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date: 01 April 2020

(p. vii) Contributors

(p. vii) Contributors

Samuel K. Allen is professor of economics at the Virginia Military Institute. His research in economic history explores workers’ compensation insurance, labor laws, and public housing.



Jeremy Atack is professor emeritus and research professor of economics at Vanderbilt University. Prior to that he was at the University of Illinois. He is also a research associate with the National Bureau of Economic Research. He has been president of the Agricultural History Society, the Business History Conference, and the Economic History Association, and an editor of the Journal of Economic History.



Martha J. Bailey is professor in the Department of Economics and research professor at the Population Studies Center at the University of Michigan. She is also a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, a research affiliate at CESifo, and an IZA Institute of Labor Economics research fellow. Her research focuses on issues in labor economics, demography, and health in the United States, within the long-run perspective of economic history.



Hoyt Bleakley is associate professor of economics at the University of Michigan and research associate professor at the Institute for Social Research. He studies health and education along the historical path of economic development.



Leah Boustan is professor of economics at Princeton University and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. She is the author of Competition in the Promised Land: Black Migrants in Northern Cities and Labor Markets.



Stephen Broadberry is professor of economic history at Nuffield College, University of Oxford. His books include The Productivity Race: British Manufacturing in International Perspective, 1850–1990; Market Services and the Productivity Race, 1850–2000: British Performance in International Perspective; the two-volume Cambridge Economic History of Europe, edited with Kevin O’Rourke; and (as coauthor) British Economic Growth, 1270–1870.



Devin Bunten is assistant professor of urban economics and housing at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, in the Department of Urban Studies and Planning. Devin’s work focuses on urban housing markets, including projects investigating zoning laws and gentrification.



Louis P. Cain is professor of economics emeritus at Loyola University Chicago and adjunct professor of economics at Northwestern University. He coauthored The (p. viii) Children of Eve with Donald Paterson and American Economic History with the late Jonathan Hughes.



Robert L. Clark is the Stephen Zelnak Professor of Economics and Management, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship in the Poole College of Management at North Carolina State University. Clark and Lee Craig have written two books and a series of articles on the history of public pensions in the United States. Clark has also conducted research examining retirement decisions, the choice between defined benefit and defined contribution plans, and the role of supplementary retirement saving plans in the public sector.



Karen Clay is professor of economics and public policy at Carnegie Mellon University and a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. She is the coauthor with Dan Berkowitz of The Evolution of a Nation: How Geography and Law Shaped the American States.



Lee A. Craig is alumni distinguished professor of economics in the Poole College of Management at North Carolina State University. His current research interests include the history and financing of pensions and social security; the impact of nutrition on long-run economic growth and the standard of living; and the history of the newspaper industry. His recent books include Josephus Daniels: His Life and Times, and, with Robert Clark, A History of Public Sector Pensions in the United States and State and Local Retirement Plans in the United States.



Stanley L. Engerman is emeritus professor of economics at the University of Rochester. Among the books he has coauthored is Time on the Cross: The Economics of American Negro Slavery (with Robert W. Fogel), and he is a coeditor of the four-volume The Cambridge World History of Slavery (with David Eltis and others).



Joseph P. Ferrie is professor of economics and history at Northwestern University and a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. He has studied international migration into the United States, intergenerational mobility, and the impact of early life circumstances on later-life outcomes.



Daniel Fetter is assistant professor of economics at Wellesley College and a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He has published on the history of housing and housing policy in journals such as the Journal of Economic History and the American Economic Journal: Economic Policy.



Alexander J. Field is the Michel and Mary Orradre Professor of Economics at Santa Clara University, and served previously as executive director of the Economic History Association. He is the author of more than seventy scholarly articles as well as several books, including A Great Leap Forward: 1930s Depression and U.S. Economic Growth, which received the Alice Hanson Jones Prize.



Price V. Fishback is the Thomas R. Brown Professor of Economics at the University of Arizona, a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, and (p. ix) executive director of the Economic History Association from 2012 to 2017. He is a coauthor of Government and the American Economy: A New History and has won several awards for research and teaching from the Economic History Association and the Cliometrics Society.



