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date: 14 October 2019

(p. xv) Contributors

(p. xv) Contributors

reuben ahroni is professor of biblical and Yemenite Studies at The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. He is the author and editor of several books, including Yemenite Jewry: Origins, Culture and Literature.



fritz erich anhelm is the director of the Protestant Academy Loccum, the Conference Centre of the Lutheran Church of Hanover in Germany. He is author of several books and articles relating to religion in society, ecumenism, and civil society.



said amir arjomand is distinguished service professor of sociology at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and the inaugural Crane Fellow in law and public affairs at the Woodrow Wilson School of Princeton University. His most recent edited book is Rethinking Civilizational Analysis.



ali s. asani is professor of the practice of Indo-Muslim languages and cultures at Harvard University. He is author of Ecstasy and Enlightenment: The Ismaili Devotional Literatures of South Asia and other publications on the devotional and mystical literatures of Muslim communities in South Asia.



lawrence a. babb is professor of anthropology and Asian studies at Amherst College. He is the author of several books including Alchemies of Violence: Myths of Identity and the Life of Trade in Western India.



randall balmer teaches American religious history at Barnard College, Columbia University. He is the author of ten books, including Mine Eyes Have Seen the Glory: A Journey into the Evangelical Subculture in America, which was made into a three-part series of television programs for PBS.



karen mccarthy brown is professor of anthropology of religion in the Graduate and Theological Schools of Drew University. She is the author of Mama Lola, a Vodou Priestess in Brooklyn and leader of The Newark Project, ten years of research on urban religion outside the institutions.



amila buturovic is associate professor of humanities and Noor Fellow of Islamic studies at York University, Toronto. She is the author of Stone Speaker: Medieval Tombstones, Landscape, and Bosnian Identity in the Poetry of Mak Dizdar and other works on cultures and religions in the Balkans.



josé ignacio cabezón is XIVth Dalai Lama professor of Tibetan Buddhist and cultural studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is the author of Buddhism and Language and other publications on Tibet, Buddhism, and the study of religion.



juan e. campo is associate professor of Islamic studies, Arabic, and the history of religions at the University of California in Santa Barbara. His book The Other Sides of Paradise: Explorations into the Religious Meanings of Domestic Space in Islam, received the American Academy of Religion's Award for Excellence. His other publications are in the areas of Islamic studies, pilgrimage, and culinary cultures of the Middle East.



david chidester is professor of comparative religion and director of the Institute for Comparative Religion in Southern Africa at the University of Cape Town. He is the author of Authentic Fakes: Religion and American Popular Culture and other books on religion in North America and South Africa.



harvey cox is Hollis professor of divinity at Harvard University. He is currently at work on the history of Christian interpretations of Islam. His most recent book is When Jesus Came to Harvard: Making Moral Choices Today.



sergio dellapergola is professor at the A. Harman Institute of Contemporary Jewry of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and senior fellow at the Jewish People Policy Planning Institute. He is a specialist in Jewish demography and has published many books and articles on Jewish population in Israel and the Diaspora.



karel dobbelaere is emeritus professor of sociology and sociology of religion at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven and secretary general of the International Society for the Sociology of Religion. He is the author of Secularization: An Analysis at Three Levels and other publications on secularization and religious life.



joseph w. elder is professor of sociology, languages, and cultures of Asia, and integrated liberal studies at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He is the main co-editor of India's Worlds and U.S. Scholars: 1947–1997.



ainslie t. embree, professor emeritus of history, Columbia University, was chairman of the history department and associate dean of the School of International and Public Affairs. He was counselor for cultural affairs at the American embassy in Delhi in 1978–1980, and in 1994–1995 he was special consultant to the U.S. Ambassador to India. His books include India's Search for National Identity, Imagining India: Essays on Indian History and Utopias in Conflict: Religion and Nationalism in India.



richard c. foltz is associate professor of religion at Concordia University in Montreal, Canada. His most recent book is Animals in Islamic Tradition and Muslim Cultures.



roger friedland is professor of religious studies and sociology at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is the co-author of To Rule Jerusalem and Matters of Culture: Cultural Sociology in Practice.



dru c. gladney is professor of Asian studies and anthropology at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa. His books include Muslim Chinese: Ethnic Nationalism in the People's Republic; Making Majorities: Composing the Nation in Japan, China, Korea, Malaysia, Fiji, Turkey, and the U.S; Ethnic Identity in China: The Making of a Muslim Minority Nationality; and Dislocating China: Muslims, Minorities, and Other Sub-Altern Subjects.



harvey e. goldberg is professor in the department of sociology and anthropology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He was a visiting professor at the University of California, Berkeley, and Boğaziçi University, Istanbul; visiting lecturer at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Science Sociale, Paris; and fellow at the Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies. His books include Jewish Life in Muslim Libya: Rivals and Relatives and Being Jewish: Cycles of Jewish Life.



richard d. hecht is professor of religious studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is the coauthor of To Rule Jerusalem.



