, 317–318
relationship to function theorists, 32
Schillings, Max, 36–37
Schmidt, Matthias, 473, 483n21
Schoenberg, Arnold, 63, 252, 262, 493, 528
Schreyer, Johannes, 2, 4, 13–32
and harmonic parenthesis, 20–32
“apparent harmonies” of, 15–16, 19
reductionist analyses of, 15–32
Schritte and Wechsel, S/W group. See Harmonieschritte
Schubert, Franz
Am Meer, 253, 262
Ganymed, 299
Gretchens Bitte, 311–317
Impromptu in G-flat major, 487–506, 508n18
Liedesend, 304–311
Piano Sonata in D major op. 53, 253, 404–407, 412
Quartet no. 14 in D minor, 225
Quintet in C Major, 299
Trost, 300–304
Schumann, Robert
Carnival “Chopin”, 253
Dichterliebe “Im wunderschönen Monat Mai”, 329–333
Scruton, Roger, 550, 553
Sechter, Simon, 35–36, 38, 336
Seidel, Elmar, 240, 440
sensation and perception, 60–64, 90n36
seventh chords, 197, 251, 254–262, 383, 385, 394, 507n5, 553–555
Shepard, Roger, 323
Siciliano, Michael, 301, 501
Smith, Charles J., 328, 565–567
Smith, Peter H., 243n38
sounding body, 57, 65, 83
Still, William Grant
Traceries “Cloud Cradles”, 389–390
Stockhausen, Julius, 478
subdominant, 500–501
in Rameau, 72, 83, 95
in Riemann, 234, 244n50, 353, 360, 495
minor, 331–332, 384, 362
Steege, Benjamin, 2, 88n13, 192n7, 291n25
Straus, Joseph, 549, 551
Strauss, Richard, 510n38
Stravinsky, Igor
The Rite of Spring, 225
Stufen.See scale degree theory
Stumpf, Carl, 141, 146–147, 169, 171, 177–180, 186
symmetry, 142, 166, 198–199, 262–263, 297, 499
cadential, 432–433
form and, 234–236, 239
individual and uniform, 248–249, 255, 266n29
pentatonic scalar, 148–152
pitch collections bearing, 389, 400–401
tonal space and, 338–343
varieties of, 246–255 See also harmonic dualism
T
Tallis, Thomas, 565–568
Tarnhelm progression, 256–258
Tartini, Giuseppe, 68, 74–76, 86
tetrachords, 143, 148, 153–158, 390–392, 562
theo-Riemannian theory, 363, 495, 496
thirds, progression by.See harmonic progression—by thirds
Thuille, Ludwig, 4, 50n116
tonal function.See harmonic function
tonal luminosity, 373, 403, 502–503, 568–572
tonality
chromatic, 360, 400–402, 403, 468, 565
monotonality, 493–494
non-monotonality, 387, 407
origins of, 141–158
post-tonality and, 390–393, 568–570
scale and, 326–327, 361, 366, 412–414
tonal complex, 296–297
tonal design, 317–318, 402–412
and dualism, 220, 223–239
double tonic complexes, 301
tonal gravity, 96, 451, 565
tone relations, 102–109, 269–270, 355
by thirds and fifths (Q/T), 274–279, 284–288, 359–360, 367–370, 404, 468, 477
compound/unary relationships, 356–357, 415n8, 568–572
cross-type, 251, 254–255, 507n5, 551–552
dualist and non-dualist, 353
tone representation. See Tonvorstellung
tonal space.See also transformation networks; Tonnetz
distance/proximity and, 250, 258–259, 278, 305, 326–328, 346n21, 413, 568
Garden of Eden, as, 363, 494, 496
in Lerdahl, 324–325, 329, 333, 344–345
in Riemann, 271–289
functional continuum, 105–107
functional representation, 96–97
temporality and, 218–219
whole-tone space, 540, 560
tonic, 97–98, 150–152, 552–553, 573
and antitonic, 556–564
in Hauptmann, 229–230, 233
in Riemann, 361, 366, 430, 443–444
Tonnetz
analysis with, 271–274, 329–345, 501–506
as acoustic matrix, 274–283, 323
as map of relations, 272–274, 285–289, 323