Jonathan Fox is assistant professor of economics in the John F. Kennedy Institute for North American Studies at the Freie Universität, Berlin. His research has covered the history of public health programs in the United States and the consequences of different ecological environments on demographic outcomes.



Carola Frydman is professor of finance at the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University, and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. She works on business and financial history.



Rowena Gray is assistant professor of economics at the University of California, Merced. She specializes in the economic history of technological change and immigration in pre–World War II United States; her work has appeared in Explorations in Economic History and Economics of Education Review.



Michael R. Haines is the Banfi Vinters Professor of Economics at Colgate University and research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He has been president of the Social Science History Association and vice president and program chair of the Economic History Association. He is coauthor of Fatal Years: Child Mortality in Late Nineteenth Century America, author of Fertility and Occupation: Population Patterns in Industrialization, and coeditor of A Population History of North America.



Owen Hearey is an associate with Analysis Group in Los Angeles. His research focuses on household residential choice, neighborhood composition, and local public goods.



Brad J. Hershbein is an economist at the W. E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, a labor studies research organization in Kalamazoo, Michigan, and a non-resident fellow in economic studies at the Brookings Institution.



Robert L. Hetzel was an economist with the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond from 1975 until early 2018. He is the author of two books on the history of the Federal Reserve System: The Monetary Policy of the Federal Reserve: A History; and The Great Recession: Market Failure or Policy Failure?



Eric Hilt is professor of economics at Wellesley College, and a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. His papers have been published in economic history, business history, and economics journals, and he has been the winner of the Arthur Cole Prize for the best paper in the Journal of Economic History, and the co-winner of the prize for the best paper in Explorations in Economic History.



Sok Chul Hong is associate professor of economics at Seoul National University. He is the coauthor of The Changing Body: Health, Nutrition, and Human Development in the Western World since 1700. (p. x)



Douglas A. Irwin is professor of economics at Dartmouth College and a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. His books include Clashing over Commerce: A History of U.S. Trade Policy and Trade Policy Disaster: Lessons from the 1930s.



Matthew Jaremski is associate professor of economics at Colgate University and is also a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research.



Taylor Jaworski is assistant professor of economics at the University of Colorado, Boulder, and faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research.



Brooks Kaiser is professor in the Management and Economics of Resources and the Environment Group of the Department of Sociology, Environmental and Business Economics at the University of Southern Denmark and research fellow at the University of Hawaii Economic Research Organization. She is currently engaged in research on environmental and resource topics including historical energy transitions, threats to natural capital, and Arctic economic development.



Carl Kitchens is assistant professor of economics at Florida State University. He has published several academic articles that explore the impacts of electrification and the structure of the electric industry during the first half of the twentieth century.



Changkeun Lee is associate fellow at Korea Development Institute (KDI). A graduate of the University of Michigan, his research focuses on firm dynamics, productivity, and labor market. At KDI, he also engages in policy evaluation and government consultation.



Gary D. Libecap is professor at the Bren School of Environmental Science and Management and Department of Economics, University of California, Santa Barbara; research associate, National Bureau of Economic Research; and research fellow at the Hoover Institution Stanford. He examines the problems of open-access resources. Recent publications include Environmental Markets: A Property Rights Approach, with Terry L. Anderson, and “Addressing Global Environmental Externalities” in the Journal of Economic Literature.



Brendan Livingston is the director of Enrollment Management Analytics at the University of California, Davis.



Robert A. Margo is professor of economics at Boston University and a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. His presidential address to the Economic History Association, “Obama, Katrina, and the Persistence of Racial Inequality,” was published in the Journal of Economic History.



Robert A. McGuire is adjunct research professor of economics at The University of Akron. He specializes in historical economics, constitutional/legal political economy, and demographic/public health issues. He is the author of We the People: A New Economic Interpretation of the United States Constitution, co-author of Parasites, (p. xi) Pathogens, and Progress: Diseases and Economic Development, and one of many coauthors of Government and the American Economy: A New History.



Petra Moser is associate professor of economics and Jules Backman Faculty Fellow at New York University Stern School of Business, and a faculty research fellow at National Bureau of Economic Research and the Centre for Economic Policy Research. Her work on the determinants of creativity and innovation has been honored with an NSF Career Grant, a fellowship at the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Science, and the Gerschenkron Dissertation Prize.