nimachia hernandez is assistant professor of Native American studies at the University of California, Berkeley. She is author of Mokakssini: Blackfoot Knowledge and other publications on Native American philosophy, religion, and lifeways.



saad ibrahim is a professor of sociology at the American University in Cairo, and is coeditor with Nicholas S. Hopkins of Arab Society: Class, Gender, Power, and Development.



john iskander is an assistant professor of Religious Studies at Georgia State University in Atlanta. His research includes Islamic and Coptic topics and the making of saints and heretics in modern Egypt.



christian jochim is professor of comparative religious studies and director of the Center for Asian Studies at San Jose State University. He is the author of Chinese Religions: A Cultural Perspective and has published articles on Chinese religion and philosophy in Journal of Chinese Religions, Modern China, Philosophy East and West, and other journals and compilations.



mark juergensmeyer is professor of sociology and global studies and director of the Orfalea Center for Global and International Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is author or editor of twenty books, including Terror in the Mind of God: The Global Rise of Religious Violence and Religion in Global Civil Society.



nathan katz is professor of religious studies at Florida International University. His most recent book is Who Are the Jews of India?, which was a finalist for the (p. xviii) 2000 National Jewish Book Award in Sephardic Studies and winner of the 2004 Vak Devi Saraswati Saman Award.



alexey d. krindatch is a research associate at Patriarch Athenagoras Orthodox Institute. During 1988–2004 he was a member of the staff of the Center of Geopolitical Studies of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Moscow, Russia. He is an expert on religion in the former USSR and on Eastern Christianity in the United States. He is an author of the monograph Geography of Religions in Russia.



scott kugle is assistant professor in the department of religion at Swarthmore College. His research focuses on Islamic law and ethics, especially within Sufi communities of South Asia. He is the author of “Islam in South Asia” in the Encyclopedia of Islam and the Muslim World.



lewis lancaster is professor emeritus of the department of East Asian languages and culture at the University of California, Berkeley. His research and publications have centered on Buddhist studies. He currently serves as the president of the University of the West in Los Angeles.



j. shawn landres is director of Research at Synagogue 3000. He has taught at the University of California, Santa Barbara; the University of Judaism in Los Angeles; and Matej Bel University Banská Bystrica, Slovak Republic. He coedited Religion, Violence, Memory, and Place and After The Passion Is Gone: American Religious Consequences.



david n. lorenzen is a professor of South Asian history at El Colegio de Mexico in Mexico City. He is the author of Praises to a Formless God and other publications on Hindu religion and Indian history.



t. n. madan is emeritus professor of sociology at the Institute of Economic Growth and chairman of the Centre for the Study of Developing Societies in Delhi, India. His most recent publication is an edited volume: India's Religions: Perspectives from Sociology and History.



richard madsen is professor of sociology and director of the Council on East Asian Studies at the University of California, San Diego. He is the author of China's Catholics: Tragedy and Hope in an Emerging Civil Society.



gurinder singh mann is Kundan Kaur Kapany professor of Sikh studies and director of the Center for Sikh and Punjab Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. His latest books include Sikhism and The Making of Sikh Scripture.



john hilary martin is professor emeritus of philosophy and theology at the Graduate Theological Union and the Dominican School of Theology and Philosophy at Berkeley. He is author of People from the Dawn and other writings dealing with Aboriginal people and land in sacred traditions.



richard c. martin is professor of Islamic studies and history of religions at Emory University. He is author of many works on Islam and Islamic society and is editor in chief of The Macmillan Encyclopedia of Islam and the Muslim World.



mansoor moaddel is professor of sociology at Eastern Michigan University. Among his publications is Islamic Modernism, Nationalism, and Fundamentalism: Episode and Discourse. He has recently been involved in a project on values surveys in Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Morocco, and Saudi Arabia.



ebrahim moosa is associate research professor at Duke University and director, Center for the Study of Muslim Networks. He is author of Ghazali and the Poetics of Imagination and other publications related to Muslim law and ethics.



tara villalba munson is a graduate student in religious studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She is a Filipino citizen whose research focuses on religion and politics in Southeast Asia. She has published articles on the historical relationship of religion and colonialism in the region and on contemporary issues of nationalism and the transnational impact of political Islam in the Philippines.



vasudha narayanan is professor of religion at the University of Florida and past president of the American Academy of Religion. She is the author or editor of six books, including Hinduism and The Vernacular Veda, and has written more than ninety articles, chapters in books, and reference entries on Hindu texts, temples, and contemporary practices.



vivian-lee nyitray is an associate professor of religious studies and chair of Asian studies at the University of California, Riverside. She is the author of Mirrors of Virtue and numerous publications on popular Chinese religion and women in the Confucian tradition.



gananath obeyesekere is professor emeritus of anthropology at Princeton University, and his most recent book is Imagining Karma: Ethical Transformation in Amerindian, Buddhist and Greek Rebirth.