chord, pitch, and region in, 325–329, 412–414
geometry of, 288, 324, 329, 501
in Oettingen, 82, 270, 322
in Riemann, 220, 322, 237, 280–288
pre-Riemannian developments of, 269–278, 322–323
tone representation with, 295–298
varieties of, 323–325, 501
Tonverwandtschaften.See tone relations
Tonverwandtschaftstabelle. See Tonnetz
Tonvorstellung, 6, 9, 34, 60–64, 165, 168–170, 294–318, 515
defining/translating, 90n36, 104–105, 138n128, 292n43, 295, 580
Helmholtz on, 60–61
tone reinterpretation and, 296–297, 301–317
Tonnetz and, 286–289, 297–298
Tovey, Francis, 457
transformation, 247, 529, 548–553, 580
contextuality in, 349–350, 353, 516–517, 527–531, 542
Riemann's conception of, 102, 127, 285, 378n23
Schritte/Wechsel vs. tone relations, 107–109, 349–350, 353–366
theories, 386, 516, 531, 552
tonality and, 485–486, 500–501, 515, 552
transformation networks, 550, 563–564
function and, 201–204, 212–214, 411, 492, 496, 502
post-tonal, 389–393, 406
transformational operations
D/DOM, 300, 328
DOUTH2, 391
H/hexatonic pole, 391, 399n22, 492, 499, 572
IDENT, 354, 357, 388
L/leittonwechsel, 11–13, 102–106, 328, 387–388, 570
N/nebenverwandt, 490–491, 508n11
P/parallel, 102–106, 495, 403, 571–572
Q/T (Quintschritt/Terzwechsel), 274–279, 284–288, 353, 359–360, 367–370, 404, 468, 477
R/relative, 9, 11–13, 102–106
Tn/transposition, 246–249, 255, 266n29, 285, 392, 398n18, 571, 573
Wn/Doppelklänge-generators, 388–391
X/Y transformations, 528–529, 534, 542, 546n31, 562–564
triad, ontology of, 344, 531–532, 548–553
triadic atonality.See tone relations—independent of key
triadic inversion, 106–107
fundamental bass and, 69–72, 187–189, 467–468, 477
structure of major and minor triads, 181–186, 197, 204
triad representation, 102–103, 270, 318, 580
trichords, 555–564
Triole, 453, 456, 460n8
Tristan chord, 259–262
Tymoczko, Dmitri, 166, 507n7
U
Ulehla, Ludmila, 562
undertones and undertone series, 7, 167–168, 182–183, 200, 277
empirical case for, 77, 186
harmonic division, 67
in Oetttingen, 77, 175–178
in Rameau, 71
V
Vallotti, Francesco Antonio, 73–74
Vaughan Williams, Ralph
Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis, 564–573
Verwandtschaftstabelle.See tonal space; Tonnetz
Vial, François-Guillaume, 323
Vogel, Martin, 269, 322
Vogler, Abbé Georg Joseph, 430
voice-leading, 1, 166, 500
absolute and directed, 489–491, 507n7, 528–529, 556, 562–564
efficiency, 253–262, 300, 324, 330, 354, 400, 489, 555, 558–560, 581
in Riemann, 103–104, 477
maximal smoothness, 256, 258, 267n35
voice exchange, 29–30
Vorhang, 447–448
W
Wagner, Richard, 10–11, 375
Parsifal, 121–122, 333–337, 489, 498, 551
Rheingold, Das 256–258
Tannhäuser, 30–32, 121–122
Tristan und Isolde, 258–261, 557
Walküre, Die, 356, 515
Wason, Robert, 13, 30
Weber, Gottfried, 249–250, 323, 327–328
Webster, James, 225
Wechsel. See Harmonieschritte
Weiner, Joan, 129
Weitzmann, Carl Friedrich, 322–323, 507n9
Weitzmann region, 490–492, 496, 507n9
Wolf, Hugo
Spanisches Liederbuch “Und schläfst du, mein Mädchen”, 407–412
X
X and Y transformations, 528–529, 534, 542, 546n31, 562–564
Z
Zarlino, Gioseffo, 67–70, 74–75, 169, 171, 180, 216n13
Zee, Anthony, 246
Ziehn, Bernhard, 3
Zuckerkandl, Victor, 549–550, 573