Suresh Naidu is associate professor of economics and public affairs at Columbia University. He works in the political economy of labor markets, economic history, and development.



Lee E. Ohanian is professor of economics at University of California, Los Angeles, and a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. He has published extensively in the fields of economic growth and business cycles, and he is the author of “The Macroeconomics of War Finance in the United States.”



Alan L. Olmstead is distinguished research professor at the University of California, Davis. His recent books coauthored with Paul W. Rhode include Arresting Contagion: Science, Policy, and Conflicts over Animal Disease Control, and Creating Abundance: Biological Innovation and American Agricultural Development. He is a fellow of the Cliometrics Society and of the Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.



John M. Parman is associate professor of economics at the College of William & Mary and a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research.



Roger L. Ransom is distinguished professor of history and economics, emeritus, at the University of California, Riverside. His books include: One Kind of Freedom: The Economic Consequences of Emancipation (with Richard Sutch); Conflict and Compromise: The Political Economy of Slavery, Emancipation and the American Civil War; and The Confederate States of America: What Might Have Been. He is a fellow of the Cliometric Society and past president of the Economic History Association.



Paul W. Rhode is the professor of economics at the University of Michigan, a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, and former editor of the Journal of Economic History. He is coauthor (with Alan Olmstead) of Creating Abundance: Biological Innovation in American Agricultural Development and Arresting Contagion: Science, Policy and Conflict over Animal Disease Control.



Gary Richardson is professor in the Department of Economics at the University of California in Irvine and research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He served as the official Historian of the Federal Reserve System. He has written extensively on the history of banking, central banking, and financial crises. He has also published on the political changes in England preceding the industrial (p. xii) revolution and on links between social, religious, and industrial change in medieval Europe.



Jonathan Rose is principal economist at the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. He is the author, with Price V. Fishback and Kenneth Snowden, of Well Worth Saving: How the New Deal Safeguarded Home Ownership.



Peter L. Rousseau is professor of economics and history at Vanderbilt University, as well as the secretary-treasurer of the American Economic Association. He is a macroeconomist and economic historian who studies the role of financial markets and institutions in growth and development. He is particularly interested in the monetary history of the United States and Europe and in how financial markets assist in spreading transformative technological changes through an economy.



Kenneth Snowden is professor of economics at the University of North Carolina Greensboro and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He is also the coauthor of Well Worth Saving: How the New Deal Safeguarded Home Ownership, and the co-editor of Housing and Mortgage Markets in Historical Perspective.



Richard H. Steckel is Distinguished University Professor Emeritus at Ohio State University and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He has been editor of Explorations in Economic History and is completing a manuscript on American slavery and its aftermath, entitled A Dreadful Childhood: The Long Shadow of American Slavery.



Melissa A. Thomasson is the Julian Lange Professor of Economics at Miami University. Her work on the economic history of health insurance and health care has been published in top journals, and she has received several grants and awards, including a grant from the National Science Foundation.



John Joseph Wallis is Mancur Olson Professor of Economics at the University of Maryland and research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. He works on the interaction of political and economic development. He is particularly interested in how patterns of economic institutions change over time and specifically how patterns of economic institutions interact with political institutions in a way that make both economic and political institutions sustainable over time.



Thomas Weiss is professor emeritus of economics at the University of Kansas, a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, and a fellow of the CESifo Research Network. He is a past president of the Economic History Association and served as editor of the Journal of Economic History. He has published widely on topics in American economic history, including economic growth in colonial North America, industrialization in the antebellum South, the rise of the service sector, and most recently on the economic history of tourism.



Gavin Wright is the William Robertson Coe Professor of American Economic History Emeritus at Stanford University. He has written extensively on the role of natural (p. xiii) resources in American economic development. His most recent book is Sharing the Prize: The Economics of the Civil Rights Revolution in the American South.



Noam Yuchtman is associate professor at the Haas School of Business and a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. He has published articles on historical labor market institutions in leading academic journals, including the American Economic Review and the Quarterly Journal of Economics, and is a member of the editorial board of Explorations in Economic History.