jacob k. olupona is professor of African American and African studies at the University of California, Davis. He is author of Kingship, Religion and Rituals in a Nigerian Community. He has edited and authored many publications on African religions.



kofi asare opoku is professor of religious studies at Lafayette College, Easton Pennsylvania. He is the author of West African Traditional Religion and other publications on African culture and African proverbs.



juha pentikäinen is the founding professor of the department of comparative religion at the University of Helsinki, Finland. He initiated the discipline of reli (p. xx) gious studies at the Institute of Social Science at the University of Tromsö; chaired the Centre for Advanced Study, Norwegian Academy research team on Shamanism; and has been a visiting professor at the Universities of Minnesota, California, Indiana, and Texas. His books include: Oral Repertoire and World View, Kalevala Mythology, Shamanism and Northern Ecology, Shamanism and Culture, and Shamanhood Symbolism and Epic.



sabrina p. ramet is professor of political science at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim, Norway. She is the author of nine books, among them Nihil Obstat: Religion, Politics and Social Change in East-Central Europe and Russia.



ian reader is professor of religious studies at Lancaster University, England. He is author of Making Pilgrimages: Meaning and Practice in Shikoku; Religious Violence in Contemporary Japan: The Case of Aum Shinrikyo; and, co-authored with George J. Tanabe, Practically Religious: Worldly Benefits and the Common Religion of Japan as well as numerous articles and chapters on new religions in Japan, pilgrimage, religion and conflict, and other topics.



martin riesebrodt is professor of sociology at the University of Chicago. He is author of Pious Passion: The Emergence of Modern Fundamentalism in the United States and Iran and other publications on fundamentalism and sociological theory, including the works of Max Weber.



joel robbins is associate professor of anthropology at the University of California, San Diego. He is the author of Becoming Sinners: Christianity and Moral Torment in a Papua New Guinea Society and a number of articles on the globalization of Pentecostal and charismatic Christianity.



wade clark roof is the J. F. Rowny professor of religion and society at the University of California at Santa Barbara. He is the author, most recently, of Spiritual Marketplace: Baby Boomers and the Remaking of American Religion and other publications on American religion.



roland robertson is professor of sociology and global society and director of the Centre for the Study of Globalization at the University of Aberdeen, UK. He is also distinguished service professor emeritus of sociology at the University of Pittsburgh, USA. He has recently coedited the six-volume Globalization: Critical Concepts in Sociology.



susumu shimazono is professor in the department of religion of Tokyo University. He is author of From Salvation to Spirituality: Popular Religious Movements in Modern Japan and other works on contemporary religious movements and modern Japanese religions.



jan shipps is professor emeritus of religious studies and history at Indiana University–Purdue University, Indianapolis. She is the author of Sojourner in the Promised Land: Forty Years among the Mormons.



paul e. sigmund is professor of politics at Princeton University. He has written Liberation Theology at the Crossroads, edited Religious Freedom and Evangelization in Latin America, and published twenty books and more than two hundred articles on political theory and Latin American politics.



ninian smart was J. F. Rowny professor of religious studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. For many years he also held a joint appointment at the University of Lancaster, England, where he founded the department of religious studies. Among his many books are Dimensions of the Sacred, The Religious Experience, The World's Religions, World Philosophies, and The Science of Religion and the Sociology of Knowledge.



jane i. smith is professor of Islamic studies at Hartford Seminary and codirector of the Macdonald Center for the Study of Islam and Christian-Muslim Relations. She is author of Islam in America and other works on Muslims in the West.



donald k. swearer is the director of the Center for the Study of World Religion and visiting distinguished professor of Buddhism at Harvard Divinity School. He is the author of Becoming the Buddha: The Ritual of Image Consecration in Thailand and other publications on Buddhism and comparative religion.



abdulkader tayob is professor of the International Institute for the Study of Islam in the Modern World at Radboud University, Netherlands. He has written on Islam and public life in frica, and on contemporary Islamic thought. He is author of “Islam in South Africa, Islam: A Short Introduction,” and numerous other essays and articles.



thomas a. tweed is Zachary Smith professor of religious studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is the author of Crossing and Dwelling: A Theory of Religion as well as historical and ethnographic studies of the religious practices of transnational migrants in the United States.



philip walters is head of research at Keston Institute, the Oxford-based center for research and information on religion in Communist and post-Communist countries. He is editor of the scholarly journal Religion, State & Society and the author of many chapters and articles on aspects of religious life and church-state relations in Russia, the former Soviet Union, and Central and Eastern Europe.



jayne s. werner is professor of political science at Long Island University and associate research scholar at Columbia University. She is the author of Gender, (p. xxii) Household, Stare: Doi Moi in Vietnam and other publications about Vietnamese history, religion, and society.



mark woodward is associate professor of religious studies at Arizona State University. He is the author of Islam in Java: Normative Piety and Mysticism in the Sultanate of Yogyakarta and other works on religion in Southeast Asia.



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