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date: 26 February 2020

(p. ix) Contributors

(p. ix) Contributors

Colin Allen is professor in the Department of History and Philosophy of Science and in the Program in Cognitive Science at Indiana University, Bloomington, where he is also a faculty member in the Center for the Integrative Study of Animal Behavior. He publishes regularly on topics in animal cognition and the philosophical foundations of cognitive ethology, and since arriving at Indiana in 2004 he has enjoyed being challenged to think about the historical contexts in which controversies about animal behavior and cognition arise and about how current developments in biology and cognitive science might reframe the debates.



Robin O. Andreasen is an associate professor of philosophy at the University of Delaware, with a joint appointment in the Department of Linguistics and Cognitive Science. She is interested in a variety of philosophical questions raised by evolutionary theory and its relation to human social life, including those related to realism and classification in the biological and social sciences. Her articles have been published in Journal of Philosophy, British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, Philosophy of Science Proceedings, and Biology and Philosophy. She is co‐editor of a Blackwell anthology in feminist theory and is an advisory editor for an upcoming Monist issue on race.



André Ariew is an associate professor of philosophy at the University of Missouri. His primary interest is in the philosophy of biology, especially those issues concerning the nature of evolutionary explanation.



Ana Barahona studied biology and obtained her Ph.D. at the National University of Mexico (UNAM). During her doctoral studies, she stayed for a year at Harvard University and did research at the American Philosophical Society. She did her postdoctoral studies at the University of California, Irvine. A pioneer in the historical and philosophical studies of science since 1980, she founded the area of social studies of science and technology in the Faculty of Sciences, UNAM, where she is currently a professor in the Department of Evolutionary Biology. Some of her interests are focused in the relation among history and philosophy of science, epistemology, science teaching, and science education.



John Beatty teaches history and philosophy of science, and social and political philosophy at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. His research focuses on the theoretical foundations, methodology, and sociopolitical dimensions of genetics and evolutionary biology. He is a coauthor of The Empire of Chance: (p. x) How Probability Changed Science and Everyday Life. He co‐directs (with Jane Maienschein and James Collins) the annual Marine Biological Laboratory Seminar in the History of Biology.



Vladimir Cachón studied biology and obtained his Ph.D. at the National University of Mexico (UNAM). He did his postdoctoral studies at the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia. At this time, he teaches philosophy and history of biology, and evolution as part of the Faculty of Sciences, UNAM. Some of his interests are focused in the history and philosophical implications of evolutionary theory, current controversies around the theory of evolution, the present biodiversity crisis, and conservation strategies to face it.



David Castle is the Canada Research Chair in Science and Society at the University of Ottawa. His research addresses the interaction between science and technology innovation and society, particularly the ethical and legal issues posed by new biotechnology. He has published Genetically Modified Foods: Debating Biotechnology; Science, Society and the Supermarket: Opportunities and Challenges for Nutrigenomics; Aquaculture, Innovation and Social Transformation; and The Role of Intellectual Property in Biotechnology Innovation.



Stephen J. Crowley is an assistant professor in the Department of Philosophy at Boise State University, Idaho. He recently completed his dissertation on the epistemic implications of animal metacognition at Indiana University, Bloomington. In addition to his attempts to make sense of the study of animal behavior by looking at its history, he is also broadening his study of the impact of animal metacognition upon epistemology. Currently, he is trying to make sense of how, if at all, bees forget things.



Zachary Ernst is an assistant professor at the University of Missouri. In addition to the philosophy of biology, he has published in ethics, game theory, and logic. He is currently working on a book manuscript in the philosophy of biology that addresses issues arising from comparative genomics. He owns a duck.



Carla Fehr is an associate professor of philosophy at Iowa State University. Her research is in evolutionary theory, philosophy of biology, and feminist philosophy of science. She is published in biology, philosophy and women's studies journals, including Molecular Ecology, Ecology, Philosophy of Science, Biology and Philosophy, National Women's Studies Association Journal, and Minnesota Studies in the Philosophy of Science.



Lisa Gannett is an associate professor in the Department of Philosophy at Saint Mary's University in Halifax, Canada. Her work addresses philosophical questions arising in genetics in the history of the discipline as well as in contemporary practice. Of particular interest are group concepts in population genetics, such as population, race, and ethnicity. Her articles have been published in British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, Philosophy of Science, and Biology and Philosophy.



Ian Gold is the Canada Research Chair in Philosophy and Psychiatry and director of the Cognitive Science Program at McGill University, Montreal. His research focuses on philosophical problems in psychiatry and neuroscience.



James Griesemer is a professor and the chair of the Department of Philosophy at the University of California, Davis, and a member of its Science and Technology Studies Program and the Center for Population Biology. He is president of the International Society for History, Philosophy and Social Studies of Biology and a member of the Konrad Lorenz Institute for Evolution and Cognition Research. He has written on a wide variety of topics, including models and practices in museum‐based natural history, laboratory‐based ecology, units of inheritance and selection in evolutionary biology, and visual representation in embryology and genetics. He is currently writing a book on the process of reproduction in evolutionary theory.



William Harms received a PhD in Philosophy from the University of California, Irvine (1996). He has published a number of papers on evolutionary game theory and on the evolution of signaling and norms, and is the author of Information and Meaning in Evolutionary Processes.



David L. Hull has worked in the philosophy of biology since 1964, especially on issues concerning systematics, reduction in genetics, Darwin and Darwinism, species as individuals, sociobiology, units of selection, historiography, and the sociology of science. In addition, he edited over forty books in his series on the Conceptual Foundations of Science at the University of Chicago Press.



Matteo Mameli is a lecturer in philosophy at King's College. He studied philosophy as an undergraduate at the University of Bologna and received his Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of London (KCL). His research is on the foundations of the biological, cognitive, and social sciences, and on the way such sciences may help one to solve problems in various areas of epistemology and ethics.



Nancey Murphy is a professor of philosophy at Fuller Seminary, Pasadena, California. She received the Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley (philosophy of science), and the Th.D. from the Graduate Theological Union. Her first book, Theology in the Age of Scientific Reasoning, won the American Academy of Religion Award for excellence. She is the author of seven other books and co‐editor of eight. Her most recent (with Warren Brown) is Did My Neurons Make Me Do It? Philosophical and Neurobiological Perspectives on Moral Responsibility and Free Will. Her research focuses on the role of modern and postmodern philosophy in shaping Christian theology, on relations between theology and science, and on neuroscience and philosophy of mind.



Karen Neander, a professor of philosophy at Duke University, has published numerous papers in philosophy of mind and philosophy of biology. These have been on functions, selection, typology, teleosemantics, and other naturalistic (p. xii) theories of mental representation, pictorial representation, and consciousness. She has a forthcoming book titled Mental Representation: The Natural and the Normative in a Darwinian World in which she argues that a Darwinian perspective can solve the problem of intentionality. Her dissertation was completed at La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.



Steven Hecht Orzack is the president of and senior research scientist at the Fresh Pond Research Institute. His research interests include comparative methods in evolutionary biology, demography, evolutionary ecology, genomics, population genetics, and the history and philosophy of biology. He is the co‐editor, along with Elliott Sober, of Adaptationism and Optimality. His “spare” time is taken up by family, sports, music, and politics.



Anya Plutynski is an assistant professor at the University of Utah. Her areas of specialization are the history and philosophy of biology. Her research has primarily been on the early synthesis and roles of mathematical models in scientific explanation. She has published in the British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, Philosophy of Science Proceedings, and Biology and Philosophy and is co‐editor of Blackwell's Companion to Philosophy of Biology.



Richard A. Richards, associate professor of philosophy at the University of Alabama, has published work on Darwin, systematics, phylogenetic inference, meta‐ethics, and aesthetics. He received his Ph.D. in philosophy from Johns Hopkins University and completed a joint program in the history of science, medicine, and technology under the tutelage of Peter Achinstein. He was a professional ballet dancer before entering graduate school in philosophy and now spends his spare time performing and dancing Argentine tango with his wife, Rita Chavez Snyder.



Jason Scott Robert is a faculty member in the School of Life Sciences at Arizona State University and in the Department of Basic Medical Sciences at the University of Arizona College of Medicine—Phoenix, in partnership with Arizona State University. At ASU, he is affiliated with the Center for Biology and Society and the Consortium for Science, Policy, and Outcomes. Robert has published many articles in the philosophy of biology and bioethics and the book Embryology, Epigenesis, and Evolution: Taking Development Seriously. He is currently working on a new book, tentatively entitled Chimeras, Cyborgs, and the Moral Limits of Science. Robert is a co-editor for Philosophy of Biology for the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy and serves on the editorial advisory board for Biological Theory.



Adina L. Roskies earned a Ph.D. at the University of California, San Diego, in neurosciences and cognitive science in 1995. Her doctoral work in neural development was conducted at the Salk Institute, and following that she pursued postdoctoral research in cognitive neuroimaging at Washington University Medical School, St. Louis. In 1997, she became senior editor of the neuroscience journal (p. xiii) Neuron. Roskies obtained a second Ph.D. in philosophy from MIT in 2004 and joined the Philosophy Department at Dartmouth College in that year. Her research interests include the philosophy of mind, philosophy of science, and ethics. Roskies has published in scientific journals, such as Science, Journal of Neuroscience, and Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, and philosophical journals, including Philosophy of Science, Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, and Philosophical Psychology.



Michael Ruse is a professor of philosophy at Florida State University. He keeps ferrets and teenagers.



Roger Sansom is a member of the Department of Philosophy at Texas A&M University. His research deals with the relationship between evolution and development. Of particular interest is the nature of developmental constraints, evolvability, selection for evolvability, and the evolvability of gene regulation networks. Along with Robert Brandon, he is co‐editor of Integrating Evolution and Development: From Theory to Practice.



Jeffrey P. Schloss is Distinguished Professor of Biology at Westmont College. He received his Ph.D. in ecology and evolutionary biology from Washington University and is interested in the theological and philosophical implications of evolutionary accounts of altruism, ethics, and religious belief and in critiques of religious antievolutionism and antireligious scientism. Recent collaborative projects include Altruism and Altruistic Love: Science, Philosophy, and Religion in Dialogue (with Stephen Post et al.) and Evolution and Ethics: Human Morality in Biological and Religious Perspective (with Philip Clayton).



David Sepkoski is an assistant professor of history at the University of North Carolina–Wilmington. He specializes in the history of evolutionary theory and its relation to paleontology. He has published widely on topics in the history of paleontology and is writing a book about the emergence of paleobiology as an autonomous discipline.



Brian Skyrms teaches at the University of California, Irvine and at Stanford University. He is the author of Evolution of the Social Contract and other light classics.



Denis Walsh is Canada Research Chair in Philosophy of Biology in the department of Philosophy and the Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, University of Toronto.



C. Kenneth Waters, John Dolan Professor of philosophy at the University of Minnesota and director of the Minnesota Center for Philosophy of Science, is interested in a variety of philosophical questions about science, including questions about pluralism, reductionism, causation and causal explanation, and ways in which scientific knowledge can be structured by an interplay of experimental (p. xiv) strategies and local causal explanations (rather than by global theoretical frameworks). He received his Ph.D. at Indiana University in history and philosophy of science. After observing his teachers at Indiana on the dance floor, he took up drinking and, under the tutelage of Ron Giere, has learned to appreciate a decent Rhone.